NEH banner

Funded Projects Query Form
63 matches

Program: Common Heritage*
Sort order: Award year, descending

Query elapsed time: 0.047 sec

Save this query
Export results to Excel

PY-253019-17

Citadel Military College of South Carolina (Charleston, SC 29409-0001)
Kerry Taylor (Project Director: 05/10/2016 to present)
Marina Lopez (Co Project Director: 01/19/2017 to present)

Aqui Estamos - Documenting the Latino Heritage of the South Carolina Low Country

Two days of digitizing community contributions, including personal and official correspondence, photographs, diaries, recipe books, beloved objects, scrapbooks, and other materials to illuminate the life and history of the Latino communities of the South Carolina Low Country.  The Citadel would partner with several local organizations for this project: the Special Collections department at the College of Charleston’s Addlestone Library (a local affiliate of the South Carolina Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America), the Charleston County Public Library, El Círculo Hispanoamericano de Charleston, the Hispanic Business Association, and radio El Sol AM 980.  The project would recruit bilingual volunteers from the Citadel, the College of Charleston, and Charleston Southern University to help staff the events and translate for the creation of metadata to describe the items brought in for digitization.  This project would build on an existing oral history program at the Citadel focused on the Latino community.  Of particular interest to the project organizers is the history of the development of Latino-led institutions, such as businesses, civic groups, and churches in the area.  During Hispanic American Heritage month of 2017 (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15), the project directors would return to Charleston public libraries to hold community forums to present some of the items brought in during the digitization days.

The Citadel Oral History Program is offering a series of public programs and digitization events for the Latino community. Harvest days will take place in the spring of 2017 at Charleston County libraries (Johns Island and North Charleston). The materials collected will be processed and evaluated during the summer and deposited with the College of Charleston's Special Collections. During Hispanic Heritage month of 2017, we will return to the libraries to hold community forums to present the results of the project. Citadel professors Aguirre and Taylor will draw from the materials that we gathered to facilitate discussions on immigration, identity, exclusion and belonging, community building and civil rights. The forums will attract students, workers, scholars, and activists. The materials will be shared with the public through the Low Country Digital Library. We will continue to promote "Aqui Estamos" and encourage teachers to use the collection in the classroom.

Project fields:
Latino History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,990 (approved)
$11,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253022-17

Kentucky Historical Society (Frankfort, KY 40601-1931)
Sara Elliott (Project Director: 05/10/2016 to present)

Integrating Segregated Histories

A day-long digitization event to capture documents and artifacts from two distinctive communities that remain underrepresented in the region’s historical record: the African American and Jewish residents of Hopkinsville and Christian County, Kentucky.  In partnership with the Museums of Hopkinsville, the applicant would also organize a second day-long public event with panel discussions and workshops, providing the opportunity for the project partners to share what they have learned and to engage the communities in preserving, interpreting, and commemorating their memories and stories. The panel discussions would serve to contextualize the digitized materials within broader historical frameworks, and the workshops would offer information about preserving family documents and photographs and conducting oral history interviews.

Rooted in the slave economy of the 19th century, Hopkinsville, Kentucky, has long been racially divided. Despite being a microcosm of race relations in the United States, little information and few artifacts have been collected pertaining to African American residents. In addition, there is little primary source material available about Jewish residents who acted as a bridge between the black and white communities.  "Integrating Segregated Histories," a project between the Kentucky Historical Society and the Museums of Hopkinsville, seeks to remedy this deficiency. Project partners will invite residents to a day-long digitization event to share experiences, archival materials, and artifacts. This project will also open a dialogue about the current state of race relations.  A follow-up event, including panel discussions and workshops, will place the materials—and conversations—into a larger context, showing residents how their path forward is firmly rooted in the past.

Project fields:
African American History; Jewish Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253032-17

Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (Seattle, WA 98104-2948)
Michelle Kumata (Project Director: 05/11/2016 to present)

Stories across Generations: Burmese Americans in Western Washington

A one-day digitization event for the public and complementary oral history workshops for youth and families. The project, focused on the Burmese-American community in Washington, would allow the community to gather, record, document and share its history. Despite the significant and growing population of Burmese Americans in Washington over the last three decades, this would be the first concerted effort for the community to record, document and share its history. The proposed events seek to bring to light the little-known histories and, by doing so, bridge generations and ethnic differences within the Burmese community to foster communication with and connect the broader public to the stories of this growing immigrant group.

The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience (The Wing) will present “Stories across Generations: Burmese Americans in Western Washington.” The project will bring to light untold and little-known histories of the Burmese American community through two oral history workshops for youth and their families, leading up to a one-day digitization event. This project will provide the opportunity for the region’s Burmese American community to gather, record, document and share its history. Through family stories and cultural heritage materials that span the journey from home country to refugee camp to resettlements to newly adopted home in the U.S., the project will help to foster communication and healing within the Burmese community as well as connect the broader public to the stories of this more recent and growing refugee group.

Project fields:
Immigration History; South Asian History; South Asian Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 9/30/2017


PY-252801-17

Universidad del Este (Carolina, PR 00984-2010)
Jaime Partsch (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Recovering Memories: Canovanas Constructs Its History

Two community digitization days in Canóvanas, a city in the northeastern part of Puerto Rico, to collect photographs and memorabilia from area residents.  The project would bring together the municipal government of Canóvanas, the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture, and the Universidad del Este, whose library staff would be in charge of archiving and describing the items brought in for digitization.  The project would invite community members to document the economic and cultural aspects of the town’s history, highlighting its transformation from a small sugar cane outpost to a complex “bedroom community” on the fringes of San Juan.  The digitized images would be exhibited and presented in four venues: the Piñero House Museum, the Public Library in the Campo Rico sector, the town square, and the Municipal Center for Aging.  A workshop is also planned for local public and private schools, entitled “Interpreting Images: Our Town in History.”


"Recovering memories: Canóvanas constructs its history" is a collaborative effort of the Jesus T. Pinero Library and Research Center of the Universidad del Este, the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture and the Municipality of Canóvanas designed to record this history and a wide-scale discussion of the major cultural and economic changes that have marked the area.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253034-17

Connecticut State Library (Hartford, CT 06106-1569)
Christine Pittsley (Project Director: 05/11/2016 to present)

Remembering World War One: Sharing History/Preserving Memories

Fifteen digitization day events across the entire state of Connecticut to collect materials related to the state and its population’s involvement in the First World War.  The state played a role in the war effort from the beginning as a major manufacturing hub for firearms and as the home of the U.S. Navy’s first submarine base.  The applicant also notes that this history represents diverse communities, as many African Americans from the South and European immigrants came to work in the factories.  Digitized items would be housed in the Connecticut Digital Library, which is also a hub for the Digital Public Library of America. Along with the digitization days, public events would include lectures related to Connecticut and World War I, with a focus on the particular communities in which the events are held.

This  project is based on the commemoration of the First World War. Working with partners across the state, the State Library will conduct Digitization Day events to surface privately held photos, letters and keepsakes that tell the stories of individual men and women who served during the war. These objects and stories are often held by children of WWI veterans and are in danger of disappearing, as younger generations no longer have ties to the people and events associated with these objects. Through digitization we will preserve them for generations to come.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Military History; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,329 (approved)
$11,329 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 4/30/2018


PY-253042-17

Southern Oregon University (Ashland, OR 97520-5001)
Maureen Battistella (Project Director: 05/11/2016 to present)
Victoria Sturtevant (Co Project Director: 12/28/2016 to present)

Legacy Labor: Making a Living on the Land in Southern Oregon

The development of community historical archives through digitization days and community forums, which will document the agricultural and timber heritage of southern Oregon. Through the digitization of family photographs and other publicly held artifacts, the project would document the dramatic change of Oregon’s landscape over the past century, including the transition away from a timber economy to industrial agriculture and urban development. The project would increase awareness of southern Oregon’s occupational folklore heritage, improve access to important cultural documents, and support partnerships between the Josephine County Historical Society, local public library systems, and the Southern Oregon University. The collected images, artifacts, and stories of heritage farm families and loggers would enrich local and regional collections, provide content for research, enhance pride of place, and showcase the state’s rich heritage. The project would be organized by a consortium of local organizations, led by the Southern Oregon University’s Hannon Library, county 4-H programs of the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, Jackson County Library Services, and Josephine County Historical Society.

Southern Oregon's landscape has changed dramatically over the last hundred years. Historic family farms have yielded to housing developments, pear trees have been pulled out to plant vineyards, and timber is nearly played out. The Legacy Labor project is designed to document a way of life that may be lost to memory because of cultural, political, and economic pressures. Legacy Labor organizes humanities-based community forums about the region's agricultural and timber heritage, digitizes family photos and artifacts, and develops rich historical archives for public use. The project is designed to increase awareness of heritage agriculture and timber work life and to enhance the importance of preserving and sharing community values. Legacy Labor: Making a Living on the Land in Southern Oregon focuses on the work life heritage of two contiguous, largely rural counties in Southern Oregon: Jackson and Josephine counties.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Public History; Sociology

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253045-17

Catawba County Library (Newton, NC 28658-3331)
Siobhan Loendorf (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Hmong Heritage Collection

Five digitization days and a variety of public programming events to capture the memories and artifacts of Hmong community members in Catawba County, just east of North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains.  Home to the fourth largest population of Hmong immigrants in the United States, Catawba attracted many refugees from Laos after the Vietnam War.  This project seeks to document the experiences and contributions of the Hmong community through a partnership between the Catawba County Library, the Historical Association of Catawba County, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, and two community organizations, Hmong Southeast Puavpheej and Hmong Carolinas, Inc.  Members of the Hmong community would be invited to digitize their documents, photos, and letters, and encouraged to provide oral histories for future generations.  All of the cultural heritage items, digitized with permission, would be saved on the library’s computer network and published via the Digital Heritage NC website to enable broader public access.  Among other public programs planned, the library would host a presentation in June 2017 to showcase traditional Hmong dances and clothing.

The Catawba County Library will collaborate with the Historical Association of Catawba County and the Digital Heritage Center of NC to collect and curate a digital collection of the Hmong community's cultural heritage, making it accessible to the public by publishing the collection on the Digital Heritage website.  The library will host five collection days to gather materials and capture oral histories of our Hmong community members.  To further inform our larger community about Hmong traditions and history, the library will host three adult programs and three book discussions.  Hmong cultural heritage is currently underrepresented in our cultural institutions. This project recognizes the value of their culture and the importance of their history of migration and community building. The goals of this project are aligned with the mission of the local Hmong community organizations to secure and preserve Hmong art and culture and to practice, promote and coordinate cultural activities.

Project fields:
Cultural History; East Asian History; Immigration History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


PY-253047-17

Athens Regional Library System (Athens, GA 30606-6331)
Angela Stanley (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to 01/03/2017)
Rikki Chesley (Project Director: 01/03/2017 to present)

African American History in Athens, Georgia

Three day-long digitization events to document and preserve historical sources relating to the African American experience in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia. The digitization events would each be held at different venues, including the East Athens Resource Center, the historic First A.M.E. Church, and the Athens-Clarke County Library, and the materials would be accessible online. With this project, the applicant aims to address the paucity of historical materials chronicling the lives of black Athenians in the region’s cultural institutions. The events would not only build out the collections that tell the stories of local residents, but also facilitate the community stewardship of the materials that document these stories, including photographs, scrapbooks, funeral pamphlets, church bulletins, and other objects, mementos, and artifacts. In order to provide deeper understanding of the experiences of African Americans in the region, public programs would also take place. Author Michael Thurmond would discuss his book A Story Untold: Black Men and Women in Athens History, and tours would be offered of the African American section of the Oconee Hill Cemetery, the First A.M.E. Church, and the Morton Theater in downtown Athens. Also planned are a course on researching ancestry taught by the President of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society and presentations on how to preserve, access, and use digitized items.

