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Funded Projects Query Form
13 matches

Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities*
Date range: 2018-2020
Sort order: Award year, descending

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HT-272418-20

Santa Fe Institute (Santa Fe, NM 87501-8943)
David B. Kinney (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Simon DeDeo (Co Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Foundations and Applications of Cultural Analytics in the Humanities

An online course on computational and quantitative methods for cultural analysis of large-scale digital sources to be followed by more advanced in-person workshops for early career scholars.

The use of computational and quantitative tools and approaches in the humanities is rapidly becoming more widespread. At the same time, there are still significant barriers preventing emerging scholars in the humanities from using these tools to generate new insights that make a genuine impact within the humanities themselves. The goal of our proposed advanced institute is to develop an online course and in-person workshop that will empower scholars in the humanities by eliminating the "black box" of computational text analysis. Participants will gain a theoretical and practical understanding of text analysis methods and the interpretation of their outputs. As such, participants will be able to extract content and derive meaning from the growing archives of digital sources, making accessible new directions in humanities scholarship. The in-person workshop in particular will be the springboard for collaborations between the next generation of analytically-inclined humanities scholars.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Philosophy, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$247,932 (approved)
$229,639 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2023


HT-272556-20

Regents of the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN 55455-2070)
Evan Roberts (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Samantha Blickhan (Co Project Director: May 2020 to August 2023)
Benjamin Wiggins (Co Project Director: May 2020 to August 2023)
Building capable communities for crowdsourced transcription

An institute to help cultural organizations plan, develop, and launch crowdsourcing projects focused on engaging communities with their collections.

Converting printed texts into digital formats is now straightforward, enabling humanities scholars to mine the world's cultural heritage. But many crucial sources exist only in manuscript form and are difficult to integrate into the future of the digital humanities. If we can convert handwriting into machine-readable text we can connect the past and present of the humanities. People can often decipher unfamiliar handwriting, and improvements in software and public engagement have made crowdsourced transcription effective. But getting it all right—design, engagement, and accuracy—remains tricky. The University of Minnesota, Adler Planetarium, and Zooniverse, as leaders in developing crowdsourcing transcription platforms, will convene an Institute developing a cohort of leaders who develop crowdsourced transcription projects. The Institute will take a cohort through the process together, led by a team with successful experience in crowdsourced transcription and teaching.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$249,856 (approved)
$249,056 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2023


HT-272565-20

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Carla Klehm (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
W. Fred Limp (Co Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Jackson Cothren (Co Project Director: July 2020 to present)
SAROI: Spatial Archaeology Residential and Online Studies

An online and in-person mentorship and training program to facilitate collaboration among scholars at the Spatial Archaeology Residential and Online Institute, devoted to large-scale archeological analysis of objects, structures, sites, and landscapes.

The Spatial Archaeology Residential and Online Institute, hosted at the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, University of Arkansas, addresses an increasing need for advanced training in spatial methodologies in archaeology and heritage management. Spatial analysis of human behavior involves data on a “very large-scale,” as there are many aspects involved in understanding how humans perceive space, occupy it, and alter it. Obtaining this “very large-scale” data involves the high-density measurement and analysis of objects, structures, sites, and landscapes. Recent developments that allow for higher density and more precision are helping us address complex questions about human nature that heretofore were not possible. SAROI seeks to support 16 junior scholars in an online and in-person training and mentorship program over the course of three years, with the intent of building long-term collaborative relationships among Fellows and between Fellows and SAROI staff.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$218,090 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2023


HT-272566-20

Ithaka Harbors, Inc. (New York, NY 10006-1819)
Nathan Kelber (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
The Text Analysis Pedagogy (TAP) Institute

A series of workshops, to be hosted at the University of Virginia and the University of Arizona, on approaches for teaching computational text analysis.

These summer institutes will support access to community support, technical infrastructure, and educational resources for teaching and learning text analysis based on open content and infrastructure. This two-year Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities grant will result in teacher development and the creation of a series of open educational resources that are intended to support the larger educational community of practice.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$248,518 (approved)
$214,465 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2022


HT-272570-20

Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)
Natalia Ermolaev (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Andrew Janco (Co Project Director: July 2020 to present)
New Languages for NLP: Building Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Humanities

an institute to help humanities scholars learn how to create linguistic data and apply statistical models to new languages.

Natural Language Processing (NLP) has revolutionized our ability to interpret texts at scale and is an essential tool for scholars in the digital humanities. However, only a small percentage of the world’s languages are supported by the major NLP libraries. The New Languages for NLP Institute will help scholars with expertise in less-resourced languages to create linguistic data and train NLP models for their languages. In three workshops, held at the Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton University in 2021-2022, participants will create linguistic data and train statistical language models for new languages. They will learn best practices in project and research data management. As an outcome of the project, participants will publish an open dataset in the standard Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning format as well as a trained language model that can be used for computational text analysis.

Project fields:
Computational Linguistics; History, General; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$239,983 (approved)
$237,034 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2022


HT-267259-19

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Rachael Samberg (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining

A four-day summer workshop at the University of California, Berkeley, and follow-up activities for thirty-two participants on the ethical and legal issues around data mining of large scale textual collections for humanities research.

