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Funded Projects Query Form
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Program: Humanities Initiatives: HSIs*
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AC-277380-21

New Mexico State University (Las Cruces, NM 88003-8002)
Eric Magrane (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Kerry Banazek (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Critical Approaches to Place: Teaching Narrative Mapping in Southern New Mexico

A two-year project to develop curriculum integrating geography, English, and digital humanities.

“Critical Approaches to Place: Teaching Narrative Mapping in Southern New Mexico” is a three-year curriculum development and public engagement project organized by collaborators from New Mexico State University (NMSU)’s Geography and English departments. It includes a faculty development workshop, which will help instructors from diverse disciplines develop digital story mapping assignments that support first-generation, multilingual, and binational students in unique ways. Additional project components include: a new geohumanities course co-taught by the project directors, a public lecture series, and a bilingual public exhibit developed in partnership with the Las Cruces Museum System that highlights student work. Taking Story Maps as a common starting place helps faculty participants, students, and community partners develop stronger relationships with one another and understand how the humanities provide essential insights into place and global environmental challenges.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Geography

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,890 (approved)
$149,890 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024


AC-277584-21

Capital Community College (Hartford, CT 06103-1211)
Jeffrey F. L. Partridge (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Black Heritage Project: Empowering Students Through Black Community History

Development of a digital archive to be used within community college and high school curricula, along with the creation of a permanent exhibit and lecture series on local African American history.

Capital Community College, a Hispanic-serving institution in downtown Hartford, proposes a Humanities Initiatives project centered on the history and people of Hartford’s Talcott Street Church and Black School to empower students through local Black community history. In partnership with Capital Preparatory Magnet School and nearby museums, the project develops three components under the theme of empowering students through the history of the Talcott Street Church and School: (1) humanities curriculum development, (2) establishment of an exhibition to support pedagogy and commemorate the historic site, and (3) inauguration of an annual public lecture called The Pennington Lecture.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,426 (approved)
$149,026 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2023


AC-277690-21

William Paterson University of New Jersey (Wayne, NJ 07470-2152)
Wartyna Davis (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Barbara Suess (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)
David Freestone (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)
Data Storytelling

The development of a new minor that integrates digital data and analysis into humanities courses, along with a series of faculty workshops in digital humanities.

William Paterson University (WP), an eligible Hispanic- and Minority-Serving public institution in Wayne, New Jersey proposes a humanities initiative to create a new minor in data storytelling that will teach students to not only critically consume, evaluate, and interpret data, but also use it to communicate ideas, tell stories, and create new knowledge. Grant funds will support the development, implementation, and evaluation of the new minor over three years. The proposed project includes (1) two cohorts of a one-year professional development program for faculty interested in teaching in the minor; (2) revision and creation of 16 elective courses for the minor; (3) four technology-for-the-humanities workshops open to all members of the WP community to prepare faculty to integrate data technologies into the humanities classroom; and (4) initial piloting of eight of the new and revised elective courses.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,994 (approved)
$149,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2024


AC-277694-21

University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Rachael Scarborough King (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Danielle L. Spratt (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Hidden Archives: Race, Gender, and Religion in UCSB’s Ballitore Collection

A two-year project on the digitization and examination of abolitionist materials to be included in experiential learning and curriculum development.

Hidden Archives is a collaborative project between the University of California, Santa Barbara, California State University-Northridge, and Howard University that digitizes and researches a collection of abolitionist materials held at UCSB while introducing underrepresented students to archival research and the digital humanities. Although both archival and digital skills are necessary to address crucial topics regarding the history of race, enslavement, and protest, the fields of book history and the digital humanities remain exclusionary to scholars of color. Hidden Archives addresses such concerns through collaborative research between faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students. The project focuses on the Ballitore Collection, a group of 18th- and 19th-century Quaker materials. By examining the collection with a diverse research team, we make it available for scholars, students, and the public while shaping a generation of researchers attuned to questions of power and absence.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,402 (approved)
$149,402 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 12/31/2022


AC-277702-21

CUNY Research Foundation, City College (New York, NY 10031-9101)
Renata Kobetts Miller (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Thomas Peele (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Building a Digital Humanities Minor at the City College of New York

A three-year initiative to develop and pilot a minor in digital humanities at City College, to be housed in the Division of Humanities and the Arts.

The City College of New York proposes to develop and pilot a curriculum for a minor in Digital Humanities. For humanities majors these courses and this minor will serve three central purposes: they will increase students' inquiry-driven and experiential learning in the humanities, they will augment and enrich traditional humanistic study by providing our students with a broader array of techniques in performing critical analysis and problem-solving (two of the central values of a humanities education), and they will expand students' understanding of the analytical frameworks that are available to them. By emphasizing the points of convergence between humanities and technology the Digital Humanities minor will enrich students' understanding of how the humanities fit within broader contexts; it will also prepare them for a broader array of career options. These courses may also attract technologically-oriented students to pursue humanistic study.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,431 (approved)
$149,431 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024


AC-277755-21

Florida International University (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Julio Capo (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Miami Studies: Building a New Interdisciplinary Public Humanities Program

A two-year project to create a new, interdisciplinary undergraduate program in Miami Studies.

The Wolfsonian Public Humanities Lab (WPHL) at Florida International University (FIU) seeks to create a new, rigorous program in Miami Studies that is particularly attentive to the unique skills our diverse student body currently possesses or needs to sharpen to be successful in today’s job market. This project proposes the creation of a series of new courses or modules that are critically integrated to FIU’s Office of Micro-Credential Initiatives, housed within the Division of Academic & Student Affairs, to build a sustained skills-based program for our students that is centered on the study of history literature, culture, language, art, architecture, politics, and overall humanistic experience of the diverse people of the Greater Miami area, a minority-majority region whose demographics are mirrored in the student population at FIU.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; Public History; Urban Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 8/31/2023


AC-277786-21

University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78229-3901)
Rachel Pearson (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
The HIV Storytelling Project: Narratives from South Texas

A collaborative project to collect and archive oral histories of the HIV epidemic, bringing together medical students, faculty, and members of the San Antonio community.

This project in digital humanities will be a collaboration between UT Health researchers and persons living with HIV and their advocates who have organized as the End Stigma End HIV Alliance (ESEHA). In its curricular component, researchers and ESEHA advocates will train health professions students in the history of HIV and HIV advocacy, the experience of living with HIV in South Texas, oral history, and digital storytelling production. Students will then work with research participants to develop compelling, participant-driven digital narratives from the South Texas HIV epidemic, and archive these narratives for use by the participants themselves as well as by medical educators and learners, community members and humanities researchers.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Urban History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,445 (approved)
$149,445 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024


AC-269129-20

National-Louis University (Chicago, IL 60603-6191)
Christopher Martin Caver (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Creating an Interdisciplinary Humanities Minor for Career-Focused Students

The creation of a six-course interdisciplinary humanities minor for undergraduate students pursuing pre-professional majors.

This project creates an interdisciplinary humanities minor program for students pursuing existing professionally-oriented major tracks. We propose to create six new courses. Two core courses will be created in aesthetic judgment and interpretive methods that use Chicago artists, writers, histories, and communities as their primary context of application and illustration. Four electives will also be created to provide humanistic counterparts to major coursework. These will be courses in storytelling and the digital humanities (Computer Science and Information Systems), the ethics of work and business (Business Administration), philosophical approaches to mortality (Human Services), and histories of crime and punishment (Criminal Justice). Additionally, our project develops opportunities for students to intern at Chicago-area humanities organizations or pursue original research as part of completing their minor, and it creates a capstone colloquium to showcase these experiences.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,548 (approved)
$99,548 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023


AC-269185-20

San Antonio College (San Antonio, TX 78212-4299)
Erik Anderson (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
San Anto History GO!

A three-year faculty development project to incorporate geographic information system technology into college and middle school history courses.

San Antonio College proposes "San Anto History GO!": a humanities initiative that uses the ArcGIS Online platform to build location-based learning and augmented reality mobile applications to connect students and the community to marginalized historical places and histories in and around the San Antonio area. Supporting the NEH area of interest, “Protecting Our Cultural Heritage,” "San Anto History GO!" seeks to empower students at both the college and middle school levels to document, share and preserve the history of the spaces they inhabit, and which reflects their lives and their own community’s history.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,659 (approved)
$99,659 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023


AC-269245-20

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Carine Bourget (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Developing Foreign Cultures Courses for the Professions

A three-year curriculum development program to infuse foreign language and culture content into courses in business, healthcare, and other professional programs. 

The Humanities play a crucial role in developing understanding of diverse cultures and appreciation of various perspectives, skills that are necessary to solve global challenges, be they related to economic or health issues, among others. One approach to make the pertinence of the Humanities to professional life obvious is to design courses that blend the Humanities with specific professional training. Such courses develop humanities skills such as intercultural competence, advanced foreign language skills when applicable, and knowledge specific to various parts of the world to help prepare students for careers in a global world.

Project fields:
Languages, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,999 (approved)
$99,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023


AC-269259-20

Texas Tech University (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)
Aliza S. Wong (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
John Carrell (Co Project Director: January 2021 to present)
A New Humanities for the 21st Century: Honors Arts and Letters

The strategic planning and curricular revision for a reframed Humanities Arts and Letters major in the Honors College.

A liberal arts education embraces the breadth of human existence. Traditionally, the liberal arts included arithmetic, astronomy, geometry, grammar, logic, and music. In the modern world, the liberal arts have matured to include such fields as art, science, history, languages, and literature, to name a few. This proposal will look to revamp the current liberal arts degree of the TTU Honors College, Humanities Arts and Letters (HAL). The planning process would include 1) faculty members working closely together to create a new framework: renaming the major; reconceptualizing the concentrations; and working closely with an advisor to create workable degree plans; 2) workshops for faculty from across the TTU campus to develop core classes for each humanities centered concentration; and 3) creating a marketing campaign that will internally and externally communicate the vigor and rigor of the new major. All Honors students would experience this humanities centered curriculum to graduate.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,865 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023


AC-269265-20

Texas Tech University (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)
Mellinee K Lesley (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Lane Sobehrad (Co Project Director: November 2019 to present)
Julie Smit (Co Project Director: November 2019 to present)
Rene Saldana (Co Project Director: November 2019 to present)
Advancing Culturally Sustainable Pedagogy Together: Using History Labs to Enhance College Readiness

The enhancement of the human geography curriculum for Lubbock’s public high schools through a collaboration between Texas Tech University and Lubbock school teachers and administrators.

