NEH banner

[light] [dark]

Funded Projects Query Form
12 matches

Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities*
Date range: 2017-2019
Sort order: Award year, descending

Query elapsed time: 0.031 sec

Export results to Excel
Save this query

HT-267259-19

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Rachael Samberg (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining

A four-day summer workshop at the University of California, Berkeley, and follow-up activities for thirty-two participants on the ethical and legal issues around data mining of large scale textual collections for humanities research.

Digital humanities (DH) scholars, and professionals who support them, often perceive a barrier to utilizing text data mining (TDM) techniques: the law. Uncertainty about the breadth of TDM rights can impede the scope of DH research questions, or unnecessarily expose scholars to risk. Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining (Building LLTDM), hosted by UC Berkeley from June 23-26, 2020, will equip DH TDM researchers, librarians, and professionals with foundational skills to: 1) confidently navigate law, policy, ethics, and risk within DH TDM projects; 2) integrate workflows for DH TDM research and professional support; 3) practice sharing these new tools through authentic consultation exercises; 4) prototype plans for broadly disseminating their knowledge; and 5) develop communities of practice to promote cross-institutional outreach about the DH TDM legal landscape. Instructional materials will be shared publicly as a CC0 (Creative Commons Zero waiver) open educational resource.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$165,034 (approved)
$141,093 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


HT-267268-19

University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Anastasia Salter (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Understanding Digital Culture: Humanist Lenses for Internet Research

A five-day institute for twenty-five participants organized by and hosted at the University of Central Florida for using digital methods to research digital culture.

There has been growing awareness of the need for humanist inquiry into the internet platforms and communities driving contemporary culture. From fan communities and discourse about works of literature to meme-makers skewering cultural objects, online spaces enable readership, creation, circulation, and transformation of humanist texts—and the active making and remaking of public history. However, much internet research is driven by computational approaches without also being rigorously grounded in theories of culture and textual production. Navigating this space can be particularly daunting to early-career humanities scholars. This is where we seek to intervene. Understanding Digital Culture: Humanist Lenses for Internet Research will foster a transdisciplinary humanities institute to provide resources, training, and a community of collaborators to engage both computational network and data analysis tools and the ethics and best practices of using the web as a site of research.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Literature, General; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$129,102 (approved)
$129,102 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


HT-267282-19

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Abigail Mullen (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Digital Methods for Military History: An Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

A two-week long institute that will teach participants how to create datasets, visualize data, and create maps, with the overarching goal of creating a cohort of military historians who are able to use digital tools and methods to examine issues at the intersection of war and society.

As historians have begun to accept and adopt digital methods for historical analysis, the field of military history has been slow to follow suit. For a field that is rich with data and unconventional sources for analysis, this lack of adoption is somewhat surprising. Both structural barriers and lack of training contribute to the relative paucity of compelling digital projects that focus on military history. To address these barriers and provide hands-on training in digital methods of particular interest to the military history community, the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University requests funding for Digital Methods for Military History, an Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities.

Project fields:
Military History

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$126,947 (approved)
$126,947 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


HT-267285-19

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
David J. Birnbaum (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Advanced Digital Editing: Modeling the Text and Making the Edition

A two-week summer institute on the theory and development of digital scholarly editions for twenty-five participants to be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

The proposed NEH Institute, “Advanced digital editing: modeling the text and making the edition”, will train 25 participants who already know how to edit their texts in TEI XML to participate directly in the modeling, conceptualization, and implementation of their editions, empowering them to express innovative philological scholarship in a way that is informed by a deep understanding of what is possible technically, and of how to achieve it.

Project fields:
Slavic Languages

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$249,456 (approved)
$247,596 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


HT-267293-19

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Lisa M. Rhody (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Digital Humanities Research Institutes: Further Expanding Communities of Practice

A ten-day residential institute and follow-up activities for 15 participants to develop core humanities computational research and project development skills hosted at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

A ten-day residential institute and follow-up activities for 15 participants to develop core humanities computational research and project development skills. The in-person institute will be hosted at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York with follow up workshops offered through online webinars.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$249,978 (approved)
$249,493 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


HT-261794-18

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Alison Langmead (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Workshops on Sustainability for Digital Projects

A series of five workshops for up to 150 participants to explore approaches to long term sustainability of digital humanities projects. The workshops would be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh, Brigham Young University, Brown University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Oklahoma State University.

The ongoing sustainability of digital humanities projects is of critical concern to the field. To help increase engagement with sustainability planning, the University of Pittsburgh has developed, with prior support from the NEH, the Socio-Technical Sustainability Roadmap (STSR). The STSR is a structured workshop that guides participants through the practice of creating effective sustainability plans, based on research findings that demonstrate that the needs of a project’s social infrastructure must be addressed alongside the needs of its technological infrastructure in order to successfully sustain digital work over time. We are applying to the NEH ODH IATDH Program to fund a series of five facilitated STSR workshops at regional digital humanities hubs located across the United States. We anticipate reaching 125-150 people in total and are particularly interested in attracting participants who lack access to digital sustainability infrastructures at their home institutions.

[White paper][Grant products]

Participating institutions:
University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) - Applicant/Recipient
Brigham Young University, Provo (Provo, UT) - Participating Institution
Brown University (Providence, RI) - Participating Institution
Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA) - Participating Institution
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater (Stillwater, OK) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$215,380 (approved)
$215,380 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


HT-261812-18

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Sarah Connell (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Institutes on Critical Teaching and Research with Vector Space Models

A series of four three-day institutes for a total of 72 participants on the use of word embedding models for textual analysis. The three-day institutes would be hosted by Northeastern University.

