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Program: Research and Development*
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University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
Deborah Anderson (Project Director, 05/05/2014 - present)
PR-50205-15
Universal Scripts Project

The preparation of twelve scripts—seven historical and five modern—for inclusion in the international Unicode standard, to aid research using materials in historical scripts and promote communication in minority language communities.

Although computer and mobile users in many parts of the world can now communicate in hundreds of languages by using their own native writing system, there are still linguistic minority groups, and users of historical writing systems, who cannot. This is because the letters and symbols of these scripts are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. More than one hundred eligible scripts are not yet included in Unicode, which directly affects humanities research, the creation of the global digital repository of humankind's literary and cultural heritage and, for users of modern scripts, basic communication. This project will fund proposals for five modern and seven historical scripts for inclusion in the standard, thereby preserving text materials in these scripts and paving the way for electronic communication in (and about) scripts by scholars and the user communities at large.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $264,700 (approved); $264,700 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2015 – 12/31/2016

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Gregory Wilsbacher (Project Director, 05/05/2014 - present)
PR-50207-15
AEO-Light 2.0: An Open Source Application for Image-Based Digital Reproduction of Optical Film Sound

The second-phase development of the AEO-Light optical sound extraction software, an open-source tool that enables more efficient digital preservation of optical sound motion pictures.

The University of South Carolina Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC) and the Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute (IMI) seek a two-year, $222,146 grant to further develop our AEO-Light optical sound extraction software created through the support of a 2011 NEH PARD grant. The initial grant was successful as a research and development grant but the software has not yet met the high standards of the preservation community. Additional funding will enable us to respond to user feedback and provide the preservation community with an open source tool able to meet its rigorous standards and further the long-term survival of our nation’s optical sound motion picture history.

Project fields: Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $222,146 (approved); $222,146 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2015 – 12/31/2016

Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405)
Jon Dunn (Project Director, 05/05/2014 - present)
PR-50211-15
HydraDAM2: Extending Fedora 4 and Hydra for Media Preservation

The development of an open-source digital asset management system to facilitate preservation of and access to humanities collections of digital sound recordings and moving images.

Indiana University Libraries and the WGBH Media Library and Archives propose to extend the HydraDAM digital asset management system to be able to serve as a digital preservation repository for time-based media collections at a wide range of institutions using multiple storage strategies. This new system will be based on the open source Hydra repository application framework and will utilize the emerging Fedora 4.0 digital repository architecture.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $399,239 (approved); $399,239 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2015 – 12/31/2016

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Andrew Lerwill (Project Director, 05/05/2014 - 07/10/2015); James Reilly (Project Director, 07/10/2015 - present)
PR-50213-15
Digital Image Correlation to Determine Shape Deformation of Paper-Based Collections due to Relative Humidity and Temperature

An applied research project conducted by the Image Permanence Institute that would define the permissible limits of relative humidity (RH) for rare books and other library and archival materials that are critical for humanities research.

One of the most frequent questions asked by rare book curators and librarians is: "At what RH, especially with respect to dry conditions, does a serious risk of irreversible mechanical stress occur?" Mechanical (physical) damage due to dryness or excessive dampness is the principal reason why special collection materials require controlled environmental conditions. For many years, recommendations have emphasized close control around a target of 45-55% RH. What is not well established from actual experimentation, however, are the practical limits where irreversible damage takes place. This area of research—safe limits for RH—has received considerable attention in the fine and decorative arts, but not for the complex and diverse mechanical structures of bound volumes. To overcome the difficulty of studying mechanical behavior of complex book structures IPI will employ a new technology, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to dynamically assess expansion and contraction of composite objects.

Project fields: Arts, Other
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $399,825 (approved); $399,825 (awarded)
Grant period: 3/1/2015 – 2/28/2018

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Jean-Louis Bigourdan (Project Director, 05/06/2013 - present)
PR-50192-14
Understanding Moisture Equilibrium for Humanities Collections: A New Path to Sustainable Humidity Control

Research into new ways of managing environmental conditions in collection spaces that could significantly reduce energy costs while providing safe environments for books, manuscripts, maps, prints, and other paper-based humanities materials. The Image Permanence Institute would study moisture equilibration rates for paper-based library materials and test new ways of managing relative humidity that could reduce the risks to collections from the most damaging conditions of summer humidity and winter dryness.

