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Program: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants*
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MD-258873-18

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Pauline T. Strong (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

Communities of Care: Voices of Healing and Endurance

Development of an online interactive exhibition of patient and medical practitioner testimonials from six to eight Central Texas communities.

Communities of Care: Documenting Voices of Healing and Endurance is a community-based multimedia storytelling project focusing on illness and healthcare narratives. This project will generate and curate its own archive by asking participants to produce narratives through writing, photography, video, and oral histories.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Public History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


MD-258841-18

gallupARTS, Inc. (Gallup, NM 87301-6205)
Rose Alexa Eason (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

Gallup’s WPA Art Collection: Exploring Past & Present Perspectives in a Virtual Art Exhibit

Development of a website showcasing Gallup, New Mexico’s collection of New Deal art.

gallupARTS proposes to design a website showcasing Gallup, NM’s unique collection of New Deal art. A New Deal Federal Art Center, Gallup is home to ~90 New Deal artworks, from paintings to tinwork light fixtures. Currently housed in four separate locations, this collection is disjointed and mostly inaccessible. It is largely forgotten/overlooked, and consequently underutilized as a humanities resource. The proposed project would digitally unify the collection, making it publicly accessible and able to be interpreted. Bringing together art historians, historians and cultural studies experts alongside web developers, designers and digital archivists, this project would also involve local artists, creatives and stakeholders in planning a creative, dynamic, community-based engaging virtual art exhibit, featuring both scholarly and creative content. The website will also function as a digital archive helping to preserve and protect the at-risk collection.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


MD-258819-18

California Institute for Rural Studies (Davis, CA 95617-1047)
Ildi Carlisle-Cummins (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

The Animated Atlas of California Farming History

Development of an interactive, multimedia atlas exploring the people, places, and events that shaped key moments in California agriculture.

The Animated Atlas of California Farming History will encourage public thought and dialogue around key historical moments in the development of an industry that has shaped the way America—and the world—eats. The atlas will create a series of online maps that deepen user engagement with an existing set of stories that dig into what may seem like a straightforward subject to uncover often surprising tales of human triumph, loss, ingenuity, abuse and connection. Discovery funding will focus a broad group of scholars on: 1) selecting the best digital platform, 2) designing an engaging user interface, 3) exploring the feasibility of illustrating “alternative” histories using digital mapping programs and 4) identifying digital team members who will build a prototype atlas. Our digital project team will craft a design plan for producing maps that reveal how stories affected the California landscape and spark vibrant public discussion about how that landscape might have looked differently.

Project fields:
Geography; Immigration History; Rural Studies

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


MD-253242-17

Valparaiso University (Valparaiso, IN 46383-4520)
Allison E. Schuette (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Flight Paths: Mapping Our Changing Neighborhoods

Development of an interactive website that examines the impact of de-urbanization in the Rust Belt revealed by the changing racial and socioeconomic demographics of Gary, Indiana.

Flight Paths is a multi-media initiative where participants engage and analyze factors contributing to de-urbanization and the fracturing of neighborhoods in post-industrial America specifically Gary, Indiana. An interactive website will explore the impact of white and green flight in the region, and will include a rich array of historical material and first-person stories. Users will juxtapose the stories of “neighbors” and analyze the sociopolitical and economic factors of de-urbanization. Users will be able to upload mental maps,stories,photographs, and an innovative map interface where they will visually experience “flight” paths of residents from the 1960s to present. Public exhibitions and toolkits for community conversations will help participants more deeply understand the ongoing impact of de-urbanization and the interconnected nature of regional life in the presence of neighbors with whom new civic relationships can be forged, potentially catalyzing participants for civic change.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


MD-253272-17

New York Foundation for the Arts (Brooklyn, NY 11201-8301)
Alison Cornyn (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Incorrigibles

Development of a multiplatform project that examines the history of detention facilities and incarceration of young women from the early 20th century to the present.