At Estacado High School traditional English and Social Studies instruction has not produced desired outcomes for college readiness. Texas Tech and Lubbock ISD have met this need by building a culture of literacy that has seen significant student growth. To expand these efforts, this project will implement a 4-week history lab that targets critical reading and writing skills in the Social Studies classroom, in which students will engage in academic research and create dynamic projects that reflect authentic historical investigation. This project will positively impact student achievement on traditional assessments, reading and writing competencies, and critical thinking skills. In addition, it will help a highly diverse population of students connect with the regional impact of marginalized and disenfranchised groups in the larger context of U.S. history and culture, connecting their personal narratives to the wider experiences of American society.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$97,905 (approved)
$85,094 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023


AC-269280-20

Azusa Pacific University (Azusa, CA 91702-2701)
Theodore Szeto (Project Director: July 2019 to February 2021)
Veronica Anne Gutierrez (Project Director: February 2021 to present)
Aaron Hinojosa (Co Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Our Declaration: A Summer Bridge Engaging GEN1 Scholars

This program will test a new approach to closing the engagement gap between first generation students and students of color and the humanities (HUM) at APU through enhanced partnerships between advising, administration, and instruction. Piloted in summer 2020, this four (4) week residential bridge program designed in recognition of and preparation for the 250th anniversary of American independence will foster the academic and personal development of two (2) cohorts of 20 students each at the APU campus through a three (3) unit introductory humanities course (HUM 221) and complementary labs, field trips, and community building. This course will help students: - express an informed understanding of the ideas, arguments, and points of view contained in the Declaration of Independence. - articulate the relevance of the Declaration of Independence to citizenship in 21st-century America - explain how faith interacts with their understanding of the Declaration of Independence

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,991 (approved)
$99,852 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023


AC-263982-19

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Naomi J. Stubbs (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Shannon Proctor (Co Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Summer Institute on Incarceration and the Humanities

A two-year series of institutes and workshops for faculty on the topic of incarceration and the humanities.

Our Summer Institute on Incarceration and the Humanities consists of two intensive summer institutes organized around central themes in the humanities scholarship on incarceration. Through selected readings, guest speaker presentations, and site visits, our faculty fellows will deepen their understanding of the ways in which research in the humanities contributes to knowledge about the history of incarceration in the United States, the goals and justifications of carceral punishment, as well as the connections between rehabilitation, education, and successful reentry. This knowledge will be shared with the community via the scholarly and classroom projects the fellows will create and assess during the institute. These projects will allow us to improve humanities education at LaGuardia Community College and to incorporate a humanist perspective into ongoing projects about incarceration.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


AC-264007-19

San Jose State University Research Foundation (San Jose, CA 95112-5569)
Richard McNabb (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Arguing the Humanities: A Course for STEM Students

The integration of humanities texts and methods of inquiry into a required writing course for STEM students, followed by faculty training, implementation of the course, and the creation of a digital archive.

Arguing the Humanities is a course redesign project that seeks to integrate substantial humanities content and texts into a required developmental course for STEM students that focuses on close reading and analytical writing. The project goal is to give STEM students broader exposure to significant works of the human intellect and imagination, and to develop the habits of mind required to analyze these works and write persuasively from and about them.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Languages, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


AC-264090-19

Felician University (Lodi, NJ 07644-2198)
Sherida Yoder (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Julie A. O'Connell (Co Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Interdisciplinary Humanities Program on the History and Culture of Paterson

The development of an interdisciplinary and place-based humanities minor that focuses on the writers, musicians, and artists of Paterson, New Jersey.

The IHP-Prism Paterson employs immersive place-based learning to engage 1st generation/at-risk college students in the study of humanities disciplines by focusing on Paterson's important writers, musicians and artists. Creating new experiential courses in the humanities that reflect Felician University's 1st generation students' identities will increase student engagement, improve skills, enhance retention, and build connections between the city and the University, while enriching humanities learning.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,995 (approved)
$99,955 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


AC-264104-19

Vanguard University (Costa Mesa, CA 92626-6520)
Kristen Lashua (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
American Stories: A Humanities Summer Bridge Program

The development and implementation of a summer bridge program based on American history and culture for at-risk students.

This project will develop and launch American Stories, a 5-week summer residential Bridge program for first-generation and other at-risk incoming freshmen at Vanguard University. Students will take HIST 156C: American Stories, a class to fulfill their freshman history requirement. The curriculum focuses on movement and ethnicity in American history, with a special emphasis on introducing students to digital humanities projects and oral history. Students will also take a one-unit Writing Lab designed to ready them for composition at the college level. A Humanities Initiatives Grant would allow Vanguard to run the program for its first two years, establishing several cohorts of at-risk students who are better prepared for college and for their study of the humanities. Vanguard has achieved great success with its STEM Bridge program and seeks to build on that success with this new humanities initiative.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
English; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$98,317 (approved)
$98,317 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


AC-264148-19

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Levi Romero (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Irene Vasquez (Co Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Culturally Mapping Albuquerque

A two-year project collaboration of university faculty and high school teachers to study the relationship between migration and cultural heritage preservation in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The Culturally Mapping Albuquerque project brings together scholars, educators, cultural workers, and students to collect, analyze, and interpret narratives on the relationship between migration and cultural heritage preservation in the city of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Over a 24-month period, faculty from across the US and UNM, high school teachers from Albuquerque Public Schools, and cultural workers from the city of Albuquerque will meet in workshops, roundtables, and a major public symposium to develop humanistic understandings of the ways human mobility and cultural heritage efforts shape city landscapes. The city of Albuquerque is a critical site of analysis because of its rich cultural services and long history of multicultural and multi-ethnic communities. Participants will examine Indigenous migration stories, artistic and literary presentations of transcontinental settlement, and global art productions of migrations and relocations that define New Mexicans in the 21st century.

Project fields:
American Studies; Ethnic Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,922 (approved)
$99,922 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


AC-264174-19

Florida International University (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Melissa Baralt (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Improving Spanish-Language Teacher Retention and Success

A collaborative partnership between Florida International University and Florida Memorial University to improve course content and teacher training in Spanish language and culture at both institutions.

This project will improve Spanish language teacher training at a Hispanic-Serving Institution in Miami, FL so that graduates are better prepared to teach in the culturally diverse settings where they are employed, primarily a Miami HBCU. Thus this project will help black Spanish-language learners at the HBCU have better Spanish-learning experiences and outcomes and reduce teacher attrition of HSI graduates at the HBCU. A team of Spanish-language learning scholars and instructors will conduct a needs analysis on learners’ and teachers’ needs at the HSI and HBCU. Then, they will redesign the Spanish-learning curriculum for black students, prepare and deliver new teacher-training workshops, and evaluate and modify the new curriculum for both teachers and students as needed over the course of the project. Finally, they will disseminate findings and pedagogical materials through a national teacher-training website, academic conferences and journals, and public teacher-training workshops.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies; Linguistic Anthropology; Spanish Language

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,832 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 8/31/2022


AC-264249-19

University Corporation at Monterey Bay (Seaside, CA 93955-8001)
Nelson Graff (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Improving Learning and Achievement with Reading/Writing-Enriched Curriculum in the Disciplines

The development of discipline-relevant reading and writing instruction to be incorporated into the core and elective courses of six majors.

This is a three-year project that will infuse humanities learning and reading/writing instruction into the core electives and majors at California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB). By adapting methods from the Writing Enriched Curriculum (WEC) model from the University of Minnesota, CSUMB faculty will improve their capacity to research, analyze and design reading and writing instruction plans relevant to their disciplines, and to integrate them into their curriculum. With this faculty-driven approach, the project will create a positive shift in reading, writing, and critical thinking skills of students across the disciplines so that they can effectively prepare their research and writing-intensive projects, senior capstones, and succeed in professional careers.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,441 (approved)
$99,441 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


AC-264286-19

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)
Jennifer Joy Esquierdo (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Stephanie M. Alvarez (Co Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Promoting Humanities Learning in Elementary Schools

Collaboration with local school districts to design a social studies curriculum for kindergarten through fifth grade that focuses on the history and culture of the Rio Grande Valley community.

Project SSTARC (Social Studies Through Authentic and Relevant Content) is a 2-year collaborative project between the Center for Bilingual Studies and the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley and local school districts in south Texas. The project aims to provide an opportunity for local K-5 teachers to gain better knowledge of local and regional history, create relevant social studies content for their students in both English and Spanish, and disseminate the content on a wide scale to enrich the schooling experience of students by exposing them to authentic humanities content. This project will bring together four humanities scholars of Mexican American Studies to work with a total of 42 K-5 teachers during two different 4-day workshops. At the workshops teachers will collaborate to design lesson plans based on the content presented by the scholars. In Year 2, a one-day conference will showcase the redesigned curriculum to 100 K-5 teachers.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Hispanic American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$111,391 (approved)
$110,756 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


AC-264292-19

Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)
Jeanine Ntihirageza (Project Director: July 2018 to April 2021)
Denise Cloonan (Co Project Director: January 2019 to April 2021)
Developing a Kurdish Language and Culture Studies Program

A one-year project to develop three new courses and related curricular resources in Kurdish language and culture.

The proposed project will develop and implement a program in Kurdish language and culture, and develop resources and curricula for use in teaching. The project builds on the mission of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages to enhance cross-cultural communication among US and global citizens. 

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Languages, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$97,390 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


AC-264295-19

University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)
Kirsten Elizabeth Gardner (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Valerie A. Martinez (Co Project Director: December 2018 to present)
An Oral History Project Dedicated to Women and War

The creation of a digital archive of oral histories of women in the military to be used in the classroom and the training of faculty and students in the professional practice of oral history.

Military City, USA: An Oral History Project Dedicated to Women and War is a two-year collaborative project between faculty at two Hispanic-Serving Institutions, the University of Texas at San Antonio and Our Lady of the Lake University, designed to integrate oral history practices into humanities education and professional training. Just as importantly, the grant will expand the scope of traditional military history for students and faculty to better understand the militarization of women's lives from World War II to the present. The project takes advantage of this unique time in contemporary society whereby as of 2016, three years after the un/official end of the Global War on Terror, women are eligible for all roles within the U.S military including combat. As women begin to occupy these historically exclusive male positions, our project will be one of the first to document and analyze the significance of female military combat participation.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Military History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,219 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


AC-258909-18

University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL 60612-4305)
Sandra Sufian (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
The Human Story of Illness: Health Humanities Portraits for Physicians in Training

The creation of health humanities portraits as case studies for use in the curriculum of the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

The Human Story of Illness: Health Humanities Portraits for Physicians in Training will establish a series of workshops over two years in which a core group of UI-COM faculty will develop “health humanities portraits” for the medical student curriculum. This process has three steps: 1) Using their distinct disciplinary lenses, invited humanities experts will develop portraits and refine them with our faculty during on-site workshops. Each portrait will consist of a first-person patient story and humanities scholarship that illuminates the story’s social, cultural, ethical and affective themes; 2) With the experts’ guidance, our faculty core will then develop additional portraits using the same process; 3) Project personnel will create an online repository of these portraits that will be utilized by the medical school and shared with other institutions. Our project will enrich medical training by creating rigorous portraits that reveal the full texture of people’s illness experiences.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,873 (approved)
$98,769 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


AC-258915-18

Kean University (Union, NJ 07083-7133)
Elizabeth Hyde (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Jonathan Mercantini (Co Project Director: December 2017 to present)
MakeHISTORY@Kean: William Livingston’s World

Development at Kean University of a new History Lab and undergraduate history curriculum focused on the life and times of William Livingston, first elected governor of New Jersey.