The thrust of this research is to quantify the potential of new approaches to seasonal management of humidity control, based on a full understanding of moisture equilibration processes for paper-based collections. Research will focus on the possibility that RH control can be used in a stepped or pulsed fashion to slow down the rate of moisture equilibration, thereby avoiding the most dangerous seasonal highs and lows. Specifically, better fundamental knowledge of equilibration behavior may allow identification of scenarios where seasonal peaks are not damaging, and scenarios for less expensive RH control aimed at 'slicing off' dangerous peaks. The research will quantify how materials' moisture content navigates between extreme RHs when exposed to either an uncontrolled seasonal humidity cycle, capped RH profile, stepped RH profile or pulsed RH profile. Research objectives are to quantify risks and benefits of these options in terms of preservation quality and potential energy savings.

Project fields: Arts, Other
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $350,000 (approved); $350,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2014 – 3/31/2017

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5000)
Julia Flanders (Project Director, 05/06/2013 - present)
PR-50195-14
TAPAS: Building an XML-Aware Repository

The development of a data repository for the TEI Archiving, Publishing, and Access Service (TAPAS), which will help scholars, educators, and librarians preserve and publish TEI projects.

This project builds upon previous work to build a data storage back end for TAPAS that includes both a Fedora repository (using the Hydra framework) and an XML database, closely integrated with the TAPAS user interface front end so that long-term repository storage, XML publication options, and enhanced searching are a seamless part of the TAPAS interface. Building this system in Hydra helps ensure that these components can be reused by other Fedora/Hydra systems, and enables TAPAS to take advantage of ongoing development by the Hydra community. In the second half of the grant we will also support a series of "code-along" events to assist TAPAS contributors in enhancing their data to make better use of the new visualization tools, and to help faculty to incorporate these collaborative coding activities into their classroom curricula.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Languages, General; Literature, General
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 3/1/2014 – 2/28/2017

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Tanya Clement (Project Director, 05/06/2013 - present)
PR-50200-14
High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship Research and Development with Repositories

The development of software that uses machine learning to help users automate descriptive metadata for spoken-word sound collections.

In order to increase the preservation of significant spoken word (such as poetry, storytelling, speeches, and oral histories) sound recordings, the UT Austin iSchool and the Illinois Informatics Institute (I3) are requesting two years of funding for HiPSTAS Research and Development with Repositories (HRDR) to develop software (ARLO) that uses machine learning and visualization to help users automate metadata description for undescribed sound collections. Products will include: (1) open source software (ARLO) that can be used with a variety of repositories; (2) a Drupal module for Mukurtu, an open source content management system designed for indigenous communities worldwide; (3) workshops and documentation for wider dissemination and training; and (4) a white paper detailing best practices in generating descriptive metadata for audio collections in the humanities.

Project fields: Social Sciences, Other
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $250,000 (approved); $250,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 12/31/2015

Sanskrit Library (Providence, RI 02906-4629)
Peter Scharf (Project Director, 05/23/2012 - present)
PR-50178-13
Developing automated text-image alignment to enhance access to heritage manuscript images

Development of software to produce the partial transcription of Sanskrit manuscripts for human validation. The project would also integrate the manuscripts in a digital library to extend the use of lexical resources and linguistic tools for full-text searching and analysis.

The proposed project aims to enhance access to primary cultural heritage materials of India by developing human-validated automated text-image alignment techniques in order to provide access to digital images via related machine-readable texts, lexical resources, linguistic software, and a sophisticated search interface. Digital images of manuscripts written in Sanskrit, one of the world's richest culture-bearing languages, will be integrated into a digital library of Sanskrit. This integration will allow generalized information extraction and search techniques to reach enormous reservoirs of Sanskrit manuscripts. Integrating primary cultural materials with the Sanskrit Library will thus enable broad use of Indic collections for research and education where Indic materials are grossly underrepresented. The result will be extendable to the collections of Sanskrit manuscripts housed in American libraries and throughout the world and to archives of scanned Sanskrit books.