Spared Sherman's wrath but not the havoc of Great Cities, Athens' Black residents and their historic neighborhoods have fought for their existence.  With the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, the applicant wishes to aid in the digitization of privately held historical sources relating to the African American experience in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia, at a series of three day-long digitization day events. These scan days will take place at the East Athens Resource Center; the historic First A.M.E. Church; and the Athens-Clarke County Library, where patrons will be able to convert special A/V formats using our conversion equipment.  Digitized material would be made available to the public with donor permission via our partnership with the Digital Library of Georgia and the Digital Public Library of America. The project would also include a public lecture series and tours of Black historic sites led by partner groups.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,962 (approved)
$11,962 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253056-17

Western Kentucky University Research Foundation (Bowling Green, KY 42101-1016)
Brent Bjorkman (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Communities Old and New: Documenting and Preserving the Diverse Cultural Heritage of South Central Kentucky

A “Community Heritage Day” to digitize photographs, documents, and artifacts that reflect the histories of the diverse communities in the city, which encompass refugees and immigrants from close to 30 countries. The applicant would also offer educational programming at this event, including lectures by local scholars, and workshops to provide advice on preservation and storage techniques for photographs, paper, and other objects. Building on the success of The Bosnia Project, for which the applicant partnered with the Bosnian-American community in Bowling Green to document, preserve, and present their stories and artifacts, this project aims to further enhance awareness of the traditions held within their numerous rich and vibrant immigrant and refugee communities and engage these communities in sharing and preserving their heritage.

South Central Kentucky's community is diverse and growing.  Due in large part to the efforts of the International Center of Kentucky in Bowling Green, immigrants from nearly 30 countries have been resettled in the region.  Long-time resident or newcomer, the area is home to a longstanding African American community, substantial Bosnian, Burmese and Hispanic populations, and a soon to arrive group of Syrian refugees, to name a few. The Kentucky Folklife Program is dedicated to documenting, presenting, and conserving the diverse traditional culture and heritage of the Commonwealth.  Housed at Western Kentucky University, KFP wishes to capitalize on its growing partnerships with the Kentucky Museum and WKU Library Special Collections to host a "Community Heritage Day" that celebrates these vibrant communities while helping to document, digitize, and preserve their story.  Event programming will also enrich and complement separate planned programming on Bowling Green's Bosnian community.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253057-17

Centre College of Kentucky (Danville, KY 40422-1309)
Amy Frederick (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Remembering Our Past: Preserving the Soul of Second Street through Digital Images

A digitization event, community conversations, workshops, and an exhibition to preserve and provide access to photographs and historical documents that chronicle the town of Danville during the 1920s through the 1970s, a time during which its historic Second Street was the “heartbeat of the African American community” in segregated Boyle County, Kentucky. The applicant would digitize family photographs and documents during the Soul of Second Street Festival and in subsequent months would offer a series of community conversations led by representatives from partner organizations: the Danville/Boyle County African American Historical Society; the Boyle County Public Library; and the Heart of Danville Main Street Program. A day-long workshop on how to care for paper, photographs, textiles, and other objects would also be provided at the Public Library, and the project would culminate in a multi-site, interactive exhibition of the collected materials during Black History Month in 2018.

From the 1920s to the 1970s, Danville, KY's Second Street district served as a vibrant hub for the surrounding African American community to socialize, shop and worship. Providing a communal space for those living in segregated Kentucky, the area fostered entrepreneurial success and social cohesion. Unfortunately, urban renewal efforts in the 1970s destroyed many of the buildings that provided the structure for this community. Recently, local organizations have begun to research and reclaim the stories of Second Street and Centre College faculty and students have begun to incorporate this work into internships and classes. Through the digitization of photographs during the Soul of Second Street Festival; the development of a public digital archive; public discussion on the importance of preserving local history; and a multi-site exhibition of the collected photographs, a Common Heritage grant would support efforts to better understand, record and share this vital piece of history.

Project fields:
African American History; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,438 (approved)
$10,438 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253058-17

Appalachian State University (Boone, NC 28608-0001)
Kristen Baldwin Deathridge (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Preserving and Sharing the Story of the Lincoln Heights Rosenwald School

A one-day digitization event to document memories and artifacts from the alumni and community of Lincoln Heights, a Rosenwald school for African Americans in Wilkesboro, North Carolina.  In operation from 1924 to 1968, the school was saved from demolition by an active community group, Lincoln Heights Recreation Corporation, that would join with staff and students from Appalachian State University to collect memorabilia about the school and explore its history as the largest school for African Americans in the surrounding counties and the only one that remains standing in the region.  This local history would contribute to the broader understanding of the rural school building program, funded by Julius Rosenwald at the behest of Booker T. Washington, in an effort to improve the quality of public education for African Americans in the early 20th-century South.  During the digitization event, several speakers would share the history of Rosenwald schools, as well as the community history of Lincoln Heights.  A screening of Aviva Kempner’s 2015 documentary Rosenwald would be followed by a talk from Mary Hoffschwelle, professor of history at Middle Tennessee State University, on the national significance and current status of Rosenwald schools.

Lincoln Heights is a large Rosenwald school for African Americans in Wilkesboro, NC. Open from 1924-68, Lincoln Heights educated and employed black southerners through the Jim Crow Era and the height of the 20th century Civil Rights Movement. Since its closure, alumni and community members have been working to preserve and share their story and have invited members of Appalachian State University's history department and library to assist in that mission. This one-day event will involve digitizing artifacts associated with the school provided by the alumni, and public programming will include stories about those artifacts as well as their memories about growing up in the Appalachian Mountains. We will also screen the documentary Rosenwald and follow it with a talk on the Rosenwald school building program to provide national context for this local experience.

Project fields:
African American History; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,877 (approved)
$9,877 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253067-17

Field Museum of Natural History (Chicago, IL 60605-2827)
Neal Matherne (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Homeland Memories: From the Philippines to Chicago

Three digitization and preservation events, held at the Field Museum, on heritage collections care and the preservation of language, cultural practices, and family traditions for the Filipina/o community in and around Chicago. The applicant, in partnership with the Chicagoland Filipina/o community, would digitize heritage items such as photographs, clothing, documents, as well as stories documenting Filipina/o diasporic history in the Chicago area from the mid to the late 20th century. Each event would feature local and national experts to discuss themes centering on the Filipina/o American experience. The final event would present a preview of the project’s contributions to the Digital Heritage Portal and feature a roundtable discussion by historians and anthropologists to further discuss the connections between identity, conservation, and memory.

In the next phase of Field Museum of Natural History's Digital CoCuration Initiative, the Chicagoland Filipina/o community is invited to preserve and share heritage items via the Museum's Digital Heritage Portal (online research collection). This co-preservation project is a part of our ongoing association with Chicago Filipina/o Americans who wish to preserve homeland culture as well as promote intergenerational dialogue and local history in the diaspora. Since 2015, members of the local Filipina/o community have joined us in cocurating our Philippine Heritage Collection of over 10,000 items from the early 20th century. In this next phase of cocuration, Chicagoland Filipinas/os will have the opportunity to share their heritage by bringing homeland objects for digital camera rendering, documents for scanning, and stories and performances for recording.  Three events are scheduled for these activities during March, July, and November 2017.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,987 (approved)
$11,987 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253069-17

Kern Community College District (Bakersfield, CA 93301-4014)
Oliver Rosales (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Digital Delano: Preserving an International Community's History

The planning and implementation of four public events to include digitization of community collections and outreach programs to raise awareness of the history of agriculture in Delano County, California. The Kern Community College’s Bakersfield College Delano Campus Library would collaborate with local cultural heritage organizations, including the Filipino American National Historical Society, the Friends of Allensworth Committee, and the Delano Historical Society. Each event would help preserve and facilitate a deeper understanding of the community’s Filipino, African American, Mexican, and European immigrant past, while raising awareness of the community’s rich history of labor organizing and agricultural development.

"Digital Delano: Preserving An International Community's History," enacts a series of digital archival recruitment events led by the Bakersfield College Delano Campus Library (BCDCL).  A new addition to the BC satellite campus, the BCDLC will work with local organizations to expand the digitization of cultural heritage materials related to Delano's diverse international migration history.  Our partner organizations represent connections to important local and diverse community constituents for recruitment of historical artifacts and ephemera.  These organizations include the Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS); Friends of Allensworth Committee; and Delano Historical Society.  Each organization will assist facilitating digitization campaigns to preserve the community's Filipino, African American, Mexican, and European immigrant past, in turn, advancing understanding of this California agricultural community's common heritage regarding its international migration past.

Project fields:
American Studies; Immigration History; Labor History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253074-17

Hampton University (Hampton, VA 23668-0001)
Maureen Elgersman Lee (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

African-American Material Culture in Williamsburg, Virginia

Two digitization days to collect a wide variety of historical, primary documents held by African Americans living in Williamsburg and adjacent James City and York counties in Virginia.  Faculty at Hampton University, with support from the Williamsburg Regional Library, would hold two community information sessions prior to the digitization days to convey their interest in collecting personal papers, to include letters, diaries, diplomas, and ephemera.  A survey of local collections of African American materials reveals that fewer papers have been preserved than historic objects and photographs.  This project aims to correct that imbalance and strengthen the historical record of African American life in the region.  The documents and metadata would be uploaded to a dedicated project website, which would go online in conjunction with a final public program to discuss the community’s contributions.

Hampton University, with support from Williamsburg Regional Library, proposes a 2017 project to digitize African-American material culture in Williamsburg, Virginia. The pilot project, which will run from January to December 2017, will focus on digitizing a wide variety of papers (including letters, diaries, advertisements, diplomas, baptismal certificates, etc.). The project's phases comprise 1) two community information/orientation meetings in February, 2) two public digitization events in May, 3) six months (June to November) of studying, organizing, creating metadata,and 4) a public celebration in December where project results and significance will be shared. Additional funding will be sought to support web hosting costs.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,975 (approved)
$11,975 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253076-17

Cleveland Restoration Society, Inc. (Cleveland, OH 44115-2746)
Kathleen Crowther (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

The Lee-Harvard Heritage Project

A project to document African-American cultural history through informed community storytelling and the digitization of heritage materials that chronicle the history of the Lee-Harvard neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio. The project builds on ongoing work by the applicant to conduct oral histories with elders in the Lee-Harvard neighborhood. The applicant would offer two public events. The first would be a public presentation by scholar Todd Michney on his research into the settlement of the black middle class in Cleveland that would lead into community storytelling; the second would be a community digitizing event. Digitized materials, including photographs, letters, scrapbooks, newspaper clippings and other documents, would supplement oral history video footage already obtained by the ongoing project and would be made available online through the society’s website and that of its partner Cleveland State University and the Cleveland Memory Project website.

What started as a classic historic preservation survey project for the Cleveland Restoration Society has evolved into a humanities project of sweeping importance. Built-up after WWII, the Lee-Harvard neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio, became the preferred "suburb in the city" for the emerging African-American middle class. Many of Cleveland's leaders have rich memories of growing up there. The Lee-Harvard Heritage Project will preserve and celebrate the story of this important neighborhood through digitization of cultural heritage materials and storytelling events that bring people together. Humanities scholar Dr. Todd Michney will provide the contextual framework. The emerging stories of Lee-Harvard promise to enlarge the understanding of African-American history in the industrial cities of the North during the twentieth century. This work aligns with the National Park Service's commitment to prioritize sharing the stories of underrepresented communities.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Architecture; Cultural History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253077-17

Naperville Heritage Society (Naperville, IL 60540-6517)
Louise Howard (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Embracing Community Change: Naperville's Contemporary Story

A series of digitization events to gather oral histories and digitize 2D items with a connection to the history of Naperville, Illinois. The project would focus on Asian immigrant communities in the city, which grew exponentially in the mid-20th century with the expansion of infrastructure and technical industries in the region but which remain underrepresented in the city’s cultural institutions. In partnership with the Naperville Public Library, and directed by community input, the applicant aims to collect, preserve, share, and reflect on the stories of Asian immigrant communities in Naperville with public digitization events and related programming. The latter would include workshops on collections care, an exhibition of collected materials, a guest lecture and community comment session, and a tour of significant local areas led by scholars and representatives from Naperville’s Asian communities.