“MakeHistory@Kean: William Livingston’s World” is a three-year project to develop the Kean University Department of History curriculum around the concept of a History Lab. Using untapped archival resources and facilities of Kean, Liberty Hall Museum and the Liberty Hall Academic Center, undergraduates will generate a portfolio of original historical research to be shared with a broad public through talks, exhibits, websites, lesson plans, and other genres. Students will reconstruct and disseminate political, intellectual, and social worlds of William Livingston, first elected governor of New Jersey, signer of the U.S. Constitution, and builder of Liberty Hall, the estate on which Kean University now sits. The development of this curriculum writes an important chapter in American History, prepares history majors to compete in the 21st-century job market, and culminates in a 5-year BA/MA degree in History and Public Humanities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$84,932 (approved)
$84,932 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2022


AC-258929-18

Passaic County Community College (Paterson, NJ 07505-1102)
Martha A. Brozyna (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Alexandra Lucignani Della Fera (Co Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Discovering Paterson: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching History and English Literature

Enhancement of required undergraduate humanities courses at Passaic County Community College through engagement with local cultural organizations in Paterson, New Jersey.

Passaic County Community College’s proposed project entitled "Discovering Paterson: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching History and English Literature" will improve coursework in History and English Literature by integrating important themes such as Industrialization, the Abolitionist Movement, and Immigration into course content. Using the early industrial city of Paterson, New Jersey, as a context, students enrolled in U.S. History I, U.S. History II, and English Literature will learn about key historical, social, and literary movements. The project is significant because it extends learning beyond the classroom environment while connecting students with vast historical, cultural, and literary resources in the surrounding community. Key partner organizations will include the Passaic County Historical Society, the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, the Paterson Public Library, the American Labor Museum, and the Paterson Poetry Center.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Literature, General; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2021


AC-258930-18

University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)
Isabel Baca (Project Director: June 2017 to February 2021)
Developing a Humanities-Based Bilingual Professional Writing Certificate for Undergraduates

Creation at the University of Texas, El Paso, of an undergraduate bilingual professional writing certificate with a focus on translation theory and ethics.

The Undergraduate Bilingual Professional Writing Certificate Program project addresses the most essential dimensions of English-Spanish bilingual professional writing through a focus on ethics, translation, language, and rhetoric. The proposed project involves substantive curricular development and faculty training on the intrinsic role of ethics in professional writing and translation by focusing on three goals: To prepare English-Spanish bilingual students to write and translate ethically both Spanish and English, in print and online, in professional settings; to deepen faculty preparation in the teaching of ethics in professional writing and translation; to collaborate with community partners through professional writing and ethical translation workshops and student internships. The UBPWC Program is planned in two phases: Phase 1 focuses on offering the redesigned UPBPWC Program face-to-face while Phase 2 focuses on offering the program in full online format.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Ethics; Languages, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,924 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


AC-258931-18

City Colleges of Chicago, Wilbur Wright College (Chicago, IL 60634-1500)
Daniel Borzutzky (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2019)
Anna M. Proffit (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Anna M. Proffit (Co Project Director: November 2017 to March 2019)
Yolanda Nieves (Co Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Latino/a Studies: Curriculum for the College Community

Curricular development and faculty workshops to enhance a new certificate program in Latin American and Latino/a Studies at Wilbur Wright College.

Wright College of the City Colleges of Chicago is proposing a two-year initiative to enhance our offerings in Latino/a Studies and to bolster our newly-formed Latin American and Latino/a Studies Program. This supports our mission as a Hispanic Serving Institution as research indicates that graduation and retention rates are improved when students see their own experiences reflected in the classroom and their college communities. The project will entail three phases: 1) research and new course design; 2) faculty development to enrich previously existing humanities courses with Latino/a content; 3) partnerships with community organizations and transfer institutions. Our goal is to improve the quality of humanities teaching and learning at our institution.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Hispanic American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,907 (approved)
$99,907 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


AC-258965-18

Texas Woman's University (Denton, TX 76204-5589)
Gretchen Busl (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Ashley Brookner Bender (Co Project Director: November 2017 to present)
Building Global Perspectives in the Humanities

A faculty development project to incorporate global perspectives into additional humanities courses at Texas Woman’s University.

The "Building Global Perspectives" project's primary aims are to increase the number of humanities courses offered that qualify for the Global Perspective requirement, and strengthen the Global Studies minor with the intent of creating an accompanying interdisciplinary major. The project will also bolster TWU's connection to the DFW community by creating experiential learning partnerships and broadening existing Global Connections Initiative programming.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,803 (approved)
$83,360 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2018 – 8/31/2020


AC-258966-18

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Ana Maria Hernandez (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Enriching the Latin American Studies Program

Faculty development and the expansion of the Latin American Studies program at LaGuardia Community College.

This project will strengthen and deepen Latin American Studies at LaGuardia by providing faculty with opportunities to develop and expand their knowledge of the humanities in Latin America and thus increase and improve the range of courses offered. The Latin American Studies option is an interdisciplinary curriculum housed in the Departments of Humanities (art, music, film, philosophy, and theater), Education and Language Acquisition (modern language and literature), and Social Science (history). Expanding Latin American Studies is important at LaGuardia as forty-one percent of its student body is of Hispanic background and the majority of the college’s international students come from a Latin American or Caribbean country. Offering a curriculum that reflects the students’ diverse origins will help improve student success and increase students' engagement with the humanities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$83,195 (approved)
$83,195 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2021


AC-253204-17

Texas A & M University, Kingsville (Kingsville, TX 78363-8202)
Susan Louise Roberson (Project Director: June 2016 to September 2019)
Toward an Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists

A two-year study and curricular development project on the theory and works of South Texas women artists and writers, for Texas A& M University faculty and Kingsville school teachers.

"Towards an Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists,” seeks to study and listen to the underrepresented voices of women writers and artist from South Texas. Part of a larger regionalist project that “call[s] into question numerous cultural assumptions about literary history, poetics, thematics, genres, and reading strategies . . .” (Fetterley and Pryse 2), our proposal aims to recover and analyze regional artistic productions as modes of discourse about location (Fetterley and Pryse 11). We propose further to articulate a paradigm by which to discuss and characterize South Texas women’s art and literature in relation to the area, the larger traditions of women’s regionalist writing and art, and national discourses of nationhood.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies; Hispanic American Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,755 (approved)
$59,141 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 5/30/2019


AC-253405-17

CUNY Research Foundation, Bronx Community College (Bronx, NY 10453-2804)
Peter Kolozi (Project Director: June 2016 to May 2019)
"Presente": Developing Latino-Centered Learning Communities

A project that would provide the opportunity for faculty to study and to develop courses on Latino history and culture at Bronx Community College.

Presente: Latino-Centered Learning Communities is a two-year professional development program designed to increase understanding of Latino history and culture for 18 faculty from Bronx Community College (CUNY) with a focus on two broad themes: citizenship and the law, and racial and gendered identities. The objectives of the program are: 1) to introduce faculty from across disciplines and First Year Seminars to new scholarship; 2) to help faculty identify common topics and approaches that can be incorporated into their courses; 3) to assist faculty in developing integrated Learning Community clusters of courses that include First Year Seminars; and 4) to strengthen the humanities curriculum by incorporating broadly applicable Latino themes and content into a broad range of courses. BCC will partner with the American Social History Project building on their work in the NEH-funded Bridging Historias Through Latino History and Culture, a three year professional development program.

Project fields:
Latino History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$87,267 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


AC-253408-17

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Naomi J. Stubbs (Project Director: June 2016 to March 2021)
Meanings of War: Its Technologies and Aftermaths

A project on the topic of war designed to integrate course content and to strengthen faculty collaboration across divisions.

LaGuardia Community College proposes a project connecting liberal arts faculty, the college community, and our diverse student body,through interdisciplinary study and curriculum development inspired by visiting scholars and readings on the theme of meanings of war.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


AC-253409-17

University of Houston System (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Rex A. Koontz (Project Director: June 2016 to March 2021)
Activating the Archive in Latin American and Latino Art History

A two-year collaborative project between the University of Houston (UH) and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) to enable public and curricular use of MFAH’s International Center for the Art of the Americas resources.

"Activating the Archive" is a two-year project that brings together the University of Houston (UH) and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) in a collaboration that will allow a large audience to access and study Latin American and Latino culture history and art criticism through primary documents in Spanish and English. This University-Museum collaboration focuses on what is already the most significant open-access, digital database of Latino and Latin American art history and criticism--the Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art (hereafter the "Documents Project"). Here we activate the archive through the addition of English translations, geospatial data, and Latino art journals.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$102,000 (approved)
$101,125 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


AC-253411-17

Texas Lutheran University (Seguin, TX 78155-5978)
Jennifer R. Mata (Project Director: June 2016 to present)
"¡Sí, Más!": Building Bridges with the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS)

A three-year bridge program between Texas Lutheran University and an area high school, anchored in the study of Mexican-American culture.

The core focus of the ¡Sí, Más!: Building Bridges with the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS) project is to serve the surrounding community; strengthen both Texas Lutheran University (TLU) and Seguin High School (SHS) commitments as Hispanic Serving Institutions; address the changing demographics of TLU, SHS, and the surrounding community; and position more SHS Hispanic students to enroll in and graduate from TLU. This grant, in accordance with the National Endowment for the Humanities Common Good Initiative to foster engagement with Humanities scholarship in areas undergoing demographic change, will allow TLU CMAS and its Mexican American Studies (MAST) program to develop a Mexican American Studies Summer Bridge Program for 20 SHS Hispanic students (2 cohorts of 10 students).

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; Latino History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$79,838 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2020


AC-253418-17

University of Texas, Permian Basin (Odessa, TX 79762-8122)
Rebecca Susan Babcock (Project Director: June 2016 to July 2019)
Jason Lagapa (Co Project Director: December 2016 to July 2019)
Boom or Bust: A Collection and Study of Energy Narratives

A two-year program of writing workshops, reading and discussion groups, and a speaker’s series bringing humanities perspectives to fields of energy production and consumption in West Texas.

“Boom or Bust: A Collection and Investigation of Energy Narratives” is a two year project at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin (UTPB) designed to bring humanities content and perspectives on the field of energy production and consumption, a field often discussed primarily through a STEM lens. The project directors, our students, and members of the West Texas community will examine the effects of energy harvesting and production on the area, with a particular emphasis on how the oil field and similar sectors of energy production affect the community, as West Texans of all races and backgrounds bridge social strata through the economic opportunity provided by the energy sector. Our primary objective in this project is to make accessible the voices of those community members who have been affected by the energy sector in this area.

Project fields:
American Literature; English; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$83,799 (approved)
$71,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


AC-253436-17

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)
Linda Christine English (Project Director: June 2016 to May 2019)
Friederike Bruehoefener (Co Project Director: May 2017 to May 2019)
Revising the Women's Studies Program

A twenty-month program of scholar-led workshops as well as faculty retreats to revise the Gender and Women’s Studies Program at the University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley.

