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15 matches

Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities*
Date range: 2013-2016
Sort order: Award year, descending

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HT-250993-16

Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
Jason Mittell (Project Director: 03/11/2016 to present)
Christian Keathley (Co Project Director: 07/06/2016 to present)

Scholarship in Sound and Image

Two two-week workshops for 15 participants each on the study of time-based media like video and audio in multimodal humanities scholarship. The first instance of the workshop would be for advanced graduate students, while the second instance would be targeted toward humanities faculty and professionals.

In June 2015, we hosted a highly successful workshop, “Scholarship in Sound and Image,” funded by a grant from the NEH’s Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities (IATDH). This workshop brought together 14 scholars of film and media studies to learn how to produce videographic criticism that incorporates sound and moving images via digital technologies. We are again applying for an IATDH grant, this time to support a pair of two-week workshops, in June 2017 and June 2018. The workshops – whose curriculum is based on a course that has been successfully taught four times at Middlebury College, in addition to the successful IATDH workshop in 2015 – is designed for 15 participants whose objects of study involve audio-visual media, especially film, radio, television, and other new digital media forms. The two iterations of the workshop will subdivide the participants, inviting Ph.D. students in 2017, and faculty or postdocs in 2018.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$241,001 (approved)
$241,001 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 12/31/2018


HT-251001-16

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
David Birnbaum (Project Director: 03/15/2016 to present)

Make your edition: models and methods for digital textual scholarship

A three-week summer institute on the theory and development of digital scholarly editions for 25 participants to be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

The digital scholarly edition is more than a reading text with links and annotations. The digital scholarly edition is an integrated platform for performing research, and digital textual scholarship advances as this platform comes to support new types of inquiry The Institute will train 25 participants who already know how to mark up their texts (in TEI XML or similarly) to participate directly in the technological conceptualization and implementation of their editions, empowering them to undertake philological work that is informed by an understanding of what is possible technically, and of how to achieve it. This training responds to the risk of miscommunication or missed opportunity in collaborative situations where no participant in a project understands fully both the textual and the technological issues involved in designing and building a digital scholarly edition.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$156,251 (approved)
$156,251 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HT-251006-16

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Owen Williams (Project Director: 03/15/2016 to present)

Folger Shakespeare Library's "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Network Analysis (EMDA2017)" institute

A two-week summer institute and follow-up workshop for 12 participants to explore network analysis approaches to early modern studies. The institute would be hosted at the Folger Shakespeare Library with a variety of visiting experts.

The Folger Institute proposes to host a two-week institute on “Early Modern Digital Agendas: Network Analysis” in summer 2017 (EMDA2017). Under the direction of Professor Jonathan Hope and Dr. Ruth Ahnert, this institute will introduce humanities scholars, alt-ac builders, and librarians (both digital and traditional) to an expert visiting faculty—computing specialists, social historians, network analysts, literary historians, linguists, and visualization designers—to model best practices for the design and implementation of quantitative network analysis. EMDA2017 will be an opportunity for 12 scholarly practitioners to consider the ways this approach may be shaping the very nature of early modern research through intensive application and analysis.

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HT-251008-16

West Virginia University Research Corporation (Morgantown, WV 26505-2742)
Cheryl Ball (Project Director: 03/15/2016 to present)

Digital Publishing Institute: Authoring and Editing Digital Humanities Scholarship

A series of workshops for humanities scholars and editors on developing and publishing digital multimedia scholarship to be hosted by West Virginia University and held on-campus as well as in conjunction with scholarly publishing conferences.

This institute will offer two sets of workshops for authors and editors who want to learn more about composing and publishing scholarly multimedia and web-based academic texts. The workshops will attend to beginners’ concerns about starting a scholarly multimedia project to more advanced author concerns regarding infrastructural and preservation work plans. The two-week author workshops provide hands-on time and staff support for completing a segment of a digital humanities project. The two-day editor/publisher workshops will focus on workflows for peer review, copy-editing, and publication (including preservation) in scholarly multimedia.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$219,832 (approved)
$219,832 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HT-231812-15

Indiana/Purdue University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-5148)
Jennifer Guiliano (Project Director: 03/09/2015 to present)

The Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies Project

Three three-day workshops of 35 participants each hosted by Yale University, Northern Arizona University, and Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) on teaching new digital methods and exploring issues of preservation and access in Native American Studies. 

