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Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation*
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University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
Andrew Garrett (Project Director, 10/06/2014 - present)
PD-230659-15
Linguistic and Ethnographic Sound Recordings from Early Twentieth-Century California: Optical Scanning, Digitization & Access

The digitization of over 2,700 sound recordings of Native American languages on wax cylinders held at the University of California, Berkeley, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, using optical scanning techniques developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

The University of California, Berkeley, is the repository of an American cultural treasure in over 2,500 early twentieth-century wax cylinder recordings of Native American speech and song. Some are the only known recordings of a language; many are the only known recordings of particular songs or stories; all are invaluable for scholarly research and the broader purposes of cultural and linguistic revitalization. Previous work using mechanical playback methods to transfer the recordings to modern sound media and digitize the result yielded low-quality sound files. This project will apply new technology (developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) to produce optical scans of all wax cylinders in the university’s collection, from which improved audio transfers will be created. At UC Berkeley, the work will involve institutional collaboration among the Hearst Museum of Anthropology, the University Library, and the Department of Linguistics; collaboration with Native communities will increase access to the resulting material.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $199,261 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2018

College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA 23186-0002)
Jack Martin (Project Director, 10/06/2014 - present)
PD-230660-15
Spoken Creek (Muskogee) Documentation Project

Documentation of Creek, an endangered Muscogean language, originally spoken in the southeastern United States, and now spoken by the Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole nations in Oklahoma, and the Seminole tribe in Florida.  The project would produce 24 hours of audiovisual recordings, transcriptions, and translations into English and would train students in language documentation methods.  The recordings and linguistic analysis would be archived at the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History at the University of Oklahoma and would be made available on the Web.

The proposed project builds on existing collaboration between the College of William and Mary and the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma to provide the first documentation of spoken Creek (or Muskogee, also spelled Muscogee, Mvskoke, and Maskoke). Video recordings will be made over three years and will consist of targeted interviews covering traditional practices, oral history, tribal history, and spontaneous conversation. Approximately 24 hours of recordings will be selected for transcription and translation. Workshops in Oklahoma will provide training for individuals interested in video production and using software to segment, transcribe, and translate video or audio recordings. Much of the transcription and translation will be done by students in Bacone College’s Master-Apprentice program paired with fluent speakers. Materials will be archived at Sam Noble Museum of Natural History. Presentation versions will be published online.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2018

Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
Jonathan Amith (Project Director, 12/23/2013 - present)
PD-50031-14
A Biological Approach to Documenting Traditional Ecological Knowledge in Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives

Fieldwork and comparative research in five Nahuat and two Totonac communities in Mexico to include nomenclature, classification, and use of plants in language documentation tools. The project would create recordings to document traditional ethnobotanical knowledge as well as employ DNA barcoding technology to facilitate plant identification.

"A Biological Approach to Documenting Traditional Ecological Knowledge in Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives" explores ethnobotanical knowledge of Sierra Nororiental de Puebla, Mexico, Nahuat and Totonac communities to address theoretical issues in cognitive anthropology (e.g., the structure of native ethnobotanical categories), historical and contact linguistics (e.g., diachronic retention, loss, semantic shift, and innovation of ethnobotanical nomenclature), and cultural history (migration and language contact between two Mesoamerican groups). It employs an innovative molecular technology, DNA barcoding, to facilitate extensive, multisited, and comparative research on Indigenous traditional ecological knowledge while documenting this knowledge through extensive digital recordings by native natural historians.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $200,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2017

Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405)
Daniel Suslak (Project Director, 12/23/2013 - present)
PD-50032-14
Community Directed Audio-Visual Documentation of Ayöök and Development of an Online Ayöök Language Portal

Documentation of the Ayöök language, spoken in the region of Totontepec (Oaxaca, Mexico), through the expansion of an existing dictionary and development of an online portal of audio and video recordings.

The aim of this project is to comprehensively document Ayöök (MTO), an endangered Mixe-Zoquean language spoken in and around the municipio of Totontepec (Oaxaca, Mexico). The project brings together a fully engaged indigenous community, a linguistic anthropologist who has done extensive fieldwork in Totontepec, and experienced language documentation filmmakers. At the heart of this proposal is the redesign and expansion of a web application, the Ayöök Portal, which links an archive of high quality video with transcribed and translated text and an online lexical database. A key component is the training of communitybased video production and text production teams. Co-PI Levine will train a team of local filmmakers using the methods he developed for the Passamaquoddy (PQM) community. PI Suslak will train a team of local linguists and language consultants to transcribe, translate, and analyze the materials they record. The Ayöök Portal will serve to share these materials and will also make it possible for the PIs to remotely monitor, guide, and collaborate with Totontepec as it continues to document its language after the project formally ends. The ultimate goal of this approach is to transfer resources back to a community that is ready to take responsibility for documenting and reviving its own language.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $253,393 (approved); $253,393 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80309-0001)
J. Andrew Cowell (Project Director, 12/23/2013 - present)
PD-50033-14
Arapaho Lexical Database and Dictionary

Documentation of the Arapaho language, an endangered language of the Algonquian family that was originally spoken on the Great Plains of the United States. The project would produce a lexical database and a bilingual dictionary in print and electronic formats.

