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Funded Projects Query Form
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Grant programs:Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions*
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Dominican University (River Forest, IL 60305-1099)
Gema Ortega (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Sheila C. Bauer-Gatsos (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)

AC-284432-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 9/30/2023

Culturally Relevant Voices: First-Year Writing and Speaking Across the Curriculum

Faculty development to optimize the implementation of a required first-year Critical Reading, Writing, and Speaking (CRWS) course sequence with a stronger grounding in culturally relevant pedagogy.

This project provides training to 23 faculty members and facilitators at a Hispanic Serving Institution that will improve their ability to teach reading, writing, and speaking to students from diverse backgrounds. Three "academies" will increase faculty capacity to utilize Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in order to facilitate student engagement with humanities texts. The academies—Teaching in Culturally Interactive Zones; Teaching Reading, Writing, and Speaking to Translingual and Transcultural Students, and Reimagine, Empower, and Embrace Diverse Student Voices—will address the project's goals: (1) to enhance the instructors' ability to effectively incorporate culturally relevant humanities texts in first-year writing and speaking courses; (2) to improve instructors’ knowledge of multilingual learning processes that improve students’ written and oral skills, and (3) to increase student proficiency in oral and written communication in the 1st-year reading, writing, and speaking program.

Mount Saint Mary's University (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1599)
Lia Roberts (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Stephen Inrig (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284466-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$148,899 (approved)
$148,899 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2022 – 3/31/2025

Women at the Los Angeles-Tijuana Border Project

The development of a project to study and preserve the history and culture of Women at the Los Angeles-Tijuana (WALAT) border region, including the development of a Gender and Border Studies minor.

MSMU’s proposed Women at the Los Angeles-Tijuana Border Project (“WALAT Border Project”) is a three-year humanities initiative to study and preserve the history and culture of women at the Los Angeles-Tijuana border. The project will 1) Develop a new WALAT Border Project minor—“Gender and Border Studies”—highlighting women’s experiences at the border. This minor will include new multidisciplinary humanities courses and include undergraduate humanities research opportunities, co-teaching, and/or guest lectures. 2) Form a WALAT Border Project Working Group comprised of MSMU faculty and external faculty partners at other universities in Southern California and Baja. 3) Launch a WALAT Border Project Symposium in final year of the project. These activities ensure engagement in the content by a wide range of scholars and the public while also encouraging the participation of emerging undergraduate scholars.

Mendocino College (Ukiah, CA 95482-3017)
Rebecca Montes (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

AC-284501-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$103,023 (approved)
$103,023 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 11/30/2024

Northern California Native American History Speaker Series

A three-year faculty development project on the history and cultures of California’s Native Americans.

Northern California Native American History Speaker Series that aims to enhance faculty knowledge of the local area history in collaboration with tribal entities.

West Texas A&M University (Canyon, TX 79016-0001)
Alex Hunt (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Alexandria Janette McCormick (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284513-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$148,728 (approved)
$148,728 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2025

Forgotten Frontera: The Mexican American Southern Plains

A curricular and co-curricular enrichment initiative focused on the cultural and historical roles of Mexican Americans in the Southern Plains region.  

The Center for the Study of the American West (CSAW) at WTAMU undertakes “Forgotten Frontera: The Mexican American Southern Plains” to preserve cultural heritage and to further teaching/learning in the humanities, including Spanish language and culture, through curricular innovation, faculty development, and community outreach. To build strength in humanities through HSI status, the project emphasizes a marginalized ethnic regional history and the under-appreciated importance of that group’s contribution to regional culture. Visiting scholars will address annual topics of “The Llaneros,” “Mexicanidad,” and “Becoming Mexican American.” WTAMU faculty will develop and offer thematically aligned humanities and language courses each year. Working between the university, its museum, and the community, CSAW will oversee curricular development, discussion of HSI best practices, delivery of new research, and student internships.

Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Jasmine Alinder (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Pranav Anand (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Sean Keilen (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

AC-284519-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,500 (approved)
$149,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/28/2025

Humanizing Technology

The development and piloting of a new humanities certificate for engineering students.

With the NEH Initiatives for HSIs grant, we will create a new Certificate in the Humanities to provide rigorous humanistic training for our Engineering students. Our goal is to develop students' capacities as deliberative, critical thinkers about social and cultural systems and to train students who can attest to the relevance of humanistic thinking not simply for their occupational life, but for navigating their values and place in the world. The certificate will achieve three goals: ensure that our many Engineering students use humanistic methods to explore and understand the social, cultural, and historical ramifications of new technologies; make purposeful general education requirements that students now complete haphazardly; and, by introducing Engineering students to humanities disciplines earlier, give them options should they change majors, without prolonging their time to degree.

San Diego State University Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-1931)
Elizabeth Ann Pollard (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Pamela A. Jackson (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284523-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,998 (approved)
$149,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024

Building a Comics and Social Justice Curriculum

A two-year project to develop 10 new courses and a certificate program in comic studies.

Scholars who study comics and graphic novels have long recognized their power to perpetuate harmful stereotypes; but also, more recently, their capacity to challenge injustice. Through engagement with issues like racial discrimination, gender inequality, sexual identity, and immigration, the ever-changing medium of comics is a change-maker. Humanists are well-positioned to trace that change and, through scholarship and teaching, make meaning of its power. Comics@SDSU seeks $150,000 for a two-year initiative to 1) develop ten new courses that will deepen and expand our humanistic comics curriculum, 2) use these courses to populate a proposed certificate in Comic Studies, and 3) support workshops that bring scholars to campus to energize comic studies at our Hispanic Serving Institution. The humanistic approach to the study of comics that we will cultivate through workshops, courses and a certificate program will empower thousands of students to visualize and manifest a more just future.

St. Francis College (Brooklyn, NY 11201-4398)
Jennifer Wingate (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Athena Devlin (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Emily Edwards (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284525-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$149,532 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Digital Humanities Across the Curriculum

A two-year curriculum development project to integrate digital humanities into history, communications, interdisciplinary studies, and English courses.