Incorrigibles is a transmedia public memory project that looks at youth incarceration, specifically as it concerns young women from the early 1900’s to present day. The project plans to use multiple media sharing platforms, social networking, a website and podcasts to collect, display and distribute documents, photographs, films, oral histories, newspaper articles, stories and participatory voices related to the history of incarcerated girls and young women—in particular, young women’s detention facilities and training schools.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Legal History; Women's History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


MD-253228-17

Carnegie Institute (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-4007)
Erin Peters (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Evaluating Digital Platforms for an Immersive Ancient Egyptian Experience

Development of an immersive digital platform for new exhibitions on ancient Egypt.

Carnegie Museum of Natural History is applying for an NEH Digital Projects for the Public Discovery grant to initiate first-stage research and planning and produce a design document for an immersive virtual experience that will be central to the museum’s future exhibition, Egypt on the Nile. Discovery grant funding will allow the museum to investigate best possible options for the content and digital platform for the exhibit, which will virtually simulate a journey on the Nile in the royal funerary boat of pharaoh Senwosret III (c. 1887-1848 BCE), which was excavated at Dahshur and is currently in the museum’s Egyptian collection. This rare boat is one of only four known in museum collections excavated at Dahshur, and its study is important for scholarship in Egyptology, maritime archaeology, and art history. We propose to virtually recreate the boat’s original construction, use, and appearance, so it can be an emotive vessel for virtual travel in an immersive museum experience.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient History; Cultural Anthropology; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$29,962 (approved)
$29,962 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


MD-253238-17

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Sheila A. Brennan (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Hearing the Americas

Development of a website that explores the transnational history of American popular music.

George Mason University’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media is seeking a Digital Projects for the Public Discovery grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to plan an accessible, digital public humanities project that will increase users’ understanding of the transnational roots of American popular music. The digitized music collections available in the Library of Congress’s (LC) National Jukebox and the University of California at Santa Barbara’s (UCSB) Cylinder Audio Archive will provide the building blocks for the team to design a digital project that will ask users how well they know their music history and invite them to discover a rich contextual network of other historical collections. The grant funds will allow the team to research the audio and archival collections; conduct audience research; draft the information architecture, test with users, and to produce a design document that will lay out how the project will proceed in future phases.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$29,996 (approved)
$29,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


MD-253223-17

New York Academy of Medicine (New York, NY 10029-5207)
Robin Naughton (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Biography of a Book

Development of an interactive exhibition that explores the production and use of 12 books and manuscripts to illustrate how knowledge was transferred through books.

The New York Academy of Medicine Library, one of the most extensive rare book collections in in the country, has selected and digitized 12 items for our project, Biography of a Book. Through the stories that underpin each book we will show the context for production, collection, and use, all with their distinctive cultures, technologies, and structures, their institutional challenges and supports. The final goal of the project is to produce an innovative, interactive exhibit that will engage the public in a dialogue about how specialized knowledge was transferred over time through the medium of books. This grant will support an advisory panel in the areas of history of medicine, history of the book, digital humanities, user research and technology to aid our development by providing feedback on content and on user experience. The end product for the Discovery Grant will be a design document that supports the future implementation and production of our Biography of a Book project.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


MD-253224-17

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3846)
Danielle Allen (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Learning Experiences about the Declaration of Independence

Development of interactive tools for middle and high school students based upon the grievances and rights articulated by British colonists in the Declaration of Independence.


“Portrait of a Tyrant” is a point-and-click adventure game where the player explores the historical stories behind the grievances and rights articulated in the Declaration of Independence. This game aims to teach humanities content and critical thinking and to cultivate civic readiness, and will support instruction of the Declaration in language arts, social studies, and U.S. history contexts.

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


MD-253319-17

Carnegie Hall Society (New York, NY 10019-3293)
Christopher Amos (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

A History of African American Music: Interactive Digital Timeline Discovery Project

Development of a web experience and on-site interactives focused on the history of African American music at Carnegie Hall.