This proposal is for an Arapaho language documentation project that will also involve infrastructure development and development and application of computational methods. The overall goal is to build a lexical database of Arapaho and produce a bilingual dictionary. The project will involve usage-based lexicographical approaches, possible thanks to the existence of a corpus of 55,000+ lines of natural discourse in Arapaho, all transcribed, translated, and annotated, with most of the material already deposited at the Endangered Language Archive Repository, University of London. This natural discourse corpus, along with additional field research, will be the basis of the usage-based lexical database, fully documenting the lexicon. A lexical glossary and an associated text database will be developed which will include both complete part-of-speech labeling and also syntactic parsing information. Lexicographical tools within the program Sketch Engine, plus some additional computational work, will allow for usage-based study of word frequency, various meanings, common collocations, and syntactic relationships. This information will then be used to create full-word definitions and other usage information, and supplemented by field elicitation and manuscript/archive investigation.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $172,290 (approved); $172,290 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 12/31/2016

University of Hawaii, Manoa (Honolulu, HI 96822-2399)
Andrea Berez (Project Director, 12/23/2013 - present)
PD-50034-14
Making Pacific Language Materials Discoverable: Identifying and Describing Indigenous Languages

The improved discovery of materials in or about Micronesian, Polynesian, and Melanesian languages held in the Pacific Collection at the Hamilton Library of the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The applicant would develop precise catalog descriptors for approximately 1,100 endangered Pacific languages; complete cataloging for nearly 10,000 items; and make this information accessible to language communities, documentary linguists, other catalogers, and the public.

We propose to greatly increase the descriptive metadata for all the Pacific language material within the University of Hawaii at Manoa Library Pacific Collection by adequately describing the languages represented in the materials. At present, the Collection is inadequately described for language. The geographic region covered by the collection is among the most linguistically diverse in the world, which means that language information is especially crucial to the usefulness of the collection. We propose to ensure that all Pacific language material in the UHM Library Pacific Collection (~10K items) has adequate and consistent levels of description according to three standards: (i) MARC Code List for Languages, (ii) Library of Congress Subject Headings, and (iii) ISO 639-3 language codes. The first 2 are considered to be best practices for American libraries, while the third, ISO 639-3, is considered by linguists to be the gold standard for language description. Together, these 3 standards of descriptive metadata will drastically increase the discoverability of Pacific language material in the Collection, the most comprehensive collection of Pacific materials in the world.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $122,317 (approved); $122,317 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2014 – 9/30/2016

Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages (Salem, OR 97302-1902)
Gregory Anderson (Project Director, 01/11/2013 - present); K. David Harrison (Co Project Director, 04/08/2013 - present)
PD-50025-13
Documentation of Hill Gta [gaq] a seriously endangered Munda language

Documentation of the Hill variety of Gta' (Didey), an endangered language of the Munda family spoken in Malkangiri and Koraput Districts, Odisha State, India. The project would produce a grammar, a dictionary, and an annotated text collection in print and electronic formats.

This project proposes a comprehensive documentation in print and electronic media of the phonology, lexicon, and morphosyntax of the Hill variety of Gta' (aka Didey), a highly endangered language of the Munda family spoken in Malkangiri and Koraput Districts, Odisha State, India. The proposed project has three parts: (i) collection, annotation and archiving of video/audio materials representing all available speech genres, (ii) adding to an existing lexical database of Munda languages through the creation of an online Hill Gta' talking dictionary and (iii) training of indigenous community members as well as training/mentoring of two indigenous pre-doctoral assistants. Each area of research builds upon ongoing close collaboration with Indian scholars and native Hill Gta' speakers. Besides providing a fundamental and systematic documentation of this seriously endangered language, we will use the data we gather to advance typological and historical research on the Munda and Austroasiatic language families. We will add our new field data into a searchable comparative multi-media lexicon of Munda languages. Adding parallel data from Hill Gta' to large data sets from Remo and Ho, and smaller sets from Sora, Juray, Kharia, Santali, and Kera Mundari. This lexical database, together with grammatical and phonological databases that are under construction and our searchable corpus of annotated video materials, will serve as the basis for all future linguistic research on this poorly known family of languages.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $246,516 (approved); $246,515 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2015

University of Maine, Orono (Orono, ME 04469-0001)
Pauleena MacDougall (Project Director, 01/11/2013 - present)
PD-50027-13
Penobscot Dictionary

Digitization of an unpublished dictionary manuscript, creation of a revised and expanded database, and preparation of a Web-based and print dictionary of Penobscot, an Algonquian language originally spoken in central and eastern Maine. Drawing on original field notes and collected texts, the project would add 30-45,000 lexical items (words, phrases, sentences, notes, and examples of usage) to the current 17,000 lexemes in the manuscript dictionary.

(edited by staff): Dr. Frank T. Siebert, Jr.'s "Penobscot Dictionary" manuscript represents more than a half-century of largely unpublished scholarship of an under-documented language. Currently, its 494 double-columned pages (approximately 17,000 lexemes) of entries in Penobscot/English format are available to tribal members and scholars only as a photocopied dot-matrix printout from the late 1980s. Working with Siebert's manuscript as a base, this project will prepare a final edited edition of the dictionary for publication with an English index, as well as a searchable database of the dictionary for the Penobscot community's electronic immersion program. Additions to the dictionary will be made from Siebert's field notes and collection of texts, which have been copied and digitized by the American Philosophical Society. A fully-edited version of the dictionary with an English index will be printed by the University of Maine Press (with funding from the Penobscot Nation).

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $339,411 (approved); $339,411 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 8/31/2016

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
Frank Seidel (Project Director, 01/11/2013 - present)
PD-50029-13
Documentation of Baga Mandori (Atlantic, Niger-Congo) (ISO 639-3:bmd)

The documentation of Baga Mandori, a language spoken in the Basse-Côte region of Guinea-Conakry in West Africa, through the compilation of a trilingual dictionary (Baga Mandori-English-French), the development of a small corpus of texts and a grammatical outline, and the training of community members in linguistic documentation techniques.

