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22 matches

Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs*
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Tuskegee University (Tuskegee, AL 36088-1923)
Loretta S. Burns,
AB-50158-14
A Critical Reappraisal of Booker T. Washington: A Tuskegee Humanities Initiative

A two-year archival digitization, faculty-student research, and course development project on the work and legacy of Booker T. Washington, to take place at Tuskegee University.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $99,999
Grant period: 1/1/2014 – 12/31/2015

Grambling State University (Grambling, LA 71245)
Hugh F. Wilson
AB-50185-14
Enhancing the Teaching of Ancient Greek Drama at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

A three-week curricular development institute on teaching ancient Greek drama for faculty from multiple Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) that would be held at Grambling State University.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $99,848
Grant period: 1/1/2014 – 12/31/2014

Norfolk State University (Norfolk, VA 23504-8090)
Cassandra L. Newby-Alexander
AB-50131-13
Observing 1619: The African Diaspora in American History and Culture

Two symposia, several teacher workshops, and the development of educational resources on the African diaspora in the New World, with a focus on the arrival of twenty Africans at Old Point Comfort (Fort Monroe, Virginia) in August 1619.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $69,529
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2014

Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)
Molly Myerowitz Levine
AB-50132-13
From Classics to Ancient Mediterranean Studies: Departmental Innovation

A three-year series of faculty workshops, public lectures, and course development activities leading to the transformation of Howard University's Classics Department into a Department of Ancient Mediterranean Studies.

Project fields: Classics
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $59,147
Grant period: 1/1/2013 – 12/31/2015

Mississippi Valley State University (Itta Bena, MS 38941-1401)
Jianqing Zheng
AB-50148-13
African-American Literary Heritage: Three Mississippi Writers

An eighteen-month program of study and curriculum development for university faculty and school teachers on Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, and Sterling Plumpp.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $55,755
Grant period: 1/1/2013 – 6/30/2014

Claflin University (Orangeburg, SC 29115-6815)
Mitali Pati Wong
AB-50097-12
Reading Classical and Contemporary Literature from South Asia through an Interdisciplinary Literary Lens

A two-year series of faculty workshops, course development, and public lectures on classical and contemporary literature from South Asia.

"Classical and Contemporary Literature from South Asia" is a two-year series of faculty workshops, public lectures, and course development at Claflin University on classical and contemporary literature from South Asia. Ten faculty members participate in three major project activities: faculty study workshops; discussion forums following four public lectures by visiting scholars Muhammad Umar Memon, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Thibaut d'Hubert, University of Chicago; Waqas Khwaja, Agnes Scott College; and Deepika Bahri, Emory University; and faculty-student presentations at Claflin University's annual Regional English and Language Arts Pedagogy Conference. They also create an interdisciplinary special topics course, South Asia: Texts and Contexts, in both on-campus and studyabroad formats. Readings from the Classical period include the autobiography of Mughal dynasty founder Zaheeruddin Babur and the memoir of his daughter Gulbadan Begum, as well as works by Persian poets Abolqasem Firdousi and Shamsuddin Hafiz; Urdu poet Mirza Ghalib; Indian poets Amir Khusro and Kabir Das; and Indian philosopher Tulsi Das. Colonial-era readings include the writings of M. K. Gandhi, novels by Mulk Raj Anand and Raja Rao, a memoir by Dhan Gopal Mukerji, and works by Indian, Bangladeshi, and Pakistani poets Rabindranath Tagore, Kazi Nazrul Islam, and Sir Muhammad Iqbal. Postcolonial and contemporary readings include works by the Afghan novelists Khaled Hosseini and Atiq Rahimi; other novels by Salman Rushdie, Mohsin Hamid, and Arvind Adiga; the memoirs of poets Meena Alexander and Bapsi Sidhwa; and works by Urdu poet Faiz Ahmed Faiz and Jewish Indian poet Nissim Ezekiel. The selected texts contribute to an understanding of the diverse literary heritage of South Asia and build upon Claflin University's existing faculty and student exchange programs with nine universities in the Indian subcontinent.

Project fields: Comparative Literature
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $99,922
Grant period: 1/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Albany State University (Albany, GA 31705-2796)
Kimberly Harper (project director)
Kimberly Harper (co-project director)
AB-50103-12
Albany, Georgia: Gateway to the National Civil Rights Struggle

A humanities bridge program over two summers for selected high school students on the history, literature, art, and music of the Civil Rights Movement.

