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Grant programs:Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants*
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MT-284677-22

Blavatnik Archive Foundation (New York, NY 10019-4105)
Julie Reines Chervinsky (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Postcards from the Siege: Messages from the Besieged City of Leningrad

Creation of a prototype for a curated digital archive of postcards published and mailed during the siege of Leningrad (1941–44).

The Blavatnik Archive seeks the Digital Projects for the Public Prototyping Grant to create an immersive storytelling and “deep dive” exploration platform for our collection of postcards published and mailed during the Siege of Leningrad (1941–1944), a humanitarian disaster that took place in the Soviet Union during World War II. The project highlights multiple functions of these popular material culture artifacts , including: as objects of propaganda, as works of art and historical artifacts, and as a means of communication. This unique material offers historical and cultural data to interests in WWII, Soviet propaganda, and Soviet art; speaks to the human need for communication in times of isolation, teaches mass media critical analysis skills, and has broad audience appeal because of its striking and varied art styles. We will develop proof of concept that brings together expert analysis, innovative multimedia-based storytelling, and a visually rich, interactive digital platform.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Media Studies; Russian History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 9/30/2022


MT-284693-22

Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
Stephen Wittek (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Shakespeare-VR

Prototyping of an interactive virtual reality (VR) experience to explore Shakespeare’s plays  through the role of a performer.

Shakespeare-VR is an interactive virtual reality experience that will enable users to step onstage in an Elizabethan theater, assume a role in a Shakespearean play, and perform in conjunction with professional actors or fellow users. When the experience is complete, it will be available for download worldwide at no cost whatsoever. In the same spirit of public accessibility, the project’s groundbreaking lending program will make quality VR headsets available to participating instructors at high schools, colleges, and universities across the US. The total amount of the funding request is $100,000. The project director is Dr. Stephen Wittek, an Assistant Professor in the English Department at Carnegie Mellon University. Over the past three years, Dr. Wittek has brought together a team of collaborators that includes pedagogical specialists, virtual media producers, theatrical practitioners, and Shakespeare instructors at universities in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Project fields:
British Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 6/30/2023


MT-284709-22

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Jill Lepore (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
The Amendments Project: Rewriting the U.S. Constitution

Prototyping of an interpretive website that integrates 200 years of proposals for new amendments to the Constitution.

The Amendments Project aims to compile, analyze, and present to the public the text of proposed amendments to the U.S. Constitution from 1787 to 2020, in the form of a digital archive and a narrative podcast. The project builds on raw, incomplete, and inaccessible data compiled by the National Archives in 2016 and extends that collection through research designed to discover proposals made by historically disenfranchised and poorly enfranchised groups. Through a collaboration with the Comparative Constitutions Project, the Amendments Project will provide access to this collection to an interested general public that will include researchers and teachers, elected officials, political parties, non-profit organizations, constitutional reformers and, especially, students from kindergarteners to senior learners. The project aims to advance civic education and support emerging proposals for constitutional reform, in alignment with the NEH’s Special Initiative, “A More Perfect Union.”

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$99,985 (approved)
$99,985 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 8/31/2023


MT-284717-22

Catticus Corporation (Berkeley, CA 94710-2597)
Richard L. Wormser (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Striking Back, Striding Forward

Development of a prototype of an interactive website on protests and desegregation of Farmville, Virginia, public schools.

The proposed i-doc interactive website tells the story of Barbara Johns, a 16-year old student who organized a student protest agains her segregated school in Farmville, Virginia in 1951 that led to the Supreme Court declaring segregation in public education unconstitutional.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2022 – 9/30/2022


MT-284790-22

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles, CA 90036-4504)
Tomas Garcia (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
The World Made Wondrous: The Dutch Collector’s Cabinet and the Politics of Possession Digital Exhibition Guide

Prototyping of a pilot digital interpretive guide to accompany the temporary exhibition The World Made Wondrous and serve as proof-of-concept for future exhibitions.