Project fields: Asian Languages
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $280,000 (approved); $280,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 6/30/2016

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Oya Rieger (Project Director, 05/23/2012 - present)
PR-50182-13
Preservation & Access Framework for Digital Art Objects

The development of a methodological framework for the preservation of digital media artwork, using the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art as a test bed.

Cornell University Library (CUL) is requesting funding to develop a technical framework and associated tools to facilitate enduring access to interactive digital media art with a focus on artworks stored on hard drive, CD-ROM, and DVD-ROM. CUL’s Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art will provide the test bed for the study. This collection, recognized as one of the most prominent of its kind in the world, contains thousands of artworks and encompasses a wide variety of formats. We seek funding from NEH of $284,550 for a two-year project. CUL will cost share 42.5% of the total project costs of $495,077. CUL will collaborate with AudioVisual Preservation Solutions, and the project will have an advisory board composed on international leaders in curation, arts, and preservation. The key principle of the project is to leverage existing standards, best practices, and technologies, and to focus on moving theory into practice in a working archival environment.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

Bay Area Video Coalition (San Francisco, CA 94107-2406)
Moriah Ulinskas (Project Director, 05/23/2012 - present)
PR-50188-13
[View white paper]
Quality Control Tools for Video Preservation

The development of a suite of open-source, quality-control software tools that will ensure accurate and efficient assessment of video media integrity throughout the archival digitization process.

To aid in the nation's efforts to preserve its video history, the Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) requests $350,000 over two years to develop an open source and freely available software "toolkit" to help perform sophisticated quality control on video digitization workflows. BAVC, in partnership with the Dance Heritage Coalition (DHC) and independent consultant Dave Rice, will create Quality Control Tools for Video Preservation (QC Tools), a suite of open source software tools that will ensure accurate and efficient assessment of media integrity throughout the archival digitization process.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $320,000 (approved); $320,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2013 – 1/31/2015

University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53706-1314)
Vance Kepley (Project Director, 05/23/2011 - present)
PR-50141-12
Investigation of Cellulose Nitrate Motion Picture Film Chemical Decomposition & Associated Fire Risk

The testing of cellulose nitrate film stock with the goal to create guidelines for the handling and long-term storage of this flammable medium on which much of the 20th century's still and moving image humanities content is stored.

This grant will support empirical research about the related threats of cellulose nitrate motion picture decay and flammability. The project will be co-investigated by two University of Wisconsin-Madison institutions--the Wisconsin Center for Film & Theater Research and the Mahanthappa Research Group--in partnership with the Wisconsin Historical Society. Used as the base for all professionally-produced motion pictures made between the 1890s and the early 1950s, cellulose nitrate is chemically unstable and highly flammable. Unfortunately, very little data about these risks is available to the preservation community. Project results will be published in a white paper targeted at an audience of archival professionals, and, as relevant, in amendments to the International Standard (ISO) and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards on nitrate handling and storage.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $200,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2012 – 8/31/2015

WGBH Educational Foundation (Boston, MA 02135-2016)
Karen Cariani (Project Director, 05/23/2011 - present)
PR-50155-12
[View white paper]
WGBH Open Source Digital Asset Management System for Media Preservation

The development of a comprehensive, open-source digital asset management system for moving image and audio humanities collections.

This project will build and implement an open source digital media preservation and DAM system, focused primarily on the needs of public media stations but relevant and applicable to all cultural institutions with moving image and audio materials. We will face the challenge of handling both large and small media files in several formats. Based on the Hydra technology stack, including the Fedora repository and the Blacklight discovery interface, it will reflect TRAC trusted repository guidelines. We will use and develop open code that will be publicly shared, clearly research and document implementation needs, implement the open source solution as a new model of digital asset management at WGBH, and test the ease of implementation at two partner public media organizations – South Carolina Educational Television Network (SCETV) and Public Radio International (PRI).

