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PR-263932-19

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218-2625)
Patricia McGuiggan (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Encapsulation: Past, Present, and Future

A Tier II project to conduct experimental analyses on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) encapsulation products used in preserving historical documents, along with the testing of newer encapsulation materials and the execution of a national survey about the number and condition of encapsulated documents in library and archival collections.

The preservation of documents by PET encapsulation is one of the most popular methods of paper conservation. In spite of this, there are concerns regarding whether the PET envelope traps acidic gases naturally produced by paper which might harm the document. We propose measuring the permeation of gases through archival PET as well as the properties of encapsulated papers. We will also survey the encapsulation methods used in libraries and archives in the US and test the condition of naturally aged PET in local libraries. We will also investigate newer, breathable films which might be used for archival storage of paper documents.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$349,879 (approved)
$349,879 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


PR-263935-19

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Susanne Paulus (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Far from Home: Exploring the application of non-destructive XRF clay analysis for the provenience study of cuneiform tablets

A study of the applicability of geochemical clay analyses, including portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), for establishing the provenance of cuneiform tablets held by the Oriental Institute (OI) of the University of Chicago.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$70,363 (approved)
$70,363 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PR-263888-19

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mark J. Williams (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Accessible Civil Rights Heritage Project

The development of processes and guidelines to facilitate the use of historical film and video from the civil rights era, with a focus on enabling access for blind and visually impaired users.

The Accessible Civil Rights Heritage (ACRH) Tier II proposal seeks to develop processes and guidelines supporting the delivery of annotated archival video to the higher education community with a particular focus on blind and visually impaired (BVI) users. The ACRH project will research the creation, curation, and consumption of online humanities collections by developing a test corpus of culturally significant newsfilm on American civil rights, dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. ACRH will then combine the deep knowledge of experts on the era with the work of archivists and human-cognition researchers to develop new cataloging and access procedures that deliver high-quality, meaningful experiences to BVI users about culturally significant material. The team will produce evidence-based accessibility guidelines and software that will be published as open resources for use by educators and archivists.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$299,863 (approved)
$277,439 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


PR-263931-19

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Sungyoung Kim (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Digital Preservation and Access to Aural Heritage Via A Scalable, Extensible Method

The development of capture protocols, standards, and tutorials for long-term preservation and virtual representations of aural heritage.

Aural heritage preservation documents and recreates the auditory experience of culturally important places, enabling virtual interaction through physics-based reconstructions. A form of “intangible” cultural heritage, aural heritage is captured via spatial acoustics techniques, creating digital audio data for auralizations (reconstructions for listening). This project will 1) codify a protocol for the capture, verification, and auralization of aural heritage, demonstrated in case-study application on three culturally distinct sites; 2) create extensibility pathways for the widespread adoption of this protocol, including workshops, web-based tutorials, and other freely disseminated resources that enable non-acoustical specialists to apply the method to a diversity of sites. Case study demonstrations of the method will serve as models for site constituencies, Humanities researchers, and other cultural heritage practitioners, while providing a digital archive of endangered aural heritage.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$347,701 (approved)
$347,701 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


PR-263939-19

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Marek R. Rychlik (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Development of Image-to-text Conversion for Pashto and Traditional Chinese

The development of optical character recognition (OCR) technology and a software prototype for an open-source global language and culture databank for Pashto and Traditional Chinese.

The proposed NEH Research and Development Tier 1 project will provide a foundation for a large-scale, open source, global language and culture data bank for Pashto and Traditional Chinese. The Tier 1 activities include: fundamental research, building a software prototype and formulating a plan for Tier 2. The most important outcome of the Tier 1 phase will be software implementing new optical character recognition (OCR) technology for the two languages. The expected outcome of the entire project will be improved access and preservation of documents in Pashto and Traditional Chinese, collectively representing the cultural heritage of hundreds of millions of people, which will have a major impact on research in the humanities.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Linguistics

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PR-263944-19

Moving Image Preservation of Puget Sound (Seattle WA, WA 98104-1850)
Rachel Price (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

DV Rescue

The development of procedures and tools designed for the preservation of Digital Video (DV) recordings, a highly fragile format used widely in the mid-1990s through 2000s, documenting local heritage, oral histories, arts performances and a variety of other cultural events and activities.

Moving Image Preservation of Puget Sound (MIPoPS) is requesting supporting funds via a Tier II National Endowment for the Humanities Research and Development grant for a project, titled DV Rescue. [The project will] develop procedures and tools that will support migrating data from DV tapes into digital files suitable for long-term preservation. This will fill an urgent need for DV tape transfer tools that can rescue content from at-risk digital videotape formats. The DV Rescue project will entail two years of work to develop open source and freely available software, user research and testing, and create documentation to help define and perform comprehensive, automated, and easy-to-use data migration techniques. MIPoPS will collaborate with RiceCapades, a consulting and development company. They will also work with eight institutions currently collecting DV videotape to conduct research, define preservation workflows, establish standards and develop the most impactful tools f

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$191,835 (approved)
$191,835 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 4/30/2021


PR-258746-18

Cultural Heritage Imaging (San Francisco, CA 94102-5867)
Mark Mudge (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

The Democratization of Scientific Imaging through Metadata Management and Archival Submission Support

The development and enhancement of open-source software tools for the collection, management, archiving, and sharing of cultural heritage imaging metadata. Data management processes associated with computational photography would be streamlined and automated through a suite of tools that would make computational photographic techniques, and the images and metadata they generate, more accessible and more sustainable for a wide audience of cultural heritage practitioners.

This work is a collaboration between Cultural Heritage Imaging and the Centre for Cultural Informatics (CCI) in Heraklion, Crete. The project will complete and disseminate a free open source pipeline of scientific imaging software tools that use data captured with off-the-shelf digital cameras and photo gear. These user-friendly tools greatly simplify metadata collection, essential to the scientific documentary imaging of “digital surrogates,” and organize these reusable materials into a standards-based Submission Information Package (SIP) for archival delivery and intake. The tools are for use by cultural heritage practitioners in museums, libraries, and historic sites, as well as by local citizen caretakers around the world. Adoption of the tools and techniques will be enhanced by software internationalization and localization into Arabic. The goal is to democratize the use of these tools to save humanity’s imperiled cultural legacy, especially in North Africa and the Middle East.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$339,295 (approved)
$339,295 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


PR-258543-18

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Michelle Hegmon (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

From Library to Laboratory: Developing Tools to Enhance the Use of Digital Archaeological and Other Humanities Collections

A Tier 1 project to develop a digital interface with a series of dynamic webpages to enhance search capabilities of archaeological field documents, images, and datasets from projects across the globe. As a test case, the project would use the Mimbres Pottery Images Digital Database, which incorporates a collection of more than 10,500 photographs and datasets on pottery dating to around 1000-1500 CE from southwestern New Mexico, eastern Arizona, and northern Mexico.

