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Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
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HD-248410-16

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Pramit Chaudhuri (Project Director: 09/15/2015 to present)

Classical Intertextuality and Computation

A research project on how techniques originally developed for computational biology, such as sequence alignment, can illuminate influences and stylistic attributes among classical Latin and Greek texts.

Literary scholarship has long been preoccupied with identifying verbal and stylistic relations among texts (“intertextuality”). This project is a collaboration between literary critics, systems biologists, and computer scientists to develop new computational tools for the study of such intertextual relations. These tools will enable researchers to trace connections among Latin and Greek texts at much a higher order of scale and efficiency than manual searches: 1) a sequence alignment tool, inspired by a core technique in genomics, which identifies verbal parallels that are close but inexact (the commonest kind of intertextuality); 2) a digital Greek-Latin thesaurus to enable identification of parallels across languages by meaning; 3) a set of tools for classification of texts according to various stylistic metrics, especially useful for studies of quotation and attribution; 4) phylogenetic methods to chart the evolutionary histories of classical texts and their traditions of reception.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,921 (approved)
$74,921 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2018


HD-248437-16

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5000)
Julia Flanders (Project Director: 09/15/2015 to present)

TEI and Humanities Pedagogy: Building TAPAS Classroom

The development of a platform for teaching the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), which would allow for shared instruction materials, collaborative teaching, student evaluation, all built within the NEH-funded TAPAS infrastructure.

Text markup with TEI is a key topic in the digital humanities classroom: it engages students in a close examination of text, discussion of interpretation, and inquiry into textual materiality. But the logistics can be challenging: tools for working with TEI/XML-encoded data require greater technical expertise than humanities faculty possess, and these tools are not designed with classroom needs in mind. TAPAS Classroom will offer instructors a centralized, user-friendly platform for organizing and sharing course materials, with features to support group analysis, display, and commenting on TEI assignments. The platform will enable both quick previewing of TEI files and sustained engagement and analysis. As part of the TAPAS framework, TAPAS Classroom will enable users to share assignments and supporting materials with the entire TEI community, and projects can also be migrated into TAPAS proper. TAPAS Classroom situates TEI pedagogy at the heart of the TEI research community.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,778 (approved)
$74,778 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 10/31/2017


HD-248450-16

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, NY 12180-3590)
James Malazita (Project Director: 09/15/2015 to present)
Dean Nieusma (Co Project Director: 03/07/2016 to present)

3D Printing as Humanistic Inquiry

A set of experiments with 3D printing and a three-day workshop in which scholars explore the philosophical and practical implications of fabrication and “making” in a humanities context.

This project brings together scholars at various stages of their careers from across the Humanities and Digital Humanities to participate in an intensive three-day 3D Making and Critique workshop and follow-on research. The project's goal is to materially brainstorm printed artifacts that serve as critical investigations, while providing time for reflection upon the broader social and environmental contexts of the 3D printing process. The intended results of the project will be to produce and disseminate early-stage critical objects, to generate reflexive theory and critique about 3D printing and making practices, to connect Humanities scholars across both the making and critical bodies of humanistic scholarship, and to create an action plan for collaborative written and made scholarship targeted for publication in open-access presses and exhibitions.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,498 (approved)
$39,498 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


HD-248462-16

University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
P. Gabrielle Foreman (Project Director: 09/15/2015 to present)

The Colored Conventions Project

Enhancement of a website to document over 120 conventions organized by African-American communities from the 1830s-1880s, including development of a reference database and fifteen interpretive exhibits.