Digital Humanities Across the Curriculum will provide the tools and resources to allow St. Francis College to implement digital humanities across multiple disciplines so that nearly all 2,700 students are exposed to digital humanities. This includes the course redesign for at least eight courses, professional development for over 50 faculty and the creation of a Digital Humanities Lab.

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark (Newark, NJ 07104-3010)
Stephanie Rodriguez (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Jennifer Byrnes Austin (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284548-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2025

Lives in Translation: Lead Through Language

The creation of a certificate program in translation and interpretation, and the development of its curricular, service-learning, and language-documentation components.

The Lives in Translation (LiT) program, which is housed within the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at Rutgers University-Newark, where we embrace our role as an anchor institution in our diverse social milieu as central to our identity, is proposing a three-year humanities initiative to (1) expand curricular offerings in translation, interpreting, and multilingualism, (2) to provide language services in a multitude of languages to our Limited English Proficiency members of our community, including indigenous and endangered languages, and (3) to support innovative teaching and learning of language documentation of multilinguals. Through this proposal, Lives in Translation’s vision is to cultivate the linguistic richness of our Rutgers-Newark campus by making languages a cornerstone of educational opportunities and providing deeper knowledge and understanding of global cultures as an integral part of our academic capacity.

Regents of the University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)
Claudia Holguin Mendoza (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Jorge Leal (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284574-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024

Spanglish and Bilingualism in Latinx Studies: A Major, a Minor, and a National Curriculum

A two-year curricular development project to create two new bilingual Latinx history courses and to incorporate a bilingual pedagogical approach into additional Latinx studies humanities courses. 

This project proposes an interdisciplinary initiative led by the Latino & Latin American Studies Research Center (LLASRC) at the University of California, Riverside (UCR) to create a Latino and Latin American Studies major and redesign the Latino and Latin American Studies minor while infusing bilingualism throughout both programs. Latinx Studies programs throughout the country have educated broad groups of students in the histories and cultures of this growing demographic group while affirming the identities of Latinx students who typically completed high school without seeing their own experiences in the curriculum. Yet surprisingly, ours will be the first to design a full curriculum that capitalizes upon students’ familiarity with Spanish to teach them deeper skills for engagement with historical, political, and cultural texts and push them to continually analyze the relationship between language and power, all while affirming their real-life bilingual abilities.

San Diego State University Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-1931)
Consuelo Salas (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Cali Linfor (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Karen Koss (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284632-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$145,832 (approved)
$145,832 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2025

Creating Expansive Approaches to the Teaching of Writing in a Southern California Border Region

Faculty intellectual enrichment opportunities and development of teaching resources that will facilitate development of writing course curriculum that centers a global rhetorics approach.

Creating Expansive Approaches to the Teaching of Writing in a Southern California Border Region is a three-year faculty intellectual enrichment, teaching resources, and curriculum initiative within the Department of Rhetoric and Writing Studies (RWS) at San Diego State University. The core humanities theme this project will address is exploring the exclusionary practices within and throughout our teaching of writing when we privilege primarily Western forms of rhetoric. The intellectual enrichment opportunities and curricular resources created from these initiatives, and the insights gained from these activities will then be used to create an expanded model of a first-year and upper division writing course curriculum that centers a global rhetorics approach. This grant would assist RWS enhance humanities teaching and learning, specifically in required undergraduate writing courses by expanding our rhetorical instruction to account for the varied and global rhetorical practices.

New Mexico State University (Las Cruces, NM 88003-8002)
Eric Magrane (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Kerry Banazek (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)

AC-277380-21
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$149,890 (approved)
$149,890 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024

Critical Approaches to Place: Teaching Narrative Mapping in Southern New Mexico

A two-year project to develop curriculum integrating geography, English, and digital humanities.

“Critical Approaches to Place: Teaching Narrative Mapping in Southern New Mexico” is a three-year curriculum development and public engagement project organized by collaborators from New Mexico State University (NMSU)’s Geography and English departments. It includes a faculty development workshop, which will help instructors from diverse disciplines develop digital story mapping assignments that support first-generation, multilingual, and binational students in unique ways. Additional project components include: a new geohumanities course co-taught by the project directors, a public lecture series, and a bilingual public exhibit developed in partnership with the Las Cruces Museum System that highlights student work. Taking Story Maps as a common starting place helps faculty participants, students, and community partners develop stronger relationships with one another and understand how the humanities provide essential insights into place and global environmental challenges.

Capital Community College (Hartford, CT 06103-1211)
Jeffrey F. L. Partridge (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

AC-277584-21
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$149,426 (approved)
$149,026 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Black Heritage Project: Empowering Students Through Black Community History

Development of a digital archive to be used within community college and high school curricula, along with the creation of a permanent exhibit and lecture series on local African American history.

Capital Community College, a Hispanic-serving institution in downtown Hartford, proposes a Humanities Initiatives project centered on the history and people of Hartford’s Talcott Street Church and Black School to empower students through local Black community history. In partnership with Capital Preparatory Magnet School and nearby museums, the project develops three components under the theme of empowering students through the history of the Talcott Street Church and School: (1) humanities curriculum development, (2) establishment of an exhibition to support pedagogy and commemorate the historic site, and (3) inauguration of an annual public lecture called The Pennington Lecture.

William Paterson University (Wayne, NJ 07470-2152)
Wartyna Davis (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Barbara Suess (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Peter Mandik (Co Project Director: October 2022 to present)

AC-277690-21
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,994 (approved)
$149,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2024

Data Storytelling

The development of a new minor that integrates digital data and analysis into humanities courses, along with a series of faculty workshops in digital humanities.