The Digital Native American studies Project (DNSP) proposes to offer three three-day workshops that will educate participants on issues of digital humanities research and methodology in the context of Native American Studies. Native American Studies, an interdisciplinary field of study exploring the history, culture, politics, issues, and contemporary experience of indigenous peoples of America, intersects with a number of issues related to access, preservation, and methodology that are problematized through the development and deployment of digital tools and methods and the conduct of digital research. While tremendous work has been done around the preservation and access of analog materials within Native American communities, there has been much less attention paid to the ways in which digital objects, practices, and methods function within Native communities and through Native American Studies scholarship outside of the anthropological context. Each three-day long workshop will serve thirty-five participants drawn from academic, cultural heritage, and tribal communities.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,817 (approved)
$249,817 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 1/31/2018


HT-231816-15

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Sharon Leon (Project Director: 03/10/2015 to present)
Sheila Brennan (Co Project Director: 07/08/2015 to present)

Doing Digital History 2016: An Institute for Mid-Career American Historians

A two-week institute for 25 historians of the United States, to be hosted by George Mason University’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, on advanced theory and application of new media tools for teaching and scholarship.

In the August 2014, twenty-three mid-career digital novices came to George Mason University (GMU) for the two-week intensive summer institute, Doing Digital History, organized by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM). Experts in their field of American history, these novices in digital methodologies were nervous, unsure of their own abilities, and intimidated by digital history. They all left as confident digital ambassadors with new skills, insights, and motivation to pursue digital work and become active participants in the growing community of digital humanists. Because of this success, and due to a continued need in the field, RRCHNM requests support from the National Endowment for the Humanities to organize Doing Digital History: 2016, a second Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities (IATDH), during the summer of 2016 to serve a cohort of twenty-five established, mid-career American history faculty and public historians.

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$219,301 (approved)
$200,651 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 3/31/2017


HT-231824-15

Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040)
Kim Gallon (Project Director: 03/10/2015 to present)
Angel Nieves (Co Project Director: 07/08/2015 to present)

Space and Place in Africana/Black Studies: An Institute on Spatial Humanities, Theories, Methods and Practice

A three-week summer institute and a follow-up workshop for 20 participants to explore spatial approaches to Africana Studies.  The institute would be hosted by Purdue University and the follow-up workshop would be held at Hamilton College.

Hosted by the African American Studies & Research Center (AARC) at Purdue University, this two-year long institute beginning the summer of 2016 is designed to advance knowledge in Africana/Black Studies by affording 20 early and mid-career Africana/Black Studies scholars, graduate students and librarians an opportunity to think critically about the relationship and intersections between Africana Studies and the spatial humanities. To that end, the Institute is concerned with helping participants to think spatially, to internalize the concept of space, and to develop spatial literacies. The Institute will also advance digital and spatial humanities approaches among Africana/Black Studies scholars. Participants will explore key topics in spatial humanities and will be introduced to a breadth of geospatial technologies. The web-based platform, BlackDH.org (www.blackdh.org) will serve as a clearinghouse and portal for scholarly discussions that will grow out of the Institute.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$245,299 (approved)
$245,299 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2017


HT-50085-14

Lane Community College (Eugene, OR 97405-0640)
Anne McGrail (Project Director: 03/19/2014 to present)

An Institute for Community College Digital Humanists: Beyond Pockets of Innovation, Toward a Community of Practice

A 5-day institute for 25 community college faculty members, to be hosted by Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon, on new digital methods, tools and practices for humanities teaching and scholarship.