Archaeologists and other humanities scholars today can access vast libraries of digital collections.  Scholars can download these collections, and given sufficient skills and software, analyze them for research.  We will develop tools to move this marvelous capability to the next level, transforming the libraries into laboratories.  Our tools will allow line analysis and research of these collections, enhancing research and opening access to the general public. Using funding assured from other means, we will also create K-12 and higher education programs utilizing these tools.  Our work will be done in the context of a large established digital repository, the Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR).  As a testbed, we will utilize the Mimbres Pottery Images Digital Database (MimPIDD), a large collection of archaeological pottery images from the Mimbres region of the US Southwest.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$73,524 (approved)
$73,524 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


PR-258893-18

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Jean-Louis Bigourdan (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

The Impact of Temperature Transitions, Short-term and Seasonal, on the Moisture Content of Library and Archive Collections

A three-year study focused on the impact of temperature changes, short-term and seasonal, on the moisture content of library and archive collections. The results would inform new sustainable preservation and access strategies for both large and small humanities collections.

The Image Permanence Institute is seeking funding for a three-year research project focused on the impact of environmental transitions on moisture content in library and archive collections. The potential for deterioration caused by moisture content exists in storage and access scenarios. This research will strengthen our understanding of the complex interactions between hygroscopic collection materials and their environment in response to temperature changes. Data collected has the potential to 1) determine the storage density necessary to effectively have hygroscopic materials control their moisture content, 2) provide a roadmap for controlling moisture content during periods of dryness and dampness, and 3) create a guide for temperature and relative humidity ranges that avoid mechanical damage during access and use. The results of this project have the potential to inform new sustainable preservation and access strategies for both large and small humanities research collections.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$349,149 (approved)
$349,149 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


PR-258903-18

Center for Research Libraries (Chicago, IL 60637-2804)
Amy Wood (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

CRL: Mining Serials Reformatting Data for Preservation

A Tier I investigation of bibliographic data for approximately 20,000 humanities serial publications preserved on microfilm and in digital form, to determine how such information could best be combined with the Print Archives Preservation Registry (PAPR) to facilitate acquisition and preservation decisions in libraries.

The Center for Research Libraries seeks NEH Research and Development Tier I funding for the planning phase of a major effort to mine the records of historical print serials reformatted through major humanities preservation microfilming programs and digitization efforts. During the planning phase, CRL will assemble from a variety of sources a testbed of bibliographic records, holdings information, and other documentation on an estimated 20,000 journals reformatted over the last fifty years by libraries and trustworthy publishers. CRL will assess the quality and reliability of records and information related to these reformatted serials, and will determine the extent to which the acquired information can be integrated with other existing data on print serials in the Print Archives Preservation Registry (PAPR). Finally, CRL will test the applicability of that information to library decisions on preservation and maintenance of print serial collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$74,981 (approved)
$74,981 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


PR-258900-18

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)
Marc Sebastian Walton (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

Metal Soap Protrusions on Georgia O'Keeffe's Paintings: Establishing a New Quantitative Imaging Paradigm for Linking Scientif

Development of an open-source tool for characterizing and monitoring the development of metal soap formation on Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings. Once developed, the tool would be available to conservators, scholars, and scientists who wish to monitor changes in surface topography on oil paintings. 

This project promises to reduce the barriers between scientific research and conservation practice; as well, it will develop user-friendly, image-based tools that could be used for real-time, long-term monitoring of the dynamic evolution of paint surfaces affected by metal soaps formation. These imaging and web-based image-processing tools, once developed, could be easily adapted to investigate other surface characteristics of paintings that are critical to their preservation such as surface cracks and lacunae. The results will provide the community with actual data on the impact of environmental as well as anthropic (i.e. solvent cleaning/lining etc.) factors on the present condition and long term preservation of paintings.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$349,988 (approved)
$349,988 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


PR-253387-17

Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (Philadelphia, PA 19103-5530)
Rachel Wetzel (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Robert Cornelius and Early Pioneering Daguerreotypists Database Project

The development of a database to gather information about early ungilded daguerreotypes created by an American pioneer of photography, Robert Cornelius (1809-93), and other early daguerreotypists, and to assist in the development of future conservation treatment practices.

Led by Rachel Wetzel, Photograph Conservator at the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, a team of experts in the field of photograph conservation will design a database for information regarding early ungilded daguerreotypes (1839-1841), by Robert Cornelius and other early pioneering daguerreotypists, to assist curators and conservators with responsibilities for the care and preservation of these important and fragile artifacts. Ms. Wetzel will collect information on the known existing Cornelius daguerreotypes, as well as other early ungilded daguerreotypes from this period. The database will be located and disseminated through the Lens Media Lab website maintained by Paul Messier at the Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage. The establishment of this database is an essential step in developing appropriate best practices and treatment protocols for these irreplaceable documents of the earliest years of photography.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; History, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$48,967 (approved)
$48,967 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


PR-253389-17

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Heather Marie Richards-Rissetto (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Keeping Data Alive: Supporting Reuse and Repurposing of 3D Data in the Humanities

A project to develop 3D architectural models of Mayan cities in an open source database for reuse and repurposing in other architectural reconstructions, leading to the creation of an open source platform to host, deliver, and visualize 3D models linked to descriptive data.

The goals of this one year project are to develop workflows to: (1) generate, store, and make accessible 3D models of architecture in an open source database that scholars can (re)use and repurpose to create their own multi-scalar reconstructions ranging from individual buildings to entire cityscapes and (2) host, deliver, and visualize 3D models, linked to metadata, paradata, and descriptive data, in an open source 3D visualization environment. The project includes front-end and back-end deliverables that will contribute to data sustainability and accessibility in the humanities. Front-end deliverables include a project website hosting workflows with tutorials and a proto-database for beta-testing and capturing user feedback. Back-end deliverables include "white paper" describing the initial database design, data structuring, initial findings, ongoing challenges, and next steps.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Architecture

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$74,368 (approved)
$71,719 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


PR-253384-17

WGBH Educational Foundation (Boston, MA 02135-2016)
Casey Davis (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

PBCore Development and Training Project

The development of tools, methodologies, workflows and training to enhance and extend the adoption of the standard Public Broadcasting Metadata Dictionary (PBCore), a metadata schema used to catalog and describe audiovisual materials.