Naperville Heritage Society will partner with Naperville Public Library to conduct public digitization sessions and programs to document and share the history of Asian immigrant communities in Naperville, Illinois. The project will: preserve the stories of community residents through oral histories and digitization of materials documenting their experiences; establish deeper relationships between the Naperville Heritage Society and Naperville's Asian immigrant communities, especially its Indian and Chinese community groups and residents; share digitized materials with the public through the Naperville Heritage Collection in the Illinois Digital Archives; offer related public programs, including a temporary museum exhibit, guest lecture and community comment session, and bus/trolley tour led by humanities scholars and representatives of local Asian communities; and identify future steps needed to effectively collect, preserve and share Naperville's history, directed by community input.

Project fields:
History, General; Immigration History; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253079-17

Litchfield Historical Society (Litchfield, CT 06759-0385)
Linda Hocking (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Preparing for the 300th: Litchfield Connecticut Community Digitization Project

In preparation for the town of Litchfield’s 300th anniversary, the Litchfield Historical Society (LHS) would hold a digitization day to collect materials about the town and its history, with a focus on highlighting the community’s artifacts.  Litchfield is the site of an early law school whose alumni include Aaron Burr and John C. Calhoun, and homes designed by modernists, such as Breuer, Neutra, and Durell Stone, for the New York elites who summered in the town.  At the same time, the economy of Litchfield also relied on dairy farming and manufacturing.  Recognizing that its collections to date include more items related to Litchfield’s wealthier and seasonal residents, LHS would present an online exhibit based on newly digitized materials that would be inclusive of the wider community.  Public programming events would include a personal digital archiving day, preservation workshops, and a walking tour.

The Litchfield Historical is seeking a $12,000 Common Heritage Grant for a project which will launch its participation in the town of Litchfield's 300th Anniversary Celebration in 2019. LHS will partner with the Connecticut State Library (CSL) to gather, digitize and manage material held in private hands in an effort to more fully document all areas of Litchfield history. By focusing on documents, photographs, recordings and oral histories that are important to current residents the digitization project will bring the shared memories of the community to LHS, sending the clear message that we care about what the residents see as significant to the town's history. LHS will gain rich material documenting twentieth and twenty-first century Litchfield for use in the planned 300th Anniversary exhibition, as well as future online exhibits and publications.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


PY-253081-17

Makah Cultural and Research Center (Neah Bay, WA 98357-0160)
Janine Ledford (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Neah Bay Community Digitization Project

The organization of four community digitization events and three public programs, which will facilitate cultural exchange within this Native American community and an interpretive exhibit of photographs. Members of the Neah Bay community will be invited to bring manuscripts, books, maps, drawings, photographs, slides, audio recordings, and other important resources to be digitized. In addition, programs would educate members of the public about protecting cultural heritage from high humidity, earthquakes, and tsunamis, to which this region is particularly susceptible. With permission, community items would be made publicly available through the Makah digital library and the Washington tribal cohort of the Sustainable Heritage Network.

The Neah Bay Community Digitization Project will preserve and protect cultural heritage resources by having at least 4 digitization parties. Community members will bring their manuscripts, books, maps, drawings, photographs, slides, audio recordings and other important resources to get digitized. This project will also develop at least 3 cultural heritage programs to increase and enhance knowledge and education about the Neah Bay Community: 1) Cultural exchange between community members and the Pacific University ‘Lend A Hand' Program 2) Makah Day Photo Exhibit with interpretive panels. 3) PowerPoint Presentation for the community revealing digitized resources along with a lecture from a Makah historian. This project will preserve collections from natural disasters. The Neah Bay community is boarded by the Pacific Ocean and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Both bodies of water have earthquake fault lines according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253084-17

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Sophia Sotilleo (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Preserving the History of Lincoln University Village

A digitization day to help chronicle the history of Lincoln University, the first university for African Americans, and of Hinsonville, Pennsylvania, the town founded by free Blacks where it resides.  Many of the university’s alumni were involved in important historical moments, such as the Civil War and the Philadelphia trolley boycott.  Lincoln University would work with the Chester County Historical Society to hold the “Heritage Day.”  All digitized content would be made available to the public through the University’s website.  Public events would include walking tours of the campus, lectures by notable historians such as Henry Louis Gates, a community-wide reading campaign, and a culminating exhibit to showcase the digitized content.

This proposal addresses the critical need to document the personal, professional, and civic experiences of the people whose lives contributed to the founding of Lincoln University, PA. Descendants of residents of Hinsonville, an early settlement of free African American landowners and farmers, now Lincoln University, will be invited to bring family memorabilia—including photos, funeral programs, articles, Bibles and other family documents—to be digitized and catalogued. This "Heritage Day" will be open to the public and held in the Langston Hughes Memorial Library. It will provide participants with free digitized copies of family memorabilia and of oral interviews conducted by program consultants and students trained in oral history interview procedures. Heritage Day will be integrated with a series of genealogy and oral interview workshops, a Heritage Speakers Series, Heritage Walking tours of Lincoln University's campus and surrounding areas, and a community wide reading campaign.

Project fields:
African American History; History, General

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253089-17

University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
Nicholas Allen (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Remus, Celie, and Me: Preserving and Presenting the History and Life behind the Literature of Putnam County

A day of local history programming centering on Putnam County, Georgia, and its literary figures, Joel Chandler Harris and Alice Walker, with community stories and heritage documenting a shared history. With the goal of engaging the local community to expand understanding of the region’s history during the tumultuous end of segregation and the struggle for Civil Rights, the project would build on institutional relationships between the University’s Wilson Center for the Humanities and Arts, the Georgia Virtual History project, the Putnam County Charter School System, and the Georgia Writers Museum. In an earlier pilot, the applicant has worked to identify characters and places in Harris’ Uncle Remus tales and to connect them with documentary information found in the Putnam County archives, including Works Project Administration interviews of former slaves. The applicant has also been using Walker’s work in the local schools to study segregation and civil rights and has conducted 75 oral histories with community members. The proposed project would use the works of Harris and Walker to widen the “lenses through which the past can more fully and meaningfully come alive.” Documents and photographs provided by community members would be digitized and oral histories recorded. Also planned are public readings of works by Harris and Walker, talks by local history scholars, and a preview of a play on the history of the region that is currently in production. Finally, the collected materials would be exhibited at the Georgia Writers Museum and made available through the Georgia Virtual History website.

Putnam County is where both Joel Chandler Harris and Alice Walker were born to learn hard lessons about the world around them, a world they changed in literature. Our project is part of an embedded commitment to involve the larger community in telling its own stories, both as context for, and document of, this crucial American literary landscape. The grant will allow us to plan, promote, stage and share a day of local history programming in spring 2017, with an exhibition and website.  The local history day event will include stations for scanning documents and photographs, recording oral histories, listening to local music and public readings from selected pieces specifically relating to Putnam County by Joel Chandler Harris and Alice Walker, as well as talks by local history scholars, and a preview of one short segment of a local history play being produced in conjunction with this larger project.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253094-17

Friends of Mount Auburn Cemetery (Cambridge, MA 02138-5517)
Bree Harvey (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Mount Auburn Cemetery: Preserving Community Memories

Two digitization days for photographs, documents, artifacts, and ephemera related to the 100,000 people buried at Mount Auburn Cemetery, and preservation workshops for participants. Notable figures buried there include Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Buckminster Fuller, and Isabella Stewart Gardner.  The Friends of Mount Auburn Cemetery would contact those on file for family lots and graves, as well as partner with community organizations to publicize the events, which will also include workshops on preservation, digitization, and preserving digital collections.  Materials digitized would enhance a mobile app currently under development, which uses GPS coordinates to document the graves and monuments and which includes biographical and historical information about those buried at the cemetery.

The Friends of Mount Auburn Cemetery (FOMAC) seeks a Common Heritage grant to host two digitization days which will aid in the discovery and digitization of a range of archival cultural heritage materials held by the public that help to tell the story of Mount Auburn Cemetery and the 100,000 people buried and commemorated here. Consultants from the Northeast Document Conservation Center will hold two separate but programmatically identical "digitization days", one each in Cambridge and Watertown, Massachusetts, organize digitization, and create metadata. Digitized materials will be provided free of charge to the public who bring in their documents and artifacts and, with permission, will be used as interpretive and educational content for Mount Auburn's new free Mobile App as well as shared on the Digital Commonwealth. FOMAC will also hold a series of public programs to highlight the importance of preservation and provide additional context for the digitization process.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Urban History; Urban Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253100-17

Ferguson Library (Stamford, CT 06901-2312)
Elizabeth Joseph (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

Tell Your Story

Six events to digitize materials related to targeted groups within Stamford, Connecticut, including African Americans, Latinos, European immigrants, women, and veterans.  At these events, library staff and consultants would record oral histories and then digitize items such as photographs, letters, memorabilia, and audiovisual materials that supplement those stories.  The oral histories and digitized content would be made available through the library’s digital archive as well as an onsite exhibit.  Lectures by local historians would be scheduled to coincide with each digitization event, and topics would be selected to feature targeted communities, such as early settlers, Jewish immigrants, and local artists.  Docent-led tours of the final exhibit would also be offered.

If America is a nation of immigrants, then Stamford is America in microcosm. From its original 29 Puritan settlers to today's population of 125,000 (36% of whom were born outside the United States), Stamford has been home and haven to generations of immigrants to America. "Tell Your Story" is a series of day-long digitizing events at the library's Digital Lab that will capture resident's lives through interviews, diaries, photos, letters, souvenirs and other cultural/historical artifacts in order to preserve and understand the cultural history of this vibrant city. The project will also be part of the city's anniversary celebration, 375 Years Strong, as well as Stamford Through the Years, a visual exhibit of images and text winding throughout the floors of the Library during 2017.  Contributors will receive a digitized copy of their content to keep, and the entire digital contents will be shared with the CT Digital Archive, CT State libraries, and the Digital Library of America.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; Urban History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/30/2017


PY-253109-17

Massillon Museum (Massillon, OH 44646-6633)
Heather Haden (Project Director: 05/12/2016 to present)

World War I Community Archives Project

A digitization event, co-sponsored by the Massillon Museum and the Massillon Public Library in Ohio, to document stories about the community’s wartime involvement in the First World War and help the families preserve heritage materials and maintain digital archives, which chronicle their relatives’ role in the war both at home and abroad. Building on extensive experience digitizing photographs and other cultural items and organizing exhibitions centered on digitized materials, the applicant would exhibit collected heritage items and arrange related programming such as school tours, gallery talks, and a panel discussion with scholars and community members regarding the region’s engagement in WWI.