The Northeastern University Women Writers Project seeks funding for a three-year institute series on word embedding models, to overcome barriers to entry for humanist researchers and teachers. We plan four institutes in all: two aimed at teachers and two aimed at researchers, with a novice and intermediate event for each audience. Each event will be followed by a three-month period of virtual discussion and consultation with WWP staff and fellow participants, and sharing of research and teaching outcomes.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$197,385 (approved)
$197,385 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2022


HT-261817-18

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
Laurie N. Taylor (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Hélène Huet (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Leah Reade Rosenberg (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Paul A. Ortiz (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Perry Collins (Co Project Director: May 2020 to May 2020)
Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute

A week-long, residential institute followed by a series of virtual sessions on collaborative digital humanities, archival collections, and Caribbean Studies for 26 participants. The institute would be hosted at the University of Florida.

The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) request to host a week-long, in-person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. Participants, especially from under-resourced institutions and those with preservation concerns, will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Latin American Studies; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$231,093 (approved)
$212,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 3/31/2021


HT-256958-17

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory R. Crane (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Anke Lüdeling (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Monica Berti (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Digital Editions, Digital Corpora and new possibilities for the Humanities in the Academy and Beyond

An intensive two-week institute and follow up workshop for 30 humanities scholars on the application of new methods for annotating textual sources for digital editions and digital corpora of historical languages. The institute would be hosted at Tufts University.

Tufts University proposes to host an intensive two week, in-residence institute in the summer of 2018 for 30 humanists on the application of new methods for annotating textual sources. Support will be offered for on-campus housing, meals, and travel to and from Tufts. Participants will have the opportunity to apply the new techniques to their own sources materials; collaborate with others on a wide range of source materials; discuss challenges and results; set and evaluate project goals; and integrate annotation work into the classroom. The proposed workshop builds upon experiences from, and work subsequent to, “Working with Text in a Digital Age,” a 2012-2014 NEH IATDH project and the on-line seminar, Sunoikisis Digital Classics, which has introduced the proposed topics to a virtual and international audience. A two day follow up workshop will be held to expand upon the topics and results of the institute. Project output will inform new Sunoikisis Digital Classics curricula.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Ancient Languages; Computational Linguistics; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$249,359 (approved)
$169,916 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


HT-256968-17

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Lisa M. Rhody (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Expanding Communities of Practice

A ten-day residential institute and follow-up activities for 15 participants to develop core humanities computational research and project development skills. The in-person institute and follow-up workshop would be hosted at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

The CUNY Graduate Center’s Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI) will advance the research goals and professional growth of individual participants, while at the same time supporting their efforts to organize and lead digital humanities workshops in their local contexts. During a ten-day residential institute in June 2018, participants will explore interdisciplinary digital humanities research and teaching with leading DH scholars, develop core computational research skills through hands-on workshops, and begin developing versions of the DHRI for their own communities. Over the following academic year, each participant will have access to an online network of peers, as well as 20 hours of consultation from our experienced staff. When participants return to New York in June 2019 to report on their experiences, their reflections will inform the publication of a guide to leading digital humanities skill workshops in a variety of institutional contexts.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$246,856 (approved)
$246,856 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2019


HT-256969-17

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Victoria Szabo (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Philip J. Stern (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Virtual and Augmented Reality for the Digital Humanities Institute (VARDHI)

A two-week institute and follow-up activities for twelve participants on the theory and application of virtual and augmented reality technologies to humanities research. Duke University would serve as the host for the institute.

The Virtual and Augmented Reality for the Digital Humanities Institute (VARDHI) explores the importance of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) theories, methods, and technologies to humanities research and communications, with an emphasis on historical and cultural representation and analysis, media arts applications, and experience design for virtual and augmented realities. This field of inquiry brings together narrative, archival, data-driven, and spatial approaches to humanistic research in combination with studies of virtual reality, human cognition, experiential learning, and digital storytelling. The key focus of VARDHI is to understand what is at stake with VR and AR, both of which are enjoying a cultural renaissance thanks to advances in mobile technologies and head mounted displays, and both of which make VR and AR more accessible to a wider range of producers and a potential mass of consumers.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$248,641 (approved)
$248,641 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


HT-256977-17

Louisiana State University and A & M College (Baton Rouge, LA 70803-0001)
Lauren Coats (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Emily McGinn (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Textual Data and Digital Texts in the Undergraduate Classroom

A one-week in-person institute hosted at Mississippi State University on approaches to computational textual analysis and how these techniques may be incorporated into the classroom. This institute will be followed by a series of virtual sessions focused on digital pedagogy and the humanities.

While the digital humanities often center on developing long-term research projects, it is the goal of our Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities Institute to bring the tools and methods of the digital humanities directly to the undergraduate classroom. “Textual Data and Digital Texts in the Undergraduate Classroom” aims to expand engagement with and access to digital humanities, particularly at under-resourced institutions, by teaching undergraduate instructors how to incorporate small-scale, data-focused digital projects into their humanities teaching. Our institute will include a one-week in-person session with hands-on instruction in turning text into data, and then analyzing that data and sharing the results. This week will be followed by bimonthly virtual sessions with experts in digital pedagogy. By the end of the institute, participants will have developed a classroom DH project or assignment about textual data.

[White paper][Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Louisiana State University and A & M College (Baton Rouge, LA) - Applicant/Recipient
Mississippi State University (Mississippi State, MS) - Participating Institution
University of Georgia (Athens, GA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$90,000 (approved)
$90,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019