Community college humanists have been slow to join communities of practice in digital humanities (DH), in part due to intensive teaching/ service workloads in an open-access context which puts constraints on professional development. To address this lag, Lane's July 13-17, 2015 institute will teach faculty DH theory and methods, build DH tools and projects, and scaffold these for their students' unique learning needs, with the result of expanding the definition of digital humanities practice to include the work of community college teachers, scholars and students. 25 participants will create a portfolio of project prototypes in data visualization, geospatial mapping, crowdsourcing, and digital storytelling, et al, emerging with a firm grounding in the complexity of DH and its applicability to their courses. A public keynote address will welcome the community into the conversation and participants’ work will be shared in an online commons that will serve as a hub for a community of practice.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$88,778 (approved)
$87,436 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


HT-50086-14

Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
Christian Keathley (Project Director: 03/19/2014 to present)
Jason Mittell (Co Project Director: 07/21/2014 to present)

Scholarship in Sound and Image: Producing Videographic Criticism in the Digital Age

A two week workshop at Middlebury College for twelve participants on the topic of incorporating time-based media like video and audio in multimodal humanities scholarship.

This two-week workshop, scheduled for June 2015, will gather scholars interested in producing critical work in a multi-media format. The workshop is designed for 12 participants, ranging in rank from advanced graduate students to full professors, whose objects of study involve audio-visual media, especially film, television, and other new digital media forms. In a workshop setting, we will consider the theoretical foundation for undertaking such innovative work, and we will experiment extensively with producing multi-media scholarly work, resulting in at least one work of publishable quality per participant. The goals will be to explore a range of approaches by using moving images as a critical language and to expand the expressive possibilities available to innovative humanists. The curriculum and work produced by the participants in the workshop will be featured in a special issue of [in]Transition, the first peer reviewed journal devoted exclusively to videographic criticism.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$95,152 (approved)
$95,109 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


HT-50088-14

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Ethan Watrall (Project Director: 03/19/2014 to present)
Lynne Goldstein (Co Project Director: 07/16/2014 to present)

Institute on Digital Archaeology Method & Practice

A twelve-day institute to be held over two summers, hosted by Michigan State University, for 20 participants to explore advanced theory and application of computational approaches and new media for archaeology.

The Institute on Digital Archaeology Method & Practice will be hosted jointly by MATRIX: The Center for the Humane Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences and the Department of Anthropology. The institute will bring together 20 participants to the campus of Michigan State University for two 6-day sessions in 2015 and 2016. In order to fulfill the institute's goals, attendance will be open to public sector archaeologists, private sector archaeologists, students, scholarly archaeologists from both the anthropological and humanist communities, and scholars from fields closely aligned with archaeology. Talks and workshops will be delivered by a wide variety of internationally regarded experts from the world of classics and ancient history, archaeology, the digital humanities, museums, and neogeography. The institute is organized along several themes: Field Methods, Data & Linked Data, Geospatial, Scholarly Publication & Communication, and Public Outreach & Engagement.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,708 (approved)
$249,708 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 9/30/2017


HT-50091-14

University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)
Alyson Gill (Project Director: 03/19/2014 to present)
Lisa Snyder (Co Project Director: 09/21/2015 to present)

Advanced Challenges in Theory and Practice in 3D Modeling of Cultural Heritage Sites

A one-week institute with a follow-up workshop held over two summers, hosted by Arkansas State University and the University of California, Los Angeles, to consider the theoretical and ethical issues associated with three-dimensional modeling of cultural heritage sites and objects.

This joint proposal by Arkansas State University and the University of California, Los Angeles builds on issues raised in the 2013 NEH Institute, considering advanced problems and issues facing content creators and end users, and attempting to bridge that gap. This ten day institute would take place over two consecutive summers at ASU in 2015 and UCLA in 2016, bringing together twenty scholars working in the humanities who have research or teaching projects that would benefit from advanced discussion of theoretical issues with an impressive group of content creators working from different perspectives.