William Paterson University (WP), an eligible Hispanic- and Minority-Serving public institution in Wayne, New Jersey proposes a humanities initiative to create a new minor in data storytelling that will teach students to not only critically consume, evaluate, and interpret data, but also use it to communicate ideas, tell stories, and create new knowledge. Grant funds will support the development, implementation, and evaluation of the new minor over three years. The proposed project includes (1) two cohorts of a one-year professional development program for faculty interested in teaching in the minor; (2) revision and creation of 16 elective courses for the minor; (3) four technology-for-the-humanities workshops open to all members of the WP community to prepare faculty to integrate data technologies into the humanities classroom; and (4) initial piloting of eight of the new and revised elective courses.

Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Rachael Scarborough King (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Danielle L. Spratt (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)

AC-277694-21
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,402 (approved)
$149,402 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Hidden Archives: Race, Gender, and Religion in UCSB’s Ballitore Collection

A two-year project on the digitization and examination of abolitionist materials to be included in experiential learning and curriculum development.

Hidden Archives is a collaborative project between the University of California, Santa Barbara, California State University-Northridge, and Howard University that digitizes and researches a collection of abolitionist materials held at UCSB while introducing underrepresented students to archival research and the digital humanities. Although both archival and digital skills are necessary to address crucial topics regarding the history of race, enslavement, and protest, the fields of book history and the digital humanities remain exclusionary to scholars of color. Hidden Archives addresses such concerns through collaborative research between faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students. The project focuses on the Ballitore Collection, a group of 18th- and 19th-century Quaker materials. By examining the collection with a diverse research team, we make it available for scholars, students, and the public while shaping a generation of researchers attuned to questions of power and absence.

CUNY Research Foundation, City College (New York, NY 10031-9101)
Renata Kobetts Miller (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Thomas Peele (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)

AC-277702-21
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,431 (approved)
$149,431 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024

Building a Digital Humanities Minor at the City College of New York

A three-year initiative to develop and pilot a minor in digital humanities at City College, to be housed in the Division of Humanities and the Arts.

The City College of New York proposes to develop and pilot a curriculum for a minor in Digital Humanities. For humanities majors these courses and this minor will serve three central purposes: they will increase students' inquiry-driven and experiential learning in the humanities, they will augment and enrich traditional humanistic study by providing our students with a broader array of techniques in performing critical analysis and problem-solving (two of the central values of a humanities education), and they will expand students' understanding of the analytical frameworks that are available to them. By emphasizing the points of convergence between humanities and technology the Digital Humanities minor will enrich students' understanding of how the humanities fit within broader contexts; it will also prepare them for a broader array of career options. These courses may also attract technologically-oriented students to pursue humanistic study.

Florida International University Board of Trustees (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Julio Capo (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

AC-277755-21
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Miami Studies: Building a New Interdisciplinary Public Humanities Program

A two-year project to create a new, interdisciplinary undergraduate program in Miami Studies.

The Wolfsonian Public Humanities Lab (WPHL) at Florida International University (FIU) seeks to create a new, rigorous program in Miami Studies that is particularly attentive to the unique skills our diverse student body currently possesses or needs to sharpen to be successful in today’s job market. This project proposes the creation of a series of new courses or modules that are critically integrated to FIU’s Office of Micro-Credential Initiatives, housed within the Division of Academic & Student Affairs, to build a sustained skills-based program for our students that is centered on the study of history literature, culture, language, art, architecture, politics, and overall humanistic experience of the diverse people of the Greater Miami area, a minority-majority region whose demographics are mirrored in the student population at FIU.

University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78229-3901)
Rachel Pearson (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

AC-277786-21
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,445 (approved)
$149,445 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024

The HIV Storytelling Project: Narratives from South Texas

A collaborative project to collect and archive oral histories of the HIV epidemic, bringing together medical students, faculty, and members of the San Antonio community.

This project in digital humanities will be a collaboration between UT Health researchers and persons living with HIV and their advocates who have organized as the End Stigma End HIV Alliance (ESEHA). In its curricular component, researchers and ESEHA advocates will train health professions students in the history of HIV and HIV advocacy, the experience of living with HIV in South Texas, oral history, and digital storytelling production. Students will then work with research participants to develop compelling, participant-driven digital narratives from the South Texas HIV epidemic, and archive these narratives for use by the participants themselves as well as by medical educators and learners, community members and humanities researchers.

National-Louis University (Chicago, IL 60603-6191)
Christopher Martin Caver (Project Director: July 2019 to present)

AC-269129-20
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,548 (approved)
$99,548 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023

Creating an Interdisciplinary Humanities Minor for Career-Focused Students

The creation of a six-course interdisciplinary humanities minor for undergraduate students pursuing pre-professional majors.

This project creates an interdisciplinary humanities minor program for students pursuing existing professionally-oriented major tracks. We propose to create six new courses. Two core courses will be created in aesthetic judgment and interpretive methods that use Chicago artists, writers, histories, and communities as their primary context of application and illustration. Four electives will also be created to provide humanistic counterparts to major coursework. These will be courses in storytelling and the digital humanities (Computer Science and Information Systems), the ethics of work and business (Business Administration), philosophical approaches to mortality (Human Services), and histories of crime and punishment (Criminal Justice). Additionally, our project develops opportunities for students to intern at Chicago-area humanities organizations or pursue original research as part of completing their minor, and it creates a capstone colloquium to showcase these experiences.

San Antonio College (San Antonio, TX 78212-4299)
Erik Anderson (Project Director: July 2019 to present)

AC-269185-20
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,659 (approved)
$99,659 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023

San Anto History GO!

A three-year faculty development project to incorporate geographic information system technology into college and middle school history courses.

San Antonio College proposes "San Anto History GO!": a humanities initiative that uses the ArcGIS Online platform to build location-based learning and augmented reality mobile applications to connect students and the community to marginalized historical places and histories in and around the San Antonio area. Supporting the NEH area of interest, “Protecting Our Cultural Heritage,” "San Anto History GO!" seeks to empower students at both the college and middle school levels to document, share and preserve the history of the spaces they inhabit, and which reflects their lives and their own community’s history.

