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Keywords: 'Xiangtangshan ' (this phrase)
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University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Anthony G. Hirschel (Project Director: August 2009 to January 2014)

GI-50172-10
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants
Public Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2010 – 9/30/2013

Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan

Implementation of a traveling exhibition, a website, an international symposium, a catalog, and programs on the sculptures of Xiangtangshan caves in China.

Combining ancient sculptures, ground-breaking scholarship, and contemporary digital media, "Echoes of the Past" tells the remarkable story of the Xiangtangshan caves, one of the earliest and most important Buddhist pilgrimage sites in China. Organized by the University of Chicago's Smart Museum of Art in partnership with the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, this extraordinary new exhibition will be presented in four major metropolitan areas across the United States: Chicago, Washington D.C., Dallas, and San Diego.

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Anthony G. Hirschel (Project Director: September 2006 to July 2008)

MC-50065-07
Museums Consultation
Public Programs

Totals:
$9,995 (approved)
$9,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2007 – 3/31/2008

Hall of Echoing Caves: Re-imaging the Ancient Buddhist Caves of Xiangtangshan

Consultation and early planning for an exhibition exploring a cave complex of sixth-century Buddhist tombs and temples created during China's Northern Qi dynasty (550-577 A.D.).

"Hall of Echoing Caves: Re-imaging the Ancient Buddhist Caves of Xiangtangshan" is a major traveling exhibition that explores the past, present, and future of the Xiangtangshan caves, an elaborate complex of sixth century Buddhist temples that have suffered a century of despoliation and dispersal. The caves were created during the Northern Qi dynasty (550-577), an overlooked period in China's history that recent archeological finds have shown was characterized by remarkable cultural exchange and artistic innovation. As the crowning cultural achievement of the period, the caves reveal how the Northern Qi set the stage for the flowering of a truly cosmopolitan Chinese culture traditionally associated with later dynasties of China's "Golden Age." Reconstructing the caves through traditional and innovative digital displays, the exhibition will increase understanding of the Northern Qi's rich visual culture and introduce the new technologies being used to capture an otherwise lost past.