WGBH Educational Foundation seeks a Tier II NEH Research and Development Grant of $345,193 for the PBCore Development and Training Project ("the Project"). The goal of the Project is to develop tools, methodologies, workflows and training to enhance and extend the adoption of the Public Broadcasting Metadata Dictionary ("PBCore"), a metadata schema for the management of public media collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$345,193 (approved)
$345,193 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 11/30/2019


PR-253360-17

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Universal Scripts Project

The preparation of nine scripts—four modern and five historical—for inclusion in the international Unicode standard, to aid research using materials in historical scripts and promote communication in minority language communities.

Although computer and mobile users in many parts of the world can now communicate in hundreds of languages by using their own native writing system, there are still linguistic minority groups, and users of historical writing systems, who cannot. This is because the letters and symbols of these scripts are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. More than one hundred and fifty eligible scripts are not yet included in Unicode, which directly affects humanities research, the creation of the global digital repository of humankind's literary and cultural heritage and, for users of modern scripts, basic communication. This project will fund proposals for four modern and five historical scripts for inclusion in the standard, and pave the way for electronic communication in (and about) scripts by scholars and the use. The project will also develop and make available fonts for the non-Latin scripts of ancient Italy, in order to aid scholars.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ancient Languages; Languages, General; Linguistics

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$274,840 (approved)
$274,840 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 3/31/2020


PR-253380-17

Georgia Tech Research Corporation (Atlanta, GA 30318-5775)
Michael Nitsche (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Archiving Performative Objects

The development of an interactive system that provides access to a puppet’s functionality and expression by allowing the viewer to manipulate and “play,” through game-like technology, with a puppet or other performative object held in a digital archive.

Archiving Performative Objects is a collaboration between Georgia Tech and the Center for Puppetry Arts (CPA), both in Atlanta. It asks how we can use digital media to archive an object's functionality as "object in use." Expanding from the use of 3D visualization and reproduction, the project aims to include usage of objects through digital means and interaction design.   The project will scan up to 15 puppets from the CPA's archive and develop an interactive system to provide access to the puppets' functionality and expression. Users can interact with these puppets, which are notoriously difficult to access and conserve, through either desktop or virtual reality (VR) software.  The system will be designed to fit into existent database structures and aims to prototype a technical solution as well as a research tool for digital humanities scholars and archivists. The CPA provides expertise in puppet archiving and manipulation, while Georgia Tech covers interaction design and technical implementation.

Project fields:
Media Studies

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$74,851 (approved)
$74,805 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


PR-253386-17

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Deborah Ann Holmes-Wong (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Unlocking Maps: Automatic and Streamlined Metadata Creation for Digital Collections

The evaluation of advanced techniques for map processing in order to streamline the cataloging of historic maps in digital libraries.

During our 12-month Tier I basic research project, we will apply automated map-processing techniques to 25 historic maps. We will compare these results with the results through two standard map cataloging methods in digital library projects. We hope to determine whether the Strabo open-source map-processing software can be used to capture the information needed to complete required fields in Qualified Dublin Core metadata records for a CONTENTdm back-end system. This is a common technical infrastructure used in many digital libraries, so our results will have broad applicability.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Geography; History, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$74,950 (approved)
$74,950 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


PR-253388-17

George Washington University (Washington, DC 20052-0001)
Murray H. Loew (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Glass at Risk: Simple Tools for Detecting Unstable Glass in 19th-Century Cultural Heritage Collections

A research project to characterize and identify unstable 19th-century glass artifacts using simple, non-invasive testing methods. Once developed, this testing protocol would be organized into a freely available “decision tree” that will allow preservation professionals of varying backgrounds and abilities to better identify and care for unstable glass in museum, library, and archive collections.

The grant will support interdisciplinary, collaborative research for the development of simple tools organized into a "decision tree" that will allow end-users of varying backgrounds and abilities, from curators and collectors to conservators and conservation scientists, to better identify the risk posed by unstable 19th century glass in historical collections. The tree and accompanying protocols will guide users in a step-wise process through the application of simple, readily available tools for the examination of glass artifacts, starting with the use of ultraviolet (UV) light, and advancing to more sophisticated non-invasive spectroscopic and spectral imaging tools, including X-ray fluorescence (XRF), spectral imaging, and fluorescence spectroscopy.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$349,830 (approved)
$349,830 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


PR-253401-17

Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) (Washington, DC 20005-1704)
Eric Pourchot (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Planning a Life Cycle Analysis Library of Preventive Conservation Methods

The pilot phase and development of a free, online Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) library and tool for conservation and preservation professionals. When completed, this library would help cultural heritage institutions evaluate the environmental and human health impacts of collection management activities including conservation treatment, storage, loans, and exhibitions.

This project will lay the groundwork for an online Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) library and tool that assesses the environmental and human health impact of sustaining a humanities collection.  The investigators will produce three representative Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) reports; document the most prevalent activities, products, and events that are part of collections care and access work in museums and historic sites; produce a beta version of a tool for evaluating LCA; and develop a plan for next steps to create a robust LCA library and online tool.  These new resources will allow custodians of cultural heritage to evaluate materials and approaches used to maintain collections, and enhance decision-making for care of all forms of material culture.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


PR-234292-16

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Alison Langmead (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Sustaining MedArt: The Impact of Socio-Technical Factors on Digital Preservation Strategies

A case study investigating the sustainability of digital humanities projects by conducting user surveys and oral histories related to the developmental history of an online image collection created in the mid-1990s of medieval architecture and artifacts known as MedArt.  The research will lead to the publication of a Web-based “Socio-Technical Digital Preservation Roadmap” that documents and guides digital humanists and preservation professionals through the preservation planning process.