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Carine Bourget (Project Director: July 2019 to present)

AC-269245-20
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,999 (approved)
$99,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023

Developing Foreign Cultures Courses for the Professions

A three-year curriculum development program to infuse foreign language and culture content into courses in business, healthcare, and other professional programs. 

The Humanities play a crucial role in developing understanding of diverse cultures and appreciation of various perspectives, skills that are necessary to solve global challenges, be they related to economic or health issues, among others. One approach to make the pertinence of the Humanities to professional life obvious is to design courses that blend the Humanities with specific professional training. Such courses develop humanities skills such as intercultural competence, advanced foreign language skills when applicable, and knowledge specific to various parts of the world to help prepare students for careers in a global world.

Texas Tech University System (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)
Aliza S. Wong (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
John Carrell (Co Project Director: January 2021 to present)

AC-269259-20
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,865 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2024

A New Humanities for the 21st Century: Honors Arts and Letters

The strategic planning and curricular revision for a reframed Humanities Arts and Letters major in the Honors College.

A liberal arts education embraces the breadth of human existence. Traditionally, the liberal arts included arithmetic, astronomy, geometry, grammar, logic, and music. In the modern world, the liberal arts have matured to include such fields as art, science, history, languages, and literature, to name a few. This proposal will look to revamp the current liberal arts degree of the TTU Honors College, Humanities Arts and Letters (HAL). The planning process would include 1) faculty members working closely together to create a new framework: renaming the major; reconceptualizing the concentrations; and working closely with an advisor to create workable degree plans; 2) workshops for faculty from across the TTU campus to develop core classes for each humanities centered concentration; and 3) creating a marketing campaign that will internally and externally communicate the vigor and rigor of the new major. All Honors students would experience this humanities centered curriculum to graduate.

Texas Tech University System (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)
Mellinee K Lesley (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Lane Sobehrad (Co Project Director: November 2019 to February 2022)
Julie Smit (Co Project Director: November 2019 to September 2022)
Rene Saldana (Co Project Director: November 2019 to present)

AC-269265-20
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$97,905 (approved)
$85,094 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2024

Advancing Culturally Sustainable Pedagogy Together: Using History Labs to Enhance College Readiness

The enhancement of the human geography curriculum for Lubbock’s public high schools through a collaboration between Texas Tech University and Lubbock school teachers and administrators.

At Estacado High School traditional English and Social Studies instruction has not produced desired outcomes for college readiness. Texas Tech and Lubbock ISD have met this need by building a culture of literacy that has seen significant student growth. To expand these efforts, this project will implement a 4-week history lab that targets critical reading and writing skills in the Social Studies classroom, in which students will engage in academic research and create dynamic projects that reflect authentic historical investigation. This project will positively impact student achievement on traditional assessments, reading and writing competencies, and critical thinking skills. In addition, it will help a highly diverse population of students connect with the regional impact of marginalized and disenfranchised groups in the larger context of U.S. history and culture, connecting their personal narratives to the wider experiences of American society.

Azusa Pacific University (Azusa, CA 91702-2701)
Theodore Szeto (Project Director: July 2019 to February 2021)
Veronica Anne Gutierrez (Project Director: February 2021 to February 2022)
Soojin Chung (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Aaron Hinojosa (Co Project Director: May 2021 to February 2022)
Stephanie Gala (Co Project Director: April 2022 to present)

AC-269280-20
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,991 (approved)
$99,852 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023

Our Declaration: A Summer Bridge Engaging GEN1 Scholars

This program will test a new approach to closing the engagement gap between first generation students and students of color and the humanities (HUM) at APU through enhanced partnerships between advising, administration, and instruction. Piloted in summer 2020, this four (4) week residential bridge program designed in recognition of and preparation for the 250th anniversary of American independence will foster the academic and personal development of two (2) cohorts of 20 students each at the APU campus through a three (3) unit introductory humanities course (HUM 221) and complementary labs, field trips, and community building. This course will help students: - express an informed understanding of the ideas, arguments, and points of view contained in the Declaration of Independence. - articulate the relevance of the Declaration of Independence to citizenship in 21st-century America - explain how faith interacts with their understanding of the Declaration of Independence

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Naomi J. Stubbs (Project Director: July 2018 to October 2022)
Shannon Proctor (Co Project Director: December 2018 to October 2022)

AC-263982-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Summer Institute on Incarceration and the Humanities

A two-year series of institutes and workshops for faculty on the topic of incarceration and the humanities.

Our Summer Institute on Incarceration and the Humanities consists of two intensive summer institutes organized around central themes in the humanities scholarship on incarceration. Through selected readings, guest speaker presentations, and site visits, our faculty fellows will deepen their understanding of the ways in which research in the humanities contributes to knowledge about the history of incarceration in the United States, the goals and justifications of carceral punishment, as well as the connections between rehabilitation, education, and successful reentry. This knowledge will be shared with the community via the scholarly and classroom projects the fellows will create and assess during the institute. These projects will allow us to improve humanities education at LaGuardia Community College and to incorporate a humanist perspective into ongoing projects about incarceration.

San Jose State University Research Foundation (San Jose, CA 95112-5569)
Richard McNabb (Project Director: July 2018 to October 2022)

AC-264007-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$59,406 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Arguing the Humanities: A Course for STEM Students

The integration of humanities texts and methods of inquiry into a required writing course for STEM students, followed by faculty training, implementation of the course, and the creation of a digital archive.

Arguing the Humanities is a course redesign project that seeks to integrate substantial humanities content and texts into a required developmental course for STEM students that focuses on close reading and analytical writing. The project goal is to give STEM students broader exposure to significant works of the human intellect and imagination, and to develop the habits of mind required to analyze these works and write persuasively from and about them.