"Albany, Georgia: Gateway to the National Civil Rights Struggle" is a two-year project at Albany State University (ASU) supporting a humanities summer bridge program for students from Dougherty and nearby counties in Southwest Georgia. The project allows under-achieving students to learn about the history, literature, art, and music of the Civil Rights Movement. Under the leadership of project director Marva Banks (African-American, African, and Caribbean literature), the program engages tenth and eleventh graders in the study of the Civil Rights Movement, focusing on the catalytic Albany Movement (1961-1963), a collective protest against Jim Crow laws that laid the foundation for subsequent demonstrations in the South and throughout the nation. The project's goals are to improve the participants' critical reading, writing, and communications skills; to lead students in an examination of the history, art, and music of the era; and to involve them in collecting oral histories of surviving participants in the Albany Movement. "ASU alumni helped launch the Albany Movement," notes the project director, "while other activists joined students at Albany State . . . to advance the cause of Civil Rights." During each of two summers, twenty-five students spend six weeks learning about this important history. They study, for example, the role of Charles M. Sherrod, now on the history faculty at ASU and available for interview, as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) who "helped lead the charge against segregation laws and policies in the city"; and that of former ASU student Bernice Johnson Reagon (Sweet Honey in the Rock) as one of the original Albany "Freedom Singers." They read works by Frederick Douglass, James Weldon Johnson, Rudolph Fisher, Ernest J. Gaines, Maya Angelou, Robert Frost, and Amy Tan, as well as study Billie Holiday's rendition of "Strange Fruit," an anti-lynching piece. They also travel to Montgomery and Selma, Alabama, and Atlanta, Georgia, to visit other sites related to the Civil Rights Movement in addition to those visited in Albany.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $100,458
Grant period: 1/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Winston-Salem State University (Winston-Salem, NC 27110-0001)
Joti Sekhon (project director)
Robert N. Anderson (co-project director)
AB-50109-12
Integrating Teaching and Learning about India in the Curriculum through the Humanities and the Liberal Arts

A three-year series of faculty study workshops, guest lectures, and seminars providing an overview of India from historical and contemporary perspectives.

"Integrating India into the Liberal Arts Curriculum" is a three-year series of faculty study workshops, guest lectures, and follow-up seminars at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) providing an overview of India from historical and contemporary perspectives. As a part of the project, an interdisciplinary group of twelve WSSU faculty members (consisting of a core group of five humanities faculty, one faculty member each from the School of Business and Economics and the School of Health Sciences, and five faculty members chosen at large from across the campus) undertake an overview of India from historical and contemporary perspectives. The study group's focus is on classical and modern Indian literature, the country's diverse religious traditions, mainstream and subaltern perspectives on Indian history, Indian art and musical traditions, language diversity in India, and Indian women. In addition to the core group, eleven invited scholars participate in a kick-off workshop, deliver lectures, and lead seminars over three semesters. They are: South Asian studies scholars Afroz Taj, Pamela Lothspeich, and John Caldwell (all University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill); Neil DeVotta (Wake Forest University); anthropologists Lisa Mitchell (University of Pennsylvania) and Sandya Hewamanne (Wake Forest University); historian Ramnarayan Rawat (University of Delaware); religious studies scholar Christian Lee Novetzke (University of Washington); English and communications studies professor Sheila Nayar (Greensboro College); art historian Rebecca M. Brown (Johns Hopkins University); international business professor Jacobus Boers (Georgia State University); women's studies scholar Anita Nahal (Howard University); and social work professor Murali Nair (Cleveland State University). The aim of the project is to develop new courses focusing on India and to infuse existing courses with knowledge about Indian culture and society in a global context to enrich the Humanities and Liberal Arts foundation of the WSSU curriculum.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $99,285
Grant period: 1/1/2012 – 12/31/2014

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352)
Marilyn Button (project director)
Chiekde Ihejirika (co-project director)
AB-50120-12
Lincoln University of Pennsylvania's Global Heritage and Legacy: a Humanities Initiative

A two-year program of study, framed by two conferences, in which ten faculty would conduct research and develop teaching modules on Lincoln University's diasporic heritage.

"Lincoln University of Pennsylvania's Global Heritage and Legacy" consists of a two-year program of study, framed by two conferences, in which ten faculty members conduct research and develop teaching modules on Lincoln University's diasporic heritage. This project seeks to revive the humanities at what has become an increasingly science-dominated institution. It does so by shaping a program that harnesses Lincoln University's distinctive history as the first institution of higher learning for African Americans (1854), ample legacy of prominent graduates, and ongoing connections with Africa and the Caribbean. Lincoln University taught Liberian boys beginning in 1873 and, nearly a century later, students from the Caribbean and emerging African nations. It graduated the first president of independent Nigeria and the first prime minister of Ghana. Lincoln University's distinctive humanities alumni include Langston Hughes of the Harlem Renaissance; the late writer and musician Gil Scott Heron; Larry Neal, founder of the Black Arts Movement; and film historian Donald Bogle. The program opens with a four-day summer institute with topics including "Lincoln University poets and their impact on the world; the University's impact on African history and Africa's impact on the University; the University and the Civil Rights Movement; and Frederick Douglass as a catalyzing figure for humanities studies." Sessions also introduce faculty to the university's online archives and collection of African art. During the following academic year, ten core faculty, selected through competition, conduct research and develop course modules that build on the institute topics and university resources. They present this work at a two-day humanities conference in the fall of 2013. Though the summer institute and fall conference are be open to all faculty and the general public, priority for the core faculty would be given to those who teach first-year students in order to maximize the program's impact.