To prepare for an exhibition aligned with the centennial of the US involvement in World War I, as well as to engage the community, county-wide, the Massillon Museum plans to facilitate a digitization event augmented by related programming. The community repositories of social, industrial and military histories can be further mined for important documentation that will not only elucidate existing narratives, but create new links with fresh and relevant perspectives connecting history to our current realities. Museum professionals will work with local experts to execute the digitization efforts and public programs, in which patrons and citizens can share their stories and voices to recognize the wartime involvement of men, women, and families of Stark County residents.  As a publicly funded institution, the Massillon Museum honors its responsibility to commemorate community members who fought in WWI, and to share best practices for preserving both oral histories and material culture.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253110-17

Appalshop, Inc. (Whitesburg, KY 41858-0743)
Caroline Rubens (Project Director: 05/13/2016 to present)

The Hills Remember: Preserving Heritage in an Appalachian Coal Community

A two-day digitization event at the Mountain Heritage Festival in Whitesburg, Kentucky, to document the community’s photographs, artwork, objects, and artifacts and preserve the Appalachian region’s historical record during a period of socio-economic transition, as communities confront challenges involved in moving beyond traditional lines of livelihood following the cessation of coal production. The applicant would select digitized items to highlight on a curated project web page, augmenting images with description of the project within the context of eastern Kentucky’s cultural heritage. To facilitate discussion and build appreciation of local heritage and cultural stewardship, the applicant would organize two additional public events: a “Home Movie Day” during which newly digitized film and video would be screened to the public and a culminating project ”showcase” at the applicant’s 2018 Seedtime on the Cumberland Festival.

Building on a sense of place that is deeper than its Appalachian coal seams while confronting the limits of a fossil fuel based economy, Letcher County, Kentucky, is in a moment of transition. The proposed project will build upon local efforts to increase sense of agency and appreciation for the community's heritage and assets. It will result in the digitization of vernacular photographic materials, artwork and  3-Dimensional objects, historical paper records and audiovisual materials provided by members of the public and gathered as a result of community engagement, public programming, and digitization events. By catalyzing the area's cultural assets, the project will increase local capacity through activities that safeguard and celebrate both the archival materials collected and the wellspring of community expression and traditions.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253117-17

St. Thomas University (Miami Gardens, FL 33054-6313)
Larry Treadwell (Project Director: 05/13/2016 to present)

The Catholic Experience in South Florida History: A Catholic Heritage Harvest & Event Series

A day-long event to digitize historical photographs and artifacts held by the St. Thomas University community and members of the Catholic schools and parishes in the Archdiocese of Miami. The project would document the rich religious and cultural lives of South Florida Catholic communities, the earliest of which date to the mid-19th century and which encompass Cuban, Haitian, African American, and Peruvian groups and raise awareness of the region’s long-standing Catholic heritage.  Following the event, the digitized materials--including photographs chronicling feasts, processions, festivals and shrines, and devotional objects such as baptismal gowns and sacramental mementos--would be displayed online, and a selection of collected photographs would be curated and exhibited in a second public event. Programming related to the exhibition would also include lectures centering on themes such as religious and cultural identity, Catholicism and American Culture, as well as discussions by community members highlighting the ways in which cultural heritage connects Catholics to their religious and cultural pasts.


To facilitate a deeper understanding of the cultural diversity in the Catholic history of South Florida, St. Thomas University Library will invite members of the campus, parishes, and schools in the Archdiocese of Miami to digitize historical photographs and artifacts that reflect their Catholic experience in South Florida. The Catholic Heritage Harvest digitization event will unearth photos depicting Catholic celebrations or family traditions, and religious documents, objects, and memorabilia. Items will be displayed online in a Digital Collection and exhibited at the Archbishop John C. Favalora Archive & Museum alongside its Catholic heritage collections. Educational programming will include a preservation workshop, a talk on connecting with one's Catholic origins through photographs, community speakers discussing their harvested items, and a talk on topics chosen by the community. Participants will connect with and appreciate their Catholic cultural heritage.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Ethnic Studies; History of Religion

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,912 (approved)
$11,912 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-234009-16

Pennsylvania Highlands Community College (Johnstown, PA 15904-2949)
Barbara Zaborowski (Project Director: 06/09/2015 to present)

Families Forever: A Cambria Memory Project

A series of community digitization events focusing on the immigrant history of Cambria County, Pennsylvania, through the collection of family photos, mementos, and artifacts. The Cambria County Historical Society, St. Francis University, the Johnstown Area Historical Association, and the Pennsylvania Highlands Community College would each serve as a scanning location and host cultural programs for the public, to include presentations entitled Healing African Dance, Pennsylvania German Groundhog Lodges, and Sevdalinka: A Musical Tour of Bosnia. In addition to the cultural heritage programming, Pennsylvania Highlands Community College in Johnstown would offer two workshops on how to handle and preserve family items using simple preservation materials readily available to the public.

Cambria County, Pennsylvania has a rich history of ethnic immigration. Families in the county have amassed historical relics brought from their native countries by grandparents and great-grandparents. In addition, there is a strong sense of family and genealogy. Many ethnic social organizations exist to keep alive the traditions of these various old world countries. This project will focus on capturing family photos, mementos, and artifacts in digital format. The digital images will be uploaded into a statewide repository, PowerLibrary, which will be a part of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). In order to generate interest in this project, a combination of social media, traditional print, and outdoor advertising will be used. A comprehensive series of public programs will also be offered to reinforce care and treatment of family heirlooms and the history of immigration. This project will highlight best practices and serve as a model for other organizations.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Immigration History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,222 (approved)
$4,222 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234215-16

Whittier Public Library (Whittier, CA 90602-1730)
Paymaneh Maghsoudi (Project Director: 06/18/2015 to present)

A Time of Transition: Whittier Communities in the Post-War Era

A region-wide series of public programs and a digitization event hosted by the Whittier Library and the Whitter Museum that would solicit cultural heritage materials from local citizens documenting the important history of postwar Whittier, California, and its rapid suburbanization. Employing established local networks and staff of the library and the museum, the project will support two public programs featuring a presentation of the library’s holdings and a lecture about the region’s history. A culminating event at the library would feature a slideshow and contextual interpretation of the public’s digitized artifacts, which would be on display permanently in the Whittier’s digital archives.

This project will encourage community members to contribute to the library’s digital collections photographs, documents, ephemera, and artifacts representing the post-war era in Whittier (1940s-1960s). Bilingual promotional materials and invitations to community leaders will be used to focus outreach on Whittier’s Latino community, which makes up 66% of incorporated Whittier, 77% of South Whittier, and 87% of West Whittier. Programs will highlight Whittier’s Latino population during a time of transition in Whittier history. A population explosion, the development of ranch and orchard land into suburban housing, and the extension of the 605 freeway into West Whittier are examples of major changes to be explored in public programming. This project will build on the California State Library grant-funded Shades of Whittier digitization project, as well as the recently-awarded ALA grant “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History,” to diversify Whittier's digital archives.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Latino History; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,951 (approved)
$11,951 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/4/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234231-16

Humanities Texas (Austin, TX 78701-1506)
Michael Gillette (Project Director: 06/22/2015 to present)

East Texas History Harvest

The creation of a “community collection” of primary source documents related to the local and regional history of East Texas with free, online access to the collection via the Portal to Texas History, and an array of public programming events, developed in partnership with local educational, historical, and cultural institutions. Programming would include a traveling exhibition featuring the collected material and a regional historical documentary produced by the Texas Archive of the Moving Image. The East Texas History Harvest would be the third in a series of four pilot programs organized by the applicant. Building on previous successes, the application includes detailed plans for the digitization event, including volunteer training materials and extensive community outreach strategies.

Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), recently initiated a series of pilot History Harvest programs, collaborating with Texas communities to document local, regional, and national heritage.  Humanities Texas seeks a $12,000 Common Heritage Grant from NEH to organize a History Harvest in East Texas in early fall 2016.  Partnering with representatives from local institutions, Humanities Texas will coordinate a day-long event, inviting residents to bring historic photos, letters, and other materials for scanning and preservation and producing a significant public collection of digitized materials documenting East Texas heritage.  The program will not only strengthen ties within the community, but also illustrate the importance of the area’s history.  Subsequent programming based on the collection will provide the community with a great understanding and appreciation of its past, as well as a desire to preserve and share their knowledge.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, General; History, Other

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PY-234249-16

Sonoma State University (Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609)
Adrian Praetzellis (Project Director: 06/23/2015 to present)

Amache Digitization Project

A one-day digitization event to be held at the Sonoma County Japanese American Citizens’ League for former internees of the Amache Japanese internment camp located near Granada, Colorado, and their descendants. Digitization would be organized by staff of Sonoma State University’s Anthropological Studies Center (ASC); items to be digitized would include photographs, documents, posters, and three-dimensional objects. Audiovisual materials would be digitized off-site at the ASC. Scanned images would reside in the Amache Museum’s digital image collection; many would also be available to the public on the Amache Preservation Society website. Public programming would be centered on the theme of art and creativity, and would consider the objects of beauty created by internees in such difficult circumstances. Programming would consist of an art exhibition of digitized images five months after the digitization day, and a presentation by co-directors of the digitization project on research at Amache before it.

The documents, photographs, artwork, and other mementos and artifacts created at Colorado’s WWII internment camp, Amache, are cherished by the Amache community—a multi-generational population linked by their ties to the incarceration of people of Japanese descent. These objects represent the resilience, creativity, and ingenuity of the internees and provide insights into their experiences. The Amache Digitization Project will preserve and share the experiences and heritage of the Amache community. The Project will digitally preserve these tangible objects of heritage so that descendants can distribute and cherish them for generations to come and the public can appreciate the lessons and insights they contain. Public programming will highlight the topic of art and creativity behind barbed wire by exhibiting particularly evocative items in a gallery as well as online. This will allow them to be recognized and valued as important pieces of art while celebrating the stories and legacies of the people who created them.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234262-16

Edisto Island Historic Preservation Society (Edisto Island, SC 29438)
Gretchen Smith (Project Director: 06/23/2015 to present)

Edisto Island History Harvest: Unearthing the Buried Treasures of Sea Island Culture

A presentation on the richness of local cultural heritage, as well as a community digitization day to capture images, artifacts, and documents in the possession of local residents. Building on the Edisto Island Historical Society’s current efforts to improve documentation of the history of the island’s long-established African American population, the project outreach and programing would target the African American community. The public program would feature Mary Elliott, project historian for the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, presenting on the history of Edisto Island and the significance of the slave cabin donated by the historical society to the Smithsonian. The digitization event would take place at a local historically significant African American church and include a celebration of African American influences on local culture through food, crafts, and history. Where permission is granted, all digitized materials will be made public through the Edisto Island Historical Society and Lowcountry Digital Library websites.

The Edisto Island Historic Preservation Society (EIHPS) serves the Edisto Island (E.I.) communities and is proposing two events to reach out to community members to capture local history and cultural heritage. The first event will be the History Hiding in Plain View public program to foster an understanding of the significance of community member’s cultural heritage and family histories and to demonstrate the need to digitally preserve their artifacts. The second event will be a History Harvest Festival to digitize historic and cultural materials provided by communities in and around E.I. These events will serve to greatly expand knowledge of E.I.’s rich history to local and virtual audiences. The events will also serve as a crucial opportunity for the EIHPS to diversify both its membership and audiences through an emphasis on digitizing historic materials that are connected to E.I.’s significant African American history and culture.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,938 (approved)
$11,938 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


PY-234270-16

University of Idaho (Moscow, ID 83844-9803)
Devin Becker (Project Director: 06/23/2015 to present)

Preserving the Recent for the Future: Generating the Latah County Common Heritage Collection through Community Digitization

Collaboration between the Latah County Historical Society and the University of Idaho Library to conduct the digitization of materials related to the history of Moscow, Idaho (home to the University of Idaho), and public programming on digital history sources and community archives. The project would center on a digitization day and a public launch event including lectures on local history, as well as two exhibits that would be displayed at both partner institutions. A digital collection of scanned cultural materials would be preserved by the university and made publicly accessible.