Questions of sustainability are becoming increasingly central to the work of digital humanists as early digital projects age and as new projects proliferate across disciplines—many of which involve scholars and practitioners who lack a shared knowledge base when it comes to addressing digital preservation needs. Sustaining the work of the digital humanities is clearly a critical task, but there is a lack of meaningful empirical data about the long-term effects of technological and staffing decisions made during project creation processes and over the course of project lifespans. This research, organized as a case study into a landmark and pioneering digital humanities initiative, will provide insight into the ways in which a digital project's sustainability can hinge on accreted decisions over time as well as on complex interactions between human, technological and administrative infrastructures.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Media Studies; Medieval Studies

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$69,041 (approved)
$67,982 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PR-234316-16

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mark J. Williams (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Semantic Annotation Tool

The development of the Semantic Annotation Tool (SAT), which would facilitate the creation and sharing of time-based media annotations on the Web by researchers, students, and educators.

The Semantic Annotation Tool (SAT) proposal seeks funds to develop and distribute a drop-in module that facilitates the creation and sharing of time-based media annotations on the web. The finished system will be composed of two parts: first, a jQuery plugin that wraps an existing media player to provide an intuitive authoring and presentation environment for time-based video annotations; and second, a linked data server that communicates with the plugin to collect and disseminate user-generated comments and tags using the W3C Open Annotation specification. The goal of building this system is to create an end-to-end open source video annotation workflow that can be used as either an off the shelf or customizable solution for a wide variety of applications. Potential uses include collaborative close reading of video for humanities research, simplified coding of time-based documentation in social science studies, enhancing accessibility for media clips on web sites, and many others

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$74,984 (approved)
$74,984 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PR-234372-16

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Jane E. Anderson (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Local Contexts 2.0: Implementing Traditional Knowledge Labels

The development of a set of protocols, standards, tools, and resources relating to digital curation and stewardship of indigenous cultural heritage that would assist non-Native collecting institutions and local Native American communities to enhance access and management of knowledge about humanities collections.

This project aims to further develop extra-legal solutions to the curatorial challenges posed by Native American and First Nations collections in relation to access and expanding the public record. This Tier II Advanced Implementation Research and Development proposal will support the further development and implementation of the Local Contexts online platform (www.localcontexts.org). In its third phase of development, Local Contexts has already provided educational materials related to intellectual property rights, digital stewardships, co-curation, and a new set of innovative Traditional Knowledge Labels for both Native/First Nations and non-Native collecting institutions. This next phase would extend the platform to create a practical set of tools, models, and workflow for digital curation of Native/First Nations collections across stakeholders. This project will unite Native/First Nations and non-Native communities and institutions who manage and hold their cultural heritage by extending the existing Local Contexts platform into a national, institutional-wide model, focusing on the development and implementation of a new set of standards for providing access to, and structuring use of Native/First Nations cultural heritage collections online.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$320,000 (approved)
$320,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2018


PR-234484-16

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
Paul Michael Whitmore (Project Director: June 2015 to present)
Rui Chen (Co Project Director: October 2016 to present)

Effects of Relative Humidity Fluctuations on Paper Permanence

A Tier I proposal to examine chemical and physical degradation in paper artifacts as a result of cycling temperature and humidity. This application builds upon a 2001 study by the Yale Aging Diagnostics Lab (ADL) examining the degradation of rag paper when exposed to humidity cycled between 25% and 75% every two hours at room temperature. The proposed second phase study would explore the key factors that determine the magnitude of risk, such as paper composition, humidity range, and cycling speed. Three different types of paper (rag, acidic newsprint, and alkaline book paper) would be studied to assess physical and chemical changes that occur during different environmental conditions. Molecular weight, tensile strength, elasticity, color and moisture content would be assessed to gauge the effects of these fluctuations on each type of paper.

This research will use material analysis to define a relative humidity range and fluctuation rate that does not cause permanent physical and chemical damage to paper-based objects. A rag paper, acidic newsprint, and modern alkaline book paper were selected to study the key factors that determine risk, paper composition and humidity excursions. Two humidity ranges will be tested, one defined as "safe", the other akin to no humidity control. The rate of humidity shift, one rapid and one slow, will control the applied shear forces. The molecular weight, tensile strength, color, and moisture content of the papers will be measured following exposure to quantify chemical and physical changes to the papers. Results will provide evidence of the risk of exposing paper-based artifacts to large or rapid changes in relative humidity. This work will clarify the conditions that best preserve paper-based artifacts using scientific data and will prolong access to original materials.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$74,650 (approved)
$74,648 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


PR-234564-16

Indianapolis Museum of Art (Indianapolis, IN 46208-4182)
Gregory D. Smith (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Rapid Pollution Off-Gassing Assessments of Museum Construction Materials by Gas Chromatographic Techniques

Development of a rapid analytical protocol for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in materials used for the display, storage, and exhibition of cultural heritage materials. The new protocol would replace the outdated and inefficient “Oddy Test,” which is currently the only way to evaluate these materials for safety in library, museum, and archival settings. A faster and more reliable approach to materials testing has been a goal of conservators and conservation scientists for more than a decade. With this request, the Indianapolis Museum of Art Conservation Science Lab will continue a year-long collaboration with Butler University to develop an alternative protocol based on evolved gas analysis (EGA) that appears to offer improvements in testing time, accuracy, and range of detectable compounds.

The Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) proposes to develop and optimize a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis protocol with a broadly applicable volatiles sampling strategy to provide rapid, quantitative, and molecularly specific assessments of the emissions from construction materials considered for use in museums. The IMA Conservation Science Lab has worked to develop an alternative sampling strategy based on evolved gas analysis (EGA) that offers several advantages over other methods. Proposed research activities include further refinement of the EGA approach, comparison with other currently-practiced methodologies, examination of correlations between detected pollutants and observed damage to artists' materials, and provision of quantitative data regarding pollution levels. The instrumental protocol and resulting data will be made freely available to institutions and will directly impact confidence in the materials used within museums, libraries, and archives.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PR-234566-16

Bay Area Video Coalition (San Francisco, CA 94110-1472)
Ben Turkus (Project Director: June 2015 to February 2017)
Kelly Haydon (Project Director: February 2017 to present)

QC Tools: Quality in Quantity

Continued development of Quality Control Tools for Video Preservation (QCTools), which will address challenges associated with large-scale and progressively automated video digitization workflows.

Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) seeks to continue the development of the open source project Quality Control Tools for Video Preservation (QCTools). By partnering with Indiana University's Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative (MDPI), BAVC will address key challenges inherent in large-scale and progressively automated video digitization workflows, improving QCTools' usability, intuitiveness, and deployment capabilities. BAVC is committed to providing preservation services that improve efficiency and provide support for the audiovisual preservation community at large. BAVC will apply lessons learned and feedback from the preservationists using QCTools, building upon current strengths to further evolve the project and better support the field of audiovisual preservation for the humanities.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$325,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PR-234554-16

Carnegie Institute (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-4007)
Neil Kulas (Project Director: June 2015 to August 2016)
Katie Reilly (Project Director: August 2016 to July 2017)
Sarah Minnaert (Project Director: July 2017 to present)

Art Tracks: Standardizing Digital Provenance Documentation for Cultural Objects

The development of a standard for the digital sharing of provenance information on works of art through structured Linked Open Data, which will improve the usefulness of provenance data for scholarly research, exhibition programming, and museum collection management.

Art Tracks is Carnegie Museum of Art’s (CMOA) project of to standardize, digitize, and convert the provenance of works of art into structured, Linked Open Data. Phase One of this project has successfully proven the ability of Linked Open Data to create an infrastructure for sharing museum data, with field wide benefit to provenance research. Phase Two will support the extension and full integration with Linked Open Data, add bibliographic references, and convert the date logic to use existing open standards from the library community. CMOA will partner with leaders in the museum field to further test and refine the standard before promoting Art Tracks dissemination and adoption of the CMOA Provenance Standard. CMOA will strongly support the use of Linked Open Data to enrich provenance, support the interconnectedness of the museum community, improve the usefulness of provenance data, and promote new scholarship through an innovative and collaborative approach to provenance research.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$350,000 (approved)
$259,947 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PR-234235-16

Alexandria Archive Institute, Inc. (San Francisco, CA 94127-2036)
Sarah Whitcher Kansa (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Beyond Management: Data Curation as Scholarship in Archaeology

A longitudinal study of practices of creation, management, and re-use of archaeological data drawn from three geographical areas (Tunisia, England, and Peru) to investigate data quality and modeling requirements for re-use by a larger research community. The project would document workflows, create exemplary open datasets, launch a new publication service, and develop online educational modules.

Research data preservation and access has particular urgency in archaeology, a discipline grappling with financial constraints and an escalating pace of economically and politically motivated site destruction. This project builds upon prior investments in digital repository and data publishing services. Archiving alone is not sufficient for ensuring future understanding. Idiosyncratic and error-prone data collection practices impede future data analysis, integration, and interpretation. To open new understanding, intellectually and methodologically rigorous approaches to data management must underpin each stage of archaeological research, from a project's initial planning through archiving. Using systematic qualitative research, our team will investigate data quality and modeling requirements for the reuse of archaeological data by a wider research community. This work expands data publishing services to widen engagement in sharing and preserving a rich and meaningful past.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$324,112 (approved)
$324,112 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2019


PR-50205-15

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: May 2014 to present)

Universal Scripts Project

The preparation of twelve scripts—seven historical and five modern—for inclusion in the international Unicode standard, to aid research using materials in historical scripts and promote communication in minority language communities.

Although computer and mobile users in many parts of the world can now communicate in hundreds of languages by using their own native writing system, there are still linguistic minority groups, and users of historical writing systems, who cannot. This is because the letters and symbols of these scripts are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. More than one hundred eligible scripts are not yet included in Unicode, which directly affects humanities research, the creation of the global digital repository of humankind's literary and cultural heritage and, for users of modern scripts, basic communication. This project will fund proposals for five modern and seven historical scripts for inclusion in the standard, thereby preserving text materials in these scripts and paving the way for electronic communication in (and about) scripts by scholars and the user communities at large.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$264,700 (approved)
$264,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 9/30/2017


PR-50207-15

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Gregory James Wilsbacher (Project Director: May 2014 to present)

AEO-Light 2.0: An Open Source Application for Image-Based Digital Reproduction of Optical Film Sound

The second-phase development of the AEO-Light optical sound extraction software, an open-source tool that enables more efficient digital preservation of optical sound motion pictures.

The University of South Carolina Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC) and the Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute (IMI) seek a two-year, $222,146 grant to further develop our AEO-Light optical sound extraction software created through the support of a 2011 NEH PARD grant. The initial grant was successful as a research and development grant but the software has not yet met the high standards of the preservation community. Additional funding will enable us to respond to user feedback and provide the preservation community with an open source tool able to meet its rigorous standards and further the long-term survival of our nation’s optical sound motion picture history.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$222,146 (approved)
$221,728 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2017


PR-50211-15

Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)
Jon W. Dunn (Project Director: May 2014 to present)

HydraDAM2: Extending Fedora 4 and Hydra for Media Preservation

The development of an open-source digital asset management system to facilitate preservation of and access to humanities collections of digital sound recordings and moving images.

Indiana University Libraries and the WGBH Media Library and Archives propose to extend the HydraDAM digital asset management system to be able to serve as a digital preservation repository for time-based media collections at a wide range of institutions using multiple storage strategies. This new system will be based on the open source Hydra repository application framework and will utilize the emerging Fedora 4.0 digital repository architecture.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$399,239 (approved)
$399,239 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2017


PR-50213-15

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Andrew Lerwill (Project Director: May 2014 to July 2015)
James M. Reilly (Project Director: July 2015 to September 2017)
Alice Carver-Kubik (Project Director: September 2017 to present)
Jennifer Jae Gutierrez (Co Project Director: September 2017 to present)

Digital Image Correlation to Determine Shape Deformation of Paper-Based Collections due to Relative Humidity and Temperature

An applied research project conducted by the Image Permanence Institute that would define the permissible limits of relative humidity (RH) for rare books and other library and archival materials that are critical for humanities research.

One of the most frequent questions asked by rare book curators and librarians is: "At what RH, especially with respect to dry conditions, does a serious risk of irreversible mechanical stress occur?" Mechanical (physical) damage due to dryness or excessive dampness is the principal reason why special collection materials require controlled environmental conditions. For many years, recommendations have emphasized close control around a target of 45-55% RH. What is not well established from actual experimentation, however, are the practical limits where irreversible damage takes place. This area of research—safe limits for RH—has received considerable attention in the fine and decorative arts, but not for the complex and diverse mechanical structures of bound volumes. To overcome the difficulty of studying mechanical behavior of complex book structures IPI will employ a new technology, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to dynamically assess expansion and contraction of composite objects.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$399,825 (approved)
$399,825 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2015 – 2/28/2019


PR-50192-14

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Jean-Louis Bigourdan (Project Director: May 2013 to present)

Understanding Moisture Equilibrium for Humanities Collections: A New Path to Sustainable Humidity Control

Research into new ways of managing environmental conditions in collection spaces that could significantly reduce energy costs while providing safe environments for books, manuscripts, maps, prints, and other paper-based humanities materials. The Image Permanence Institute would study moisture equilibration rates for paper-based library materials and test new ways of managing relative humidity that could reduce the risks to collections from the most damaging conditions of summer humidity and winter dryness.