Carnegie Hall requests an NEH Digital Projects for the Public Discovery Grant of $30,000 to support the exploratory phase of an initiative to update and relaunch an existing interactive digital timeline of the history of African American music. The project seeks to modernize the timeline from several perspectives: design and technology, chronology, and thematic content. In its current form, the timeline’s technical infrastructure is outdated and has only limited multimedia functionality. Recognizing the enduring value of this resource and the importance of this area of American music history, Carnegie Hall is committed to redeveloping the timeline.The goal of the discovery phase work is to develop a design document that demonstrates the integration of humanities ideas, digital technology, and public outreach strategies for the updated interactive timeline.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


MD-253338-17

Exploratorium (San Francisco, CA 94111-1454)
Robert Rothfarb (Project Director: June 2016 to present)

Buried Ships and the San Francisco Coast Line

Development of a place-based mobile app that explores the history of the changing landscape of downtown San Francisco by investigating the more than 65 ships buried beneath the city.

The Exploratorium proposes to develop a design document for, Buried Ships and the Coastline of San Francisco, a place-base designed mobile app that will allow users to discover elements of historical, cultural, and scientific interest about the world below their feet. There are over 65 ships buried below the downtown San Francisco area that are often encountered and uncovered during building construction projects that remain a link to the past and are rich historical assets that continue to captivate public interest. Using the wealth of artifacts under the visitor’s feet as tangible entry points to the maritime history of the city, the app will use geolocative maps, overlays, and multimedia augmentations to provide an immersive experience that can meaningfully engage users in the stories of the changing coastline and its impact on the urbanization of San Francisco’s past, present and future.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/16/2017 – 12/22/2017


MD-234145-16

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Grace E. Hale (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Participatory Media

A series of meetings and workshops that explore possible digital platforms and approaches to bring to the public a curated set of community documentary films from the 1960s and 1970s.

Participatory Media interactively engages with and presents participatory community media from the 1960s and 1970s. Participatory Media will centralize disparate archives of community media and place them in the larger context of America’s public documentary record. The project will also bring to light the development of participatory media practices, and the social and cultural history of American communities during this era. Through the discovery phase, the project will explore how to provide access to community-made, rare, and often publicly-funded moving images and their related archives; provide a model for community involvement in digital public humanities work, specifically participatory archival, curatorial, and exhibition work; and employ innovative technologies to enable digital participation on multiple levels. The final product of this discovery grant will be design documents that include user interface specifications, technology requirements, and wireframes.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$29,587 (approved)
$29,587 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


MD-226669-15

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-1203)
Ross W. Higgins (Project Director: June 2014 to present)

Slavery in the North Website

Development of a website that explores northern slavery through individual stories that illustrate how enslaved people endured and resisted the institution of slavery.

Historic Hudson Valley's website project will address the history of slavery in the colonial North, with a special focus on individuality and resistance. It is an outgrowth of our NEH-funded reinterpretation of Philipsburg Manor, HHV’s National Historic Landmark in Sleepy Hollow, NY, where we have been presenting the history of northern colonial slavery--and, later, incorporating themes of individuality and resistance--for years. HHV is determined to bring this personalized history online and engage with the public in new, exciting ways. Through Discovery, HHV will: 1) Convene a select group of humanities scholars, museum professionals, education advisors, and digital media experts; 2) Identify, update, and prioritize our humanities content involving northern colonial enslavement and resistance; 3) Determine how content will be structured and presented online to engage a 21st-century audience; and 4) Create a design document that details the fundamental aspects of the website.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Public History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2015


MD-226682-15

New School (New York, NY 10011-8871)
Anne Balsamo (Project Director: June 2014 to present)

The Creation of Digital Memorialization Applications for the AIDS Memorial Quilt

Development of web-based “public interactives” to provide cultural and social history for the AIDS Memorial Quilt.

We request funding to extend and expand functionality of the AIDS Quilt Touch media system to incorporate stories as a mode of user-engagement. If funded, this project will result in the prototype of an interactive digital narrative through multimedia tours (via an online platform). The tours will be designed around key humanities themes.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Media Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


MD-226668-15

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Seth M. Kotch (Project Director: June 2014 to present)

Digital Civil Rights Radio

Development of a website that makes accessible and interprets digitized recordings of non-commercial, independent radio station broadcasts providing local accounts of the civil rights and black power movements.