The Colored Conventions Project (CCP) is a digital collection and hybrid site for research and teaching that brings unprecedented public attention to the thousands of African Americans who made up the 19th-century Colored Conventions Movement. ColoredConventions.org collects, for the first time, rare and scattered minutes from more than 100 conventions. A DH Start-Up II grant will enable our interdisciplinary team of faculty, graduate and undergraduate researchers, library professionals, church and national teaching partners to collaborate to 1) create 15 new exhibits showcasing original research and visualizations 2) amass a database of 4,000+ conventions attendees for reference and datasets 3) expand outreach for our crowdsourcing Transcribe Minutes and 4) introduce Translate Minutes with our first international partner. Ultimately CCP will model a more inclusive digital history as we recover a movement for racial, economic and educational justice that resonates in our own time.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; American Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 11/30/2018


HD-248360-16

Fitchburg State University (Fitchburg, MA 01420-2697)
Catherine Buell (Project Director: 09/14/2015 to present)
Ricky Sethi (Co Project Director: 03/07/2016 to present)
William Seeley (Co Project Director: 03/07/2016 to present)

Scientific Workflows, Image Analysis, and Visual Stylometry in the Digital Analysis of Art

The development of an alpha-level prototype for a tool that would help statistically identify artistic style, and a workshop to discuss the tool’s use and implications in the study of art history.

The goal of the project is to develop a tool for digital image analysis of paintings that is powerful enough to support advanced research in computer science, cognitive science, art history, and the philosophy of art while providing an accessible interface that can be used by researchers or students with little or no computer science background. The tool we envision will implement a broad range of digital image analysis algorithms as scientific workflows using the WINGS semantic workflow system. Scientific workflows allow users to build programs like one would draw a flowchart, dragging shapes representing data sets and image analysis procedures onto the workspace and drawing links between them. The tool can be used to promote computational literacy and data analytic skills among humanities students, introduce science students to research in art and the humanities, and help us understand how viewers perceptually categorize/recognize paintings and otherwise engage with artworks.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Aesthetics; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


HD-248377-16

University of Maine, Orono (Orono, ME 04469-0001)
Anne Knowles (Project Director: 09/14/2015 to present)

Visualizing Spatial Experience in the Holocaust

Employing computational linguistics and natural language processing techniques to study how Holocaust survivors use spatial terms to describe their experiences. Testimonies from the University of Southern California’s Shoah Foundation Center collection would provide the sources for the preliminary study.

First-person accounts are central to understanding the Holocaust. Our project will be the first to examine survivors' testimony for the spatiality of individuals' experiences. Drawing on video interviews with survivors, we will analyze the language survivors use in speaking of places, events, movement, relationships, and their perceptions of space and time. We will focus on how their social networks were fragmented and reformed and the spatial characteristics of work places and work relationships experienced by forced laborers in ghettos and labor camps. We will do this through a hybrid methodology that combines close listening with spatial visualization and corpus and computational linguistics methods that we will apply to interview transcripts. The dictionary of spatial and relational terms this will produce, along with our visual conceptualizations of the topologies of experience, will enable us to link survivors to Nazi-controlled spaces represented in our existing GIS datasets.

Project fields:
European History; Geography; Jewish Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$73,168 (approved)
$73,168 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


HD-248405-16

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47401-3654)
Edward Lazzerini (Project Director: 09/15/2015 to present)

Historical Demography and Population Behavior among Muslims in Russian Central Eurasia, 1828-1918: The Case of Kazan City

Development of a public database that would enable research into the Muslim community of the Russian Empire from 1828-1918 by converting information found within parish registers from the city of Kazan.

The Central Eurasian Muslim Population Project (CEMPP) will create over time a massive relational database of longitudinal vital statistics and social information gathered from the metrical books (parish registers) compiled for Muslim subjects of the Russian Empire between 1828 and 1918. Funding from NEH will support the first phase of the project whereby, seeking proof-of-concept, we will gather data for approximately 25,000 Muslim inhabitants of Kazan, the third largest city in Russia, as organized around 18 mosques and their parishes. One of our major digital tools will be the open, scalable, and extendable "Intermediate Data Structure" that is becoming the standard for longitudinal databases on historical populations. By means of IDS, our database will join those focused on other regions of Eurasia and contribute to large-scale comparative studies of the life course of Eurasia as a whole.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion; Russian History; Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$71,108 (approved)
$71,108 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 10/31/2017


HD-248511-16

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Worthy Martin (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)
Lilla Kopar (Co Project Director: 03/07/2016 to present)
Nancy Wicker (Co Project Director: 03/07/2016 to present)
Daniel Pitti (Co Project Director: 03/07/2016 to present)

Project Andvari

Pilot implementation of Project Andvari, an online portal to aggregate digital collections of northern European, early medieval art and artifacts from a range of cultural institutions.