The thrust of this research is to quantify the potential of new approaches to seasonal management of humidity control, based on a full understanding of moisture equilibration processes for paper-based collections. Research will focus on the possibility that RH control can be used in a stepped or pulsed fashion to slow down the rate of moisture equilibration, thereby avoiding the most dangerous seasonal highs and lows. Specifically, better fundamental knowledge of equilibration behavior may allow identification of scenarios where seasonal peaks are not damaging, and scenarios for less expensive RH control aimed at 'slicing off' dangerous peaks. The research will quantify how materials' moisture content navigates between extreme RHs when exposed to either an uncontrolled seasonal humidity cycle, capped RH profile, stepped RH profile or pulsed RH profile. Research objectives are to quantify risks and benefits of these options in terms of preservation quality and potential energy savings.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$350,000 (approved)
$348,039 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2014 – 9/30/2017


PR-50195-14

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: May 2013 to present)

TAPAS: Building an XML-Aware Repository

The development of a data repository for the TEI Archiving, Publishing, and Access Service (TAPAS), which will help scholars, educators, and librarians preserve and publish TEI projects.

This project builds upon previous work to build a data storage back end for TAPAS that includes both a Fedora repository (using the Hydra framework) and an XML database, closely integrated with the TAPAS user interface front end so that long-term repository storage, XML publication options, and enhanced searching are a seamless part of the TAPAS interface. Building this system in Hydra helps ensure that these components can be reused by other Fedora/Hydra systems, and enables TAPAS to take advantage of ongoing development by the Hydra community. In the second half of the grant we will also support a series of "code-along" events to assist TAPAS contributors in enhancing their data to make better use of the new visualization tools, and to help faculty to incorporate these collaborative coding activities into their classroom curricula.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Languages, General; Literature, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2014 – 2/28/2018


PR-50200-14

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Tanya E. Clement (Project Director: May 2013 to present)

High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship Research and Development with Repositories

The development of software that uses machine learning to help users automate descriptive metadata for spoken-word sound collections.

In order to increase the preservation of significant spoken word (such as poetry, storytelling, speeches, and oral histories) sound recordings, the UT Austin iSchool and the Illinois Informatics Institute (I3) are requesting two years of funding for HiPSTAS Research and Development with Repositories (HRDR) to develop software (ARLO) that uses machine learning and visualization to help users automate metadata description for undescribed sound collections. Products will include: (1) open source software (ARLO) that can be used with a variety of repositories; (2) a Drupal module for Mukurtu, an open source content management system designed for indigenous communities worldwide; (3) workshops and documentation for wider dissemination and training; and (4) a white paper detailing best practices in generating descriptive metadata for audio collections in the humanities.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$249,983 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 8/31/2017


PR-50178-13

Sanskrit Library (Providence, RI 02906-4629)
Peter M. Scharf (Project Director: May 2012 to present)

Developing automated text-image alignment to enhance access to heritage manuscript images

Development of software to produce the partial transcription of Sanskrit manuscripts for human validation. The project would also integrate the manuscripts in a digital library to extend the use of lexical resources and linguistic tools for full-text searching and analysis.

The proposed project aims to enhance access to primary cultural heritage materials of India by developing human-validated automated text-image alignment techniques in order to provide access to digital images via related machine-readable texts, lexical resources, linguistic software, and a sophisticated search interface. Digital images of manuscripts written in Sanskrit, one of the world's richest culture-bearing languages, will be integrated into a digital library of Sanskrit. This integration will allow generalized information extraction and search techniques to reach enormous reservoirs of Sanskrit manuscripts. Integrating primary cultural materials with the Sanskrit Library will thus enable broad use of Indic collections for research and education where Indic materials are grossly underrepresented. The result will be extendable to the collections of Sanskrit manuscripts housed in American libraries and throughout the world and to archives of scanned Sanskrit books.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Asian Languages

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$280,000 (approved)
$280,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 7/31/2016


PR-50182-13

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Oya Rieger (Project Director: May 2012 to present)

Preservation & Access Framework for Digital Art Objects

The development of a methodological framework for the preservation of digital media artwork, using the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art as a test bed.

Cornell University Library (CUL) is requesting funding to develop a technical framework and associated tools to facilitate enduring access to interactive digital media art with a focus on artworks stored on hard drive, CD-ROM, and DVD-ROM. CUL’s Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art will provide the test bed for the study. This collection, recognized as one of the most prominent of its kind in the world, contains thousands of artworks and encompasses a wide variety of formats. We seek funding from NEH of $284,550 for a two-year project. CUL will cost share 42.5% of the total project costs of $495,077. CUL will collaborate with AudioVisual Preservation Solutions, and the project will have an advisory board composed on international leaders in curation, arts, and preservation. The key principle of the project is to leverage existing standards, best practices, and technologies, and to focus on moving theory into practice in a working archival environment.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$296,341 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2013 – 8/31/2015


PR-50188-13

Bay Area Video Coalition (San Francisco, CA 94110-1472)
Moriah Ulinskas (Project Director: May 2012 to present)

Quality Control Tools for Video Preservation

The development of a suite of open-source, quality-control software tools that will ensure accurate and efficient assessment of video media integrity throughout the archival digitization process.

To aid in the nation's efforts to preserve its video history, the Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) requests $350,000 over two years to develop an open source and freely available software "toolkit" to help perform sophisticated quality control on video digitization workflows. BAVC, in partnership with the Dance Heritage Coalition (DHC) and independent consultant Dave Rice, will create Quality Control Tools for Video Preservation (QC Tools), a suite of open source software tools that will ensure accurate and efficient assessment of media integrity throughout the archival digitization process.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$320,000 (approved)
$320,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 1/31/2015


PR-50141-12

University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Vance L. Kepley (Project Director: May 2011 to present)

Investigation of Cellulose Nitrate Motion Picture Film Chemical Decomposition & Associated Fire Risk

The testing of cellulose nitrate film stock with the goal to create guidelines for the handling and long-term storage of this flammable medium on which much of the 20th century's still and moving image humanities content is stored.