(edited by staff) This project will deliver the first in-depth linguistic documentation of any of the Baga languages spoken in the Basse-Côte region of Guinea-Conakry, West Africa. Baga Mandori (also Baga Ma(n)duri), the focus of this project, belongs to the Atlantic (Niger-Congo phylum) group of languages and is part of the Mel cluster. Baga Mandori represents one of the two linguistic communities-the other being Baga Sitemu-that still use a Baga variety in intra-communal communication to some degree. The language is, however, under strong pressure by Soso, a Mande language and the dominant lingua franca of the region, and first signs of failing language transmission between generations have been noted. The project will combine linguistic documentation with visual anthropology and community training and participation. Linguistic documentation will be in the form of a trilingual dictionary (Baga Mandori-English-French), an extensive grammatical outline, an orthography, and annotated and transcribed audiovisual material from a variety of linguistic genres. Furthermore, a set of ethnographic documentary films using Baga Mandori as the main language will be produced together with the community and integrated into the linguistic documentation. Lastly, the project aims to train a team of community members from a remote African language community to produce good quality audio recordings and transcription in order to empower them to provide their own documentary materials and thus contribute their own vision to the project.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $247,873 (approved); $247,862 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2013 – 9/30/2015

Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Daryl Baldwin (Project Director, 12/30/2011 - present)
PD-50017-12
Dictionary of the Miami-Illinois Language: the Inokaatawaakani Project

the creation of a digital edition of an 18th-century French dictionary of Miami-Illinois, an Algonquian language formerly spoken in the Midwest. The project would involve transcription, annotation, and translation of the original dictionary and the creation of a searchable online resource.

(edited by staff) The Dictionary of the Miami-Illinois Language: the Inokaatawaakani Project will digitize an unpublished early 18th-century Miami-Illinois bilingual (Early French/Miami-Illinois) dictionary, translate it into modern French and English, and make it accessible via a searchable online interface. Access to this historic document will be of interest to linguists, anthropologists, historians, the general public, and language and cultural educators of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma. Miami-Illinois, an Algonquian language that was spoken in the area of present-day Illinois, Indiana, and western Ohio, has no first-language speakers remaining. The manuscript codex on which the project is based is attributed to Jean-Baptiste Le Boullenger, who probably compiled it in the 1720s, and is now held by the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University. The manuscript consists of a French/Miami-Illinois dictionary and devotional texts in Miami-Illinois. The dictionary occupies 185 leaves, and lists approximately 3,000 words in French, followed by equivalents in Miami-Illinois. Devotional materials include prayers and a catechism, explanations of the Ten Commandments and the symbols of the Apostles, translations of readings for the church year from the Gospels, and a translation of the Book of Genesis. The proposed project is part of current revitalization efforts to teach the heritage language to members of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma. A 20-year collaboration between the tribe and Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, has already created educational materials that are used in tribal community programs, by K-12 public school teachers, tribal and non-tribal student populations at Miami University, and for research supported by the Miami Tribe.

Project fields: Linguistics; Native American Studies
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $124,292 (approved); $124,292 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2012 – 7/31/2015

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6243)
Eugene Buckley (Project Director, 12/30/2011 - present)
PD-50019-12
Kashaya (kju) Database and Dictionary

the creation of an online database, dictionary, and grammatical sketch of Kashaya, a Pomoan language spoken in northern California, based on archival resources and new fieldwork and analysis.

(edited by staff) Kashaya is a critically endangered Native American language of the Pomoan family in northern California. The goal of this project is to develop an electronic database of lexical information, and a grammatical sketch, derived from the notes of Robert Oswalt, a linguist who worked with native speakers in the late 1950s, and from new field research and analysis. The database will be used to generate a complete published dictionary of Kashaya for use by scholars and other researchers, and to create a pedagogical dictionary and targeted word lists and other materials for use in teaching. The published dictionary will serve as a comprehensive reference for language learners, and a grammatical sketch will be written to be accessible to more advanced learners. The lexical database will be used to produce the pedagogical dictionary along with a variety of word lists by semantic area (such as kinship terms, plant names, or verbs of movement), according to the needs of instructors and language learners. The data collected-recordings of interviews with speakers, and the electronic database that is developed-will be archived at the Survey of California and Other Indian Languages at University of California, Berkeley, to ensure their long-term preservation as well as access by scholars and community members.

Project fields: Linguistics; Native American Studies
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $216,698 (approved); $216,698 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2012 – 6/30/2015

Funding details
Original grant (2014) $203,738
Supplement (2014) $12,960

University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203)
Timothy Montler (Project Director, 12/30/2011 - present)
PD-50021-12
Saanich Dictionary and Electronic Text Archive

compilation of a comprehensive online dictionary of Saanich, a dialect of Northern Straits Salish spoken in Vancouver Island, British Columbia, together with a digital audio collection of transcribed and translated speech. The dictionary would also be available in print format.

Saanich is the most vital dialect of Northern Straits, a severely endangered and under-documented Salishan language of North America. Although there is great interest among the Saanich people in preserving the language and a growing number of speakers of Saanich as a second language, Saanich is today spoken fluently as a first language by only a small number of elders living on southern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. I have investigated Salishan linguistics for over 30 years focusing primarily on the languages and dialects of the Straits-sub group. From 1980 to 1991, I conducted field work and published on the Saanich dialect. In 1992, I was asked by the Klallam people to help in their efforts to preserve and revitalize their language. For the past 20 years I have helped them develop language documentation and revitalization material and have just completed a large, comprehensive dictionary of the Klallam language that will be published in 2012. I have now returned to focus on Saanich with the intent of producing a dictionary similar to and exceeding the breadth and depth of the recently finished Klallam dictionary. The primary aim of this project is the production of such a dictionary together with a digital audio collection of transcribed and translated speech. The dictionary database will be built so as to be easily formatted for both print and on-line versions. It will be designed to be both accessible to Saanich language learners and useful to scholars of language and culture. The secondary aim of this project is the linguistic training of a group of Saanich tribal members for their efforts in the preservation and revitalization of their language.