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$218,139 (approved)
$218,139 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


HT-50092-14

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Owen Williams (Project Director: 03/19/2014 to present)
Jonathan Hope (Co Project Director: 07/21/2014 to present)

Folger Shakespeare Library's "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Advanced Topics" Institute

A 13-day summer institute, hosted by the Folger Shakespeare Library, for fifteen technically-advanced scholars of early modern English studies to explore advanced analytical techniques for engaging with digitized humanities collections.

The Folger Institute proposes to host an NEH institute on "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Advanced Topics" in summer 2015. This institute will introduce humanities scholars, alt-ac builders, and librarians (both digital and traditional) to an expert visiting faculty-historians of technology, information catalogers and retrievers, computing specialists, linguists, literary historians, visualization theorists, and statisticians-to model best practices for the design and implementation of digital projects. EMDA2015 will be both an expansively defined training institute and an opportunity for scholarly practitioners to consider how new technologies may be shaping the very nature of early modern research. Fifteen participants will have two and a half weeks of intensive application and analysis to answer such questions.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$175,649 (approved)
$175,649 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 3/31/2017


HT-50077-13

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Sharon Leon (Project Director: 03/12/2013 to present)
Sheila Brennan (Co Project Director: 07/01/2013 to present)

Doing Digital History: An Institute for Mid-Career American Historians

A two-week institute for 25 historians, to be hosted by George Mason University's Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, on advanced theory and application of new media tools for teaching and scholarship.

Historians, as a group, are reluctant and anxious to engage in digital research methods and to integrate those methods and accompanying tools into their teaching. Taking a cue from the most recent Ithaka S+R report, "Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians," the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University (RRCHNM) requests support from the National Endowment for the Humanities to host a two-week institute in 2014 to fill a much-needed gap for historians who need instruction and a professional learning community to engage with new media methods and tools, and to push forward with work on their own digital projects. In the spirit of capitalizing on our own expertise and the significant resources in the field, we will solicit our participants from the broad field of American History, without respect to subfield specialty.

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$215,718 (approved)
$175,746 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 5/31/2015


HT-50078-13

Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-3288)
Jennifer Guiliano (Project Director: 03/12/2013 to present)
George Williams (Co Project Director: 07/01/2013 to present)

Building an Accessible Future for the Humanities

A series of four two-day workshops to be held at Northeastern University, Emory University, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and the University of Texas, Austin, on theoretical and practical approaches for making digital humanities scholarship accessible to blind, low-vision, deaf, and hard-of-hearing users. An online guide of best practices with examples of humanities projects would be produced as a part of these workshops.

The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland will partner with the BrailleSC.org project, the Northeastern Center for Digital Humanities, the Emory University Libraries Digital Commons (DiSC), the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities (CDRH) at the University of Nebraska, and the College of Information at the University of Texas-Austin to foster the making of digital environments accessible and usable by blind, low-vision, deaf, and hard-of-hearing users. AccessibleFuture will facilitate four two-day long workshops for one hundred humanists, librarians, and information scholars (twenty-five per workshop) to develop and educate humanities scholars with all levels of expertise from beginner to the most advanced about technologies, design standards, and accessibility issues associated with the use of digital technologies.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,302 (approved)
$220,908 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2016


HT-50080-13

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Clifford Anderson (Project Director: 03/12/2013 to present)

XQuery Summer Institute: Advancing XML-Based Scholarship from Representation to Discovery

This two-week summer institute at Vanderbilt would train 12 participants in the techniques and methodologies of XQuery language, which allows for searching and manipulating texts encoded in XML.

The XQuery Summer Institute at Vanderbilt University will be aimed at archivists, librarians, professors, and students who have experience marking up texts in XML, but do not yet know how to work computationally with those documents. Our institute aspires to recruit twelve members of the digital humanities community to a two week institute in June 2014. The faculty of the institute will teach participants to work productively with their XML-encoded texts using XQuery, a programming language designed specifically for XML. With XQuery, scholars can learn a single language to ingest their texts into an XML database, ask questions of them, connect them with other sources of information, and publish them on the web. Participants will go beyond using XML for representation to querying XML for discovery.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$72,760 (approved)
$70,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014