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $250,000 (approved); $250,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/2012 – 1/31/2015

Wheaton College (Norton, MA 02766-2322)
Michael Drout (Project Director, 07/08/2010 - present)
PR-50112-11
[View white paper]
Lexomic Tools and Methods for Textual Analysis: Providing Deep Access to Digitized Texts

Development of computational tools and documentation for applying advanced statistical methods to textual and literary problems. The tools and methods would be demonstrated using material from a variety of languages and time periods, including Old English, medieval Latin, and the 20th-century Harlem Renaissance.

This project hybridizes traditional humanistic approaches to textual scholarship, such as source study and the analysis of style, with advanced computational and statistical comparative methods, allowing scholars "deep access" to digitized texts and textual corpora. Our multi-disciplinary collaboration enables us to discover patterns in (and between) texts previously invisible to traditional methods. Going forward, we will build on the success of our previous Digital Humanities Start-up Grant by further developing tools and documentation (in an open, on-line community) for applying advanced statistical methodologies to textual and literary problems. At the same time we will demonstrate the value of the approach by applying the tools and methods to texts from a variety of languages and time periods, including Old English, medieval Latin, and Modern English works from the twentieth-century Harlem Renaissance.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $135,895 (approved); $135,895 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2011 – 8/31/2013

University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Gregory Wilsbacher (Project Director, 07/08/2010 - present)
PR-50122-11
[View white paper]
An Open Source Application for Image-Based Digital Reproduction of Optical Film Sound

Creating a one-pass system to capture accurately both image and sound in digital scanning. In particular, historians would benefit from the availability of this open-source software tool, since film constitutes a vital primary souce for research on the 20th century.

The University of South Carolina Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC) is collaborating with research faculty from the University’s Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute (IMI) to develop an open-source software application to directly reproduce the optical sound tracks of motion picture films from digital scans. We seek $362,125 (of a total $465,905 budget), from the National Endowment for the Humanities over a three-year period to fund our collaboration and take our proven concept through development to deployment as an open-source and freely available application. Unless alternatives to current expensive approaches to digitizing sound films are found, access to most of this important material will effectively end as the commercial sector abandons support for traditional film screening equipment.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2011 – 9/30/2013

Educopia Institute (Atlanta, GA 30309-3578)
Katherine Skinner (Project Director, 07/08/2010 - present)
PR-50134-11
[View white paper]
Distributed Preservation of Born-Digital and Digitized Newspaper Collections

The study, documentation, and modeling of distributed digital preservation frameworks to preserve digitized and born-digital newspaper collections.

The Educopia Institute, with the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the libraries of University of North Texas, Penn State, Virginia Tech, University of Utah, Georgia Tech, Boston College, and Clemson University, proposes to study, document, and model the use of data preparation and distributed digital preservation frameworks to collaboratively preserve digitized and born-digital newspaper collections. We propose to investigate three issues through the following series of research questions: 1. How can curators effectively and efficiently prepare their existing digitized and born-digital newspaper collections for preservation?] 2. How can curators ingest preservation-ready newspaper content into existing DDP solutions? 3. What are the strengths and challenges presented by using three leading DDP solutions for preserving digital newspaper content?

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2011 – 4/30/2014

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
Daniel Pitti (Project Director, 08/03/2009 - present)
PR-50080-10
[View white paper]
Enhancing Access to Contextual Information on Individuals, Families, and Corporate Bodies for Archival Collections

The development of an automated tool for deriving contextual information from archival finding aids, enhancing the information by matching it with established authority records, and enabling links to multiple primary and secondary humanities sources.