The aim of Project Andvari is to provide a free digital portal for integrated access to dispersed collections of northern European art and artifacts of the early medieval period (4th–12th centuries). Funding is requested to support development, testing, and implementation of a pilot platform that will harvest and aggregate existing metadata records and digital surrogates of objects maintained in the collections of three international partner institutions with representative datasets that participate in linked open data initiatives. Ultimately, Project Andvari will facilitate interdisciplinary research in art, archeology, history, and literary and religious studies, allowing users to study visual culture across media and beyond traditional geographical and disciplinary boundaries. The innovative application of aggregated search methods and enhanced metadata will promote discovery and comparative analyses of artifacts in ways that have not previously been feasible.

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,577 (approved)
$74,577 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 1/31/2018


HD-248519-16

Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
Diana Saiki (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)
Valerie Birk (Co Project Director: 03/02/2016 to present)

3D Modeling for Textile Collections

The development of a prototype web application of three-dimensional models of historic clothing for use by researchers, teachers, and the general public. The test collection would consist of World War II-era American clothing from the Beeman Historic Costume Collection.

The funds from the Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant Level I will be used to create a working prototype of "Fashion Fusion," a publicly available web-based application. Fashion Fusion will be a catalog of historic clothing, enabling interactive study of a three-dimensional digital image of a historical garment and replication of it with downloadable pattern pieces. The project results will be useful to museum professionals, clothing history researchers and teachers, and designers for theater and re-enacting.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, General; Cultural History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,713 (approved)
$39,713 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 10/31/2017


HD-248520-16

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Benjamin Brochstein (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)
Chad Shaw (Co Project Director: 03/02/2016 to present)
Erez Lieberman Aiden (Co Project Director: 03/02/2016 to present)
Suzanne Kemmer (Co Project Director: 03/02/2016 to present)

Genealogy of Texts and Ideas: Looking Back and Forth through Early English Books Online

A two-day workshop and follow-up activities for early modern literature scholars, linguists, and computer scientists to consider how the Bookworm textual analysis tool could be used with the Early English Books Online-Text Creation Partnership corpus.

We propose a workshop on how to extend and customize a graphical user interface (GUI) for Bookworm, the well-established open-source text analysis and visualization tool. Hosted by Rice University's Humanities Research Center, the workshop will focus on applying Bookworm to the Early English Books Online (EEBO) corpus and leverage expertise in various disciplines including history, linguistics, genomics, and bioinformatics to design a powerful, intuitive, open-source text analysis package to allow novice users instant access to the utility and promise of digital text analysis.

Project fields:
Computational Linguistics; History, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HD-248544-16

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Daniel Rosenberg (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)

Time Online

The development of digital prototypes of historical graphic artifacts, such as timelines and time charts, from 1600 to 1900.  The project also would investigate methods of maintaining and publishing these prototypes.

Time Online is a collaborative, interdisciplinary research project on the uses of graphic design in the study of history. When complete, it will produce a new kind of scholarly digital publication in the form of a suite of interrelated software modules investigating and re-imagining key graphic artifacts from the period 1600 to 1900 in a robust, interactive environment. Based at the University of Oregon, the project joins resources of two universities and three laboratories, the Digital Scholarship Center and InfoGraphics Lab at the University of Oregon and the Stanford Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Time Online explores new possibilities in humanities research and new models of digital publication through a creative combination of scholarship and programming. It provides insight into the history of print-era graphics and into emerging possibilities for interactive graphics in the era of digital media.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Intellectual History; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 12/31/2018


HD-248560-16

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Ty Pierce (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)

TourSites for WordPress: Digital Tour Experiences for Multi-site Museum Networks

The development of a platform that supports the sharing of humanities content through mobile tours in both exterior and interior spaces, building on Curatescape and Wordpress platforms.