Project fields: Linguistics; Native American Studies
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $349,033 (approved); $349,033 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 8/31/2016

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Wilson Silva (Project Director, 12/30/2011 - present)
PD-50023-12
Desano Collaborative Project (639:3): Collection of Audio-Video Material and Texts

documentation of Desano, an endangered Eastern Tukanoan language spoken in the northwestern Amazonian region of Colombia and Brazil. The project would create a corpus of recordings, transcriptions, and translations of the variety of Desano spoken in Colombia, and, ultimately, produce a dictionary and grammar of this language.

The Desano Collaborative Project (DCP) is a two-year, team-based project that will document Desano language and oral traditions, and support community members with training about language documentation. The focus of this documentation project will be the Desano communities in Colombia. Desano is spoken by 200-300 individuals in northwestern Amazonia, in Colombia and Brazil. It is a member of the Eastern branch of the Tukanoan family, a group of some 20 languages spoken in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Desano is one of the few languages in the family with speakers living in communities spread out in a wide geographical area comprising the three main rivers in the region: Vaupés, Papuri and Tiquié. It is in direct contact with other Eastern Tukanoan languages and with languages of other families (e.g., Makuan and Arawakan). Desano data will provide information that can be used by linguists to distinguish grammatical features inherited from Proto-Tukanoan from features acquired due to contact with other languages of the region. In addition, work on the language conducted during the past three years has revealed a number of typologically intriguing features that will be of broader linguistic interest. This collaborative project has three main documentation goals: (1) production of a high-quality textual and audio-visual corpus of Desano, with a focus on oral traditions; (2) the preparation of a Desano language database; and (3) provision of a collection of interlinearized texts and lexicon with English/Portuguese/Spanish translations. In addition, this project will actively support community efforts in language revitalization, by providing training to community members in aspects of language documentation, which is urgently needed in the Desano communities in Colombia. Meaningful collaborations with Desanos and Colombian linguists are an important part of this project. This will be the first language documentation project engaging the Desanos living in traditional communities in Colombia.

[Media coverage]
Project fields: Latin American Languages; Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $70,937 (approved); $70,937 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2012 – 12/31/2015

Mescalero Apache Tribe (Mescalero, NM 88340)
E. Scott Rushforth (Project Director, 12/20/2010 - present)
PD-50015-11
Mescalero Apache Language Project

Creation of a dictionary and introductory grammar of Mescalero Apache, an Athapaskan language spoken in New Mexico, and expansion of a digital archive of recordings, transcriptions, and analyzed examples of Apache language use.

Mescalero Apache, spoken in southern New Mexico, has received scant attention from linguists, is poorly documented, and is rapidly disappearing. Ndé Bizaa, The Mescalero Apache Tribe Language Program will: (1) produce a dictionary and introductory grammar of Mescalero Apache (southern Athapaskan); and (2) expand the Language Archive by recording, transcribing, and analyzing examples of Apache language use. A database will be created to construct the dictionary and grammar. The proposed dictionary will contain approximately twenty thousand lexical items arranged in two sections: a Mescalero Apache to English dictionary and a glossary of English to Mescalero Apache. The introductory grammar will include sections on phonology, morphology, and syntax, with greatest emphasis on morphology. For the academic community, the proposed tools will provide a foundation for further linguistic study of Mescalero Apache and provide data for comparative analyses. Ndé Bizaa's experience, knowledge of linguistic work in other Athapaskan languages, and expertise in computer applications and audio-visual recording, will ensure the quality of intellectual content. For the Mescalero community, these tools will provide materials that the Tribe can use in language-planning activities, especially at the Mescalero Apache School, and provide a foundation for language revitalization.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $321,200 (approved); $321,200 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2011 – 6/30/2015

Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
Carolyn MacKay (Project Director, 12/20/2010 - present)
PD-50016-11
A Dictionary of Pisaflores Tepehua (TPP)

The production of an online and print dictionary of an endangered Totonac-Tepehua language spoken in the community of Pisaflores, Veracruz, Mexico.

Pisaflores Tepehua is an endangered language of the Totonac-Tepehua family spoken by approximately 2,500 speakers in the community of Pisaflores in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. The proposed project would produce a trilingual (Tepehua/Spanish/English) analytical dictionary, the first dictionary of any of the three Tepehua languages and the first analytical dictionary of a Totonac-Tepehua language. Containing at least 5,000 lexical items, the dictionary would provide a transcription and phonological and morphological analysis of each word, examples of the words used in context, and definitions in both Spanish and English. It would be produced in both print and electronic versions, with the print version accompanied by a CD of digitized audio tokens, or sound files, of each lexical entry and each example phrase, and the electronic version with links between the dictionary entries and their audio tokens. The resulting resource would provide linguists and researchers of language as well as members of the community with useful documentation for linguistic analysis and language preservation. The team of investigators has done fieldwork in the area since 1998 and has published the only linguistic documentation currently available on the Pisaflores Tepehua language. The team would work with speakers of the language over the summers of 2011-2013, recording and verifying the lexical entries that would then be entered into an electronic database, which would serve as the basis for both the print and digital versions of the dictionary. Data entry and analysis would be undertaken during the academic year in the United States.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $200,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2011 – 8/31/2015

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
John Lucy (Project Director, 01/05/2010 - present)
PD-50012-10
Chicago Historical Archive of Mesoamerican Linguistics

Digitization of an archive of linguistic materials that document indigenous languages mainly of Mesoamerica collected between 1930 and 1995. An on-line interface will be developed to provide free access to the materials and associated multimedia resources.