LACMA requests a NEH Digital Projects for the Public grant to develop a prototype for an interactive, digital Exhibition Guide to accompany The World Made Wondrous: The Dutch Collector’s Cabinet and the Politics of Possession, a temporary exhibition scheduled to be on view from June 2023 to January 2024. The World Made Wondrous assembles a range of media from LACMA’s permanent collection and select loans into a collector’s cabinet to interrogate the politics of possession in the practice of collecting in early modern Europe. The Exhibition Guide will invite visitors to reconsider why the museum exists as we know it today and why museums collect the objects they do. The goal of the project is to create a proof of concept that encourages interaction and exploration by bringing multiple voices into the in-gallery experience to deepen public understanding of the humanities-based themes explored in LACMA’s new building for its permanent collection, scheduled to open in 2024.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024


MT-277003-21

Public Museum School (Grand Rapids, MI 49504-5371)
Alex Forist (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
River of Time: A Game for Community Engagement

Prototyping of a web-based, mobile game that explores the history of the Grand River.

The Grand Rapids Public Museum (GRPM) will create a state-of-the-art digital learning game called River of Time that will engage thousands of players. River of Time will encourage players to explore and interact with humanities content through their smartphones or tablets without having to download an app. The goal of the project is to create a scalable platform, running on the web, that will allow the GRPM to deliver curated information, digital collections, and fun interactive experiences directly through ‘activation points’, triggered by a device’s camera, at locations anywhere in the community. Using personal devices, the game will be offered to the general public, who will be able to access it anywhere, anytime, at no cost. The software will lay the foundation for innovative community engagement that directly ties human experience to Museum quality content. The prototype will focus on activation points along the 40-mile-long Lower Grand River corridor.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


MT-277056-21

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300)
Anthony F. Arrigo (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
VR Hoover Dam: A Virtual Reality Game Exploring the History and Construction of an American Icon

Development and prototyping of an educational virtual reality experience chronicling the Hoover Dam’s construction.

A virtual reality, historically-based, photorealistic educational game centered on the construction of one of the most iconic structures in the world

Project fields:
Communications; Communications; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$99,957 (approved)
$99,803 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


MT-277057-21

University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)
Kristina Neumann (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
The SYRIOS Project: Studying Urban Relationships and Identity over Ancient Syria

Prototyping of an interactive online exhibition exploring the history of ancient Syria through coin distribution.

The SYRIOS Project: Studying Urban Relationships and Identity over Ancient Syria (Prototype) guides a public audience through exploration of the different coins and histories of the city of Antioch during the Greco-Roman period.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classical History; Near and Middle Eastern History; Public History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$98,095 (approved)
$98,095 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


MT-277117-21

SUNY Research Foundation, Albany (Albany, NY 12222-0001)
David Paul Hochfelder (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Picturing Urban Renewal

Prototyping of an interactive website exploring the history and legacy of urban renewal in four New York places.

We are applying for an NEH Digital Projects for the Public prototyping grant to continue content development and website design for Picturing Urban Renewal. This public-facing website will tell the story of urban renewal in four New York places: Stuyvesant Town in New York City; mid-sized Albany, the state’s capital and site of the Empire State Plaza; and two small cities with big urban renewal plans, Newburgh and Kingston. We selected these sites both for their rich visual and documentary record and because placing the stories of these four cities side-by-side allows us to construct a more complete and complicated picture of urban renewal and how it continues to shape our nation’s cities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Urban History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$59,914 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


MT-268897-20

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-5591)
Elizabeth L. Bradley (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
Cuffee's Trial: A Digital Graphic History

Prototyping of an interactive digital history on the New York Conspiracy trials (1741), in which both enslaved people and poor white New Yorkers stood accused of plotting to burn the city and murder its white inhabitants.

Historic Hudson Valley (HHV) requests funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to develop a prototype of a digital graphic history provisionally titled Cuffee’s Trial. This product will depict the trial of Cuffee, an enslaved man accused of conspiracy to commit arson and insurrection in colonial New York. Cuffee, who was among the first of 37 men and women to be tried, convicted, and sentenced to death for what became known as the New York Conspiracy, was the property of Adolph Philipse, the proprietor of Philipsburg Manor, a provisioning plantation that HHV now maintains as a National Historic Landmark in Sleepy Hollow, New York. Cuffee’s Trial represents both HHV’s deep expertise in relaying the history of northern colonial slavery, and our commitment to sharing this knowledge extensively through dynamic digital storytelling. The digital graphic history will become part of our constellation of “Slavery in the Colonial North” digital products.