While there is no shortage of digital experience options for cultural heritage institutions, the number of realistic options for today’s small-­- and medium-­-sized institutions is unfortunately slim, and museums of all sizes still struggle to deliver engaging mobile experiences. TourSites for WordPress: Digital Tour Experiences for Multisite Museum Networks will create a digital platform that combines WordPress and Curatescape into a new opportunity for the field. This project builds on previous collaborations between the Ohio History Connection and the Center for Public History + Digital Humanities and leverages their respective expertise to create a new set of tools specifically for the WordPress Network environment. The open-­-source platform created by this project will enable any institution to create digital tour experiences across multiple locations, maintain those networks with efficient use of resources and connect the public to stories, people and places in innovative ways.

[White paper]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,943 (approved)
$74,943 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


HD-248577-16

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Doug Reside (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)
Gregory Lord (Co Project Director: 03/07/2016 to present)

NY Public Library for the Performing Arts, Billy Rose Theater Division - 3D Visualization of Theatrical Lighting Designs

Initial planning and a feasibility study to determine how virtual simulation software could be re-purposed to create representations of historical theater designs based on archival sources.

To emulate theatrical lighting design in a web-based 3D visualization platform that would give humanities scholars a way to see the effects historical lighting designs were meant to create. More specifically, NEH funding would make possible a feasibility study for emulating lighting design using current web-based 3-D technology. Depending on the results of this study, the project team will determine the best way to move forward to build a robust tool for serving emulations of lighting designs in special collection reading rooms.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$35,000 (approved)
$35,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HD-248600-16

DePaul University (Chicago, IL 60604-2287)
John Shanahan (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)
Robin Burke (Co Project Director: 03/02/2016 to present)
Antonio Ceraso (Co Project Director: 03/02/2016 to 10/20/2016)
Megan Bernal (Co Project Director: 03/02/2016 to present)
Ana Lucic (Co Project Director: 10/20/2016 to present)

Reading Chicago Reading: Modeling Texts and Readers in a Public Library System

A pilot study on how analyzing patron responses to a citywide reading program can help scholars and librarians better understand which book genres and styles prove most meaningful to the community.

“Reading Chicago Reading” aims to put new data-intensive predictive tools in the hands of public librarians and digital humanities scholars in order to enhance their ability to serve public needs and interests. We take as our starting point the Chicago Public Library’s popular and muchimitated “One Book One Chicago” program, in which books are annually selected for city-wide promotion. Our project combines circulation data, social media postings, text analysis, branch-bybranch demographics, and history of the events of themselves to recover quantitative, predictive factors that link texts to reader response. The multi-disciplinary project brings together expertise in library science, text mining, predictive modeling and machine learning, literature, and urban sociology, and builds on existing collaborations with the Chicago Public Library.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,271 (approved)
$74,271 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


HD-248607-16

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Maryemma Graham (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)

Black Book Interactive Project

Preliminary steps toward developing a metadata schema that accounts for race in order to increase scholarly access to archival materials.

The negligible number of African American (AA) literary texts digitally available for scholars working in the field of digital humanities remains a persistent problem. The Black Book Interactive Project (BBIP) responds to this critical digital invisibility by proposing to create a metadata schema that accounts for race, to make these archives more discoverable for scholarship. Using 75 novels from the Project on the History of Black Writing digital archive, we will produce a demonstration project that increases access to little known AA texts, encourages and enables text mining as a digital practice, and bridges the current gaps in computational research in literary studies. Our goal is to expand the community of users and practitioners and to make this schema a standard for the interactive exploration of similar digitized collections.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African Literature; American Literature

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 2/28/2018


HD-248610-16

Washington and Lee University (Lexington, VA 24450-2116)
Rebecca Benefiel (Project Director: 09/16/2015 to present)
Sara Sprenkle (Co Project Director: 03/07/2016 to present)

Ancient Graffiti Project: Tools for Analyzing Personal Communication

Prototype development of a web-based resource documenting handwritten inscriptions found within the ruins of the early Roman Empire, with a focus on the town of Herculaneum as a pilot case.