The grant seeks funding to bring in program consultants and specialists in an effort to revitalize the Gender And Women's Studies Program at UTRGV. The first phase of the project entails bringing in three program consultants to conduct workshops with affiliated faculty on best practices for generating interest and extending enrollment. In the second phase, external specialists will be invited to lead workshops on women, gender, and sexuality topics. Affiliated faculty will attend both workshops and retreats focused on incorporating insights gained from the external consultants into the program curriculum and course syllabi.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Women's History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$68,028 (approved)
$51,035 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


AC-253445-17

Galveston College (Galveston, TX 77550-7496)
David Shane Wallace (Project Director: June 2016 to November 2019)
Michael P. Berberich (Co Project Director: March 2017 to November 2019)
Coastal Culinary: Exploring Food Narratives

A two-year project for faculty to study and develop courses on food studies.

The “Coastal Culinary: Tasting Food Narratives” project is a two-year (25 month) effort to strengthen the teaching and study of humanities within the Galveston region, specifically at Galveston College, a small Hispanic serving community college. The humanities topic of focus is food studies, food pathways, and the use of personal narratives informed by family recipes – story-telling focused on food. Twelve faculty participants in addition to the Director and Co-Director (n=14) will engage in a four-phase professional development sequence of (1) group study, (2) curriculum re-design, (3) implementation, and (4) assessment of practice through self-study.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Ethnic Studies; Literature, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,429 (approved)
$88,458 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 5/31/2019


AC-253456-17

California State University East Bay Foundation (Hayward, CA 94542-1602)
Christopher M. Moreman (Project Director: June 2016 to June 2019)
Developing a Religious Studies Minor

An eighteen-month scholar-led seminar that would prepare an interdisciplinary faculty team at California State University, East Bay, to develop a comparative religion minor.

California State University, East Bay has recently been acknowledged as an Hispanic Serving Institution, by which we plan to increase the spectrum of our curriculum in Humanities to better serve a traditionally under-represented population. Our university prides itself on the diversity of its student population, and strives to address issues of diversity and social justice in our teaching, research, and engagements. In recognition of the need to bolster the Humanities, the departments of Philosophy, Ethnic Studies, History, English, Modern Languages & Literatures, and Liberal Studies have recently agreed to come together collectively to form a new School of Global Humanities and Cultural Studies, to foster interdisciplinary collaborations among Humanities scholars and to strengthen each of the disciplines within. As the first major initiative of the school, all of the departments in the school have agreed to support the formation of a program in Comparative Religion.

Project fields:
Comparative Religion

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,993 (approved)
$99,881 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


AC-234211-16

Pima County Community College District (Tucson, AZ 85709-6000)
Brian Stewart (Project Director: June 2015 to May 2019)
Border Culture in the Classroom and the Public Square

An eighteen-month interdisciplinary project on border culture for faculty, students, and community, incorporating curriculum development, enhancement of writing skills, and a public dialog program.

The Desert Vista Campus of Pima Community College proposes an 18 month interdisciplinary humanities project. Our project entitled, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, Theme: Border Culture has three components: 1)teachers/scholars will develop new curriculum and teach within the interdisciplinary cohorts; 2) two semesters of piloting the three interdisciplinary courses that bring together writing and reading, writing and history, and writing and art. 3) development of a Public Dialogue Program on the Desert Vista Campus which will serve as an active dissemination site to showcase student work, and further provide a space for dialogue among and between the campus and the surrounding community and neighborhoods. These three components bring the work in humanities courses into a direct relationship with work beyond the academic setting and provide our teachers, students, and the larger community with a way to understand our unique experience at the border.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$89,799 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2018


AC-234254-16

University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL 60612-4305)
Jennifer Scott (Project Director: June 2015 to August 2018)
Securing the Common Good: Hull-House History at the University of Illinois at Chicago

A two-year project that seeks to integrate the Jane Adams Hull House Museum and its history of social reform into the university curriculum and bring the humanities to public service fields.

“Securing the Common Good” is a two-year initiative designed to strengthen the teaching and learning of the humanities at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and expand the reach of the campus’ most significant humanities resource, the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum (JAHHM). Through a year long seminar for faculty in the humanities and social sciences, the creation of new teaching modules, and the development of a new undergraduate course, the history and philosophies of the Hull-House Settlement will be integrated into curricula across the UIC campus as never before.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 4/1/2018


AC-234283-16

University of the Incarnate Word (San Antonio, TX 78209-6318)
Frederick Zenon Culverhouse (Project Director: June 2015 to February 2021)
Trauma: Conflict and Aftermath

A series of faculty and curriculum development activities on the subject of trauma.

This project looks at Trauma and its Aftermath through an interdisciplinary humanities focusing on three populations 1) Veterans of War; 2) Refugees and 3) Sexual Violence Victims. While usually the province of the clinical sciences, the complexity of trauma induced through intentional violence increasingly requires a humanities perspective to add to the analysis. University of the Incarnate Word will enhance the undergraduate humanities curriculum by implementing new courses and embedding service learning opportunities within new and existing courses with a focus on psychological trauma. A faculty cohort led by the PI will receive development via readings and invited lecturers each spring, develop curriculum in the summer, and then implement and evaluation new courses each fall semester of the project period. At the end of the three-year project, a conference will be held highlighting student and faculty work and research in this area.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$98,819 (approved)
$98,778 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2019


AC-234284-16

University Auxiliary and Research Services Corporation (San Marcos, CA 92096-0001)
Joely Proudfit (Project Director: June 2015 to October 2017)
Building a Twenty-first-Century American Indian Studies Program

An eighteen-month faculty and curricular development project to establish a minor in American Indian Studies.

The goal of this project is to engage CSUSM faculty and representatives from California tribal nations in the design of a minimum of four American Indian Studies courses to support the American Indian Studies Department dialogue and to foster continuing collaborative dialogues that bridge cultures while enhancing access and retention efforts on campus. Objective 1: Use faculty and American Indian SME dialogues to inform humanities course content for a minimum of four courses (heritage languages, visual and performing arts, history, and politics). Objective 2: Engage CSUSM faculty in the delivery of humanities curricula using indigenous epistemologies to support access and retention of diverse populations in courses which include content relevant to American Indians, particularly American Indians in California.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,605 (approved)
$99,605 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


AC-234498-16

California State University, Bakersfield (Bakersfield, CA 93311-1022)
Dustin Knepp (Project Director: June 2015 to December 2015)
Liora Gubkin (Project Director: December 2015 to November 2017)
Dustin Knepp (Co Project Director: December 2015 to November 2017)
Crossing Borders, Making Connections: The Humanities and Ethnic Studies

An eighteen-month collaborative project for faculty to develop an interdisciplinary Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies.

During this project, faculty from six different disciplines in the humanities and three disciplines in the social sciences will develop interdisciplinary expertise in Ethnic Studies in order to offer an interdisciplinary BA in Ethnic Studies. Participants will meet monthly and co-lead discussions of assigned readings that address ethnicity from various perspectives. Participants will work with two expert visiting scholars and two community organizers to expand knowledge of underrepresented and hidden minorities in the Central Valley. Local organizers will facilitate meetings between faculty and minority community leaders in order to develop applied learning opportunities for students and assess potential partnerships between community and university. Public events include a panel discussion “Ethnic Diversity in the Valley” and two major multicultural learning events: a Tamalada and a Basques in California exhibit.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$98,284 (approved)
$82,837 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


AC-234555-16

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Anne E. Leonhardt (Project Director: June 2015 to June 2019)
A Cultural History of Digital Technology

An eighteen-month interdisciplinary faculty and curricular development project focused on placing digital technologies in cultural, historical, and philosophical context.

New York City College of Technology (CUNY) proposes an eighteen-month interdisciplinary faculty development project designed to equip faculty from both STEM and humanities disciplines with an understanding of the cultural, historical, and philosophical dimensions of three major contemporary technologies that are focal points in our curriculum: geospatial technology, digital fabrication, and robotics. A Cultural History of Digital Technology will engage prominent theorists who work at the interface of technology and culture with City Tech faculty in situating these particular technologies in a cultural and historical framework so that they are understood both as expressions of cultural values and as technological innovations. The broad aim of this project is to equip faculty and ultimately our students not only with technical knowledge and specific skills sets but with a broader vision of the rich interplay between technological developments and specific cultural contexts.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,998 (approved)
$99,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 2/28/2018


AC-226761-15

Modesto Junior College (Modesto, CA 95350-5800)
Chad Redwing (Project Director: June 2014 to April 2017)
The Search for Common Ground: Culture in California's Central Valley

A curricular development project to bring humanities faculty from Central Valley community colleges to Modesto Junior College to study the local and regional culture of California’s Central Valley.

Five faculty members from the humanities disciplines (humanities, history, philosophy, and literature) will explore the diverse cultural backgrounds of the populations in our community in order to make the curriculum in these disciplines more relevant to the students in humanities courses. The project includes lectures by imminent scholars from California universities; multi-week seminars on specific topics; exploration of arts, museums, centers and festivals; development of learning modules that reflect the findings of the seminars; and a symposium to share findings with community college faculty from around the Valley. Humanities curriculum will be revised to reflect the local and regional culture of the people of California's Central Valley.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,882 (approved)
$99,882 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


AC-226771-15

Angelo State University (San Angelo, TX 76909-2601)
Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai (Project Director: June 2014 to May 2019)
Christine Lamberson (Co Project Director: June 2014 to May 2019)
West Texans and the Experience of War: World War I to the Present

A three-year project at Angelo State University in West Texas to preserve and examine the experiences of America’s military veterans and their families from World War I to the present day.

A Century Apart: West Texans and America's Wars is a three year project at Angelo State University (ASU) designed to compile, preserve, share, and analyze the experiences of America's warriors and their families from World War I to the present day. The project directors and their students will examine the similarities, differences, and challenges faced by American soldiers with a connection to West Texas in those conflicts by focusing on six themes: motivation for service, public support for the conflict, familial support and challenges, experience of wartime service, interaction with and articulation of American national identity to foreigners, and challenges of returning to civilian life.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Military History; Public History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,982 (approved)
$94,920 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2018


AC-226779-15

CUNY Research Foundation, Manhattan Community College (New York, NY 10007-1044)
Alex d'Erizans (Project Director: June 2014 to present)
Cultivating Global Competencies in a Diverse World

A series of faculty workshops, curriculum development activities, and a regional symposium on world cultures and global interdependence at the Borough of Manhattan Community College.