This grant will support empirical research about the related threats of cellulose nitrate motion picture decay and flammability. The project will be co-investigated by two University of Wisconsin-Madison institutions--the Wisconsin Center for Film & Theater Research and the Mahanthappa Research Group--in partnership with the Wisconsin Historical Society. Used as the base for all professionally-produced motion pictures made between the 1890s and the early 1950s, cellulose nitrate is chemically unstable and highly flammable. Unfortunately, very little data about these risks is available to the preservation community. Project results will be published in a white paper targeted at an audience of archival professionals, and, as relevant, in amendments to the International Standard (ISO) and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards on nitrate handling and storage.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$178,133 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 8/31/2015


PR-50155-12

WGBH Educational Foundation (Boston, MA 02135-2016)
Karen Cariani (Project Director: May 2011 to present)

WGBH Open Source Digital Asset Management System for Media Preservation

The development of a comprehensive, open-source digital asset management system for moving image and audio humanities collections.

This project will build and implement an open source digital media preservation and DAM system, focused primarily on the needs of public media stations but relevant and applicable to all cultural institutions with moving image and audio materials. We will face the challenge of handling both large and small media files in several formats. Based on the Hydra technology stack, including the Fedora repository and the Blacklight discovery interface, it will reflect TRAC trusted repository guidelines. We will use and develop open code that will be publicly shared, clearly research and document implementation needs, implement the open source solution as a new model of digital asset management at WGBH, and test the ease of implementation at two partner public media organizations – South Carolina Educational Television Network (SCETV) and Public Radio International (PRI).

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2012 – 1/31/2015


PR-50112-11

Wheaton College (Norton, MA 02766-2322)
Michael D. C. Drout (Project Director: July 2010 to present)

Lexomic Tools and Methods for Textual Analysis: Providing Deep Access to Digitized Texts

Development of computational tools and documentation for applying advanced statistical methods to textual and literary problems. The tools and methods would be demonstrated using material from a variety of languages and time periods, including Old English, medieval Latin, and the 20th-century Harlem Renaissance.

This project hybridizes traditional humanistic approaches to textual scholarship, such as source study and the analysis of style, with advanced computational and statistical comparative methods, allowing scholars "deep access" to digitized texts and textual corpora. Our multi-disciplinary collaboration enables us to discover patterns in (and between) texts previously invisible to traditional methods. Going forward, we will build on the success of our previous Digital Humanities Start-up Grant by further developing tools and documentation (in an open, on-line community) for applying advanced statistical methodologies to textual and literary problems. At the same time we will demonstrate the value of the approach by applying the tools and methods to texts from a variety of languages and time periods, including Old English, medieval Latin, and Modern English works from the twentieth-century Harlem Renaissance.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$135,895 (approved)
$135,895 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2011 – 8/31/2013


PR-50122-11

University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Gregory James Wilsbacher (Project Director: July 2010 to present)

An Open Source Application for Image-Based Digital Reproduction of Optical Film Sound

Creating a one-pass system to capture accurately both image and sound in digital scanning. In particular, historians would benefit from the availability of this open-source software tool, since film constitutes a vital primary souce for research on the 20th century.

The University of South Carolina Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC) is collaborating with research faculty from the University’s Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute (IMI) to develop an open-source software application to directly reproduce the optical sound tracks of motion picture films from digital scans. We seek $362,125 (of a total $465,905 budget), from the National Endowment for the Humanities over a three-year period to fund our collaboration and take our proven concept through development to deployment as an open-source and freely available application. Unless alternatives to current expensive approaches to digitizing sound films are found, access to most of this important material will effectively end as the commercial sector abandons support for traditional film screening equipment.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Library Science

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2011 – 9/30/2013


PR-50134-11

Educopia Institute (Atlanta, GA 30309-3578)
Katherine Elizabeth Skinner (Project Director: July 2010 to present)

Distributed Preservation of Born-Digital and Digitized Newspaper Collections

The study, documentation, and modeling of distributed digital preservation frameworks to preserve digitized and born-digital newspaper collections.

The Educopia Institute, with the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the libraries of University of North Texas, Penn State, Virginia Tech, University of Utah, Georgia Tech, Boston College, and Clemson University, proposes to study, document, and model the use of data preparation and distributed digital preservation frameworks to collaboratively preserve digitized and born-digital newspaper collections. We propose to investigate three issues through the following series of research questions: 1. How can curators effectively and efficiently prepare their existing digitized and born-digital newspaper collections for preservation?] 2. How can curators ingest preservation-ready newspaper content into existing DDP solutions? 3. What are the strengths and challenges presented by using three leading DDP solutions for preserving digital newspaper content?

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2011 – 4/30/2014


PR-50080-10

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Daniel V. Pitti (Project Director: August 2009 to present)

Enhancing Access to Contextual Information on Individuals, Families, and Corporate Bodies for Archival Collections

The development of an automated tool for deriving contextual information from archival finding aids, enhancing the information by matching it with established authority records, and enabling links to multiple primary and secondary humanities sources.

We will address the ongoing challenge of transforming description of and improving access to primary humanities resources via advanced technologies. The project will test the feasibility of using existing archival descriptions in new ways, in order to enhance access and understanding of cultural resources in archives, libraries, and museums. We will derive Encoded Archival Context-Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF) records from existing archival findings aids from the Library of Congress (LoC) and three consortia, and name authority files from the LoC and the Getty Vocabulary Program. We will produce open-source software used in the derivation and creation of the EAC-CPF records and a prototype access system demonstrating their value to the archival community and the use of primary humanities resources. The Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, Univ. of Virginia, will partner with the California Digital Library and the School of Information, UC Berkeley.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Library Science

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$363,221 (approved)
$363,221 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 4/30/2013

Funding details:
Original grant (2010) $0
Supplement (2011) $15,000


PR-50087-10

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Jean-Louis Bigourdan (Project Director: August 2009 to present)

Methodologies for Sustainable HVAC Operation in Collection Environments

Investigation of the impact on paper-based collections of short-term fluctuations in environmental conditions resulting from the dynamic management, through temporary setbacks and shutoffs, of climate control systems. A guide would be published to help cultural institutions design and evaluate sustainable approaches to managing collection environments that achieve energy savings and long-term preservation of humanities collections.