We propose to develop tools to study and analyze handwritten, informal, ancient inscriptions (graffiti) for the Ancient Graffiti Project. Thousands of these messages from Herculaneum and Pompeii convey voices at every level of ancient society. Handwritten inscriptions differ from inscriptions on stone. First, since graffiti are found in situ, original geospatial and contextual data are available. Graffiti also include drawings, which are difficult to locate in text-based search engines. Consider how to search for a dog attacking a stag. These tools include 1) representation of graffiti in their spatial context at multiple granularities, 2) a system of controlled vocabularies and filters to make figural graffiti (drawings) searchable and retrievable, and 3) a schema of medium-specific metadata for handwritten inscriptions. With these tools, users will be able to study both inscribed texts and images, as well as research questions specific to ancient graffiti.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Classical Languages; Classics

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,592 (approved)
$74,592 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 11/30/2018


HD-248622-16

Stone Soup Productions, Inc. (Washington, DC 20036-2504)
Andrea Kalin (Project Director: 09/17/2015 to present)

The Search for Harmony: Building a Game Development Tool for WordPress

The development of an educational games module for the WordPress content management system. The prototype game would be associated with an upcoming documentary film on African Americans and classical music.

The process of creating information-rich websites has become more accessible to the public through content management systems (CMSs) like WordPress. New game development tools have also become available to creators for designing engaging experiences. However, there is a need for a tool that can create educational games with the familiarity of a CMS platform already in use in the humanities, rather than require learning a new program. The proposed tool aims to pair a game development framework with WordPress to allow media makers to develop educational games using a simple interface. The Search for Harmony is a case study game concept, about multicultural influence on classical music, that will help provide content to develop and refine the tool. The end product would reduce resources needed to create educational games of a certain type, foster websites that could repurpose game content, and encourage educators and others in the humanities to create engaging experiences for students.

[White paper]

Project fields:
African American Studies; Cultural History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$37,430 (approved)
$37,430 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


HD-248648-16

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Stephen Brier (Project Director: 09/18/2015 to present)

Beyond Citation: Critical Thinking About Digital Research

Further development of Beyond Citation, a web-based guide to research databases in the humanities. During this phase, the project would result in thematic guides to databases in fields such as art history, history, and literature, as well as a prototype tool for use by research libraries.

Although humanities scholars widely use academic databases from publishers such as ProQuest or Gale, knowledge of how proprietary databases work is limited because their structures are dynamic and not transparent. Scholars therefore may not be aware of and cannot account for how database structures affect their interpretations of search results or text. Lack of information is an obstacle to scholarly inquiry because databases shape the questions that can be asked and the arguments that can be made through search interfaces and algorithms. Beyond Citation is a research platform that aggregates information about academic databases so that scholars can understand the significance of the material they glean. By making accessible essential information about the structures and content of databases, Beyond Citation takes an important step in updating the scholarly apparatus to encourage critical thinking about academic databases and their impact on research and scholarship.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$63,485 (approved)
$63,485 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 4/30/2018


HD-228732-15

Wheaton College (Norton, MA 02766-2322)
Mark LeBlanc (Project Director: 09/04/2014 to present)
Scott Kleinman (Co Project Director: 03/16/2015 to present)
Michael Drout (Co Project Director: 03/16/2015 to present)

Easing Entry and Improving Access to Computer-Assisted Text Analysis for the Humanities

The addition of several features to the Lexos software, including a set of instructional resources to help scholars and students understand the most appropriate uses for computational methods for text analysis.

The rapid digitization of texts presents both new opportunities and real barriers of entry to computer-assisted explorations of texts. The Lexos software developed by the Lexomics Project provides a simple, web-based workflow for text processing, statistical analysis, and visualization designed to address these barriers. The project will support Lexos' core strength as an entry-level tool while seeking to position it as an innovative intervention in Digital Humanities conversations about the interplay of machine learning and text analysis. The project will embed dialogue about the use of computational methods to study humanities data in the tool itself through our "In the Margins" feature to collect and disseminate discussions of the problems, solutions, and best practices for using computational methods for text analysis.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 6/30/2017


HD-228783-15

Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
Timothy Duguid (Project Director: 09/09/2014 to present)

MuSO: Aggregation and Peer Review in Music

A two-day workshop and follow-up activities to develop the Music Scholarship Online (MuSO) project to consider approaches for federating and evaluating digital projects in music.