This project proposes to enhance the accessibility of the Microfilm Collection of Manuscripts on Cultural Anthropology (MCMCA) at the University of Chicago. The collection contains an unparalleled corpus of field-based material developed by pre-eminent linguists and linguistic anthropologists from 1930 to 1995. The MCMCA includes approximately 115,000 pages of transcriptions and translations, dictionaries, grammars, concordances, field notes, and other ethnographically rich manuscripts that document approximately 100 indigenous languages belonging to the Mayan, Oto-Manguean, Uto-Aztecan, Mixe-Zoque, Tarascan, Totonacan, Na-Dene, Hokan, Creole, and Carib language families. Some of these languages are extinct; many are endangered; and most are rapidly declining as the number of monolingual speakers diminishes. MCMCA materials would be made more widely accessible by digitizing the microfilm and converting the text with optical character recognition software to enable full-text searches. The metadata for each record in the collection would be enhanced to improve their discoverability by researchers and to link the textual materials to related multimedia resources. The results of this project would support further linguistic analysis.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $171,400 (approved); $171,400 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2010 – 7/31/2012

University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53706-1314)
Monica Macaulay (Project Director, 01/05/2010 - present)
PD-50013-10
Potawatomi Language Documentation, Lexical Database, and Dictionary

The documentation and preservation of the Potawatomi language, an endangered Algonquian language spoken in the Midwestern United States, through preparation of a database of lexical materials and an online and hardcopy bilingual dictionary.

Potawatomi, also known as Neshnabémwen, is a critically endangered Algonquian language spoken primarily in the Midwestern United States. At the height of Potawatomi's historical influence and geographical spread in the late 18th century, there were as many as 10,000 speakers in villages surrounding Lake Michigan. Estimates are that 15 or fewer fluent native speakers of this language remain, all in their 70s and 80s. The goals of the project are the documentation and preservation of the language through the compilation of a database of lexical materials from which a bilingual dictionary will be published in both hardcopy and electronic format. The project draws upon a wide variety of written and recorded language documentation that has been collected by missionaries, speakers, students, and scholars over the years and would make these existing materials more generally available, supplementing them with newly collected linguistic data, consolidating them into a database, and producing a dictionary for the first time. A collaborative effort between community language speakers and linguists, the project would benefit Potawatomi language teachers and learners as well as linguists, especially those interested in comparative and historical Algonquian. The project builds upon a previously funded NSF project to document the related Menominee language.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $375,000 (approved); $374,993 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2010 – 5/31/2014

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
Brent Henderson (Project Director, 12/18/2008 - present)
PD-50009-09
Documentation of Chimiini, a Bantu Language of Somalia

The preparation of a grammar, recordings, a lexicon, texts, an orthography, and a Web site on Chimiini, an endangered Bantu language formerly spoken in Somalia.

Due to Somalia's civil war in the 1990s, the vast majority of Chimiini's 20,000 speakers now live in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Kenya where the pressures of shifting to a culturally and economically dominant language like English or Swahili are intense. Because the language is not being passed on to succeeding generations, the number of Chimiini speakers will rapidly decrease over the next few decades. Yet Chimiini remains poorly documented, represented only by an academic lexicon and a handful of academic linguistics papers. The project will be carried out by collecting linguistic material from large refugee communities. The materials that will result from this project include (1) a reference grammar of Chimiini, (2) a corpus of digitally-archived recordings, (3) two collections of texts including traditional stories, proverbs, and personal histories published in English and Chimiini (one intended for linguists and one for non-linguists), (4) a basic lexicon/phrasebook, (5) a standard orthography, (6) a public Web site with multimedia content about the language and its speakers, and (7) scholarly articles on issues in theoretical linguistics. Furthermore, the collection of texts intended for non-linguists will employ the standard orthography, making it useful for literacy development among the refugee groups.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $185,191 (approved); $182,138 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2009 – 4/30/2014

Funding details
Original grant (2010) $173,095
Supplement (2010) $12,096

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Stephanie Wood (Project Director, 12/18/2008 - present)
PD-50010-09
An Online Nahuatl Lexical Database: Bridging Past, Present, and Future Speakers

The preparation of a multilingual dictionary of the Nahuatl language.

With years of experience collaborating on the Nahuatl language and managing large grants, the Wired Humanities Project at the University of Oregon and academic teams in Mexico are proposing to create a multilingual, no-cost, Nahuatl lexical database with unparalleled dimensions. The database will include the first-ever monolingual dictionary of Nahuatl with its own online interface. We are choosing Eastern Huastecan Nahuatl for the core dictionary because it will serve the largest number of living Nahuatl speakers, but also because we can enhance it with comparisons that will serve speakers of other endangered dialects of the language. We will also provide Spanish translations that bilingual speakers can offer and access through an additional online interface. To this modern Nahuatl written material we will add Classical examples, extracting attestations from recently published colonial manuscripts and studies of the same, with their Spanish and English translations and commentaries. It is our sincere goal to bridge the gap between Modern and Classical Nahuatl and bolster native speakers' literacy and access to the unparalleled cultural legacy that potentially thousands of manuscripts written in Nahuatl can represent. Finally, this lexical database will have the enhancement of audio files pulled from focus group discussions where university students who are native speakers come together to consider word usage and meanings across dialects and capture vital contextualizing language and ethnographic examples.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $350,000 (approved); $350,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 6/30/2013

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Joel Sherzer (Project Director, 12/18/2008 - present)
PD-50011-09
Archiving Significant Collections of Latin American Endangered Language Resources II

Digital archiving of endangered Mexican and South American linguistic materials to be made accessible by the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America.