"Methodologies for Sustainable HVAC Operation in Collection Environments" is a research project designed to allow staff of libraries and archives with significant humanities collections to confidently evaluate protocols for energy saving and sustainability, and to balance stewardship with fiscal realities and global responsibility. Since little research has been done on the impact of short-term fluctuations in temperature and humidity("setbacks" during unoccupied nights and weekends), neither facilities managers nor collection care specialists know how to evaluate their effect on collection preservation. Through a combination of laboratory research, field investigation, data modeling, and the creation of a user-friendly field guide-style publication, this project will provide the field with reliable data and a usable method for monitoring room environments and estimating the impact of short-term fluctuations on long-term preservation.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$399,926 (approved)
$399,926 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 6/30/2016


PR-50088-10

Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-3288)
David J. Bodenhamer (Project Director: August 2009 to present)

New Tools for the Humanities: Visualizing Complex Spatial Data

The development of a prototype tool to explore and to visualize geospatial data in the humanities using as a test bed a preexisting interactive Web mapping site on religious adherence in the United States in the 20th century.

This proposal, New Tools for the Humanities: Visualizing Complex Spatial Data, requests funding to develop new approaches and new tools to enhance the use of spatial data in the humanities. It uses web-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology in an existing product, the North American Religion Atlas, but seeks to make it both easier to use and much more powerful as a research tool through new types of visualizations already developed and tested in prototype by the project collaborators.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$224,575 (approved)
$224,575 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 10/31/2012


PR-50019-08

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Roy Rosenzweig (Project Director: July 2007 to January 2008)
Daniel J. Cohen (Project Director: January 2008 to present)

Text-Mining and Analysis Tools for Historical Research

Research, development, and testing of tools designed to locate documents in large digital corpora, extract information, and analyze large-scale patterns across texts.

In the last decade the library community and other providers of digital collections have created an incredibly rich digital archive of historical and cultural materials. Yet most scholars have not yet figured out ways to take full advantage of the digitized riches suddenly available on their computers. Indeed, the abundance of digital documents has actually exacerbated the problems of some researchers who now find themselves overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of available material. Meanwhile, some of the most profound insights lurking in these digital corpora remain locked up. We believe the absence of appropriate methods and interfaces is largely to blame: digital content providers have not yet developed the kind of sophisticated and flexible search, extraction, and analysis tools capable of capitalizing on this vast investment in a digitized cultural heritage.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$320,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2008 – 5/31/2011


PR-50020-08

Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA 15282-0001)
Patrick Juola (Project Director: July 2007 to present)

A Machine-Aided Back-of-the-Book Indexing System

Development and evaluation of a prototype system for helping indexers, including authors and publishers, produce traditional back-of-the-book indexes.

We propose to develop and test a prototype system for helping indexers (including authors, scholars, and publishers) produce traditional back-of-the-book indexes. Using standard text analysis technology (including Latent Semantic Analysis, Named Entity Extraction, Hierarchical Cluster Analysis, and other methods) we hope to identify, group, and present appropriate concepts for inclusion in an index and then automatically generate index anchors within the text itself. Human input will be possible -- and indeed, encouraged -- at any point in the process.

Project fields:
Library Science

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$131,465 (approved)
$131,465 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 6/30/2012


PR-50013-08

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory R. Crane (Project Director: July 2007 to present)

The Dynamic Lexicon: Cyberinfrastructure and the Automatic Analysis of Historical Languages

Research on methods to generate a dynamic lexicon for a text corpus in a digital library. Using Greek and Latin texts, the project would investigate processes to enumerate possible senses for the words being defined and provide detailed syntactic information and statistical data about their use in a corpus.

We propose to research core functions for the automatic analysis of historical languages (Greek & Latin) within an emerging cyberinfrastructure; we will research three technologies for building a dynamic lexicon, as well as the processes required to automatically create such a reference work for any textual collection. Our efforts will focus on parallel text analysis ? word sense induction and disambiguation ? as well as syntactic parsing. These technologies will enable us to create a reference work that lists the possible senses for a word while also providing syntactic information and statistical data about its use in a corpus. The methods we use to create this work will let users search a text not only by word form, but also by word sense, syntactic subcategorization and selectional preference. Our main contribution will be the steps that any digital library needs to take to dynamically create a reference work of their own and interface it with the texts in their collection.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Classical Languages

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$285,000 (approved)
$284,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 12/31/2011


PR-50004-07

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: July 2006 to present)

Universal Scripts Project

Incorporation into the Unicode standard of 15 historical and minority language scripts.

Although computer users in many parts of the world can now communicate using their own native writing systems, there are still at least 40 linguistic minority scripts, and about 40 more scripts of historical importance, that are difficult or impossible to use because they are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. And because continued corporate interest and support for these scripts is uncertain, communication among the groups who use them, and long-term access to their written cultural and historical resources, is threatened. This project will fund proposals to adopt 9 modern and 6 historical scripts into the standard, and will foster collaboration among scholars, users, and institutions to continue working on more proposals, so that computers will ultimately support all the world's scripts.

Project fields:
Languages, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$269,200 (approved)
$269,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 9/30/2009


PR-50010-07

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Evelyn Frangakis (Project Director: July 2006 to present)

Developing Data Models and Best Practices for Diagnosis and Improvement of Preservation Environments

A joint project of the New York Public Library (NYPL) and the Image Permanence Institute (IPI) to determine best practices for monitoring, evaluating, and optimizing environmental storage conditions in cultural repositories.

The New York Public Library and its research partner, the Image Permanence Institute, seek $351,077 to develop best practices for monitoring, evaluating, and optimizing collection storage conditions from an environmental perspective. The Library proposes to research fundamental environmental control issues and develop tools for communicating about and managing environmental problems. Research will be carried out through the implementation of an environmental monitoring system at the Library. The project will enhance a prototype data management system to provide high-level analysis of the raw data and tailored environmental monitoring reports that are accessible and comprehensible to the variety of stakeholders who have an interest in improving preservation environments. Project tools such as data models and user interface guidelines will be made publicly accessible to help libraries, museums, and other repositories realize good preservation environments for their collections.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 12/31/2008


PR-50011-07

University of Maine, Orono (Orono, ME 04473-1513)
Jon Cooper Ippolito (Project Director: July 2006 to present)

Forging the Future: New Tools for Variable Media Preservation

The development of a new metadata standard and three complementary tools for the cataloging and preservation of born-digital and ephemeral artworks.

Forging the Future proposes a consortium of museums and cultural heritage organizations dedicated to exploring, developing, and sharing new vocabularies and tools for cultural preservation.

Project fields:
Museum Studies or Historical Preservation

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$307,691 (approved)
$307,691 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 12/31/2009