Project fields:
African American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


MT-268924-20

gallupARTS, Inc. (Gallup, NM 87301-6205)
Rose Alexa Eason (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
The Gallup New Deal Art Website: Exploring Past & Present Perspectives in a Multi-dimensional Virtual Art Showcase

Prototyping of a new interactive website on the New Deal art collection of Gallup, New Mexico.

gallupARTS seeks $100K to prototype the Gallup New Deal Art (GNDA) website, which showcases Gallup’s expansive and impressive collection of New Deal Art. The GNDA website was planned through a 2018 NEH Digital Projects for the Public Discovery grant. Now, gallupARTS proposes to take the next step in developing the website by building a model to evaluate its content and design. The GNDA website takes a combined scholarly and creative approach to interpreting Gallup’s New Deal art in a way that both recognizes its historical significance and engages with it from a contemporary perspective, making it relevant to a diverse audience. It features a search-able database of 144 artworks and 29 artists, 4 special exhibits taking an art historical approach to the major aspects of the collection (e.g., western American art and Native art), and 7 non-traditional interpretations by creatives (e.g., artists and writers), adding dimension to the discussion.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


MT-268952-20

Texas Christian University (Fort Worth, TX 76129-0001)
Wendi Sierra (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
A Strong Fire: An Oneida Language and Culture App for Children and Families (Prototyping category)

Prototyping of an online interactive game using Oneida folklore to explore Oneida language, culture, and, philosophy.

The proposed project is an online game for elementary aged children and their parents to introduce them to and support their learning of Oneida language and culture. The game will be structured around the “Thanksgiving Address,” a traditional Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) address that thanks the earth and the environment for all that they give to humanity. The game will include narratives recounting Oneida folklore, with targeted vocabulary introduced throughout based on the content of the stories. Game development will involve collaboration with Oneida tribal organizations as well as with indigenous scholars and artists. A Strong Fire is built on two important and interrelated humanities themes: the experiencing of oral literature, and the introduction to Oneida culture and philosophy via the language, especially the Oneida belief in the Good Mind, which includes recognizing the interconnectedness of all beings and showing gratitude and respect to all beings.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies; Native American Studies

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$99,222 (approved)
$99,222 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 4/30/2021


MT-263777-19

Cahokia Mounds Museum Society (Collinsville, IL 62234-7617)
Lori Jean Belknap (Project Director: June 2018 to March 2019)
Jack Kerber (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Back to the City of the Sun

Creation of an augmented reality (AR) prototype, website, and educational resources based on the latest research and interpretation of the eleventh-century Native American settlement.

The Cahokia Mounds Museum Society is seeking this grant to develop a working prototype of a mobile augmented reality application and a new educational website that will focus on this archaeological site that is also one of 23 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country. The website will also contain educational modules for students that can be used in the classroom.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


MT-263824-19

Chicago History Museum (Chicago, IL 60614-6038)
John Russick (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Chicago 00: Ferris Wheel

Development of a project prototype using augmented reality and virtual reality to explore the history of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

The Chicago History Museum proposes to create a digital storytelling prototype that transports audiences to the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893, where fair-goers are captivated by the technological marvel of the first Ferris wheel. Using virtual and/or augmented reality to share historical images alongside contemporary scenes and extant sites, the project will relay iconic urban history in a bold new way, weaving humanities topics that explore the complexity and relevance of a defining moment in the life of a great American city. Chicago 00: Ferris Wheel will be a user-driven, broadly accessible exploration of history. The prototype process will strongly emphasize evaluation of platforms and themes to help us deliver meaningful immersive reality experiences to new audiences. By integrating evaluative moments throughout, we will identify pathways for design that maximize impact and reach. These pathways and measurement tools will be iterative and shared with peer organizations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Urban History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


MT-263872-19

Valparaiso University (Valparaiso, IN 46383-4520)
Allison E. Schuette (Project Director: June 2018 to February 2021)
Flight Paths: Mapping Our Changing Neighborhoods

Development of a prototype for a multimedia website exploring the social and economic effects of deindustrialization in Gary, Indiana, and the surrounding region.

Flight Paths: Mapping Our Changing Neighborhoods is a multi-media initiative analyzing factors that contribute to the fracturing of urban neighborhoods, communities, and regions in post-industrial America. It documents the changing racial and economic demographics of Gary and Northwest Indiana, including the rise of black political power and opportunity in the ‘60s and '70s, the flight of white residents and businesses to the suburbs, and the automation and underemployment of the steel mills. The website will animate migration of residents over time and host a curated portion of historical materials and professionally edited interviews (residents and scholars) within an interactive map of Northwest Indiana. Public media, curriculum, community forums and exhibitions will draw participants more deeply into the ongoing impact of the urban crisis and the interconnected nature of regional life. Through our partners, the project can reach over 1/2 million participants in a five-year period.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$97,792 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021


MT-263895-19

Marshall University Research Corporation (Huntington, WV 25701-2218)
David J. Trowbridge (Project Director: June 2018 to March 2022)
Walking Through History: An Open Platform for Humanities Scholars and Organizations to Reach the Public Where They Stand

A prototype of a new user interface and four mobile tours charting the history of West Virginia using the digital platform Clio.