"Digital Civil Rights Radio" seeks to explore a digital project around a growing body of historic radio recordings from non-commercial, often black-owned, radio stations that operated in the 1970s and 1980s. These stations, founded by activists inspired by but unsatisfied with the gains of the civil rights movement, expanded upon and redirected the movement's energy in response to local needs and the politics of the Black Power movement. These recordings, not heard since they originally aired, require digitization. And moreover, they call out for a public re-airing. This project will take the initial steps toward developing a robust, public facing digital infrastructure around the recordings, making them visible, accessible, and crucially, hearable for the first time in decades. And it will integrate them into an immersive digital experience that when coupled with public programming will model a new style of effective, engaged humanities scholarship.

Project fields:
African American History; Journalism; Public History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$28,323 (approved)
$19,739 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


MD-226651-15

Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Neil Safier (Project Director: June 2014 to present)

Exploring the Four Elements: Toward a Digital Environmental History of the Americas

Development of a series of online and on-site exhibits examining the ways that the ecological elements of earth, air, fire, and water were interpreted by the inhabitants of the early Americas.

This proposal, submitted to the NEH Division of Public Programs for a Digital Projects for the Public Discovery Grant, constitutes a request in the amount of $29,755 to support the exploratory phase of a project to bring a new humanities initiative at the John Carter Brown Library to a much broader public than has traditionally been the case for the Library’s exhibitions and scholarly projects. “Exploring the Four Elements: Toward a Digital Environmental History of the Americas” takes a simple concept, the cultural significance of earth, air, fire, and water to the diverse populations of the Americas, from the continents’ earliest indigenous inhabitants to the last waves of European scientific explorers at the end of the colonial period, and examines the ramifications of human engagement with these elements as a window onto changing ecological relationships throughout the pre-contact and early modern periods in the early Americas.

Project fields:
History of Science

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$29,755 (approved)
$29,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


MD-226699-15

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Tracy J. Fullerton (Project Director: June 2014 to present)

Walden, a game

The creation of a prototype for a first-person video game that allows players to engage with author Henry David Thoreau’s first year at Walden Pond.

Prototype for a unique video game based on the writings of the American author Henry David Thoreau at Walden Pond. Designed and directed by game designer Tracy Fullerton, "Walden, a game," will simulate the experiment in living made by Thoreau at Walden Pond in 1845-47, allowing players to walk in his virtual footsteps, attend to the tasks of living a self-reliant existence, discover in the beauty of a virtual landscape the ideas and writings of this unique philosopher, and cultivate through the game play their own thoughts and responses to the concepts discovered there. The humanities content of the game will focus on an interactive translation of Thoreau’s writings and will also include references to the historical context of those writings. The game takes place in the environment of 1845 New England, when new technologies such as the railroad, the telegraph were first being seen and were part of the changes to the pace of life that Thoreau so articulately resisted in his critiques of society.

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


MD-226680-15

Richard Stockton College of New Jersey (Galloway, NJ 08205-9441)
Lisa Rosner (Project Director: June 2014 to present)

Pox in the City: A 3-D Strategy Game for the History of Medicine

Development of a prototype of an interactive, web-based game on an early 19th-century smallpox outbreak in Philadelphia.

Stockton College is requesting $99,837 to develop a working prototype that demonstrates the humanities ideas, technology, and public outreach for "Pox in the City", a Unity 3D strategy game. "Pox in the City" draws upon a core interpretive framework for medical history, that beliefs, practices, and treatment are shaped by the interaction of the healer, the patient, and the disease entity. Players take on the role of a physician who has arrived in Philadelphia just as a smallpox outbreak erupts. Armed only with Edward Jenner’s new vaccination technique, players undertake the challenge of preventing the spread of the disease by persuading patients to be vaccinated. The interactive format will immerse players in the city’s rich history, as they experience the choices made by historical actors and constrained by scientific knowledge and cultural values. The prototype is being designed by Eduweb and developed in partnership with the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History of Science; U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$99,837 (approved)
$99,837 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 7/31/2016