The University of Idaho Library (UI Library) and Latah County Historical Society (LCHS) will host a day-long Common Heritage Event and additional public lectures on digital scholarship and community archives in Moscow, Idaho. The event will enable community members to work with the UI Library's experienced staff to digitize and create metadata for their cultural heritage materials. These materials will eventually become the Latah County Common Heritage Digital Collection, which will be made available online through the UI Library's website. Afterwards, we will host a digital collection launch party that will feature local experts on themes that emerged from the materials and the importance of community-generated archives. Two physical exhibits will also be created to feature materials from the collection. Together, these events will benefit future study of Idaho history by collecting historical materials that document underrepresented eras in both the UI Library and LCHS collections.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,974 (approved)
$11,539 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234322-16

Mead Public Library (Sheboygan, WI 53081-4563)
Debbra Voss (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Preserving the History of Sheboygan Through Digital Images

A series of community digitization events at several cultural heritage organizations in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, to preserve personal photographs, letters, memoirs, posters, artwork, and other privately-held sources documenting the history and culture of the region. The materials would be made accessible via “Recollection Wisconsin,” a statewide digital repository that contributes content to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). The applicant would also collaborate with the Sheboygan County Historical Society and Museum to develop an exhibit that would featuring selections from digitized sources and also host a six-part series of public lectures on local history by the director of the Sheboygan Historical Research Center. Finally, the curator of a local historic property, the Wade House, would offer a related set of public events entitled “Restoring the Past,” inviting visitors to participate in hands-on historic restoration activities.

This project offers individuals the opportunity to have digitized their historical photographs, documents, and works of art that have a City of Sheboygan connection. Items previously digitized by any publicly accessible digital archive will be excluded. A series of scanning days will be held throughout the grant period, on-site and off-site, to ensure the greatest opportunity to capture these images. Individuals will be encouraged to sign a Deed of Gift so these images can be included in the Ozaukee & Sheboygan Memories digital database. This database will be harvested by Recollection Wisconsin, which will soon become a hub of the Digital Public Library of America. Collaboration with the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center, Sheboygan Museum, and the Wade House will connect the community with its past through presentations and exhibits on how this unique history shaped and influenced not only the lives of current day residents but extended to national and international borders.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,802 (approved)
$10,716 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234324-16

University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)
Laura Treat (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Spotlight on North Texas

A one-day digitization event to preserve moving-image-related resources related to the history of Denton, Texas, which was a vibrant commercial and amateur film community in the early to mid-20th century. Free, online access to the digitized material would be available via the Portal to Texas History. Public programming at venues across the state would be developed in collaboration with the Texas Archive of the Moving Image (TAMI). Through public screenings and discussion events, an exhibit on Texas media history, and the Web portal, the project would contextualize the historical materials and prompt audiences to consider the cultural importance of historical preservation, with a special emphasis on home movies and commercial films.

The University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries seek $11,840 to provide access to the rich visual histories of Denton, Texas.  This project will support the digitization of community materials related to the motion picture history of Denton, TX including 40,000 feet of film, 300 hours or videotape, and 1,000 documents. The project will support access and education by providing unrestricted online access to digitized content and public programming that will situate Denton with Texas’s film history.  Denton has a long but unexplored history of commercial and amateur film production dating to 1913 when the city funded a film about their town, Denton: City of Education.  Unfortunately, this history has not been preserved or collected.  By focusing on materials related to our filmic past – home movies, amateur film, advertisements, posters, and photographs – we will illuminate the value of locally created records and redefine how small towns like Denton contributed to film history.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Public History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,840 (approved)
$11,536 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/1/2017


PY-234326-16

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center, Inc. (New Bedford, MA 02741-2052)
Laura Orleans (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Salted, Pickled, or Smoked: Preserving and Presenting the Cultural Heritage of New Bedford’s Fishing Community

A day-long digitization event and subsequent follow-up to preserve cultural heritage materials held by members of the New Bedford area fishing community, and attendant public programming. The applicant would partner with the University of Massachusetts, Boston, which has run the “Mass Memories Road Show.” University staff would provide support during the digitization day and would also train volunteers. Images would be stored in the University’s digital collections, as well as at New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center, the Digital Commonwealth, and the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). Items anticipated for scanning include photographs, documents, and artifacts. Public programming would have three themes: sustaining community, life on shore, and life at sea. Programs would include presentations by members of the fishing community before the digitization day event at the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center; a workshop by New Bedford Public Library staff on proper archival storage on the day of the event; and an exhibit of digitized materials after the event.

The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center proposes to digitize the cultural heritage of the local fishing community. Commercial fishing is often a family activity with skills and knowledge passed from one generation to the next. Consequently, much of this history resides in the photo albums, documents, and artifacts of fishing families. This project will digitize these materials through a day-long public event in combination with “house calls” to digitally document materials from individuals who are unable to attend the event. The project will be bookended by a variety of public programs which will serve to inspire community participation, evoke memories, and provide an interpretive framework for materials that are brought forward. Digitizing these materials, making them publicly available, and using them to tell the story of the fishing community will create a lasting legacy for families who have spent generations working the water in what is one of the nation’s oldest occupations.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Folklore and Folklife; Labor History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2016 – 2/28/2017


PY-234356-16

ACCESS (Dearborn, MI 48120-1556)
Elyssa Bisoski (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Impacting Dearborn: The Arab American Community

A digitization event, open to the general public, to gather personal collections relating to the history of Dearborn, Michigan, and a community oral history event. The project would provide for a one-day scanning event, complemented by information on preserving family documents and photographs, coordinated by experienced museum staff and community volunteers. That event will be followed by a community-focused community storytelling and spoken word event, which will highlight the cultural history and contributions of notable Dearborn residents. The Arab American National Museum (AANM), in conjunction with the Lebanese American Heritage Council and the Dearborn Historical Society, would coordinate and sponsor these events in Dearborn, which has the highest percentage of Arab Americans of any city in the United States.

The goal of this project is to tell an accurate story about the Arab American community’s continued impact on Dearborn, MI. Dearborn has the highest percentage of Arab Americans of any city in the country. The diverse Arab American community has been a part of Dearborn for nearly a century, creating positive impacts on the city’s economy and cultural landscape. Despite many media depictions, non-Arab residents in Dearborn live peacefully side by side with their Arab American neighbors. This project will help Arab Americans feel pride in their community and will demonstrate, to a local and national audience, the invaluable contributions of the diverse and vibrant Arab American community. To accomplish this, we will partner with two community institutions, the Lebanese American Heritage Club and the Dearborn Historical Society, to capture, preserve, and share images and stories about Dearborn from both Arab and non-Arab residents.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 3/31/2017


PY-234360-16

Troy State University Main Campus (Troy, AL 36082-0001)
Martin Olliff (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Wiregrass Common Heritage Project

Digitization of materials about the Wiregrass region, which spans southeast Alabama, southwest Georgia, and northwest Florida, and public programs including a workshop on African American genealogical sources in Alabama. The applicant would partner with the Dothan Landmarks Foundation and Houston-Love Memorial Library to host two community scanning days, post digitized items to the Alabama Mosaic repository, provide public programming intended to engage residents of this region, and commemorate the history of the region, named for the tough grass that fed cattle. While preserving the history of this under-documented region, the project would also provide community training in recording and capturing community archives.

The Wiregrass Archives (WA) of Troy University, working with the Dothan Landmarks Foundation and Houston-love Memorial Library, will host two community scanning days in Dothan, AL. Five scanning teams will digitize and capture Dublin Core metadata from community-supplied photographs and documents. Scanned copies will become property of the WA, which will post them to its website and social media sites, and submit them to the statewide digital database, Alabama Mosaic. WA will provide scanned copies to community donors via thumb drives. A metadata consultant and scanning supervisors will train and supervise scanning team members, and we will recruit local senior citizens to provide historical content information and context about scanned images and documents. WA will host training, two community workshops on preserving family archives and African American genealogical sources, and a project summary presentation. WA will build a traveling exhibit of appropriate scans.

Project fields:
Public History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,997 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234362-16

Grand Valley State University (Allendale, MI 49401-9403)
Melanie Shell Weiss (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Growing Community: A Century of Migration in Oceana County

Events that would preserve and raise appreciation for community history in Oceana County, Michigan. The project would be undertaken via a collaboration between Grand Valley State University's Special Collections and Archives and the Kutsche Office of Local History, the Oceana County Historical and Genealogical Society, and El Centro Hispano de Oceana. Building on extant community relationships, the Kutsche Office would gather historical materials and oral histories from Latino elders and youth through a one-day “history harvest” event. The project would also present a series of community dialogues, which would take place during Hispanic Heritage Month, about the history of immigration in Michigan.

This project aims to build community among residents of Oceana County, Michigan, by holding a "history harvest" to gather in migrant family histories from across the region. A collaboration among El Centro Hispano de Oceana, the Oceana County Historical and Genealogical Society, and Grand Valley State University, this effort will: 1) Build connections between Latino elders and youth through an engaged planning process; 2) Bring together seasonal migrants and year-round residents to document and preserve their diverse experiences and family histories; 3) Preserve these histories so that they will be accessible to future generations; and 4) Use these materials as the basis for a community dialogue as part of Hispanic Heritage Month Celebrations 2016. Themes in this exploration will include migration, labor, religion, family, belonging, national and cultural identities, language, and citizenship. It will also help foster a shared sense of community across ethnic and class lines.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,522 (approved)
$11,522 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PY-234371-16

South Dakota State University (Brookings, SD 57007-0001)
Jessica English (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Preserving Historic Hobo Day

The gathering, digitization, preservation, and appreciation of materials related to “Hobo Day,” a fall homecoming celebration at the South Dakota State University. Held annually in Brookings since 1912, “Hobo Day” not only reflects the history of the university but also demonstrates wider community response to political and cultural changes in South Dakota, providing more than a century of annual snapshots of culture in the central Plains. This project would expand the documentation of the Hobo Day celebration, currently known only through annual yearbooks, to include a wealth of other, community-held materials never systematically collected, including flyers, buttons, newspaper clippings, personal photographs, and firsthand accounts. Collected items would be preserved in digital form by the university libraries and made available through an online exhibit; an accompanying lecture on the history of Hobo Day would interpret the event in the context of regional history.

The South Dakota State University Archives will engage the local Brookings County public with “Preserving Historic Hobo Day” educational lecture and digitization events to collect, preserve, and provide online access to a new body for research on how the local, regional, and University’s social and cultural expression has changed throughout the past century as demonstrated through the enduring Hobo Day tradition. The public will gain new insights into their families’, friends’, and neighbors’ involvement in this community event, and discover ways in which the Brookings County community has been forged, strengthened, and adapted through this annual tradition. Partnering with the Brookings Area Genealogical Society and the SDSU Alumni Association for “Preserving Historic Hobo Day” events is a first step toward developing and sharing resources for sustainable, digital local history preservation of the regional public’s documents, photographs, oral histories, and audiovisual materials.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,987 (approved)
$11,987 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234397-16

Town of Westborough (Westborough, MA 01581-1902)
Maureen Ambrosino (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Westborough: Your Town - Your History

A day-long digitization event preserving historical documents held by community members and related to the town of Westborough, Massachusetts. The event would build on the recent discovery of a trove of documents dating to before the Revolution. Those documents and the story of their discovery and preservation would be featured in a showcase program for the public before the digitization day. The digitization event would be staffed by consultants from BiblioTemps, a service of the Massachusetts Library System; consultants would advise on copyright and digitization best practices. Following the digitization day would be the screening of a film of the event that would include a presentation by a local historian on the significance of the digitized items, as well as testimonials from members of the public about their materials. After the digitization event, the applicants would also create an online exhibit featuring the digitized items. The digitization day and subsequent programming would be timed to coincide with the 300th anniversary of the founding of Westborough in 2017.