With a prototype level grant, Marshall University will design, test, and make freely available a new authoring platform within Clio that will allow scholars and organizations to create walking tours and digital heritage trails that guide users to their next location while they listen to location-aware audio and browse related text and media. Our team will also build features requested by humanities organizations and the public that will enhance Clio www.theclio.com a free website and mobile application that connects the public to humanities scholarship related to nearby historical and cultural sites. Our team will work with community partners to create model tours, user guides, and instructional videos to assist similar organizations to utilize the new platform. Members of the team will also design requested resources and features for K-12 educators and features that will provide greater accessibility for the vision impaired.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$81,398 (approved)
$81,398 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


MT-263908-19

Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)
Wendy Cadge (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Mapping Religious Transformation in Boston’s Hidden Sacred Spaces

A mobile application, a website, and related radio programs that explore religious life in Boston through sacred spaces of public buildings.

“Mapping Religious Transformation in Boston’s Hidden Sacred Spaces” is a location based mobile application that provides an entry point for exploring how religious life in the United States is changing. It provides close readings of hidden chapels, meditation spaces, and prayer rooms that people in Boston pass daily but few stop to closely consider. In partnership with WBUR and Walking Cinema, the project focuses on three spaces in Boston: one in the port, one in a hospital, and one on a university campus. They tell the story of each, illustrating the effects of immigration, religious diversity, and the architecture of the sacred that underlie American religious change since 1950. Distinguished humanities scholars contextualize and make the project’s themes accessible. The project will create three fifteen-minute video pieces that include immersive audio and augmented reality for a mobile application; three corresponding radio pieces that will air on WBUR; and a website.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Religion, General; Sociology

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


MT-263969-19

Carnegie Hall (New York, NY 10019-3210)
Christopher Amos (Project Director: June 2018 to June 2021)
A History of African American Music: Interactive Digital Timeline Prototyping Project

Development of a website prototype and interactive timeline on the history of African American music.

Carnegie Hall requests an NEH Digital Projects for the Public Prototyping Grant of $100,000 to develop a working prototype as the next phase of an initiative to redevelop an interactive digital timeline of the history of African American music. The goal of the prototyping process is to produce an engaging and innovative resource that makes the humanities content on African American music, culture, and history accessible to a broad public audience. By engaging in an iterative, user-centered, and mobile-first design approach, Carnegie Hall intends to create a dynamic, responsive resource with multifaceted layers that can continue to grow, evolve, and be used and sustained over time. Carnegie Hall plans to relaunch the timeline prominently and support broad engagement with the new digital resource for music lovers, students, educators, and researchers worldwide.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


MT-263973-19

CyArk (Oakland, CA 94612-3017)
John Ristevski (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Resonant: Exploring Cultural Heritage through Game-based Virtual Reality

Development of a prototype of a virtual reality game exploring the ancient Native American site Mesa Verde, using existing archival three-dimensional scans.

CyArk is seeking to develop a prototype virtual reality game built on top of extensive archival 3D scans of Mesa Verde. The game, Resonant, will explore core humanities topics including connections among place, culture, and language through historical, archaeological, and cultural perspectives. Resonant will transform how cultural sites are approached and contextualized in virtual media. As learner-players unlock sections of the game, they engage in a number core humanities topics relating to place and history, as well Native American traditions and pathways and their stories today.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Native American Studies

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 5/31/2020


MT-258751-18

ETV Endowment of South Carolina, Inc. (Spartanburg, SC 29302-1970)
Betsy Newman (Project Director: June 2017 to May 2021)
Reconstruction 360

Prototyping of an interactive mobile app and website using 360-degree video to examine multiple perspectives on the impact and legacy of Reconstruction.