The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) is a digital repository of multimedia materials. A central part of AILLA's mission is to locate valuable language resources, digitize and catalog them in accordance with international standards, house them in a secure repository, and make them accessible to indigenous people, researchers, and interested laypersons worldwide. The two-year Archiving Significant Collections II (ASC-II) project will perform this service for the following six collections: 1) Achuar and Shuar [Ecuador and Peru]; 2) Quichua and Quechua [Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru]; 3) Tzotzil and other Mayan languages [Mexico]; 4) Pastaza Quechua [Ecuador]; 5) Huasteca Nahua [Mexico]; and 6) Tucano [Brazil].

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $276,985 (approved); $276,985 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2009 – 2/28/2012

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588)
Catherine Rudin (Co Project Director, 12/21/2007 - present); Mark Awakuni-Swetland (Project Director, 12/21/2007 - present)
PD-50007-08
Omaha and Ponca Digital Dictionary

The preparation of an online dictionary of Omaha and Ponca, mutually intelligible Siouan languages spoken in Nebraska and Oklahoma.

The project would create a comprehensive dictionary of Omaha and Ponca at a time when there are only a few dozen elderly fluent speakers. Data would be drawn from archival and published documents from nearly a dozen sources. The largest source is an unpublished word list compiled by ethnologist James Owen Dorsey in the late nineteenth century, which includes approximately 20,000 entries written in a complicated orthography. All materials would be digitized and transcribed into the contemporary orthographies used by tribal members and educators. The dictionary would be in a Structured Queried Language database that conforms to standards promulgated under the Electronic Metastructure for Endangered Languages Data. Omaha has a complex verbal morphology with the possibility of multiple affixes. All words, especially verbs, would be analyzed to determine their roots, their appropriate placement in the dictionary, and which affixed forms should be included. The dictionary would contain a brief grammatical sketch, including a description of the phonemes of the language, its major phonological and morphological patterns, and an outline of sentence structure. This project would make freely available to native communities, students, and researchers a vast collection of Omaha and Ponca language.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Languages, General; Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $348,800 (approved); $348,800 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 8/31/2012

University of Oklahoma, Norman (Norman, OK 73019-3003)
Sean O'Neill (Project Director, 12/21/2007 - present)
PD-50008-08
Documenting Plains Apache: Fieldwork, Archives, and Database

Fieldwork on the grammar, lexicon, and storytelling traditions of the Plains Apache, speakers of an endangered Athabaskan language in Oklahoma. The project would result in a database, which would be used to produce a dictionary and a collection of texts.

This project would produce new material on Plains Apache, a scarcely documented Athabaskan language formerly known as Kiowa-Apache. The original homeland of the Athabaskan family most likely lies in northwestern Canada and Alaska (where the bulk of the languages are spoken today), suggesting a one-time southward migration of the ancestors of the present-day speakers of Plains Apache. When working with a group of closely related languages, it is often possible to reconstruct earlier forms of speech by studying minute differences that have arisen in each of the daughter languages, because each language preserves the material in a slightly different way. Since Plains Apache is the most divergent member of the Apachean branch of Athabaskan, new material on this language variety would play a vital role in reconstructing the prehistory of the Athabaskan-speaking peoples. From another perspective, the speakers of Plains Apache have been in close contact with neighboring Kiowa speakers for well over 100 years, and it would be interesting to assess the degree of influence between these languages. Because the vast majority of the speakers are elderly, this work is urgent. First, I plan to elicit new material on the grammar, lexicon, and storytelling traditions of Plains Apache in order to expand and complete its existing documentation. Second, I would combine the new data with existing archival materials in a database, from which a series of publications would be produced, including a practical dictionary for the tribe, an analytical lexicon with extensive grammatical information, and a collection of narrative texts. Graduate students and a community speaker would be trained in both fieldwork and database construction.

Project fields: Languages, General; Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $348,800 (approved); $270,751 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2008 – 5/31/2013

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
Leanne Hinton (Co Project Director, 01/04/2007 - present); Andrew Garrett (Project Director, 01/04/2007 - present)
PD-50005-07
Berkeley Indigenous Language Resources: Access, Archiving, and Documentation

Enchanced description of and access to linguistic materials, including fieldwork notes, manuscripts, and audio recordings that document over 130 endangered American Indian languages.

The University of California, Berkeley, has sponsored language documentation throughout California and the American West since 1901. For the past 55 years this work has largely been undertaken by linguists affiliated with the Survey of California and Other Indian Languages (SCOIL). The products of this research and that of other linguists included field notes, manuscripts, and audio recordings housed in four Berkeley repositories. The Bancroft Library and Hearst Museum of Anthropology hold most of the older records; materials collected since 1952 are housed in SCOIL and the Berkeley Language Center. Together these collections form the largest university archive of Native American language materials and one of the five most important American linguistic archives of any kind. Despite its importance, this material is inconsistently described, making it difficult to locate resources related to a specific interest. With the assistance of a professional archivist--who is also a trained linguist with experience in language documentation--the project's staff would improve the quality and quantity of information in the SCOIL catalog; create metadata records conforming to the Open Language Archiving Community standard to share information across institutions; devise a controlled vocabulary for California languages that relates the designations used by both scholars and Native communities; and develop a Web interface to provide access to full metadata for all SCOIL collections and abbreviated metadata for related resources at other Berkeley repositories, as well as links to digitized SCOIL materials. The project would also support Native American community revitalization and documentation efforts. Access and use policies would be refined, and staff would provide professional and research support to community-based projects.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $340,000 (approved); $340,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2007 – 12/31/2011

University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203)
Timothy Montler (Project Director, 01/05/2007 - present)
PD-50006-07
Klallam Dictionary and Electronic Text Archive

Preparation of a dictionary of Klallam, an endangered Salishan language spoken in Washington state and Vancouver Island, and the archiving of Klallam texts and audio video materials.