This Level I project will fund a two-day workshop at Texas A&M University for 15 software engineers, music librarians, music encoding specialists, and music scholars from the U.S., Canada and abroad that will lay the foundation to launch MuSO (Music Scholarship Online). Using the period-specific virtual research environments, or research nodes, of the Advanced Research Consortium (ARC) as templates, this workshop will establish methods for aggregating and evaluating digital projects in the fields of music analysis, culture, history and literature. The workshop will address the metadata needs for media such as musical scores and audio recordings, and it will establish a standard and process for peer reviewing the projects that contribute to and participate in MuSO. The funded workshop will therefore produce a list of changes to the ARC metadata guidelines as well as a method for evaluating digital projects in music.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Arts, Other; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,935 (approved)
$29,924 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 5/31/2016


HD-229114-15

Small Axe, Inc (New York, NY 10027-6598)
Kaiama Glover (Project Director: 09/12/2014 to present)
Alex Gil (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)

The sx:archipelagos Project

Development and assessment of new workflows for publication and long-term preservation of born-digital scholarship within Caribbean Studies.

The Caribbean is the site of some of the most radical and diverse theoretical and material engagements with the digital. The sx:archipelagos project seeks to channel that activity by providing an innovative two-tiered platform to support digital scholarship in, for, and about the Caribbean Each layer of sx:archipelagos will contribute something new to both Caribbean Studies and to the digital humanities, first via the creation and documentation of a new cost-efficient workflow for the production of text-based scholarly outputs; and second, via the creation and support of a flexible multimodal environment for the production of unique works of digital scholarship. By the close of the grant period we expect to generate: 1) five scholarly articles produced using Markdown; 2) a workflow analysis and position paper documenting the process and results of our experiment in online publishing; 3) one peer-reviewed digital project and corresponding narrative of its construction. We will post our white paper and multimodal exhibition to an inaugural, beta iteration of the platform.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,914 (approved)
$29,914 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


HD-228866-15

Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
Jonathan Amith (Project Director: 09/10/2014 to present)
Eric Remy (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)

Comparative Ethnobiology in Mesoamerica: A Digital Portal for Collaborative Research and Public Dissemination

Prototype development of a database and website that would aggregate indigenous linguistic information relevant to Mesoamerican flora and fauna.

In 1983 Catherine Fowler completed a pioneering study of Uto-Aztecan cultural history, focused on locating the Proto-Uto-Aztecan homeland by linking reconstructed PUA biological terms to the historic distribution of biological species labeled by these terms. Others have studied loan patterns in biological nomenclature among non-genetically related languages to develop models of migration and linguistic and cultural convergence in prehistoric periods. These two complementary approaches require an immense dataset of biological terminology from diverse languages. To achieve this dataset for Mesoamerica, an area characterized both by extensive migration and great biodiversity, this project will create an innovative portal to facilitate the exchange of information on Indigenous nomenclature, classification and use of biotaxa. This portal will enable a community of scholars to share material that would otherwise languish for years before, if ever, being disseminated in a print publication.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Languages, Other; Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,930 (approved)
$29,930 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 10/31/2017


HD-228890-15

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Elaine Sullivan (Project Director: 09/10/2014 to present)

3D Saqqara: Reconstructing Landscape and Meaning at an Ancient Egyptian Site

Development of a three-dimensional model and virtual tour that would demonstrate how the ancient Egyptian cemetery at Saqqara evolved over the course of nearly three millennia--from 2950 BCE to 332 BCE.