The BMCC NEH initiative, Cultivating Intercultural Competencies in the Globalized Classroom, is an interdisciplinary three-year project designed to equip students with greater intercultural competencies to participate in a globalized world. More than simply embracing the notion of cultural diversity by encouraging the toleration of group differences, BMCC seeks to develop a broader agenda based on a common theme of enhancing intercultural competencies across course offerings in the Humanities so that BMCC students can better understand the interconnected world around them and be prepared to become effective agents of social justice and social change.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,993 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2018


AC-50194-14

University of Houston System (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Todd Romero (Project Director: July 2013 to present)
The History of Food Production and Consumption in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region

A six-semester program designed to enhance teaching, scholarship, and community engagement through the study of food and its role in the Gulf Coast region's history, economy, and cultural life.

The Gulf Coast Food Project: Humanities Research and Curriculum is a six semester program to enhance humanities teaching, scholarship, and community engagement through food studies at the University of Houston. It consists of a faculty reading and curriculum development group designed to enrich food studies teaching and develop new courses; a series of public lectures and faculty workshops to catalyze humanities-based foodways scholarship and teaching; and a public conference on race and ethnicity in foodways. The programming will support participating faculty in creating a new interdisciplinary curriculum in Food Studies, including an undergraduate minor and graduate certificate in Food Studies at UH. A growing area of study, food studies resonates with special meaning for humanities scholars who explore the cultural dimensions of food production and consumption, as food is fundamental to identity, labor, economy, culture, and history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2014 – 2/28/2019


AC-50195-14

University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)
Sandra Ivanna Garabano (Project Director: July 2013 to May 2016)
Border Securities and the Humanities

A two-year program of curriculum enhancement using personal narratives, folktales, fiction, and scholarship to develop faculty perspectives on border security

Enhancing the Curriculum in Two Master of Art Programs is a Fellows Program that aims to increase the impact of the humanities in the conversation about border security. While border security has been at the center of public debates and has received the attention of scholarship in the social sciences, there is ample body of work on cultural understanding, language proficiency and the appreciation of different cultures that might deepen the conversation. This project proposes to study the experience of living and crossing the US. Mexico border as portrayed in fiction, personal narratives, folktales and anecdotes to contribute a renewed perspective on security that has been absent from national media and political discourses. Engaging the humanities in topics such as border security will probe the scope and reach of its various disciplines in addressing the contemporary problems of an increasingly interconnected world. The Program will begin January 1, 2014 and end December 31, 2014.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Area Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$89,361 (approved)
$68,760 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


AC-50199-14

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Phyllis Van Slyck (Project Director: July 2013 to September 2014)
Naomi J. Stubbs (Project Director: September 2014 to April 2018)
Naomi J. Stubbs (Co Project Director: December 2013 to September 2014)
Richard Brown (Co Project Director: March 2015 to December 2016)
Bethany D. Holmstrom (Co Project Director: December 2016 to April 2018)
Technology, Self, and Society: A Humanities Initiative

A three-year interdisciplinary project that would examine the theme of technology and the self, in order to enrich introductory courses, as well as the college's capstone course, "Humanism, Science, and Technology."

LaGuardia Community College proposes a 3-year Project connecting liberal arts faculty, the college community, and our diverse student body, through interdisciplinary study and curriculum development inspired by visiting scholars and readings on the theme of technology and the self. The goals of the Project are to: 1) enhance the capacity of LaGuardia faculty to enrich their curriculum in the humanities, and 2) bring NEH faculty Fellows into conversation with visiting scholars and current issues involving identity in relation to new technologies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
English

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$97,532 (approved)
$97,532 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2017


AC-50204-14

University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)
Juliet M. McMullin (Project Director: July 2013 to present)
Narrative in Tandem: Creating New Medical and Health Humanities Programs

A two-year interdisciplinary project that would contribute to the development of a new program in health humanities at a newly established medical school.

Narrative in Tandem is organized around examining narrative in the humanities and medicine through three approaches of conveying, expressing, and understanding "the symptom." "The symptom" is defined to include both medical and social conditions impacting health experiences from patient/provider to connections with individuals and communities not physically present in the encounter. Over the course of two years, participants from disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and medicine will explore these issues through intersecting activities designed to: 1) contribute to knowledge of narrative in health and medicine; 2) develop narrative skills, including course syllabi and activities that can be applied in humanities and medical education; 3) compile seminar discussions to contribute to a larger strategy about integrating humanities and medicine; and 4) lay the groundwork for establishing a vibrant health humanities program at UCR.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


AC-50213-14

California State University, Fresno Foundation (Fresno, CA 93740-0001)
Vincent F. Biondo (Project Director: July 2013 to April 2017)
The California Pluralism Project: A Digital Humanities Archive for Civility and Citizenship Education

A two-year project, comprised of a conference and online materials development activities, on the subject of religious and cultural pluralism in California.

The two-year "California Pluralism Project" will make religious literacy available to high school students and teachers to improve civility and college readiness. According to the Pew Forum, Hispanic students have the nation's lowest religious literacy and highest college drop out rate. In the nation's most diverse state, we learned from our initial 2010-2012 "Ethics, Religion and Civil Discourse" NEH project that religious literacy is necessary to support the First Amendment, civil society, and democratic participation. A Humanities curriculum that incorporates religious literacy in classrooms that are ethnically and religiously pluralistic will improve retention rates.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Philosophy of Religion

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,991 (approved)
$96,139 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


AC-50217-14

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Geoffrey D. Zylstra (Project Director: July 2013 to October 2015)
Making Connections: Engaging the Humanities at a College of Technology

To support an eighteen-month interdisciplinary project that would examine the role of the humanities in technological developments.

New York City College of Technology (City Tech) proposes an 18 month interdisciplinary humanities project entitled Making Connections: Engaging the Humanities in a College of Technology, designed by faculty in history, English, and architecture. The project has three components: 1) a year-long NEH Faculty Seminar for eight NEH Fellows who will pursue an intellectually rigorous study of selected themes through discussions led by external scholars; 2) the development of new interdisciplinary courses and modules that link the humanities with technical majors; and 3) a vigorous dissemination agenda pursued through presentations and papers to professional peers at City Tech and at national conferences.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,958 (approved)
$99,958 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


AC-50163-13

CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)
Richard Haw (Project Director: July 2012 to June 2016)
Reading Moby-Dick and One Hundred Years of Solitude: The Integrated Humanities Project

Faculty and curriculum development to create interdisciplinary intensive reading courses on Melville's Moby-Dick and Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude.

The Integrated Humanities (IH) Project is an interdisciplinary deep-reading and research curriculum devoted to immersive study of one capacious book each semester—Melville’s "Moby-Dick" and García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude." The Project aims to offset students’ often fragmented academic experience by engaging them with the text almost daily while developing their ability to think critically, conduct research, recognize the interconnectedness of knowledge in the humanities and understand the diversity of human experience. To create a cohesive reading community, the IH Project allows students to receive 6 General Education humanities credits for two parallel 3-hour courses, one in the classroom, the other online, linked by bi-weekly small-group tutorials. The classroom course concentrates on close reading and written analysis; the research-based online course culminates in the collaborative creation of an illustrated, extensively annotated online edition of the core text.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$74,799 (approved)
$74,799 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 3/31/2016


AC-50166-13

CUNY Research Foundation, Queensborough Community College (Bayside, NY 11364-1432)
Megan Joanna Elias (Project Director: July 2012 to October 2015)
The Foodways and Humanities Project

A multi-year collaboration between humanities and culinary arts faculty and students exploring Latino history and culture through foodways.

The Food and Humanities Project is a multi-campus learning community which links humanities and culinary arts courses at the City University of New York to develop an understanding of Latin American history and culture. Students in history courses are guided by an expert in the field to conduct primary research in Latin American food history. The recipes they select as reflective of important moments in the region’s development will be created in the kitchens of a culinary arts program. This process will be filmed and the resulting videos first shown to the participating history students during the course of the project and then made public as teaching resources through the project’s permanent web site.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$74,937 (approved)
$74,937 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2015


AC-50169-13

Heritage University (Toppenish, WA 98948-9562)
Winona Wynn (Project Director: July 2012 to September 2014)
Somos Indios, We Are Indian: Bridging Indigenous Identities

An eighteen-month curriculum development project for a new Native American and Indigenous Studies program at a Hispanic-serving institution with a large Native American student population.

Heritage University, a private, four-year Hispanic-Serving Institution located on the Yakama Indian Reservation in rural Eastern Washington, proposes an eighteen-month "Somos Indios, We are Indian: Bridging Indigenous Identities" curriculum development project. Processing themes through dialogues with invited scholars will deepen understandings of the shared socio-political histories of our Hispanic and Native American students, thereby providing a critical interdisciplinary Humanities foundation for contested identity dialogue in four key courses of a Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS) Program currently under development. Additionally, ten culturally-embedded course assignments or projects following the theme of "We are Indian" will be created and housed in our online Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching to enhance faculty teaching across the curriculum.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$74,247 (approved)
$74,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


AC-50175-13

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Barbara Grumet (Project Director: July 2012 to December 2013)
Mary Sue Donsky (Project Director: December 2013 to May 2015)
Mary Sue Donsky (Co Project Director: June 2013 to May 2015)
Comparative Perspectives on Health, Illness, and Healing

A year-long faculty development project to explore the practice of medicine as an expression of beliefs and value systems that differ across cultures.

Designed by faculty in nursing, radiological technology, dental hygiene, vision care, biology, and law and paralegal studies departments, Comparative Perspectives on Health, Illness and Healing, a year-long humanities project that will explore the practice of medicine as a manifestation of cultural beliefs and value systems that have differed widely across cultures and over the course of history.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$74,986 (approved)
$73,650 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


AC-50128-12

California State University, Long Beach Foundation (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)
Clorinda Donato (Project Director: July 2011 to May 2015)
French and Italian for Spanish Speakers

A three-year project enabling faculty from four Southern California institutions to enhance humanities content in French and Italian courses for Spanish speakers.

"French and Italian for Spanish Speakers" is a three-year project beginning in 2012 that enables faculty from four Southern California institutions to enhance humanities content in French and Italian courses for Spanish speakers. This project, headed by Clorinda Donato (chair of Italian studies and professor of French) and Claire Martin (professor of Spanish) at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB), engages nine faculty members from four area community colleges and high schools with the Intercomprehension method of language learning, successfully used at CSULB in French for Spanish Speakers (since 2007) and Italian for Spanish Speakers (since 2010). This method builds on students' knowledge of one Romance language to accelerate acquisition of another, uniting cultural content with language study from the start. Participants examine and adapt to their own use selected case studies from CSULB courses, such as a first-semester Italian lesson that expands existing textbook content on Baroque art to include the parallel history of the Baroque in Italy, Mexico, and Spain, its political and religious significance, and the study of a poem from the Baroque period. Other examples include a first-semester French lesson during which students read all of Saint-Exupery's Le Petit Prince prior to studying the work's author, historical period, and literary context and the second semester Italian lesson exploring the mind-body connection through discussing a chapter of Italo Svevo's novel Zeno's Conscience, the biography of Svevo, his role in introducing the language of psychoanalysis into literature, and his place in Italian and European literary history. Participating faculty meet five times a year during the three years of the project. In years one and three, Pierre Escudé (Institut Universitaire de Formation des Maîtres Midi-Pyrénées) leads workshops on his research and teaching involving Intercomprehension and makes site visits to each participant campus; in year two, Alexandra Jaffe (CSULB) leads a workshop on the interplay between the three Romance languages of Corsican, French, and Italian in Corsica. Study and critique of syllabi and materials culminate in the third year, with development of syllabi for each institution's courses and a "how to" manual, alongside a hands-on teacher-training workshop, a colloquium for interested faculty, and presentations at national conferences such as the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL).