Reconstruction 360 will apply the elements of documentary film—interviews with historians and descendants, carefully crafted video reenactments, archival footage and music, photographs, drawings, maps, and text—to stories that represent significant Reconstruction themes. The final products will be an immersive, mobile application and a companion website that are widely available to a global audience on tablets and smartphones, bringing the Reconstruction era to life for users of mobile and online platforms at all levels of expertise. We will also develop resources for teachers and students in grades 8–12, as well as fundraising, marketing and promotion plans for implementation of the site, and outreach programming for general audiences statewide and for dissemination nationally.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$93,416 (approved)
$93,062 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 4/30/2019


MT-258876-18

Chemical Heritage Foundation (Philadelphia, PA 19106-2702)
Erin McLeary (Project Director: June 2017 to October 2021)
Age of Alchemy: The Goldsmith's Daughter

Development of a prototype of an immersive game set in 17th-century London that explores the relationship between science, culture, and history.

The Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF) is developing Age of Alchemy, a game exploring alchemy’s “Golden Age” in Europe during the 1600s. In this era, alchemy was not a fool’s quest for riches and eternal life: it provided economic opportunity, invited curiosity, and examined relationships between humankind and the natural world. Alchemy formed our current ideas about experimental scientific practices and paved the way for modern chemistry. It also impacted period literature, visual art, and music and continues to excite public imagination. Age of Alchemy draws on CHF’s collections of alchemical art and rare books to produce a visually rich and historically accurate experience, awakening empathy for past individuals who used experimental work to navigate society. During this prototyping phase, we will work with playtesters and our advisory team of experts to shape key game mechanics and assess levels of audience engagement and the successful communication of our humanities themes.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; History of Science; Women's History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


MT-258880-18

Kent State University (Kent, OH 44242-0001)
Paul Haridakis (Project Director: June 2017 to May 2021)
Layers of History: Experiencing May 4, 1970 and Its Legacy

Prototyping of an augmented reality experience on the campus of Kent State University examining the history and memorialization of the May 4, 1970, Kent State shootings.

The project aims to create an augmented reality (AR) application to engage the public with humanities themes and interpretation of historical events surrounding the May 4th shootings that took place on the campus of Kent State University in 1970, during which Ohio national guardsmen killed 4 students and wounded 9 others. The project will create a freely accessible and cross platform website that offers an augmented reality tour of important May 4 landmarks at Kent State. As we prepare for the fiftieth commemoration, this project will help visitors better understand the landscape of both memory and history of the 17.24 acres recently designated the Kent State Shooting National Landmark. By virtually reconstructing buildings and landscapes we can help visitors better understand the events of May 4 and the larger struggle to memorialize and commemorate the victims. The humanistic ideals of citizenship, free speech, protest, and excessive use of force lay at the heart of this project.

Project fields:
Communications; Communications; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$52,939 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


MT-253276-17

CUNY Research Foundation, City College (New York, NY 10031-9101)
Ramona Hernandez (Project Director: June 2016 to May 2021)
A History of Dominican Music in the U.S.

Prototyping of a website exploring the variety of Dominican music and its genres in the United States.

The CUNY Dominican Studies Institute (CUNY DSI) requests support from the NEH in the amount of $99,999 for A History of Dominican Music in the U.S., to prototype an online platform that will narrate the history of Dominican music in the United States from the 1920s to the present. A History of Dominican Music in the U.S. will expose broad American audiences to the cultural contributions and influences that Dominican musicians have had in the U.S. for almost 100 years. The current version of the project will focus on cities where Dominicans have had historically a large presence such as Boston, Miami, New York, Providence, and Washington D.C.; however, the interactive components of the site will yield other cities where Dominican music culture existed and currently takes place.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$99,999 (approved)
$99,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 1/31/2020


MT-253343-17

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Michael Abraham Epstein (Project Director: June 2016 to March 2021)
Walking Cinema: Museum of the Hidden City

Prototyping of a mobile application and website exploring the history of housing and urban design in San Francisco.

Walking Cinema: Museum of the Hidden City (MoHC) is a mobile application and walking tour exploring San Francisco’s history of affordable housing. Due to its unique mix of preservationist and progressive policies, San Francisco’s affordable housing stock spans a range of eras: from Depression Era minimalist housing blocks, to inclusionary housing in expensive new glass towers, to the largest concentration of Single Room Occupancy hotels left in the United States. The project will use this architecture and its surrounding neighborhoods as stages to show how the history of affordable housing informs present and future efforts to create shelter for all the city’s residents. Amidst numerous cranes, ubiquitous upscaling, and notorious evictions, MoHC will reveal a saga of unintended consequences for a project that may just be getting its footing in one of the most expensive cities in the country

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Architecture; Urban History; Urban Studies

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


MT-234000-16

RIT (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Owen Gottlieb (Project Director: June 2015 to April 2017)
Lost and Found: Promoting Religious Literacies through Gaming

The development of a digital prototype for a game that explores the history of medieval legal codes with an initial focus on the Mishneh Torah written by Maimonides.