Klallam is an American Indian language of the Salishan family spoken on three reservations on Washington's Olympic Peninsula and Vancouver Island in Canada. The aim of this project is the production of the first full dictionary of the Klallam language together with a digital audio and video collection of transcribed and translated speech in various genres. The dictionary database would be built so as to be easily formatted for both print and online versions. It would be designed to be both accessible to Klallam language learners and useful for scholars of language and culture. Products of this project, all Unicode compliant, would include: 1) a digitized archive of over 140 60-to-90-minute audio recordings in Waveform audio format; 2) a comprehensive dictionary of the Klallam language in Extended Markup Language format keyed to a large digital text archive; 3) a ready-to-print formatted version of the dictionary; 4) an on-line, hypertext version of the dictionary; 5) over 200 Klallam texts, digitized, transcribed, translated and analyzed; 6) 20 Klallam language texts recorded in 1992 on VHS video, converted to digital Audio Video Interleave format for archiving; and 7) these 20 video texts subtitled in Klallam and English and converted into interactive language study tools with links to grammar and dictionary entries.

[Grant products] [Media coverage]
Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $317,502 (approved); $317,502 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2007 – 8/31/2011

Eastern Michigan University (Ypsilanti, MI 48197-2214)
Lyle Campbell (Co Project Director, 01/04/2006 - present); Veronica Grondona (Project Director, 01/04/2006 - present)
PD-50002-06
Wichi: Documentation, Description, and Training

The preparation of language description tools for Wichí (an indigenous language of South America spoken in Argentina and Bolivia) with focus on the undocumented Central Pilcomayo dialect.

The goal of this project is the documentation of Wichí, an indigenous language of South America spoken in Argentina and Bolivia. The project would produce a dictionary, a reference grammar, and a collection of morphologically analyzed and translated texts for Central Pilcomayo Wichí. It would also establish the range of variation across the very divergent Wichí dialects and produce other online resources for scholarly and educational activities.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $228,026 (approved); $161,505 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2006 – 4/30/2012

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Joel Sherzer (Project Director, 01/04/2006 - present); Heidi Johnson (Co Project Director, 01/04/2006 - present)
PD-50003-06
Archiving Significant Collections of Endangered Language Resources

Digital archiving of Mexican, Central, and South American linguistic materials to be made accessible by The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA).

The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) is a Web-based repository of multimedia materials that are digitize in accordance with international standards and are made accessible to scholars and speaker communities worldwide. In collaboration with the eight linguists who have collected materials over the last 40 years, the project staff would digitize and preserve recordings and written materials that document languages of Costa Rica, Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, and Mexico.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $348,000 (approved); $348,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2006 – 8/31/2010

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Ronald Schaefer (Project Director, 01/10/2006 - present)
PD-50004-06
Documenting Edo North Languages with Oral Narratives

Documentation of Edo North languages of Nigeria through linguistic analysis of oral narrative samples that will be transcribed and translated. The project would also prepare a digital archive of the field recordings.

This project will document 15-20 endangered and rapidly fading Edo North (EN) languages spoken in Nigerian villages. For each text, the collaborators will develop interrelated orthographic and interlinear transcriptions, with English translations, that will be disseminated in print and electronic forms. The project will also archive and make accessible the original recordings.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $175,000 (approved); $175,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2006 – 7/31/2010

Unknown institution
George Adams (Project Director, 01/01/1979 - present)
PD-003179-79
Independent Study Program

To conduct study courses on: interpreting historic sites, documents, and photographs; improving the exhibits and publications of museums and historic agencies; and using museum collections in history programs for the schools and general public.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $215,750 (approved); $215,750 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/1979 – 9/30/1980

Regents of The University of California (Irvine, CA 92697-7600)
Wesley Johnson (Project Director, 01/01/1979 - present)
PD-006179-79
Getting History into the Community for Cultural Enrichment and Problem Solving

To support a public sector outreach program (initiated in 1977 with support of a NEH grant) aimed at bringing history into the community by awakening those who hold authority to the value of historians.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $68,971 (approved); $68,971 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/1979 – 6/30/1980

Council of the Southern Mountains (Clintwood, VA 24228)
Mark Middleton (Project Director, 01/01/1979 - present)
PD-006279-79
The Council of the Southern Mountains Appalachian Mobile Bookstore

To provide a forum for the literature of the Appalachian region to make this literature available to the public. The program should reach 50,000 people living in the region.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $37,900 (approved); $37,900 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/1979 – 12/31/1979

Consumers Union Foundation, Inc. (Mt. Vernon, NY 10553-1052)
Rhoda Karpatkin (Project Director, 01/01/1979 - present)
PD-016279-79
Planning Grant

To develop a humanities perspective on contemporary low-income consumer probelms and to plan publications analyzing those problems for policy-makers.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $16,600 (approved); $16,600 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/1979 – 10/31/1979

Unknown institution
Diane Eisenberg (Project Director, 11/01/1978 - present)
PD-020879-79
Energy and the Way We Live: A National Issues Forum