Project fields:
French Language

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,990 (approved)
$96,412 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 12/31/2014


AC-50136-12

Valencia College, Osceola Campus (Kissimmee, FL 34744)
Marlene Temes (Project Director: July 2011 to September 2014)
PreColumbian Humanities Expansion and Integration Initiative

A two-year project for a study group of twelve community college faculty to create new course content on Mesoamerican cultures before Columbus.

"Integrating Pre-Columbian Studies into the Humanities Curriculum" is a two-year project beginning in 2012 at Valencia College that supports a study group of twelve community college faculty as they create new course content on Mesoamerican cultures before Columbus. Project director Marlene Temes (Latin American humanities) heads a faculty study group on the Aztec, Maya, and Inca cultures; this group expands curricular offerings by developing a new course in Pre-Columbian Humanities. The group also integrates the knowledge gained about these cultures into the existing curriculum of Introduction to Humanities, the highest-enrollment humanities class at the college. The study group unites seven part-time faculty who teach Introduction to Humanities with four full-time faculty members (in Latin American studies and in humanities) and the project director. For year one, faculty readings address such areas as pre-Columbian worldview and religion, visual arts and architecture, and indigenous communities today. In year two, the material developed for course integration allows comparison between the rise and fall of Mayan civilization and that of the Roman empire, and consideration of Mesoamerican ballgames alongside ancient Olympic games. Robert Sitler (Stetson University, modern languages) provides external expertise on Mesoamerican civilizations and guides faculty on a Spring 2013 site visit to Guatemala for first-hand study of major architectural and cultural monuments. The resulting curriculum, which serves as a model for colleges nationwide, is disseminated via a website and through conference presentations (e.g., for the Community College Humanities Association).

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,291 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


AC-50146-12

Mount St. Mary's University (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1599)
Montserrat Reguant (Project Director: July 2011 to March 2015)
Julie Feldman-Abe (Co Project Director: December 2011 to March 2015)
Women in China: Internationalizing the Humanities and Professional Studies Curricula

A two-year curriculum and faculty development project to study women in China from antiquity to today and to produce content for courses in humanities, education, business, and health-related studies.

"Women in China: Internationalizing the Humanities and Professional Studies" is a two-year curriculum and faculty development project beginning in 2012 at Mount St. Mary's College (MSMC) for eight faculty members to study and produce new course content on women in China from antiquity to today. Through a focus on women in China, this project strengthens the college's offerings on this increasingly important country, which is nonetheless largely unknown to MSMC undergraduates-many of whom are Latina, first-generation college students from low-income family backgrounds. Project co-directors Montserrat Reguant (chair, Language and Culture) and Julie Feldman-Abe (director, Center for Cultural Fluency) are joined by six additional faculty members, three each from the humanities and the professions; over the two-year project, they work to modify or create fifteen courses across three degree levels and eight majors. One such new course compares Chinese and American poetry; existing courses incorporate new material on Confucian ethics in the Introduction to Philosophy and fold Chinese literature and philosophy about leadership in the business management seminar. During the first year of faculty reading and study, six visiting scholars from universities in the region bring their expertise to campus, each offering a public lecture followed by a faculty seminar on such topics as "Empresses, Art, and Agency" and "What Can Chinese Films Tell Us About Modern Chinese History?" The college itself funds the faculty cohort's seven-day "immersive experience" in China, building on an existing relationship with Nanjing University, which hosts faculty seminars and guides the cohort's visits to key cultural sites. Late in the second year, the faculty work to develop a China Resource Network as a forum for further dialogue and dissemination, with its website housing all project materials, including scholars' recorded public lectures.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$97,603 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2012 – 9/30/2014


AC-50147-12

University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (San Juan, PR 00925-2512)
Elsa Marin-Lopez (Project Director: July 2011 to February 2013)
Melba M. Martinez (Project Director: February 2013 to September 2013)
Brenda Ann Camara (Project Director: September 2013 to May 2015)
El Puente a UPR-RP y Hacia el Mundo (The Bridge to UPR-RP and the World)

A three-year project offering a yearly summer bridge program engaging at-risk high school students in humanities study at the university, followed by additional school-year support.

"El Puente: A Bridge to the University and the World" is a three-year project beginning in 2012 to offer a yearly summer "bridge" program at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (UPR-RP), engaging at-risk high school students in humanities study at the university, followed by additional school-year support. The goal of the project is to broaden the worldview and deepen the humanities knowledge of students from neighboring secondary schools, where project directors find that "thousands of at-risk public high school students who live across the pedestrian bridge to UPR-RP believe their chances of attending it, or any university, are as remote as their chances of visiting Antarctica." A ten-day interdisciplinary humanities workshop takes place each of three summers, reaching eighty students: twenty students each year supported by NEH, and an additional twenty in the first year supported by the college. In one workshop session, philosophy department chair Anayra Santory Jorge leads students in an examination of ethics through current news articles. In others, professors open up their disciplines for students by focusing their study on the Caribbean-its music and writing; its cultural history; its connections to West Africa; and its masks in comparison with other cultures' mask traditions. The workshop requires daily writing and oral presentations from the students to strengthen their analytical and communication skills and engages them in working with resources in the university library, museum, and Hispanic Studies Seminar Room. High school teachers from participating schools assist in sessions and four upper-level humanities undergraduates serve as tutors. This bridge program also takes advantage of a little-known university policy permitting high school students to enroll in university courses but defer tuition and fee payment until they are officially admitted as first-year students. Students thus enrolled in university courses during the academic year are supported by a network drawn from their summer program experience, including workshop tutors, faculty, and project director Elsa Marin-Lopez.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$97,045 (approved)
$63,774 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2012 – 1/31/2015


AC-50152-12

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)
Russell K. Skowronek (Project Director: July 2011 to May 2015)
Sonia Hernandez (Co Project Director: December 2011 to May 2015)
From Porciones to Colonias: Curriculum Innovation in the Rio Grande Valley

A three-year project for twelve middle-school teachers on archival, oral, and archaeological research to develop place-based curricula on the history of the Rio Grande Valley.

"From Porciones to Colonias: Curriculum Innovation in the Rio Grande Valley" is a three-year project at the University of Texas, Pan America (UTPAS) to train twelve middle-school teachers in archival, oral, and archaeological research as they develop place-based curricula on the history of the Rio Grande Valley. Based at University of Texas-Pan American (UTPA), minutes from the U. S.-Mexican border, this program equips seventh- and eighth-grade teachers to incorporate the complex story of the Rio Grande Valley into the region's history curriculum. The story begins with the presence of diverse Indian peoples. It continues with Spanish settlers who received porciones (land grants) in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the subsequent influx of Mexican and Anglo inhabitants, the rise of commercial agriculture, and the development of colonias (unincorporated subdivisions) which comprise Hidalgo county today. In the face of present-day border tensions and severe poverty, this project recovers the historic and cultural wealth of this dynamic borderlands region. It also fosters cross-cultural understanding by exposing teachers, and consequently their students, to their diverse cultural heritage. UTPA faculty affiliated with CHAPS (Community, Historical, Archeology Project with Schools) conduct a series of workshops on the region's land, family, architectural, and archaeological history. Based on these workshops and visits to local sites and archives, the teachers produce oral histories and lesson plans. Culminating the program, they present their work to other area teachers at a free public conference. CHAPS faculty produce an edited volume combining scholarly essays and the teacher projects.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,425 (approved)
$88,226 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 12/31/2014


AC-50154-12

University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (San Juan, PR 00925-2512)
Loretta Collins (Project Director: July 2011 to September 2014)
Humanities and the Healing Arts: Faculty Development and Multidisciplinary Curriculum in the Context of Puerto Rico and the C

Faculty development activities and public lectures leading to the creation of undergraduate courses on the intersection of medicine and the humanities.

"Humanities and the Healing Arts in the Context of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean" is a project supporting a series of public lectures and faculty development activities leading to the creation of undergraduate courses on the intersection of medicine and the humanities at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (UPR-RP). The project brings together a multidisciplinary study group that enables fifteen humanities and medical sciences faculty to collaborate in designing undergraduate curricular materials for the medical humanities in the cultural contexts of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. The project grows from the increasing need for the university's sizable student population preparing for the health or medical care professions not only to have a good grasp of organic chemistry and biology, but also to have an enriched preparation in the humanities. Four interdisciplinary topical courses, including Literature and Medicine and the History of Public Health, have already been developed; this project expands the corpus of offerings. Public lectures by guest scholars set the stage for related faculty development workshops, new courses, research publications, and a website. For example, the inaugural lecture, by Dr. Rafael Campo, Director of the Medical Humanities program at Harvard University, is followed by a workshop on poetry and the importance of voice in diverse experiences of illness. Participating faculty also explore medical humanities as it relates to the visual arts, film, drama, bioethics, and history. Readings for the three-year program include, among others, Campo's The Healing Art: A Doctor's Black Bag of Poetry; invited speaker Kwame Dawes's Hope's Hospice and other Poems; Chekhov's Doctors: A Collection of Chekhov's Medical Stories; playwright Margaret Edson's Wit; and selections from Jose G. Rigau's Historia de la medicina: la salud en Puerto Rico en el siglo XX.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$86,411 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


AC-50156-12

University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Mayaguez, PR 00680-6475)
Dana L. Collins (Project Director: July 2011 to October 2016)
The Convergence of Culture and Science: Expanding the Humanities Curriculum

A series of faculty seminars and curriculum development activities on artificial intelligence; the confluence of philosophy, engineering, and technological choice; and theism, cosmology, and evolution.