Digital humanities (DH) scholars, and professionals who support them, often perceive a barrier to utilizing text data mining (TDM) techniques: the law. Uncertainty about the breadth of TDM rights can impede the scope of DH research questions, or unnecessarily expose scholars to risk. Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining (Building LLTDM), hosted by UC Berkeley from June 23-26, 2020, will equip DH TDM researchers, librarians, and professionals with foundational skills to: 1) confidently navigate law, policy, ethics, and risk within DH TDM projects; 2) integrate workflows for DH TDM research and professional support; 3) practice sharing these new tools through authentic consultation exercises; 4) prototype plans for broadly disseminating their knowledge; and 5) develop communities of practice to promote cross-institutional outreach about the DH TDM legal landscape. Instructional materials will be shared publicly as a CC0 (Creative Commons Zero waiver) open educational resource.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$165,034 (approved)
$141,093 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


HT-267268-19

University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Anastasia Salter (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Understanding Digital Culture: Humanist Lenses for Internet Research

A five-day institute for twenty-five participants organized by and hosted at the University of Central Florida for using digital methods to research digital culture.

There has been growing awareness of the need for humanist inquiry into the internet platforms and communities driving contemporary culture. From fan communities and discourse about works of literature to meme-makers skewering cultural objects, online spaces enable readership, creation, circulation, and transformation of humanist texts—and the active making and remaking of public history. However, much internet research is driven by computational approaches without also being rigorously grounded in theories of culture and textual production. Navigating this space can be particularly daunting to early-career humanities scholars. This is where we seek to intervene. Understanding Digital Culture: Humanist Lenses for Internet Research will foster a transdisciplinary humanities institute to provide resources, training, and a community of collaborators to engage both computational network and data analysis tools and the ethics and best practices of using the web as a site of research.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Literature, General; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$129,102 (approved)
$129,102 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


HT-267282-19

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Abigail Mullen (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Digital Methods for Military History: An Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

A two-week long institute that will teach participants how to create datasets, visualize data, and create maps, with the overarching goal of creating a cohort of military historians who are able to use digital tools and methods to examine issues at the intersection of war and society.

As historians have begun to accept and adopt digital methods for historical analysis, the field of military history has been slow to follow suit. For a field that is rich with data and unconventional sources for analysis, this lack of adoption is somewhat surprising. Both structural barriers and lack of training contribute to the relative paucity of compelling digital projects that focus on military history. To address these barriers and provide hands-on training in digital methods of particular interest to the military history community, the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University requests funding for Digital Methods for Military History, an Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities.

Project fields:
Military History

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$126,947 (approved)
$126,947 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


HT-267285-19

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
David J. Birnbaum (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Advanced Digital Editing: Modeling the Text and Making the Edition

A two-week summer institute on the theory and development of digital scholarly editions for twenty-five participants to be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

The proposed NEH Institute, “Advanced digital editing: modeling the text and making the edition”, will train 25 participants who already know how to edit their texts in TEI XML to participate directly in the modeling, conceptualization, and implementation of their editions, empowering them to express innovative philological scholarship in a way that is informed by a deep understanding of what is possible technically, and of how to achieve it.

Project fields:
Slavic Languages

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$249,456 (approved)
$247,596 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2022


HT-267293-19

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Lisa M. Rhody (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Digital Humanities Research Institutes: Further Expanding Communities of Practice

A ten-day residential institute and follow-up activities for 15 participants to develop core humanities computational research and project development skills hosted at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

A ten-day residential institute and follow-up activities for 15 participants to develop core humanities computational research and project development skills. The in-person institute will be hosted at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York with follow up workshops offered through online webinars.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$249,978 (approved)
$249,493 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


HT-261794-18

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Alison Langmead (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Workshops on Sustainability for Digital Projects

A series of five workshops for up to 150 participants to explore approaches to long term sustainability of digital humanities projects. The workshops would be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh, Brigham Young University, Brown University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Oklahoma State University.

The ongoing sustainability of digital humanities projects is of critical concern to the field. To help increase engagement with sustainability planning, the University of Pittsburgh has developed, with prior support from the NEH, the Socio-Technical Sustainability Roadmap (STSR). The STSR is a structured workshop that guides participants through the practice of creating effective sustainability plans, based on research findings that demonstrate that the needs of a project’s social infrastructure must be addressed alongside the needs of its technological infrastructure in order to successfully sustain digital work over time. We are applying to the NEH ODH IATDH Program to fund a series of five facilitated STSR workshops at regional digital humanities hubs located across the United States. We anticipate reaching 125-150 people in total and are particularly interested in attracting participants who lack access to digital sustainability infrastructures at their home institutions.

[White paper][Grant products]

Participating institutions:
University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) - Applicant/Recipient
Brigham Young University, Provo (Provo, UT) - Participating Institution
Brown University (Providence, RI) - Participating Institution
Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA) - Participating Institution
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater (Stillwater, OK) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$215,380 (approved)
$215,380 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


HT-261812-18

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Sarah Connell (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Institutes on Critical Teaching and Research with Vector Space Models

A series of four three-day institutes for a total of 72 participants on the use of word embedding models for textual analysis. The three-day institutes would be hosted by Northeastern University.

The Northeastern University Women Writers Project seeks funding for a three-year institute series on word embedding models, to overcome barriers to entry for humanist researchers and teachers. We plan four institutes in all: two aimed at teachers and two aimed at researchers, with a novice and intermediate event for each audience. Each event will be followed by a three-month period of virtual discussion and consultation with WWP staff and fellow participants, and sharing of research and teaching outcomes.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$197,385 (approved)
$197,385 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2022


HT-261817-18

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
Laurie N. Taylor (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Hélène Huet (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Leah Reade Rosenberg (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Paul A. Ortiz (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Perry Collins (Co Project Director: May 2020 to May 2020)
Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute

A week-long, residential institute followed by a series of virtual sessions on collaborative digital humanities, archival collections, and Caribbean Studies for 26 participants. The institute would be hosted at the University of Florida.

The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) request to host a week-long, in-person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. Participants, especially from under-resourced institutions and those with preservation concerns, will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Latin American Studies; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$231,093 (approved)
$212,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 3/31/2021