To develop and implement a coordinated, comprehensive nationwide community forum discussion program on the humanitic dimension of the energy issue.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/1978 – 4/30/1979

Appalachian South Folklife Center (Pipestem, WV 25979-0005)
Don West (Project Director, 01/01/1979 - present)
PD-032479-79
Planning for a Public Humanities Program

To plan a program which will serve the people of Appalachia, including a week- end conference involving humanists, scholars, union representatives, state representatives, and citizens.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $17,500 (approved); $17,500 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/1979 – 5/31/1979

National Italian-American Foundation (Washington, DC 20036)
Joseph Ventura (Project Director, 11/01/1978 - present)
PD-033079-79
Planning for Public Humanities Programs

To research studies on issues relating to The National Italian-American Foundation.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $17,500 (approved); $17,500 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/1978 – 5/31/1979

Oil, Chemical, & Atomic Workers International
Anthony Mazzocchi (Project Director, 02/01/1979 - present)
PD-034779-79
Conference on Ethical Issues and Occupational Health Hazards

To conduct a conference on innovative ways of incorporating the humanities into a medical school curriculum that will lead to changes in professional behavior.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $16,182 (approved); $16,182 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/1979 – 6/30/1979

Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (New York, NY 10003-3330)
Marvin Ciporen (Project Director, 05/01/1978 - present)
PD-094278-79
Humanities Program for ACTWU Members

To develop effective materials and settings to implement a humanities program to fill the special needs of workers who have had little contact with the humanities.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $15,000 (approved); $15,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/1978 – 7/31/1979

Foreign Policy Association (New York, NY 10016-6022)
Carter Burgess (Project Director, 07/01/1977 - present)
PD-104079-79
Use of Humanities Materials and Programs in FPA's World Affairs Educational Activities

To promote wider public understanding of the humanities by expanding and bringing to FPS's adult audiences ideas from the humanities that bear on America's past, present, and future role in the world.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $13,565 (approved); $13,565 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/1977 – 6/30/1980

Institute of the Rockies (Missoula, MT 59801)
John Badgley (Project Director, 10/01/1977 - present)
PD-116479-79
Columbia River Watch

To support programs on public policy affecting water use, including a symposiumto develop a primer and educational and audio-visual material, sixteen community programs, and a fair for educational and celebratory events.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $16,586 (approved); $16,586 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/1977 – 1/31/1979

Labor Institute for Human Enrichment (Washington, DC 20006-4101)
Jack Golodner (Project Director, 11/01/1978 - present)
PD-122878-79
Planning Grant for Public Humanities Program

To develop humanities programs for the American working people in cooperation with labor unions and scholars.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $4,500 (approved); $4,500 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/1978 – 9/30/1979

Morningside College (Sioux City, IA 51106-1717)
Cornelius Bodine (Project Director, 11/01/1978 - present)
PD-002979-79
Third Annual Midwestern Conference on Food and Social Policy

To support a conference that will examine U.S. public policy affecting food and its global distribution.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $15,000 (approved); $15,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/1978 – 11/30/1978

Philadelphia Area Cultural Consortium (Philadelphia, PA 19102-5021)
Meredith Savery (Project Director, 01/01/1979 - present)
PD-006379-79
Discovering the Philadelphia Tradition

To support a full-scale social and cutlrual education program on the traditions of the city of Philadelphia and its environs.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $199,940 (approved); $199,940 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/1979 – 6/30/1980

National Center for Urban Ethnic Affairs (Washington, DC 20005-5502)
William Watman (Project Director, 12/01/1977 - present)
PD-019678-79
Neighborhood and the Humanities

To develop and administer model programs in neighborhoods of Chicago, BaltimoreProvidence, and South Bend which seek to bring academic and community humanities together around issues concerning the values and quality of life in those communiites.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $42,585 (approved); $42,585 (awarded)
Grant period: 12/1/1977 – 5/31/1979

District 1199 Cultural Center, Inc. (New York, NY 10036-3981)
Moe Foner (Project Director, 01/01/1979 - present)
PD-022479-79
Bread and Roses

To support conferences, seminars, symposia, lectures and workshops on history, literature, art, photography and film and to experience a variety of dramatic, musical performances relevant to the lives of hospital workers.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/1979 – 12/31/1980

National Coalition of Cuban-Americans (Washington, DC 20013-2984)
Andres Hernandez (Project Director, 02/01/1979 - present)
PD-033979-79
Planning for a Public Humanities Program

To support planning for a public humanities program.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $17,422 (approved); $17,422 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/1979 – 7/31/1979

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA 02139-4307)
David Rose (Project Director, 07/01/1979 - present)
PD-092776-79
Faith, Science, and the Future

To broaden the public outreach of the Faith, Science, and the Future conference to be held at M.I.T.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $75,000 (approved); $75,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/1979 – 12/31/1979

Institute for the Study of Civic Values (Philadelphia, PA 19108-1001)
Edward Schwartz (Project Director, 07/01/1978 - present)
PD-118178-79
Justice, Participation, and Urban Institutions

To examine how religious and social Darwinist traditions respond to the major issues surrounding work, community life, and economic development in cities.

Project fields: Law and Jurisprudence
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $52,504 (approved); $52,504 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/1978 – 6/30/1979

University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
John Burke (Project Director, 08/01/1978 - present)
PD-129778-79
The Rural Communities of Georgia and the Contemporary Crisesin Values

To support a planning conference that will develop a public program for four rural communities in Georgia about changing values.

Project fields: Social Sciences, General
Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $2,224 (approved); $2,224 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/1978 – 10/31/1979

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