"The Convergence of Culture and Science: Expanding the Humanities Curriculum" is a three-year project at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, consisting of a series of faculty development seminars and related follow-up activities on artificial intelligence; the confluence of philosophy, engineering, and technological choice; and theism, cosmology, and evolution. The project explores the intersection of the humanities and the growing density and depth of scientific discoveries and bourgeoning changes in technologies. Over the three years, faculty from the humanities, engineering, and the social, natural, and agricultural sciences read and discuss key texts with invited scholars in preparation for developing three interdisciplinary courses on artificial intelligence; appropriate technology: engineering, philosophy, and technology choice; and theism, cosmology, and evolution. In year one, participants read Descartes' Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy, Pamela McCorduck's Machines Who Think, and Tim Crane's The Mechanical Mind: A Philosophical Introduction to Minds, Machines and Mental Representation, among other works, to consider the social, philosophical, psychological, and technical aspects of the creation and use of artificial intelligence. In year two, guest scholars Carl Mitcham (Colorado School of Mines) and Indira Nair (Carnegie Mellon University) lead faculty in explorations of the philosophical and social aspects of engineering design and technological innovation, related questions of policy, and the "idea of 'progress,'" using such works as Mitcham's Thinking Through Technology: The Path Between Engineering and Philosophy and D. Riley's Engineering and Social Justice. Year three features scholars Jorge Ferrer-Negron (UPRM), Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and Donald Pfister (Harvard University) in discussions of the history of theism, the philosophy of religion, the Big Bang and String theories of the origins of the universe, and Darwin's On the Origin of Species and its impact in the world. Teleconferences extend the academic exchanges with scholars.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,737 (approved)
$94,976 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2016


AC-50089-11

California State University, Northridge, University Corporation (Northridge, CA 91330-8316)
Nayereh Tohidi (Project Director: June 2010 to April 2017)
Creating a New Minor in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at CSUN

A two-year project to establish a minor in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies.

The College of Humanities at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) is seeking funding to establish a minor in Middle East and Islamic Studies. As an interdisciplinary program, the minor will offer the study of Islamic and Middle East cultures, politics and societies. An important component of the minor will be training in languages widely spoken in the Middle East and other Muslim majority countries. In Year One (2010/2011 academic year), CSUN will establish three new courses: an Arabic language class, Women in Islamic Literature, and Gender Issues among the Muslim Community of North America. The addition of these three courses to the existing course offerings in the area of Muslim and Middle Eastern studies will allow for the establishment of a new minor in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies. In Year Two (2011/2012 academic year), the following courses will be added: Sufism, Turkish language, intermediate Farsi and advanced Farsi.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,969 (approved)
$98,320 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2016


AC-50098-11

Mercy College (Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522-1189)
Celia Karen Reissig-Vasile (Project Director: June 2010 to September 2014)
The Latino and Latin American Studies Project

A two-year project to establish a new interdisciplinary minor in Latino and Latin American studies.

A four-member core committee of faculty from the School of Liberal Arts at Mercy College, a federally-designated Hispanic Serving Institution located in Dobbs Ferry, NY, is proposing the Latino and Latin American Awareness Project, a collaborative initiative that will work toward the establishment of a new undergraduate interdisciplinary minor in Latino and Latin American Studies. This two-year project will serve to strengthen and enrich humanities teaching and scholarship by supporting a community of faculty members who will work together to explore and examine the contributions of Latino culture and Latin America to the global community and who will develop a curriculum that will foster greater knowledge and expand students' views. The project will be informed by an ongoing lecture series presented by external experts devoted to issues that concern the Latino and Latin American communities. A total of six presentations will be offered over the course of the project.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$98,928 (approved)
$97,419 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2013


AC-50106-11

California State University, Fresno Foundation (Fresno, CA 93740-0001)
Andrew Gordon Fiala (Project Director: June 2010 to September 2014)
Vincent F. Biondo (Co Project Director: June 2010 to September 2014)
Ethics, Religion, and Civil Discourse in Central California

A conference, curriculum development workshops, a new college course, and an edited conference volume on the range of ethical and religious responses to increased religious diversity in Central California.

This project will promote civil discourse about religion and religious diversity. With support from the College of Arts and Humanities and the interdisciplinary Ethics Center at Fresno State, the project will sponsor an academic conference in the first year. This will be followed, in year two, by a curricular workshop organized in conjunction with the School of Education. Humanities scholars from campuses throughout the state of California will participate in both conferences along with practitioners of interfaith dialogue and K-12 educators. The project will produce a book that can be used for teaching about religious diversity. It will build partnerships among humanities scholars at campuses across California. It will contribute humanities scholarship to growing interfaith and inter-religious networks in California. And it will result in curricular innovations: a course on “Religion in California” and suggestions for connecting humanities scholarship to the K-12 curriculum.

Project fields:
Religion, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$95,329 (approved)
$84,004 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


AC-50107-11

Capital Community College (Hartford, CT 06103-1211)
Jeffrey F. L. Partridge (Project Director: June 2010 to April 2016)
Hartford Heritage: Enhancing Writing Courses with New Humanities Content

A two-year project for twelve faculty members at Capital Community College to investigate the history, literature, and culture of Hartford, Connecticut, and to reframe the institution's first-year writing courses as writing-intensive humanities studies.

"Hartford Heritage: Enhancing Writing Courses with Humanities Content" is a two-year project to re-design and enhance first-year English Composition courses affecting 400 students annually. It will establish relationships with nationally significant cultural and historical institutions near Capital Community College benefiting 1,200 students annually. Twelve Humanities faculty members will participate in a series of 18 seminars and workshops leading to development of course work that will connect students with the heritage of Hartford in all of their courses. Seminars would be taught on themed writing courses, learning communities, learner-centered methodology, Hartford history, ethnic/immigrant trends and artists and authors of Hartford. The workshops would be held at historic sites such as The Mark Twain House and The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center. The outcomes including five to six new syllabi for English 101 courses in the fall, 2012 reflecting Hartford's rich and diverse past.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$98,645 (approved)
$98,645 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


AC-50118-11

University Enterprises Corporation at CSUSB (San Bernardino, CA 92407-2318)
Rueyling Chuang (Project Director: June 2010 to May 2015)
Integrating Area Studies and Humanities Through Faculty Teaching and Learning Communities: Bridging Cultures in an Era of Internationalization and Web 2.0

A two-year project to support the linking and integration of programs in three interdisciplinary areas: Asian, Latin American, and Islamic and Arabic studies.

The goals of this new humanities initiative are to: (1) promote cultural competency by bridging cultural differences and promoting appreciation of cultural diversity through integration of Asian, Latin American, and Islamic and Arabic studies; (2) enhance teaching excellence by forming a faculty learning community that augments course contents and encourages innovative pedagogical strategies; (3) expand faculty and student knowledge by inviting outside consultants and scholars who are content experts in the areas; (4) establish digital humanities networks that systematically create resources, such as a CSUSB YouTube channel, CSUSB Wikis, and podcasting, for campus and local communities; and (5) reach out to the wider campus community and local communities by sponsoring public lectures that enhance intellectual life and by inviting participation from community members, local high school teachers and students to participate.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$96,734 (approved)
$96,571 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2014


AC-50119-11

Whittier College (Whittier, CA 90601-4446)
Charles Eastman (Project Director: June 2010 to September 2015)
EXPANDING THE INTEGRATION OF GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN A FIRST YEAR WRITING PROGRAM

A three-year project for twenty university faculty to design twenty interdisciplinary writing courses with humanistic content for first-year students.

The integration of global perspectives into college curricula serves to prepare students best for the complex, interdependent world of many cultures they will enter after graduation. Whittier College plans to integrate such perspectives into its First Year Writing Program—building upon a successful pilot effort. Led by the Writing Program Director with aid from expert consultants, 20 faculty participants will engage in a series of seven workshops over the spring, summer and fall, designed to help them plan, develop, execute and evaluate 20 new writing seminars centered around global humanistic themes, ultimately impacting ¾ of the student body. The course development template utilized will be followed in subsequent years to continue introducing such courses in the Program. Assessment and dissemination paradigms will grow out of existing relationships and models. Los Angeles' leading museums & cultural organizations will contribute to the humanities content of new course offerings.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$86,620 (approved)
$78,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 6/30/2015


AC-50120-11

Center for Advanced Studies on Puerto Rico and the Caribbean (San Juan, PR 00902-3970)
Lilliana Ramos-Collado (Project Director: June 2010 to March 2011)
Jaime L. Rodriguez Cancel (Project Director: March 2011 to September 2014)
Master's Program in Puerto Rican and Caribbean Art History

A series of public lectures and faculty development seminars in anticipation of the creation of a new master's program in Puerto Rican and Caribbean art history.

The Center for Advanced Studies on Puerto Rico and the Caribbean proposes a 2-year grant to strengthen and enrich humanities education and scholarship at the Center, an institution with high Hispanic enrollment, through a new master??s level program in Puerto Rican and Caribbean Art History. NEH resources will provide faculty development seminars to six qualified doctoral faculty members by six leading hemispheric authorities in the field, who will help develop a strong faculty core with a shared body of knowledge in the field; assist in the design and implementation of course contents that are practical, intellectually sound, pertinent to regional and international theory and practice, and responsive to student needs. Moreover, the project will cement strong academic collaborations; develop a supportive scholarship and professional environment; encourage student recruitment; and foster public dissemination of humanities knowledge related to art history.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$97,736 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2013


AC-50066-09

Texas A & M University, Kingsville (Kingsville, TX 78363-8202)
Susan Louise Roberson (Project Director: January 2009 to September 2014)
Exploring the Global Caribbean through Literary and Theoretical Texts

A project for secondary school teachers and university faculty to examine Caribbean literature and culture in two two-week summer seminars, one summer mini-conference, and three continuity group activities during the academic years.

The study proposed by this grant, "Exploring the Global Caribbean through Literary and Theoretical Texts," (1/16/10-1/15/13) will look at the Caribbean through the lenses of literary and theoretical cultural texts to enable greater understanding of its culture and literature as well as to lay theoretical groundwork for understanding the processes of the transnational transport of peoples, languages, and literatures. The grant will sponsor two week-long Summer Seminars for intensive study of Caribbean literature and theoretical texts and a Mini-Conference on Caribbean Literature and Popular Culture in the third summer. To assure continuity, the grant will also sponsor three Continuity Groups--a Book Club, a Writing Group, and a Curriculum Development Group. As a result of the project, university and secondary school teachers will gain knowledge about important literary and theoretical texts by Caribbean authors related to discovery, colonization, post colonialism, and diaspora.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,484 (approved)
$53,022 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2010 – 12/31/2013


AC-50067-09

University of the Incarnate Word (San Antonio, TX 78209-6318)
Matthias Schubnell (Project Director: January 2009 to September 2014)
Water and Culture: Unifying the Humanities Core Curriculum

A project to incorporate the theme "Water and Culture" into the University's Core Humanities Curriculum.

The humanities faculty at UIW plan to implement a faculty development program to further internationalize the humanities core (general education) curriculum. The over arching goal is to develop in all students a global perspective through which they will be able to view the world, think about issues, and make decisions. This broad vision is imperative in an increasingly globalized professional workplace. To facilitate the teaching of a global perspective, the humanities faculty has chosen to focus on the international theme of "Water and Culture." This theme will be thread through diverse humanities courses and will also help students learn how to draw connections between seemingly disparate humanities courses in the Core Curriculum. NEH funds will support an array of faculty development activities, including a public speaker series, readings, limited travel and service learning trips, and planning workshops. Curriculum revisions will be made starting in Fall 2009.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,712 (approved)
$75,933 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 5/31/2012


AC-50068-09

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)
Dahlia Ann Guerra (Project Director: January 2009 to September 2010)
Festival of International Books and Arts 2010: Remembering the Revolution: A Study of the Impact of the Mexican Revolution

The preparation and implementation of a week-long multidisciplinary conference on the Mexican Revolution.