We will address the ongoing challenge of transforming description of and improving access to primary humanities resources via advanced technologies. The project will test the feasibility of using existing archival descriptions in new ways, in order to enhance access and understanding of cultural resources in archives, libraries, and museums. We will derive Encoded Archival Context-Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF) records from existing archival findings aids from the Library of Congress (LoC) and three consortia, and name authority files from the LoC and the Getty Vocabulary Program. We will produce open-source software used in the derivation and creation of the EAC-CPF records and a prototype access system demonstrating their value to the archival community and the use of primary humanities resources. The Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, Univ. of Virginia, will partner with the California Digital Library and the School of Information, UC Berkeley.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $363,221 (approved); $363,221 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2010 – 4/30/2013

Funding details
Original grant (2011) $348,221
Supplement (2011) $15,000

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Jean-Louis Bigourdan (Project Director, 08/03/2009 - present)
PR-50087-10
Methodologies for Sustainable HVAC Operation in Collection Environments

Investigation of the impact on paper-based collections of short-term fluctuations in environmental conditions resulting from the dynamic management, through temporary setbacks and shutoffs, of climate control systems. A guide would be published to help cultural institutions design and evaluate sustainable approaches to managing collection environments that achieve energy savings and long-term preservation of humanities collections.

"Methodologies for Sustainable HVAC Operation in Collection Environments" is a research project designed to allow staff of libraries and archives with significant humanities collections to confidently evaluate protocols for energy saving and sustainability, and to balance stewardship with fiscal realities and global responsibility. Since little research has been done on the impact of short-term fluctuations in temperature and humidity("setbacks" during unoccupied nights and weekends), neither facilities managers nor collection care specialists know how to evaluate their effect on collection preservation. Through a combination of laboratory research, field investigation, data modeling, and the creation of a user-friendly field guide-style publication, this project will provide the field with reliable data and a usable method for monitoring room environments and estimating the impact of short-term fluctuations on long-term preservation.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $399,926 (approved); $399,926 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2010 – 4/30/2015

Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-3288)
David Bodenhamer (Project Director, 08/03/2009 - present)
PR-50088-10
[View white paper]
New Tools for the Humanities: Visualizing Complex Spatial Data

The development of a prototype tool to explore and to visualize geospatial data in the humanities using as a test bed a preexisting interactive Web mapping site on religious adherence in the United States in the 20th century.

This proposal, New Tools for the Humanities: Visualizing Complex Spatial Data, requests funding to develop new approaches and new tools to enhance the use of spatial data in the humanities. It uses web-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology in an existing product, the North American Religion Atlas, but seeks to make it both easier to use and much more powerful as a research tool through new types of visualizations already developed and tested in prototype by the project collaborators.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $224,575 (approved); $224,575 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2010 – 10/31/2012

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory Crane (Project Director, 07/05/2007 - present)
PR-50013-08
The Dynamic Lexicon: Cyberinfrastructure and the Automatic Analysis of Historical Languages

Research on methods to generate a dynamic lexicon for a text corpus in a digital library. Using Greek and Latin texts, the project would investigate processes to enumerate possible senses for the words being defined and provide detailed syntactic information and statistical data about their use in a corpus.

We propose to research core functions for the automatic analysis of historical languages (Greek & Latin) within an emerging cyberinfrastructure; we will research three technologies for building a dynamic lexicon, as well as the processes required to automatically create such a reference work for any textual collection. Our efforts will focus on parallel text analysis ? word sense induction and disambiguation ? as well as syntactic parsing. These technologies will enable us to create a reference work that lists the possible senses for a word while also providing syntactic information and statistical data about its use in a corpus. The methods we use to create this work will let users search a text not only by word form, but also by word sense, syntactic subcategorization and selectional preference. Our main contribution will be the steps that any digital library needs to take to dynamically create a reference work of their own and interface it with the texts in their collection.

[Grant products] [Prizes]
Project fields: Classical Languages
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $285,000 (approved); $284,999 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2008 – 12/31/2011

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Roy Rosenzweig (Project Director, 07/05/2007 - 01/13/2008); Daniel Cohen (Project Director, 01/14/2008 - present)
PR-50019-08
Text-Mining and Analysis Tools for Historical Research

Research, development, and testing of tools designed to locate documents in large digital corpora, extract information, and analyze large-scale patterns across texts.