Project fields: African American Studies
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $100,000
Grant period: 1/1/2012 – 12/31/2014

Alcorn State University (Lorman, MS 39096-7510)
Cecile Dianne Bunch
AB-50069-11
Stories That Heal: Embedding Narrative Medicine in the Sciences, English, and Nursing Curricula

A two-year project on narrative medicine for twenty science and humanities professors to enrich undergraduate and graduate health care programs with literary studies.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $97,506
Grant period: 5/1/2011 – 5/31/2013

Savannah State University (Savannah, GA 31404-5255)
Robert W. Smith
AB-50084-11
STUDYING THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN SAVANNAH AND SOUTHEAST GEORGIA: DEVELOPING RESOURCES FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY EXPLO

An eighteen-month forum, consisting of public lectures, colloquia, and curriculum development activities, on the African-American experience in Savannah and Southeast Georgia during the historical periods of slavery and emancipation.

Project fields: African American Studies
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $99,929
Grant period: 1/1/2011 – 6/30/2015

Rust College (Holly Springs, MS 38635-2328)
Marco Robinson
AB-50086-11
Center for the Study of Ida B. Wells and the African American Heritage in North Mississippi

The development of a website and searchable database on the life work of pioneer journalist and civil rights advocate Ida B. Wells.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $99,949
Grant period: 1/1/2011 – 8/31/2013

Norfolk State University (Norfolk, VA 23504-8090)
Cassandra L. Newby-Alexander
AB-50053-09
Waterways to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in Virginia

A project to create a historical simulation of the Underground Railroad in Virginia by using interactive gaming technology to educate high school and college students.

Project fields: African American Studies
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $100,000
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 12/31/2011

Jackson State University (Jackson, MS 39217-0001)
Robert Luckett
AB-50061-09
Collaboration for Digital Access for Margaret Walker Archives

A project to digitize and provide intellectual context for the papers of African-American writer Margaret Walker Alexander (1915-1998), which are housed in the university's Sampson Library.

[Grant products]
Project fields: African American Studies
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $97,087
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 6/30/2013

Virginia State University (Petersburg, VA 23806-1000)
Christina Proenza-Coles
AB-50037-08
Local History in a Global Context: Petersburg's African American History in the Context of the Atlantic World

To Support: A one-year project to create a research center, a website, and a graduate history curriculum on the history of Petersburg, Virginia's African American community.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $74,322
Grant period: 2/1/2008 – 12/31/2010

Kentucky State University (Frankfort, KY 40601-2355)
George P. Weick
AB-50018-07
Reinvigorating Humanities Teaching and Learning through a Comparative Approach to World Literature

A program to enhance the comparative study of classic works of Western civilization along with selected non-Western and African American works for ten faculty members engaged in revising the core curriculum.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $29,862
Grant period: 2/1/2007 – 5/31/2008

Prairie View A & M University (Prairie View, TX 77445)
James M. Palmer
AB-50019-07
Reeling Them In: Invigorating the Humanities Through Film At Two Texas Historically Black Colleges

A collaboration between Prairie View A & M University and Texas Southern University to prepare faculty at both institutions to develop and teach courses on the history and the critical interpretation of film.

Project fields: Film History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $74,843
Grant period: 1/1/2007 – 5/31/2008

Mississippi Valley State University (Itta Bena, MS 38941-1401)
Jianqing Zheng
AB-50020-07
Richard Wright: A Mississippi Writer

A project on Richard Wright and his works, to include workshops and the development of teaching materials, for faculty and school teachers from the Mississippi Delta.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $30,000
Grant period: 1/1/2007 – 12/31/2007

Virginia State University (Petersburg, VA 23806-1000)
Dirk Peter Philipsen
AB-50024-07
FREEDOM, ECONOMICS AND RELIGION: Race and African American Experience in the Atlantic World: The Case of Petersburg, VA

Four workshops on the history of Petersburg, aimed at developing a model for teaching local history in a global context.

Project fields: History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $30,000
Grant period: 2/1/2007 – 6/30/2008

Grambling State University (Grambling, LA 71245)
Hugh F. Wilson
AB-50029-07
Enhancing the Comprehension, Appreciation and Teaching of Western Literature: from Homer to Shakespeare at HBCUs

A month-long summer program of study of Homer, Dante, Marie de France, Christine de Pizan, and Shakespeare for six to eight faculty members at Grambling and participants selected from neighboring Historically Black College and Universities.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $75,000
Grant period: 1/1/2007 – 12/31/2007

Xavier University of Louisiana (New Orleans, LA 70125)
Gary A. Donaldson
AB-50016-06
The Diaspora in segregated Louisiana: an archival and oral history research initiative

A project to involve faculty and students in the recovery of the cultural heritage of the African diaspora in Louisiana by locating and preserving transcripts of original interviews produced in the Federal Writers' Project and by incorporating additional interviews and other relevant resources.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $30,000
Grant period: 4/1/2006 – 8/31/2009

Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)
Georgia M. Dunston
AB-50009-06
Advancing Humanities and Genetics Teaching and Scholarship at HBCUs

A collaboration between the GenEthics Center of the National Humane Genome Center at Howard University and the Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care to enhance the links between genetics and humanities at HBCUs.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $74,981
Grant period: 4/1/2006 – 11/30/2008

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