This project will prototype a strategic card-to-mobile game based on medieval religious legal codes and will provide a public outreach plan. The purpose of the project is to enhance religious literacies and improve discourse about religious legal systems and increase awareness of the prosocial aspects of religious legal systems (collaboration and cooperation).

Project fields:
Comparative Religion

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,925 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


MT-234023-16

Ohio Humanities Council (Columbus, OH 43215-3857)
Patricia Nelda Williamsen (Project Director: June 2015 to November 2019)
SeeOhioFirst.org

Prototype for a statewide website and mobile application showcasing Ohio humanities and cultural resources.

Ohio Humanities requests a prototyping grant of $100,000 to expand its cultural heritage tourism initiative by developing SeeOhioFirst.org to be a comprehensive, content-rich digital portal showcasing Ohio's rich and varied humanities resources. As the home of First Peoples and the birthplace of astronauts, the human story plays out across the landscape of Ohio. The natural and built environment of the state has contributed to the national story—as a gateway to an expanding nation, as contest ground for empires and contemporary politics, as a proving ground for invention and innovation. SeeOhioFirst.org will include thematic landing pages, a searchable database, and mapping tools to provide the first curated overview of the state's historical and cultural assets. Our goal is to showcase the humanities as a civic and economic asset for the state, and by encouraging cultural heritage experiences, to stimulate the educational potential of travel.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 4/30/2019


MT-234029-16

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Tracy J. Fullerton (Project Director: June 2015 to June 2019)
Chrono Cards: American Revolution

Prototype development of two complementary card games and an educational website to engage middle school students in learning about the roots of the American Revolution.

The Game Innovation Lab at the University of Southern California requests support for the Chrono Cards: American Revolution project, a set of digital and physical card games that utilizes digital media to guide middle school students in their demonstration of historical knowledge and practice of historical thinking skills. The historical content of the games covers the causes and early events of the American Revolution. Accompanying the games are a series of curricular supports that help teachers contextualize the games and use them most effectively in a classroom environment. This prototype builds on previous work done in partnership with Microsoft Research, which resulted in a proof-of-concept for the games, Fact Fuse and Chrono Scouts.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,936 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


MT-234084-16

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-5591)
Ross W. Higgins (Project Director: June 2015 to May 2017)
Slavery in the North Website Project

The prototyping phase of a website on the exploration of the history of slavery in the north during the colonial period.

Historic Hudson Valley is requesting $100,000 to develop a prototype that demonstrates the humanities ideas, digital technology, and public outreach for an online interactive documentary tentatively titled Slavery in the North. The website will shed light on the history of slavery in the colonial North, with a focus on individual stories as a means to personalize the past. Continuing our successful collaboration with design firm C&G Partners and evaluation firm ExposeYourMuseum, HHV will use the Prototyping grant to: 1) Consult with humanities scholars, museum professionals, education advisors, and multi-media storytellers; 2) Compile and expand upon content relating to all northern colonies; 3) Refine the website structure and user experience; 4) Develop scripts and digitize selected assets; 5) Develop a website prototype; 6) Test and evaluate the user experience; and 7) Finalize the website design and technical specifications for Production.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Public History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


MT-234139-16

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Peter Der Manuelian (Project Director: June 2015 to May 2017)
Digital Giza: A New Portal to the Pyramids

The creation of a three-dimensional prototype of the Khafre Pyramid Complex for inclusion in the Digital Giza Project website.

The objective of this Digital Project for the Public (DPP) Prototyping Grant is the creation of scale-version prototype of the Giza Project’s forthcoming public website—Digital Giza: A Portal to the Pyramids (Digital Giza, for short). Using the tools of the future to study the past, this public resource will integrate diverse, primary documentation from over 100 years of international archaeological research with the most archaeologically accurate 3D immersive computer model of the entire Giza Plateau, including the pyramids, temples, settlements, and surrounding cemeteries. The result will be a powerful new online education and research tool for the world community at all levels of expertise.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Prototyping Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016