Felician University (Lodi, NJ 07644-2198)
Sherida Yoder (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Julie A. O'Connell (Co Project Director: December 2018 to present)

AC-264090-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,995 (approved)
$99,955 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Interdisciplinary Humanities Program on the History and Culture of Paterson

The development of an interdisciplinary and place-based humanities minor that focuses on the writers, musicians, and artists of Paterson, New Jersey.

The IHP-Prism Paterson employs immersive place-based learning to engage 1st generation/at-risk college students in the study of humanities disciplines by focusing on Paterson's important writers, musicians and artists. Creating new experiential courses in the humanities that reflect Felician University's 1st generation students' identities will increase student engagement, improve skills, enhance retention, and build connections between the city and the University, while enriching humanities learning.

Vanguard University of Southern California (Costa Mesa, CA 92626-6520)
Kristen Lashua (Project Director: July 2018 to October 2022)

AC-264104-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$98,317 (approved)
$98,317 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 9/30/2021

American Stories: A Humanities Summer Bridge Program

The development and implementation of a summer bridge program based on American history and culture for at-risk students.

This project will develop and launch American Stories, a 5-week summer residential Bridge program for first-generation and other at-risk incoming freshmen at Vanguard University. Students will take HIST 156C: American Stories, a class to fulfill their freshman history requirement. The curriculum focuses on movement and ethnicity in American history, with a special emphasis on introducing students to digital humanities projects and oral history. Students will also take a one-unit Writing Lab designed to ready them for composition at the college level. A Humanities Initiatives Grant would allow Vanguard to run the program for its first two years, establishing several cohorts of at-risk students who are better prepared for college and for their study of the humanities. Vanguard has achieved great success with its STEM Bridge program and seeks to build on that success with this new humanities initiative.

Regents of the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Levi Romero (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Irene Vasquez (Co Project Director: December 2018 to present)

AC-264148-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,922 (approved)
$99,922 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

Culturally Mapping Albuquerque

A two-year project collaboration of university faculty and high school teachers to study the relationship between migration and cultural heritage preservation in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The Culturally Mapping Albuquerque project brings together scholars, educators, cultural workers, and students to collect, analyze, and interpret narratives on the relationship between migration and cultural heritage preservation in the city of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Over a 24-month period, faculty from across the US and UNM, high school teachers from Albuquerque Public Schools, and cultural workers from the city of Albuquerque will meet in workshops, roundtables, and a major public symposium to develop humanistic understandings of the ways human mobility and cultural heritage efforts shape city landscapes. The city of Albuquerque is a critical site of analysis because of its rich cultural services and long history of multicultural and multi-ethnic communities. Participants will examine Indigenous migration stories, artistic and literary presentations of transcontinental settlement, and global art productions of migrations and relocations that define New Mexicans in the 21st century.

Florida International University Board of Trustees (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Melissa Baralt (Project Director: July 2018 to present)

AC-264174-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,832 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 11/30/2022

Improving Spanish-Language Teacher Retention and Success

A collaborative partnership between Florida International University and Florida Memorial University to improve course content and teacher training in Spanish language and culture at both institutions.

This project will improve Spanish language teacher training at a Hispanic-Serving Institution in Miami, FL so that graduates are better prepared to teach in the culturally diverse settings where they are employed, primarily a Miami HBCU. Thus this project will help black Spanish-language learners at the HBCU have better Spanish-learning experiences and outcomes and reduce teacher attrition of HSI graduates at the HBCU. A team of Spanish-language learning scholars and instructors will conduct a needs analysis on learners’ and teachers’ needs at the HSI and HBCU. Then, they will redesign the Spanish-learning curriculum for black students, prepare and deliver new teacher-training workshops, and evaluate and modify the new curriculum for both teachers and students as needed over the course of the project. Finally, they will disseminate findings and pedagogical materials through a national teacher-training website, academic conferences and journals, and public teacher-training workshops.

University Corporation at Monterey Bay (Seaside, CA 93955-8001)
Nelson Graff (Project Director: July 2018 to present)

AC-264249-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,441 (approved)
$99,441 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

Improving Learning and Achievement with Reading/Writing-Enriched Curriculum in the Disciplines

The development of discipline-relevant reading and writing instruction to be incorporated into the core and elective courses of six majors.

This is a three-year project that will infuse humanities learning and reading/writing instruction into the core electives and majors at California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB). By adapting methods from the Writing Enriched Curriculum (WEC) model from the University of Minnesota, CSUMB faculty will improve their capacity to research, analyze and design reading and writing instruction plans relevant to their disciplines, and to integrate them into their curriculum. With this faculty-driven approach, the project will create a positive shift in reading, writing, and critical thinking skills of students across the disciplines so that they can effectively prepare their research and writing-intensive projects, senior capstones, and succeed in professional careers.

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)
Jennifer Joy Esquierdo (Project Director: July 2018 to October 2022)
Stephanie M. Alvarez (Co Project Director: December 2018 to October 2022)

AC-264286-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$111,391 (approved)
$110,756 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Promoting Humanities Learning in Elementary Schools

Collaboration with local school districts to design a social studies curriculum for kindergarten through fifth grade that focuses on the history and culture of the Rio Grande Valley community.

Project SSTARC (Social Studies Through Authentic and Relevant Content) is a 2-year collaborative project between the Center for Bilingual Studies and the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley and local school districts in south Texas. The project aims to provide an opportunity for local K-5 teachers to gain better knowledge of local and regional history, create relevant social studies content for their students in both English and Spanish, and disseminate the content on a wide scale to enrich the schooling experience of students by exposing them to authentic humanities content. This project will bring together four humanities scholars of Mexican American Studies to work with a total of 42 K-5 teachers during two different 4-day workshops. At the workshops teachers will collaborate to design lesson plans based on the content presented by the scholars. In Year 2, a one-day conference will showcase the redesigned curriculum to 100 K-5 teachers.

Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)
Jeanine Ntihirageza (Project Director: July 2018 to April 2021)
Denise Cloonan (Co Project Director: January 2019 to April 2021)

AC-264292-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$97,390 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019

Developing a Kurdish Language and Culture Studies Program

A one-year project to develop three new courses and related curricular resources in Kurdish language and culture.

The proposed project will develop and implement a program in Kurdish language and culture, and develop resources and curricula for use in teaching. The project builds on the mission of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages to enhance cross-cultural communication among US and global citizens. 

University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)
Kirsten Elizabeth Gardner (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Valerie A. Martinez (Co Project Director: December 2018 to January 2022)
Aimee Villarreal (Co Project Director: January 2022 to November 2022)

AC-264295-19
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,219 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022

An Oral History Project Dedicated to Women and War

The creation of a digital archive of oral histories of women in the military to be used in the classroom and the training of faculty and students in the professional practice of oral history.

Military City, USA: An Oral History Project Dedicated to Women and War is a two-year collaborative project between faculty at two Hispanic-Serving Institutions, the University of Texas at San Antonio and Our Lady of the Lake University, designed to integrate oral history practices into humanities education and professional training. Just as importantly, the grant will expand the scope of traditional military history for students and faculty to better understand the militarization of women's lives from World War II to the present. The project takes advantage of this unique time in contemporary society whereby as of 2016, three years after the un/official end of the Global War on Terror, women are eligible for all roles within the U.S military including combat. As women begin to occupy these historically exclusive male positions, our project will be one of the first to document and analyze the significance of female military combat participation.

University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL 60612-4305)
Sandra Sufian (Project Director: June 2017 to October 2021)

AC-258909-18
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,873 (approved)
$98,769 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2020

The Human Story of Illness: Health Humanities Portraits for Physicians in Training

The creation of health humanities portraits as case studies for use in the curriculum of the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

The Human Story of Illness: Health Humanities Portraits for Physicians in Training will establish a series of workshops over two years in which a core group of UI-COM faculty will develop “health humanities portraits” for the medical student curriculum. This process has three steps: 1) Using their distinct disciplinary lenses, invited humanities experts will develop portraits and refine them with our faculty during on-site workshops. Each portrait will consist of a first-person patient story and humanities scholarship that illuminates the story’s social, cultural, ethical and affective themes; 2) With the experts’ guidance, our faculty core will then develop additional portraits using the same process; 3) Project personnel will create an online repository of these portraits that will be utilized by the medical school and shared with other institutions. Our project will enrich medical training by creating rigorous portraits that reveal the full texture of people’s illness experiences.

Kean University (Union, NJ 07083-7133)
Elizabeth Hyde (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Jonathan Mercantini (Co Project Director: December 2017 to present)

AC-258915-18
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$84,932 (approved)
$84,932 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2022

MakeHISTORY@Kean: William Livingston’s World

Development at Kean University of a new History Lab and undergraduate history curriculum focused on the life and times of William Livingston, first elected governor of New Jersey.

“MakeHistory@Kean: William Livingston’s World” is a three-year project to develop the Kean University Department of History curriculum around the concept of a History Lab. Using untapped archival resources and facilities of Kean, Liberty Hall Museum and the Liberty Hall Academic Center, undergraduates will generate a portfolio of original historical research to be shared with a broad public through talks, exhibits, websites, lesson plans, and other genres. Students will reconstruct and disseminate political, intellectual, and social worlds of William Livingston, first elected governor of New Jersey, signer of the U.S. Constitution, and builder of Liberty Hall, the estate on which Kean University now sits. The development of this curriculum writes an important chapter in American History, prepares history majors to compete in the 21st-century job market, and culminates in a 5-year BA/MA degree in History and Public Humanities.

Passaic County Community College (Paterson, NJ 07505-1102)
Martha A. Brozyna (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Alexandra Lucignani Della Fera (Co Project Director: February 2018 to present)

AC-258929-18
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2022

Discovering Paterson: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching History and English Literature

Enhancement of required undergraduate humanities courses at Passaic County Community College through engagement with local cultural organizations in Paterson, New Jersey.

Passaic County Community College’s proposed project entitled "Discovering Paterson: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching History and English Literature" will improve coursework in History and English Literature by integrating important themes such as Industrialization, the Abolitionist Movement, and Immigration into course content. Using the early industrial city of Paterson, New Jersey, as a context, students enrolled in U.S. History I, U.S. History II, and English Literature will learn about key historical, social, and literary movements. The project is significant because it extends learning beyond the classroom environment while connecting students with vast historical, cultural, and literary resources in the surrounding community. Key partner organizations will include the Passaic County Historical Society, the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, the Paterson Public Library, the American Labor Museum, and the Paterson Poetry Center.

University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)
Isabel Baca (Project Director: June 2017 to February 2021)

AC-258930-18
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,924 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019

Developing a Humanities-Based Bilingual Professional Writing Certificate for Undergraduates

Creation at the University of Texas, El Paso, of an undergraduate bilingual professional writing certificate with a focus on translation theory and ethics.

The Undergraduate Bilingual Professional Writing Certificate Program project addresses the most essential dimensions of English-Spanish bilingual professional writing through a focus on ethics, translation, language, and rhetoric. The proposed project involves substantive curricular development and faculty training on the intrinsic role of ethics in professional writing and translation by focusing on three goals: To prepare English-Spanish bilingual students to write and translate ethically both Spanish and English, in print and online, in professional settings; to deepen faculty preparation in the teaching of ethics in professional writing and translation; to collaborate with community partners through professional writing and ethical translation workshops and student internships. The UBPWC Program is planned in two phases: Phase 1 focuses on offering the redesigned UPBPWC Program face-to-face while Phase 2 focuses on offering the program in full online format.