The Festival of International Books and Arts (FESTIBA) is an annual event which takes place during the last week of March at the University of Texas-Pan American. The theme of FESTIBA 2010 is to study the impact of the Mexican Revolution on the language, literature, culture, and role of women in South Texas. Since 2010 will be the centennial anniversary of the beginning of the Mexican Revolution, this study will create a timely opportunity for faculty, students, and community members of South Texas to investigate the profound effect of this chapter of Mexican history on our region and culture. The ultimate goal of FESTIBA 2010 is to bring outstanding scholars to our university and community who will contribute their expertise, encourage intellectual inquiry and exchange, and improve our capacity to understand and thereby teach the humanities.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 5/31/2010


AC-50070-09

CUNY Research Foundation, Hostos Community College (Bronx, NY 10451-5323)
Gregory Angelo Marks (Project Director: January 2009 to June 2011)
From Inquiry to Innovation: Integrating the Humanities into General Education

A project to develop an introductory course for freshmen and a capstone course for graduating seniors, both courses centering on the theme "Conflict and Dialogue."

This project is a one-year, interdisciplinary, multi-campus initiative that will bring together faculty participants from across the City University of New York system. Its goal is to help faculty study the humanities to develop curricula and syllabi that will unify the student experience, especially through modeling freshman inquiry and capstone courses centered around the theme of "conflict and dialogue." A four-day seminar in summer 2009 will help frame the challenges of teaching substantial humanities texts. A speaker series in fall 2009 and spring 2010 will present scholars reflecting on the theme through the lens of their disciplines. Finally, a three-day seminar in May 2010 will assist faculty to frame specific freshman or capstone courses. The end of this initiative is to ensure student success from matriculation through graduation; it will do so by helping faculty become more effective teachers of the substantial issues in the humanities, and in life.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$95,433 (approved)
$95,433 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


AC-50072-09

Heritage University (Toppenish, WA 98948-9562)
Michel Keenan (Project Director: January 2009 to August 2009)
Sneh B. Veena (Project Director: August 2009 to November 2011)
James Borst (Project Director: November 2011 to June 2012)
Visiting Professors for Faculty Development in Native American and Hispanic Cultural Studies

A year-long faculty development program bringing ten core humanities faculty members together with visiting scholars to enhance their course offerings in Native American and Hispanic studies.

This proposal will address the faculty development needs of ten faculty members at Heritage University, Toppenish, Washington who teach one or more courses in the American Indian Studies major and/or Hispanic Literature. Faculty have traditionally been educated as specialists in specific humanities areas, such as history, philosophy, language, music, literature, etc., but the need in a small liberal arts university is for faculty to be able to integrate the interdisciplinary humanities content involved in their courses. At Heritage University the high percentage of multicultural students, especially Hispanics and Native Americans, impels the faculty to meet the diverse cultural needs of the students by offering courses which address these cultures.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$73,689 (approved)
$73,689 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2009 – 7/31/2011


AC-50045-08

CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)
Allison Pease (Project Director: June 2007 to June 2011)
Literature and the Law: Disciplinary Perspectives and Faculty Development

To Support: A year-long faculty development seminar series in the field of law and literature.

The English Department of John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, seeks to fund a year-long faculty seminar and series of lectures in literature and the law. The seminar will host six internationally recognized scholars in the field of law and literature who will deliver public lectures and run seminars for English Department faculty. These seminars will ensure the Department's new English major with an optional concentration in Literature and the Law has a strong intellectual foundation. Grant funds will be used to pay for travel expenses and honoraria of visiting scholars as well as small stipends and book allowances for faculty participants.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$29,926 (approved)
$29,926 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 6/30/2009


AC-50053-08

California State Los Angeles University Auxiliary Services, Inc. (Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226)
Scott Wells (Project Director: June 2007 to September 2012)
Religion, Identity, and Civil Society in the Era of Globalization

To Support: A faculty workshop series on religious pluralism in Los Angeles, leading to the eventual creation of a religious studies program at California State University, Los Angeles.

Religious literacy has become an essential skill for effective participation in the globalized marketplaces of cultural, political, and economic exchange. California State University Los Angeles, in partnership with Claremont Graduate University, is seeking funding from the NEH to sponsor a year-long curriculum development project on the theme of religion, identity, and civil society in the era of globalization. A series of seven major program meetings will take place throughout the year, including a year-long symposium entitled "Religion in Los Angeles, Religion in the Americas, Religion in the Era of Globalization." These program meetings will structure the participants' ongoing discussions about curriculum development with the goal of designing ten to twelve new or newly-reconceived courses incorporating the study of religion, as well as drafting a Mission Statement and Strategic Plan for an expanded interdisciplinary program in religious studies at CSULA.

Project fields:
Religion, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 12/31/2010


AC-50058-08

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Richard Hanley (Project Director: June 2007 to May 2009)
Water and Work: The Ecology of Downtown Brooklyn

To Support: A one-year seminar series for sixteen faculty members, along with a public symposium, on the natural and cultural history of Brooklyn's waterfront.

New York City College of Technology (CUNY), proposes a faculty development program to broaden faculty understanding of and engagement with the history and ecology of downtown Brooklyn, the immediate environment of the college. Participants will develop a new required interdisciplinary humanities course for first year students.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$29,959 (approved)
$29,959 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 12/31/2008


AC-50039-07

California State Los Angeles University Auxiliary Services, Inc. (Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226)
Micol Seigel (Project Director: July 2006 to January 2007)
H. Mark Wild (Project Director: January 2007 to April 2016)
Michael Nevin Willard (Co Project Director: January 2007 to April 2016)
Cultures of Engagement in an Era of Displacement

A year-long project and a four-day symposium to explore current scholarship in migration studies for faculty from California State University, Los Angeles and neighboring Hispanic-Serving community colleges.

CSULA will hold a four-day colloquium in June, 2007, ?Cultures of Engagement in an Era of Displacement,? to bridge gaps across humanities and departments separated by institutional structures and promote collegial collaboration in curricular and programmatic development. Faculty participants will share research on culture and migration, a topic of interest to a large number of humanities faculty at CSULA in part because of the institution's location in East Los Angeles, which has given many researchers here unique perspectives on phenomena related to migration. Research emerging from this geographic context and specific historical moment can therefore contribute critical insights and translate those insights back into the classroom by promoting curricular and programmatic development. Lead-up seminars will prepare participants for the colloquium; working groups will convene in the months following for curriculum development, programmatic planning and further cooperative grantwriting.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 4/30/2008


AC-50041-07

El Paso Community College (El Paso, TX 79915-1914)
Manuel J. Velez (Project Director: July 2006 to September 2007)
Mauricio Rodriguez (Project Director: September 2007 to November 2008)
Keri L. Moe (Co Project Director: September 2007 to November 2008)
EPCC Chicana/o Studies Humanities Institute

A series of workshops on Chicano/Mexican-American studies for faculty at El Paso Community College.

EPCC will develop a Humanities Institute whose purpose will be to build a comprehensive interdisciplinary framework to guide its newly approved Chicana/o Mexican American Studies Program. This project will create an opportunity for humanities faculty members to study together while improving their capacity to teach the humanities in this newly created academic program of study. Renowned humanities scholars from Chicano/Mexican-American Studies programs throughout the U.S. with extensive expertise will lead these workshops. The topics for the lectures/forums will focus on issues directly affecting the U.S.-Mexico border and will lay the foundation for scholarly enhancement and faculty professional development necessary to formally develop a sound program in Chicana/o Studies in El Paso, Texas.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 2/29/2008


AC-50002-06

Florida International University (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Steven Heine (Project Director: September 2005 to January 2017)
The Miami-China Connection: Enhancing Chinese Cultural Studies at Florida International University and Miami-Dade College

The development of a full-time instructorship in Chinese language and culture for Florida International University and an aligned adjunct instructorship to teach beginning Chinese language courses at Miami-Dade Community College.

Florida International University and Miami Dade College, the largest Hispanic-serving institutions in the nation, request a grant of $140,935 for a two-year project (Aug. 2006-May 2008) to enhance Chinese language/cultural studies in Miami. The overriding goal of Miami-China Connection is to create a full-time instructorship position in Chinese cultural studies to be made permanent by FIU following the grant cycle. The instructor will have responsibilities for creating courses on Chinese language and culture, organizing cultural activities, and helping coordinate study abroad programs. Another main component of the new position will be to help a qualified adjunct instructor develop Chinese I and II at MDC and organize joint cultural events.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Asian Languages

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$73,823 (approved)
$73,823 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 5/31/2008


AC-50009-06

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Marta Effinger-Crichlow (Project Director: September 2005 to April 2008)
Retentions and Transfigurations: The Technological Evolution and Social History of Five New York City Neighborhoods

An interdisciplinary seminar for fifteen faculty members to study five New York neighborhoods and develop a humanities across the curriculum model for technical and professional courses.

This interdisciplinary study,conducted in partnership with the Municipal Art Society of New York, will engage fifteen faculty members from humanities, technical, and professional disciplines in an investigation of five New York City neighborhoods selected for their architectural, literary, and cultural distinction. It will feature a seminar conducted by visiting scholars and tightly correlated field study with these same scholars. A Humanities Across the Curriculum model will be used to incorporate new humanities content into a wide range of courses. Information literacy, as a 'liberal art' that reflects critically on the nature of information itself in its social, cultural, and philosophical meanings, will be embedded throughout.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 6/30/2007


AC-50013-06

CUNY Research Foundation, Bronx Community College (Bronx, NY 10453-2804)
Harriet Shenkman (Project Director: October 2005 to November 2008)
Hall of Fame for Great Americans Summer Seminars

Two one-week summer seminars for twenty-four faculty members from area institutions, using the collections of the landmark site of the Bronx Community College Hall of Fame for Great Americans, for extensive study of American history.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$74,974 (approved)
$74,974 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 12/31/2007


AC-50015-06

Florida International University (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Uva de Aragon (Project Director: October 2005 to December 2008)
Cuban Music in the Humanities Context

A collaborative effort to assist faculty at Florida International University and area institutions to incorporate the Crístobal Díaz-Ayala Cuban and Latin American Popular Music Collection into various humanities courses.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$47,870 (approved)
$47,870 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 6/30/2008


AC-50023-06

University of Houston, Downtown (Houston, TX 77002-1014)
Ann S. Jennings (Project Director: October 2005 to December 2008)
Ethics in a Technical Communication Curriculum

A revision of the Masters in Professional Writing and Technical Communication curriculum to incorporate ethics into required courses for the degree.

Project fields:
Ethics; Philosophy, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 9/30/2008


AC-50026-06

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)
Susana I. Nuccetelli (Project Director: October 2005 to January 2017)
Humanities Perspectives on Latin American Thought and Philosophy

Collaborative faculty workshops to be directed by outside scholars on the contributions of humanities disciplines to Latin American philosophy.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 4/30/2007