In the last decade the library community and other providers of digital collections have created an incredibly rich digital archive of historical and cultural materials. Yet most scholars have not yet figured out ways to take full advantage of the digitized riches suddenly available on their computers. Indeed, the abundance of digital documents has actually exacerbated the problems of some researchers who now find themselves overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of available material. Meanwhile, some of the most profound insights lurking in these digital corpora remain locked up. We believe the absence of appropriate methods and interfaces is largely to blame: digital content providers have not yet developed the kind of sophisticated and flexible search, extraction, and analysis tools capable of capitalizing on this vast investment in a digitized cultural heritage.

[Grant products] [Media coverage]
Project fields: History, General
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $320,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2008 – 5/31/2011

Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA 15282-0001)
Patrick Juola (Project Director, 07/05/2007 - present)
PR-50020-08
A Machine-Aided Back-of-the-Book Indexing System

Development and evaluation of a prototype system for helping indexers, including authors and publishers, produce traditional back-of-the-book indexes.

We propose to develop and test a prototype system for helping indexers (including authors, scholars, and publishers) produce traditional back-of-the-book indexes. Using standard text analysis technology (including Latent Semantic Analysis, Named Entity Extraction, Hierarchical Cluster Analysis, and other methods) we hope to identify, group, and present appropriate concepts for inclusion in an index and then automatically generate index anchors within the text itself. Human input will be possible -- and indeed, encouraged -- at any point in the process.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $131,465 (approved); $131,465 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2008 – 6/30/2012

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
Deborah Anderson (Project Director, 07/07/2006 - present)
PR-50004-07
Universal Scripts Project

Incorporation into the Unicode standard of 15 historical and minority language scripts.

Although computer users in many parts of the world can now communicate using their own native writing systems, there are still at least 40 linguistic minority scripts, and about 40 more scripts of historical importance, that are difficult or impossible to use because they are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. And because continued corporate interest and support for these scripts is uncertain, communication among the groups who use them, and long-term access to their written cultural and historical resources, is threatened. This project will fund proposals to adopt 9 modern and 6 historical scripts into the standard, and will foster collaboration among scholars, users, and institutions to continue working on more proposals, so that computers will ultimately support all the world's scripts.

Project fields: Languages, General
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $269,200 (approved); $269,200 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2007 – 9/30/2009

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10018)
Evelyn Frangakis (Project Director, 07/07/2006 - present)
PR-50010-07
Developing Data Models and Best Practices for Diagnosis and Improvement of Preservation Environments

A joint project of the New York Public Library (NYPL) and the Image Permanence Institute (IPI) to determine best practices for monitoring, evaluating, and optimizing environmental storage conditions in cultural repositories.

The New York Public Library and its research partner, the Image Permanence Institute, seek $351,077 to develop best practices for monitoring, evaluating, and optimizing collection storage conditions from an environmental perspective. The Library proposes to research fundamental environmental control issues and develop tools for communicating about and managing environmental problems. Research will be carried out through the implementation of an environmental monitoring system at the Library. The project will enhance a prototype data management system to provide high-level analysis of the raw data and tailored environmental monitoring reports that are accessible and comprehensible to the variety of stakeholders who have an interest in improving preservation environments. Project tools such as data models and user interface guidelines will be made publicly accessible to help libraries, museums, and other repositories realize good preservation environments for their collections.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $350,000 (approved); $350,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2007 – 12/31/2008

University of Maine, Orono (Orono, ME 04469-0001)
Jon Ippolito (Project Director, 07/07/2006 - present)
PR-50011-07
Forging the Future: New Tools for Variable Media Preservation

The development of a new metadata standard and three complementary tools for the cataloging and preservation of born-digital and ephemeral artworks.

Forging the Future proposes a consortium of museums and cultural heritage organizations dedicated to exploring, developing, and sharing new vocabularies and tools for cultural preservation.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Research and Development
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $307,691 (approved); $307,691 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2007 – 12/31/2009

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