A collection of historic documents recently discovered in Town Hall has given the Westborough Public Library the opportunity to reinvent its local history services and become an “Access Hub” to historic materials held by other institutions and individuals in town. To build these services, the Library will use a Common Heritage Grant to create programming using the theme “Your Town – Your History,” to show the links between the discovered documents and the history that residents are creating now. We'll ask residents to look through their homes for historic materials about Westborough and bring them to a daylong event where they can be digitized. The images will then be added to the Library’s new Digital Repository. At a follow-up program, an historian of New England life will discuss how the images collected on that day add to our understanding of Westborough’s history, and we'll debut a film and online exhibit created as part of the event.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234421-16

Knox College (Galesburg, IL 61401-4999)
Laurie Sauer (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

Struggle and Progress: Documenting African-American History in Galesburg, Illinois

The digitization of privately held historical sources relating to the African American experience in the western Illinois city of Galesburg, which served as a stopping point along the Underground Railroad in the 19th century. Among the materials anticipated for digitization are memoirs, photographs, news clippings, and records from African American businesses and churches documenting the local black community’s participation in the Civil War and World War I, along with 20th century civil rights activities and daily life in the community. New content would be contributed to digital collections maintained by a statewide academic library consortium. The project would also include several public programs, including a media production of the digitization events, an exhibition of selected sources gathered from the community, a public lecture, and a panel discussion bringing together humanities scholars and community members at the Galesburg Public Library.

Knox College and its partners propose to document the experience of African American citizens in Galesburg, Illinois. The project will offer three community digitization days; the resulting digital objects and associated metadata will enrich a publicly accessible digital repository entitled Struggle and Progress. Five public humanities events will be offered over the grant period, from the screening of video from the community digitization days, to a lecture on the history of African Americans in Galesburg, to an Oral History Story Day, at which citizens who contributed objects for digitization will discuss their particular experiences, personal and family stories of struggle and progress. Themes about African Americans to be explored include civic, social, religious and business life; participation in wars; prejudice, discrimination; segregation, integration; public education; and voting rights. The project goal is to enhance a sense of inclusiveness in the Galesburg community.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,700 (approved)
$10,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


PY-234429-16

Montgomery County Museum and Lewis Miller Art Center (Christiansburg, VA 24073-3537)
Samantha Parish (Project Director: 06/24/2015 to present)

The People, Places, and Things of Montgomery County, Virginia

Three community digitization events held at the Montgomery-Floyd Library, the Newman Library at Virginia Tech, and the Montgomery Museum in Christiansburg, soliciting privately held resources documenting the history and culture of Southwestern Virginia. The final event would coincide with the museum’s yearly Heritage Day celebration and feature a presentation to interpret selected objects contributed at the events. The digitization events would also provide community members with information on the basic care of their cultural objects. Archival preservation materials would be available to attendees to protect fragile ephemera, documents, and photos. This project would involve multiple community partners including staff and students from the University Libraries at Virginia Tech.

Exploring the intersections between material culture, family and community forms the basis of “The People, Places, and Things of Montgomery County, Virginia,” a cultural heritage project focusing on preserving local history. The utilization of objects in this project to spur memories will allow public opportunities of camaraderie and reflection, resulting in successful educational and collaborative community efforts. These free events will aid in adding valuable information to our historical knowledge base by examining historical and communal connections from within family heirlooms, photos and documents. An introductory lecture followed by two, day long events of digital documentation of personal objects will conclude with a session facilitated by a public historian providing commentary on selected items brought in by the public. Participants will be given a free digital copy of their object, and the opportunity to include those items on a public website dedicated to the project.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,213 (approved)
$9,953 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 8/30/2016


PY-234437-16

Holyoke Public Library Corporation Incorporated (Holyoke, MA 01040-4858)
Eileen Crosby (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Nuestros Senderos: Las Historias de Nuestras Vidas en Holyoke [Our Paths: Stories of Life in Holyoke]

Two day-long digitization events in predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods of Holyoke, Massachusetts, to digitize cultural heritage materials held by members of the Latino community. The applicant would target community organizations and elders, and would hire both a short-term outreach consultant and a bilingual outreach assistant. Digitized materials from the digitization days would be made available to the public with donor permission through Massachusetts’ Digital Commonwealth portal. At a public program event following the digitization days, speakers from Hunter College’s Center for Puerto Rican Studies and the University of Puerto Rico would present on Puerto Rican and Latino history in the United States and Holyoke. Displays created by community members illustrating their experiences and incorporating digitized materials from the digitization days would also be included in the public programming. In addition, oral histories would be gathered at the public program event, and attendees would have the opportunity to make written contributions to a collection that would be preserved in the History Room of Holyoke Public Library.

The history and culture of Holyoke, Massachusetts, are marked by its role as the destination of people seeking new opportunities. While many Irish, Polish, and Canadian immigrant family stories are preserved at our library, those of Holyoke's numerous families of Hispanic heritage (nearly 50% of the current population) have never been systematically gathered or preserved. This project, “Nuestros senderos: Las historias de nuestras vidas en Holyoke [Our Paths: Stories of life in Holyoke],” aims to begin to rectify that omission by reaching out to community members of Hispanic origin and inviting them to share their family histories through photographs and documents at digitization events, by partnering with local cultural organizations to promote these events and to identify cultural heritage materials in their possession, and by sponsoring a set of talks by scholars that will place the experience of migration to Holyoke in historical context.

Project fields:
Latino History; Public History; Urban History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


PY-234441-16

Queens Borough Public Library (Jamaica, NY 11432-5242)
Natalie Milbrodt (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

50 Years of Integration: Personal Impacts of Demographic Changes on Shifting Neighborhoods in New York City

A project exploring the impact of demographic changes over the last 50 years in Queens and Brooklyn, New York, through digitization events, community history programs, and marquee events organized by the Queens Borough Public Library and the Brooklyn Public Library. The project would focus on six distinct neighborhoods, including Astoria, Corona, and Flushing in Queens and Bushwick, Carnarsie, and Sunset Park in Brooklyn and would ask residents, both old and new, to share personal histories, pictures, memorabilia, and artifacts. These stories and objects would be digitized in neighborhood events and made accessible both on site, at the Archives at Queen’s Library or at Brooklyn Public Library, and on local Web portals. Follow-up history programs in each of the participating neighborhoods would further explore and contextualize the archived stories and digitized materials. Two marquee events would conclude the project; researchers, scholars, and community members would present and discuss the collaborative work resulting from previous events. Through these varied programs, participants would gain a deeper, multilayered understanding of the history of their neighborhood and its residents.

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 had a profound impact on the demographic map of the US. Breaking from the immigration policies of the past, the law gave a nearly equal shot to newcomers from every part of the world and is still palpable today, especially in Queens and Brooklyn neighborhoods where it has resulted in the integration of immigrant communities that we see today. Queens Borough Public Library (AKA Queens Library) in collaboration with Brooklyn Public Library will select 6 neighborhoods that have witnessed significant demographic changes in the past 50 years. Through 12 digitization events, 6 community history programs, and 2 marquee events, intergenerational residents will be invited to digitally deposit their personal stories and artifacts and develop a deeper perspective of the history and people of their neighborhood that will further understanding and help create an inclusive, accepting environment beneficial to established residents and newcomers alike.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Public History; Urban History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


PY-234444-16

Clearwater Public Library System (Clearwater, FL 33755-4029)
Linda Rothstein (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Discovering Clearwater's Hidden Treasures

As part of the city’s centennial celebration in 2016, the Clearwater Public Library in Florida would hold digitization events at its five branches to capture residents’ historical documents, photographs, and artifacts. Following the digitization events, each branch would host a lecture to reveal the items discovered, featuring local history experts discussing the history of Clearwater and the branch’s neighborhood. Digitized materials would be made available via the library’s Pinellas Memory Project website. As one of the earliest points of contact between the Old World and the New, Clearwater’s history includes unsuccessful Spanish missions, railroad development, the sponge industry, and beach tourism. Each of the five library branches represents a unique constituency, including: an area mainly frequented by tourists with a small number of permanent residents; a planned community; a Spanish-speaking enclave; and one of Florida's first suburban neighborhoods.

In celebration of its centennial anniversary and as an extension of its “Pinellas Memory” project, the Clearwater Public Library System proposes the digitization, description and display of historical documents, photographs, artifacts and oral histories by the residents of the city. In order to accomplish this goal, the library would hold a digitization event at all of its five branches, each of which represents a diverse section of the city. The library would subsequently stage a lecture at each branch to reveal to participants and the public what items were discovered during the digitization event and how they relate to the history of the city. After indexing and tagging, items digitized at each event would be made available to the public via the library’s Pinellas Memory Project website (http://pinellasmemory.org/).

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$10,314 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234446-16

Montclair Historical Society (Montclair, NJ 07042-0322)
Juandamarie Gikandi (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Nubian Heritage Quilters Exhibition, Workshops, and Digitization Project

A collaborative project between the Montclair Historical Society and the Nubian Heritage Quilters Guild to recognize the contributions of African American quilters and to educate members of local quilting guilds, as well as the community in and around Montclair, New Jersey, on the importance of documenting and preserving quilts and quilting traditions. The project comprises three interrelated parts: an exhibition of quilts and interpretations of their historical context; demonstrations of quilting and instructions on quilt preservation; and a digitization event during which the quilts will be photographed. The digital images would be made available on the New Jersey Digital Highway. Primarily highlighting the work of community quilters, the multiple events would integrate exhibition with preservation training and information exchange regarding quilting techniques and traditions.

This joint project of the Montclair Historical Society and the Nubian Heritage Quilters consists of 3 components that work in concert to recognize the contributions of African American quilters, keep the tradition alive through demonstrations and workshops, educate people on preserving their works, and create a digital database of African American quilts. The project includes 1) an exhibition of traditional quilts paired with modern African American interpretations enabling a side-by-side exploration of the historical context for modern quilts; 2) demonstrations and workshops on quilting and quilt techniques that foster the spread of knowledge about African American material culture and quilting in the community; and 3) a digitization event where members of the community will share the provenance of their quilts, have them digitally photographed for their own use as well as for public availability on the New Jersey Digital Highway, and receive materials to protect and preserve them.

Project fields:
African American History; Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 9/30/2016


PY-234452-16

South Asian American Digital Archive, NFP (Philadelphia, PA 19107-4719)
Samip Mallick (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Our Stories: South Asian Americans in Los Angeles

A series of public programming events and digitization sessions located in two Los Angeles neighborhoods with cultural and historical resources that illuminate what it means to be South Asian American. The project would raise awareness of South Asian American heritage by strengthening established community networks and raising awareness through the South Asian American Digital Archive. The events would feature lectures by historians, stories drawn from the South Asian American Digital Archive, and a slideshow and discussions centered on the artifacts digitized during the program.

“Our Stories: South Asian Americans in Los Angeles” seeks to uncover the undocumented, under documented, untold and little-known histories of Los Angeles’ South Asian American communities in two key neighborhoods: “Little India” in Artesia, CA and “Little Bangladesh” in Koreatown. At community venues in each location, SAADA’s Executive Director and a Board Member, together with 3 students from UCLA’s MLIS program, will host digitization days in which community members will bring in materials for digitization and share stories about their relationship to these objects. The digitization events will be immediately followed by a public presentation in which SAADA staff and volunteers will contextualize the newly digitized materials within the larger narratives of South Asian American history. Selections of the digitized materials will then be made available through SAADA’s website, (http://www.saada.org), the world’s largest digital repository of South Asian American community history.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Immigration History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234453-16

Black Archives of Mid-America, Inc. (Kansas City, MO 64108-1644)
Glenn North (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Kansas City Digital Encyclopedia Project: Jazz Age and the Great Depression, 1918 - 1941

The digitization of community photographs, letters, employment records, artworks, and artifacts pertaining to the African American experience in Kansas City, Missouri, during the early 20th century. The applicant would collaborate with the Kansas City Public Library, which would make the sources accessible via its Kansas City Digital Encyclopedia Project. The Library would also ensure that digital items could be found through the WorldCat bibliographic network as well as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). In cooperation with the American Jazz Museum of Kansas City, the applicant would also offer public lectures by area scholars and musicians about the history of Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression and would sponsor screenings of films held by the Jazz Museum, including the documentary “Women in Jazz.”