City Colleges of Chicago, Wilbur Wright College (Chicago, IL 60634-1500)
Daniel Borzutzky (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2019)
Anna M. Proffit (Project Director: March 2019 to October 2021)
Anna M. Proffit (Co Project Director: November 2017 to March 2019)
Yolanda Nieves (Co Project Director: March 2019 to October 2021)

AC-258931-18
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,907 (approved)
$82,076 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2020

Latino/a Studies: Curriculum for the College Community

Curricular development and faculty workshops to enhance a new certificate program in Latin American and Latino/a Studies at Wilbur Wright College.

Wright College of the City Colleges of Chicago is proposing a two-year initiative to enhance our offerings in Latino/a Studies and to bolster our newly-formed Latin American and Latino/a Studies Program. This supports our mission as a Hispanic Serving Institution as research indicates that graduation and retention rates are improved when students see their own experiences reflected in the classroom and their college communities. The project will entail three phases: 1) research and new course design; 2) faculty development to enrich previously existing humanities courses with Latino/a content; 3) partnerships with community organizations and transfer institutions. Our goal is to improve the quality of humanities teaching and learning at our institution.

Texas Woman's University (Denton, TX 76204-5589)
Gretchen Busl (Project Director: June 2017 to November 2022)
Ashley Brookner Bender (Co Project Director: November 2017 to November 2022)

AC-258965-18
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,803 (approved)
$83,360 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2018 – 8/31/2020

Building Global Perspectives in the Humanities

A faculty development project to incorporate global perspectives into additional humanities courses at Texas Woman’s University.

The "Building Global Perspectives" project's primary aims are to increase the number of humanities courses offered that qualify for the Global Perspective requirement, and strengthen the Global Studies minor with the intent of creating an accompanying interdisciplinary major. The project will also bolster TWU's connection to the DFW community by creating experiential learning partnerships and broadening existing Global Connections Initiative programming.

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Ana Maria Hernandez (Project Director: June 2017 to May 2022)

AC-258966-18
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$83,195 (approved)
$83,193 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2021

Enriching the Latin American Studies Program

Faculty development and the expansion of the Latin American Studies program at LaGuardia Community College.

This project will strengthen and deepen Latin American Studies at LaGuardia by providing faculty with opportunities to develop and expand their knowledge of the humanities in Latin America and thus increase and improve the range of courses offered. The Latin American Studies option is an interdisciplinary curriculum housed in the Departments of Humanities (art, music, film, philosophy, and theater), Education and Language Acquisition (modern language and literature), and Social Science (history). Expanding Latin American Studies is important at LaGuardia as forty-one percent of its student body is of Hispanic background and the majority of the college’s international students come from a Latin American or Caribbean country. Offering a curriculum that reflects the students’ diverse origins will help improve student success and increase students' engagement with the humanities.

Texas A & M University, Kingsville (Kingsville, TX 78363-8202)
Susan Louise Roberson (Project Director: June 2016 to September 2019)

AC-253204-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,755 (approved)
$59,141 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 5/30/2019

Toward an Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists

A two-year study and curricular development project on the theory and works of South Texas women artists and writers, for Texas A& M University faculty and Kingsville school teachers.

"Towards an Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists,” seeks to study and listen to the underrepresented voices of women writers and artist from South Texas. Part of a larger regionalist project that “call[s] into question numerous cultural assumptions about literary history, poetics, thematics, genres, and reading strategies . . .” (Fetterley and Pryse 2), our proposal aims to recover and analyze regional artistic productions as modes of discourse about location (Fetterley and Pryse 11). We propose further to articulate a paradigm by which to discuss and characterize South Texas women’s art and literature in relation to the area, the larger traditions of women’s regionalist writing and art, and national discourses of nationhood.

RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK (Bronx, NY 10453-2804)
Peter Kolozi (Project Director: June 2016 to May 2019)

AC-253405-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$87,267 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018

"Presente": Developing Latino-Centered Learning Communities

A project that would provide the opportunity for faculty to study and to develop courses on Latino history and culture at Bronx Community College.

Presente: Latino-Centered Learning Communities is a two-year professional development program designed to increase understanding of Latino history and culture for 18 faculty from Bronx Community College (CUNY) with a focus on two broad themes: citizenship and the law, and racial and gendered identities. The objectives of the program are: 1) to introduce faculty from across disciplines and First Year Seminars to new scholarship; 2) to help faculty identify common topics and approaches that can be incorporated into their courses; 3) to assist faculty in developing integrated Learning Community clusters of courses that include First Year Seminars; and 4) to strengthen the humanities curriculum by incorporating broadly applicable Latino themes and content into a broad range of courses. BCC will partner with the American Social History Project building on their work in the NEH-funded Bridging Historias Through Latino History and Culture, a three year professional development program.

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Naomi J. Stubbs (Project Director: June 2016 to March 2021)

AC-253408-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2019

Meanings of War: Its Technologies and Aftermaths

A project on the topic of war designed to integrate course content and to strengthen faculty collaboration across divisions.

LaGuardia Community College proposes a project connecting liberal arts faculty, the college community, and our diverse student body,through interdisciplinary study and curriculum development inspired by visiting scholars and readings on the theme of meanings of war.

University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)
Rex A. Koontz (Project Director: June 2016 to March 2021)

AC-253409-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$102,000 (approved)
$101,125 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2019

Activating the Archive in Latin American and Latino Art History

A two-year collaborative project between the University of Houston (UH) and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) to enable public and curricular use of MFAH’s International Center for the Art of the Americas resources.

"Activating the Archive" is a two-year project that brings together the University of Houston (UH) and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) in a collaboration that will allow a large audience to access and study Latin American and Latino culture history and art criticism through primary documents in Spanish and English. This University-Museum collaboration focuses on what is already the most significant open-access, digital database of Latino and Latin American art history and criticism--the Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art (hereafter the "Documents Project"). Here we activate the archive through the addition of English translations, geospatial data, and Latino art journals.