The Black Archives of Mid-America is an institution that showcases Kansas City’s rich socio-cultural history through the preservation of valuable documents, photographs and objects. Through a strategic alliance with the award-winning Kansas City Public Library, it has increased its ability to present insightful scholarly and artistic programming to the Midwest region of the United States and beyond. This exciting partnership calls for the Black Archives of Mid-America to support the Kansas City Public Library in the “Kansas City Digital Encyclopedia Project.” The next planned series will highlight the period of 1918-1941, with a specialized focus on the Jazz Age and the Great Depression, and will be supported through community digitization events and associated programming. This project exposes community members to important historical information and allows participants to protect the integrity of artifacts through digitization, while further developing a sense of belonging.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,624 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234454-16

Marquette Regional History Center (Marquette, MI 49855-4204)
Kaye Hiebel (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Sisu Stories

Digitization events and community exhibits in Marquette County, Michigan. The project would support the digitization of family documents and photographs. In order to serve a larger segment of the population in the largely rural county, digitization events will be held in two communities. The project would collect community stories as well as personal and family documents. Following the digitization days, an exhibit based on the contributed materials would be presented at the Marquette County History Museum, along with a series of public events including curator talks, poetry readings, musical performances, and commentary on community history in local newspapers. The proposed events would be organized around the concept of “Sisu,” a Finnish word for determination and perseverance in the face of adversity, and would contribute to understanding of the Finnish American legacy in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

The Marquette Regional History Center will utilize the theme Sisu Stories for our project. Sisu, a Finnish word, describes the character of the people living in our region, a dynamic, persevering and resourceful people, who are shaped by this challenging environment. This deep connection between the people and the landscape will be central to our project. A unique cultural identity has emerged through time. We will use this theme to promote the digitization project as well as the exhibit and related programming. We have chosen to offer this project to the whole county as the population is spread out through this rural area. Marquette County is the largest county in Michigan and as such will require two locations for digitizing materials to make it more accessible for those living in outlying areas to the west of Marquette. The digitization events will take place in the fall of 2016.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,745 (approved)
$11,745 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234457-16

Gallaudet University (Washington, DC 20002-3600)
Jean Bergey (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Capturing Deaf Heritage

A day-long community event hosted by the Center for Deaf Documentary Studies in collaboration with the Gallaudet University Archives to further the documentation of the American Deaf community’s cultural heritage. Through digitization, the project would gather historical materials, including personal photographs, family letters, documents, artifacts, and 3D objects. The event would feature four workshops—free, bilingually (ASL/English) accessible, and open to the public—on topics including: Cultural Heritage Material in Research and Public History presented by a staff member of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, Artifacts and Cultural Heritage by a museum specialist from the Gallaudet University Museum, Individual Collections as Community Heritage by faculty from the Center for Deaf Documentary Studies, and Recovery Stories by a faculty member from the Department of English who would provide a brief study of how individuals’ text stories are put into context for the public.

Gallaudet University’s Common Heritage project Capturing Deaf Heritage combines community outreach and programming with capture and preservation of primary source material. This day-long event hosted by the Center for Deaf Documentary Studies (CDDS) in collaboration with the Gallaudet University Archives will increase appreciation for and stewardship of the American Deaf community’s cultural heritage. Capturing Deaf Heritage day will use best practices and Archival expertise to reach individuals who often do not recognize that personal images and collections have value to the wider community and to researchers of U.S. history. The digitization and workshop day is slated to coincide with Gallaudet University’s Homecoming weekend in October 2016 for maximum community participation. In addition to Gallaudet faculty, staff and students, Homecoming typically draws 2,000 deaf people to campus from many states. This application requests $12,000 for digitization equipment and supplies.

Project fields:
History, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234464-16

Oyster Bay Historical Society (Oyster Bay, NY 11771-2317)
Philip Blocklyn (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Preserving Community Collections: The Oyster Bay Historical Society’s Documentation of a Congregation’s Cultural Heritage

A day-long event at the Oyster Bay Historical Society in Oyster Bay, New York, to digitize the cultural heritage collections of the Hood African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church and to hold a series of three public programs: a walking tour of the 1850s church, its Pine Hollow Cemetery, and the surrounding historic district; a community roundtable on the uses of primary sources in researching family history; and a workshop on best practices in preservation. The church’s collections encompass materials such as correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, journals, diaries, genealogies, and military records that chronicle its members, who descend from free local African-Americans and from families from Virginia who relocated to Oyster Bay in the mid-20th century. The digitized materials would be made accessible on the website of the historical society and on the Long Island Memories website sponsored by the Long Island Library Resources Council. The public events aim to highlight the role of church members in the development of Oyster Bay in the 19th and 20th century and their participation in a broader national historical narrative through military service in the American Civil War. The project would create new and extend existing connections within the Oyster Bay community.

The project invites congregants of the Hood A.M.E. Zion Church in Oyster Bay, NY, to a day-long event, organized by the Oyster Bay Historical Society, to digitize that community’s cultural heritage materials. The event’s primary goals are to preserve the community’s personal collections and make them a resource to be shared by their own members and by Historical Society members, visitors, and researchers. Access to the digital collection will be available through the Historical Society’s web site and through the Long Island Library Resources Council’s Long Island Memories web site. A series of public programs in the weeks following the event will provide a workshop on best practices for preserving personal collections; a walking tour of the Zion Church, its Pine Hollow Cemetery, and a six-block historic district of the hamlet as part of the New York Landmarks Conservancy’s Sacred Sites Weekend; and a community roundtable on the uses of primary sources in researching family history.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$10,249 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 10/31/2016


PY-234476-16

University of Central Florida, Orlando (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Connie Lester (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Harvesting the Histories of Three Diverse Central Florida Communities

“History Harvests” documenting three Central Florida communities: the town of Cocoa Beach in the 1960s and 1970s; Orlando’s LGBT community; and the African American community of Parramore. Cocoa Beach’s photos, maps, postcards, menus, and documents would illuminate Florida’s Space Coast and Cape Canaveral. All digitized materials would be made available with permission in the University of Central Florida’s RICHES (Regional Initiative for Collecting the History, Experiences, and Stories) Mosaic Interface and via local presentations at Cocoa Beach Public Library, Parliament House, and Jones High School. Documenting these three Florida communities would add texture to the public’s understanding of the diversity within the state.

The Regional Initiative for Collecting the History, Experiences, and Stories (RICHES™) of Central Florida proposes funding for History Harvests in three diverse communities in the Central Florida area: the space-age community of Cocoa Beach in the 1960s and 1970s, the Orlando LGBT community at the Gay destination site of Parliament House, and the African-American community of Parramore. The materials collected through the three History Harvests will be made available to larger communities in four ways: RICHES Mosaic Interface™, the project database https://richesmi.cah.ucf.edu ; local presentations at Cocoa Beach Public Library, Parliament House, and Jones High School; a workshop on RICHES and History Harvests at a meeting of a national historical organization (NCPH, OAH, or SHA); and a journal article.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,719 (approved)
$11,683 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234482-16

Seneca Nation of Indians (Salamanca, NY 14779-1362)
Tami Watt (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Seneca Historic Photo Collection Project

In a multi-departmental collaboration lead by their Media and Communications Center, the Seneca Nation of Indians will coordinate the digitization and cataloguing of historic photographs, prints, and audio-visual materials at community events throughout western New York State, including the March of the Nation, the Marvin Joe Curry Veterans Pow Wow, and the Cornplanter Descendants Reunion. With the Nations’ knowledgeable elder population dwindling and in recognition of significant visual gaps in the historic narrative, the project aims to preserve history and produce community-driven content while also creating stronger relationships among community members and fostering collaborations. The resulting collection of digitized media will be exhibited at the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum to promote community dialogue and interest in stewardship and history.

Native American communities traditionally rely on community activities for sharing of their cultural heritage and history. The Seneca Nation of Indians, in a multidepartment collaboration lead by the Media and Communications Center, will collect historic community photos. A digitization team will coordinate collection booths at community events throughout the year with digitization and cataloguing commencing on site during the events. The Seneca Nation of Indians finds great value in collecting and preserving visual records for the community, as each year there are fewer elders who lived during significant events in Seneca history. The collection will be exhibited at the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum with the goal of promoting participants and the whole community as stewards of the Seneca Nation’s history. In the spirit of conversation based programming, this project will spark community dialogue and interest in history and stewardship.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,398 (approved)
$11,398 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


PY-234492-16

Trustees of Davidson College (Davidson, NC 28035-7149)
Jan Blodgett (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

History Homecoming Day: Digitizing the Gaps in the Diverse History of a Small College Town

A digitization event designed to document community history in Davidson, North Carolina, particularly that related to the African American community which is underrepresented in local area archives. During the digitization event, screenings of the documentary short film Always Part of the Fabric, illustrating the role African Americans played at Davidson College from its inception, would be offered, followed by community discussion with Davidson faculty. In addition, walking tours of community neighborhoods, an interactive online map, and presentations at programs sponsored by the Davidson Historical Society and Davidson Parks & Recreations would explore local African American history.

The small college town of Davidson, North Carolina, grew around Davidson College, which was established in 1837 as an all-male, all-white institution. The town was, from its inception, racially mixed, and has had a long history of civic cooperation juxtaposed with divisions between social groups. The publication of a recent town history has raised awareness that the history of the African-American community is underrepresented in organized artifact collections and narratives.  In collaboration with town government and civic organizations the Davidson College Archives will leverage existing expertise in public history projects to implement History Homecoming Day, an event to capture data about Davidson’s African-American Community through the digitization of cultural artifacts, the capture of oral history narratives, and educational presentations regarding this history as part of a planned Davidson Neighborhoods program.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,825 (approved)
$8,529 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234493-16

Minot State University (Minot, ND 58707-0001)
Bethany Andreasen (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Minot's Common Heritage

A collaboration between Minot State University and the Minot Public Library that would digitize family letters, personal documents, photos, film, and video for the residents of Minot, North Dakota, and the surrounding region. Minot has seen unprecedented social and economic change in the last decade due to the oil boom, and the city suffered a devastating flood in 2011 that destroyed 4,000 homes. The project aims to preserve and interpret community and personal documentary materials and to reconstruct and safeguard Minot’s cultural heritage going forward.

This project aims to digitize family letters, personal documents, photos, film, and video for community members in Minot, North Dakota and the surrounding region. It uses preservation and a shared digital archive to document community identity at a time when Minot is being rapidly transformed after an unimaginably disastrous flood and by significant population and industrial growth related to the explosion of oil activity in the region. It trains university students as digital ambassadors who can continue this work beyond the time frame of the grant. Organized by the MSU History Department, the project involves partnership with the Minot Public Library and area assisted living facilities to ensure broad community access and participation. Public programming in partner organization venues will highlight themes from the resulting collections and an online digital archive will offer permanent access to all community members.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$8,118 (approved)
$8,118 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


PY-234508-16

University of Nevada, Reno (Reno, NV 89557-0001)
Scott Hinton (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to 12/14/2015)
Peter Goin (Project Director: 12/14/2015 to present)

North Lake Tahoe Digitization Day

The digitization of visual materials and print media relating the history of Lake Tahoe, as well as lectures by a local historian and a photographer that would place the visual documentation of this region, long known for its natural beauty and leisure opportunities, in a broader historical context. The North Lake Tahoe Historical Society would join with the University of Nevada at Reno to gather and preserve historic visual materials, with an emphasis on pre-1970s resources, which are held in personal collections. The project would fill gaps in the local archival record, a particularly pressing need in a region that has been often devastated by forest fires, which has resulted in the destruction of cultural heritage collections and their dispersal through institutions across the country.