Texas Lutheran University (Seguin, TX 78155-5978)
Jennifer R. Mata (Project Director: June 2016 to October 2021)

AC-253411-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$79,838 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2020

"¡Sí, Más!": Building Bridges with the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS)

A three-year bridge program between Texas Lutheran University and an area high school, anchored in the study of Mexican-American culture.

The core focus of the ¡Sí, Más!: Building Bridges with the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS) project is to serve the surrounding community; strengthen both Texas Lutheran University (TLU) and Seguin High School (SHS) commitments as Hispanic Serving Institutions; address the changing demographics of TLU, SHS, and the surrounding community; and position more SHS Hispanic students to enroll in and graduate from TLU. This grant, in accordance with the National Endowment for the Humanities Common Good Initiative to foster engagement with Humanities scholarship in areas undergoing demographic change, will allow TLU CMAS and its Mexican American Studies (MAST) program to develop a Mexican American Studies Summer Bridge Program for 20 SHS Hispanic students (2 cohorts of 10 students).

University of Texas, Permian Basin (Odessa, TX 79762-8122)
Rebecca Susan Babcock (Project Director: June 2016 to July 2019)
Jason Lagapa (Co Project Director: December 2016 to July 2019)

AC-253418-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$83,799 (approved)
$71,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018

Boom or Bust: A Collection and Study of Energy Narratives

A two-year program of writing workshops, reading and discussion groups, and a speaker’s series bringing humanities perspectives to fields of energy production and consumption in West Texas.

“Boom or Bust: A Collection and Investigation of Energy Narratives” is a two year project at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin (UTPB) designed to bring humanities content and perspectives on the field of energy production and consumption, a field often discussed primarily through a STEM lens. The project directors, our students, and members of the West Texas community will examine the effects of energy harvesting and production on the area, with a particular emphasis on how the oil field and similar sectors of energy production affect the community, as West Texans of all races and backgrounds bridge social strata through the economic opportunity provided by the energy sector. Our primary objective in this project is to make accessible the voices of those community members who have been affected by the energy sector in this area.

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)
Linda Christine English (Project Director: June 2016 to May 2019)
Friederike Bruehoefener (Co Project Director: May 2017 to May 2019)

AC-253436-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$68,028 (approved)
$51,035 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 8/31/2018

Revising the Women's Studies Program

A twenty-month program of scholar-led workshops as well as faculty retreats to revise the Gender and Women’s Studies Program at the University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley.

The grant seeks funding to bring in program consultants and specialists in an effort to revitalize the Gender And Women's Studies Program at UTRGV. The first phase of the project entails bringing in three program consultants to conduct workshops with affiliated faculty on best practices for generating interest and extending enrollment. In the second phase, external specialists will be invited to lead workshops on women, gender, and sexuality topics. Affiliated faculty will attend both workshops and retreats focused on incorporating insights gained from the external consultants into the program curriculum and course syllabi.

Galveston College (Galveston, TX 77550-7496)
David Shane Wallace (Project Director: June 2016 to November 2019)
Michael P. Berberich (Co Project Director: March 2017 to November 2019)

AC-253445-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,429 (approved)
$88,458 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 5/31/2019

Coastal Culinary: Exploring Food Narratives

A two-year project for faculty to study and develop courses on food studies.

The “Coastal Culinary: Tasting Food Narratives” project is a two-year (25 month) effort to strengthen the teaching and study of humanities within the Galveston region, specifically at Galveston College, a small Hispanic serving community college. The humanities topic of focus is food studies, food pathways, and the use of personal narratives informed by family recipes – story-telling focused on food. Twelve faculty participants in addition to the Director and Co-Director (n=14) will engage in a four-phase professional development sequence of (1) group study, (2) curriculum re-design, (3) implementation, and (4) assessment of practice through self-study.

California State University East Bay Foundation (Hayward, CA 94542-1602)
Christopher M. Moreman (Project Director: June 2016 to June 2019)

AC-253456-17
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,993 (approved)
$99,881 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 5/31/2018

Developing a Religious Studies Minor

An eighteen-month scholar-led seminar that would prepare an interdisciplinary faculty team at California State University, East Bay, to develop a comparative religion minor.

California State University, East Bay has recently been acknowledged as an Hispanic Serving Institution, by which we plan to increase the spectrum of our curriculum in Humanities to better serve a traditionally under-represented population. Our university prides itself on the diversity of its student population, and strives to address issues of diversity and social justice in our teaching, research, and engagements. In recognition of the need to bolster the Humanities, the departments of Philosophy, Ethnic Studies, History, English, Modern Languages & Literatures, and Liberal Studies have recently agreed to come together collectively to form a new School of Global Humanities and Cultural Studies, to foster interdisciplinary collaborations among Humanities scholars and to strengthen each of the disciplines within. As the first major initiative of the school, all of the departments in the school have agreed to support the formation of a program in Comparative Religion.

Pima County Community College District (Tucson, AZ 85709-6000)
Brian Stewart (Project Director: June 2015 to May 2019)

AC-234211-16
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$89,799 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2018

Border Culture in the Classroom and the Public Square

An eighteen-month interdisciplinary project on border culture for faculty, students, and community, incorporating curriculum development, enhancement of writing skills, and a public dialog program.

The Desert Vista Campus of Pima Community College proposes an 18 month interdisciplinary humanities project. Our project entitled, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, Theme: Border Culture has three components: 1)teachers/scholars will develop new curriculum and teach within the interdisciplinary cohorts; 2) two semesters of piloting the three interdisciplinary courses that bring together writing and reading, writing and history, and writing and art. 3) development of a Public Dialogue Program on the Desert Vista Campus which will serve as an active dissemination site to showcase student work, and further provide a space for dialogue among and between the campus and the surrounding community and neighborhoods. These three components bring the work in humanities courses into a direct relationship with work beyond the academic setting and provide our teachers, students, and the larger community with a way to understand our unique experience at the border.