The North Lake Tahoe Digitization Day will invite community members to bring in historical visual materials for expert-supervised digitization and instruction in basic preservation strategies. NLTHS staff and UNR Photography faculty will organize 4-5 presentations for the day, including talks by professional photographers on their reprographic work; by the NLTHS executive director; by the Photograph Archivist; and by a local historian, highlighting contexts in which historical photographs can be used (emphasizing the importance of Community donations and how the community can themselves use archival materials). In additiona, the NLTHS will host docent-led tours of its museum, and will offer a Photo ID station for participants to identify locations or persons in images from the archives. Images acquired during the course of the day will be included in the NLTHS's Past Perfect system, providing public access to anyone interested in researching North Lake Tahoe's rich cultural history.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural History; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,998 (approved)
$10,052 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234522-16

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Rebecca Trivison (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to 01/11/2016)
Anthony Gibbs (Project Director: 01/11/2016 to present)

Ohio Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Scanning Project

The digitization of community materials and support for public programs that will deepen the historical record documenting Ohio’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. The project would support a scanning day and programs that include talks by curators as well as community exhibit spaces that would serve audiences around Ohio, in both urban and rural communities. The proposed project would contribute digitized community material, including letters, diaries, photographs, and scrapbooks that document the recent decades of this community, to the Ohio History Connection (OHC).

The Gay Ohio History Initiative (GOHI) is requesting $12,000 to develop the Ohio Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Scanning Project. The Ohio LGBT Scanning Project is a humanities based project designed to digitize historical materials from members of Ohio’s LGBT community to build a comprehensive history of this community. The LGBT Scanning Project will build on the efforts set forth by GOHI to digitize community collections. GOHI will hold this community event at the Ohio History Connection in Columbus, Ohio.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$10,661 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 11/30/2016


PY-234524-16

University of Southern Maine (Portland, ME 04104-9300)
Joyce Gibson (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Franco-American Veterans: Heritage of Service

A one-day digitization event targeted at preserving the cultural heritage materials related to military experiences - at war and on the home front - of members of Maine’s Franco-American population, the state’s largest ethnic group. The grant would also support a speaker series addressing the history of Franco-American military service. The theme of military service would allow the applicant to help the public explore questions of identity and loyalty, which attended Maine’s Franco-American population from its early days. Digitized materials would be stored as part of the Franco-American collection at the University of Southern Maine’s Lewiston-Auburn College. Materials that could be digitized include photographs, documents, film, and audio (the latter two would be sent off-site for digitization).

The University of Southern Maine is seeking a grant of $10,477 to support programming on Franco-Americans and military service. A one-day event will provide the opportunity for veterans and their families to bring in materials related to military service and to share stories of that experience. A lecture series by scholars will address the history of Maine Franco-Americans in the Armed Forces, the significance of military service for Franco-American identity, and the impact of service on veterans and their families.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,477 (approved)
$10,229 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


PY-234544-16

City of Richmond Virginia (Richmond, VA 23219-1907)
Meg Hughes (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to 02/08/2016)
Patricia Parks (Project Director: 02/08/2016 to present)

Nuestra Historia: The Latino Community in Richmond, Virginia

A series of community digitization events at several cultural heritage organizations in Richmond, Virginia, that would invite members of the public to share personal photographs, artwork, and other artifacts to document the history and culture of the Latino community in the city. The curated digital copies would form the basis for an exhibition entitled Nuestra Historia: The Latino Community in Richmond in 2017 at the Valentine (Richmond’s history museum). The City of Richmond Office of Multicultural Affairs, Richmond Public Library, and the Sacred Heart Center for the Latino Community would join with the museum to host Spanish-language events throughout Richmond, including city tours, tours of the Valentine, bilingual community conversations, story-gathering events, and opportunities for community members to inform the cultural and creative design of the exhibit, Nuestra Historia.

The Richmond Public Library (RPL), an agency of the municipal government of Richmond, Virginia, proposes a dynamic partnership with the Valentine (Richmond’s history museum), the Sacred Heart Center for the Latino Community, and the City of Richmond Office of Multicultural Affairs to create a publicly sourced digital history project that will affirm the role of the local Latino community within Richmond’s past, present, and future. To better serve and represent this population, project partners will hold a series of “History Harvests” in primarily Latino neighborhoods. Latino community members will be invited to share photographs, artwork, and other artifacts for digitization that reflect both their experiences While participating community members will receive digital copies of the shared materials, retained and curated digital copies will form the basis of a 2017 exhibition at the Valentine entitled Nuestra Historia: The Latino Community in Richmond.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234561-16

Texas A & M University, Kingsville (Kingsville, TX 78363-8202)
Jonathan Plant (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Mi Familia - Mi Comunidad

The creation of a collection of family records, photographs, and oral histories specifically related to the Hispanic community of Kingsville, Texas. The seat of rural Kleberg County, Kingsville is home to 25,000 residents, 80 percent of whom are Hispanic. Building on Texas A&M Kingsville’s successful Mi Familia – Mi Comunidad initiative, this project would help community members better understand the value of preserving family history. Hosted at the John E. Conner Museum in partnership with South Texas Archive, Texas A&M staff archivists and students would assist participants during the day-long collection event. Public programming would be held during Hispanic Heritage Month and would include a scholar-led discussion and musical performances by mariachis. Collected resources would be made available online and an exhibition would be developed for display at the Conner museum throughout spring 2017. The exhibition launch event would feature a historian who would discuss contributions by Hispanic and Latino residents in the broader context of South Texas history.

The goal of the project is to create a digital collection of the Hispanic Community’s materials.  The history of this community is not currently preserved or adequately exhibited.  Public programming will encourage Hispanic-American families in the Kingsville community to preserve their own stories, family histories, and items of family interest.  Individuals who participate will have a better understanding of the significance of their own family heritage and take an enhanced interest in researching, documenting, and preserving it for future generations.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Latino History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$11,935 (approved)
$11,733 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234572-16

County of Orange-Orange County Community Resources/ OC Parks (Irvine, CA 92602-2304)
Justin Sikora (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Islands of the Past: Digitizing Memories at Orange County Historical Parks

A series of public programs and digitization workshops staged across four historical parks in Orange County, California: Yorba Cemetery, Old Orange County Courthouse, Heritage Hill Historical Park, and Arden: Helena Modjeska Historic House and Gardens. Utilizing the entire Orange County park network as a platform for outreach, the applicant would team with independent consultant Justin Sikora and his staff to collect and digitize material gathered from participants for storage and online access at the Online Archive of California. Public displays of collected artifacts would be presented at selected sites across the Orange County park system. Programs would include training workshops, an exhibit of photographs from the Orange County Register, a lecture by historian Ann Forsyth, and two concluding events at Yorba Cemetery that would feature slideshows of the community’s digital heritage.

The project will explore a part of Orange County communities' history by hosting historical events at OC Parks historical facilities to gather historical photos, documents, oral histories and artifacts for digitizing. Event programming will include workshops, lectures, exhibits and community conversations to bring to life Orange County's history during the height of suburban development.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; Urban Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,500 (approved)
$10,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


PY-234576-16

Museum of Chinese in America (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to present)

Our Family Treasures at the Museum of Chinese in America

A project by the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), in the heart of historic Chinatown, New York City, to document Chinese American history by providing members of the public opportunities to learn how to store, preserve, and share family objects and stories. This project would offer a day-long event for attendees to digitize personal items and to participate in presentations and workshops on Chinese American history and on ways to research and preserve their family heritage. Digital images and object stories would be accessible on MOCA’s Mapping Our Heritage Project, an online repository hosted by the museum. Following the digitization event, MOCA would offer a series of four workshops focused on training youth and their families in techniques for researching family histories and conducting oral history interviews. MOCA would also combine digitization opportunities at their regularly scheduled public programs, which spotlight first-person stories by authors, filmmakers, historians, and community members, who present behind-the-scenes perspectives into how they have researched their own family histories. Overall, the aim of the project is to highlight the untold stories and the living histories of Chinese immigrant communities in New York City.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) seeks a grant to support Our Family Treasures - a public program and education initiative aimed at preserving, digitizing and showcasing family and community history and culture through a day-long Our Family Treasures preservation and digital archiving program; an introductory workshop series for youth; and public programs at the Museum and Queens Public Library. Working on the premise that American history and experience is shaped by the material culture and memories of those who interact intimately with them over time, Our Family Treasures spotlights the untold stories and living histories of immigrant communities in New York City and their heirlooms. This project is part of a larger, ongoing museum effort to more fully capture the richness of the City’s growing immigrant population with multifaceted neighborhoods of working families, diverse cultural heritages, and industries, as well as the diversity of the Chinese diaspora across America.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234588-16

African American Museum in Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19106-1504)
Adrienne Whaley (Project Director: 06/26/2015 to 02/08/2016)
Helen Haynes (Project Director: 02/08/2016 to present)

Documenting Philadelphia's African American Community History

A community event to explore Philadelphia's African American history through community photograph contributed by members of the public, as well as programming to highlight photography at the African American Museum in Philadelphia. In addition to scanning community materials, the event would include workshops on family history and photographic preservation presented by the African American Genealogy Group, a lecture on the life of local African American photographer Jack Franklin, whose archives were left to the museum in 1986, and a film screening of the documentary, Through A Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People.

The African American Museum in Philadelphia (AAMP) uses art, culture, and historical witness to bring together diverse communities in greater appreciation of Black experiences. Partnering with the Digital Diaspora Family Reunion (DDFR), AAMP proposes to further its mission through a 3-day engagement combining digitization, exploration & explanation of African American photographic culture. This project will include a screening of the documentary Through A Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of A People, a day of public digitization of personal family photographs, multiple workshops on the relationships between photography and family & community history, and a finale featuring curated photos and stories from the various stages of this project. To successfully bring this to fruition, AAMP will partner with the African American Genealogy Group (AAGG) to assist in outreach and marketing while DDFR will manage digitization and other technical aspects of the project.

Project fields:
African American History; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 5/31/2018


PY-234606-16

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc. (Cleveland, OH 44114-1023)
Jennie Thomas (Project Director: 06/29/2015 to present)

Northeast Ohio Popular Music Archives Scanning Days and Program

Community digitization events and public programming organized by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio. The project would document musical heritage in and around Cleveland, which was the birthplace of significant musicians, notable radio stations, as well as a tour stop for many jazz, blues, and gospel musicians before the rise of rock and roll. The proposed events would simultaneously preserve documentation of local music history and bring them into the museum’s collection for online and on-site exhibitions through contributions to the Northeast Ohio Popular Music Archives. The proposed activities, including four digitization days and a one-day event with a panel discussion of local musical history, would draw from personal collections to provide a window on popular music in a major American city.

The proposed project invites the public to bring two-dimensional objects related to local music history to four scanning events where Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum Library and Archives staff will digitize the items, provide a digital copy to the owner, and accession digital copies of appropriate items into the Northeast Ohio Popular Music Archives (NEOPMA). NEOPMA ensures that the musical history of a community that is home to dozens of internationally-known artists in multiple genres and that is widely regarded as the home of rock and roll, is not lost in the international focus of Cleveland’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The Rock Hall will use the items collected on the scanning days in a public event that discusses Northeast Ohio’s musical history, provides information about preserving personal collections, and discusses what items are appropriate and needed for ongoing collecting for the NEOPMA.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,785 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016