GIS, a major data organization tool in archaeology, places information within a two-dimensional geospatial framework linked to locations on the Earth's surface. Human lives are not lived, however, on a flat surface, but are embedded in a three-dimensional world. The addition of a third coordinate, elevation or height allows us to replace layers of complexity when working with cultural data. Change over time (the forth dimension) is a fundamental aspect of human life and crucial to understanding human experience in the past. 3D Saqqara offers a 4D study of an ancient site across space and time. By simulating the changing built and natural landscape, the project explores the visual environment that shaped the experiences and choices of past peoples. Through the recreation of lines-of-sight between important cult places, the project traces how decisions over time change the meaning of these spaces and altered ancient peoples' perception of the ritual landscape.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$47,200 (approved)
$47,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


HD-228942-15

University of Florida Board of Trustees (Gainesville, FL 32611-5500)
Sidney Dobrin (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)
Laurie Taylor (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)
Matthew Gitzendanner (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)

MassMine: Collecting and Archiving Big Data for Social Media Humanities Researchers

Development of an open-source toolkit and training materials that would allow humanities researchers to collect and analyze large-scale, publicly available data drawn from social media sites.

The MassMine project team representing participants from the Department of English, George A. Smathers Libraries (Libraries), and Research Computing at the University of Florida (UF) requests $60,000 to finish the version 1.0 release, develop a robust training program, and promote the MassMine open source software. MassMine enables researchers to collect their own social media data archives and supports data mining, thus providing free access to big data for academic inquiry. MassMine further supports researchers in creating and defining methods and measures for analyzing cultural and localized trends, and developing humanities research questions and data mining practices. The primary aims of this project are to: 1) refine the MassMine tools to support collection, acquisition, and use of available social media and web data; and, 2) develop a training program and corresponding online resources for supporting the broad use of MassMine by humanities researchers, regardless of experience.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Cultural History; English; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$54,127 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 4/30/2016


HD-228949-15

University of San Francisco (San Francisco, CA 94117-1050)
Seth Wachtel (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)

Discovery and Documentation of At-Risk Built Heritage

A pilot effort in which community and student volunteers would use easily accessible technologies to document and describe local architectural heritage. A prototype website would offer a common platform for wide participation and public access.

Historic buildings and sites that represent our physical cultural heritage are vulnerable to loss or alteration. Current methods of recording require skilled professionals and expensive technologies. This limits the number of recorded sites to high profile targets, leaving out thousands of worthy and vulnerable sites. This project will demonstrate integrated use of crowdsourcing, low-cost recording devices and open source Internet technologies to achieve high volume recording of heritage sites that may otherwise never be recorded before they are lost. The focus is historically and culturally significant low-visibility sites. Recording includes site, geographic location, images, architectural attributes and 3D models generated from digital images. Volunteers are recruited using social networks. Low-cost recording devices include digital camera, camera-capable mobile phone and Internet-connected computer. Technical infrastructure includes a website for collecting and disseminating record

Project fields:
Architecture; Cultural Anthropology; Cultural History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 6/30/2017


HD-228956-15

San Diego State University Research Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-0001)
Jessica Pressman (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)
Joanna Brooks (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)

Building and Broadening the Digital Humanities Through a Regional Network

A year-long initiative bracketed by two workshops where faculty from teaching-intensive institutions would test best practices for teaching humanities content using digital methods in under-resourced classrooms.

Digital Humanities (DH) offers vast pedagogical opportunities for teachers and students, but implementation may be seemingly untenable at certain institutions, particularly large public teaching schools grappling, after years of budget cuts, with impacted class sizes and overburdened faculty. Similarly, R1 institutions or liberal arts colleges might possess a single DH expert but lack infrastructural support, limiting DH pedagogy to individual classrooms. Since our emergent information economy requires citizens to work with digital technologies and also critique them, students who do receive access to DH learning are placed at a disadvantage. We need to determine ways to distribute DH research and pedagogy widely, across a spectrum of institutional types and student populations, including students learning at night in community colleges, students taking 300-person lecture classes at large public universities, students from primarily underrepresented groups, and ESL learners. Towards this goal, we propose a workshop for faculty from regional institutions to develop pedagogical strategies and share resources.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,999 (approved)
$29,626 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


HD-228961-15

WGBH Educational Foundation (Boston, MA 02135-2016)
Ted Sicker (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)

Digital Humanities for Lifelong Learners

A workshop and research study to investigate how best to use WGBH’s archive of humanities programming to create a robust library of cross-disciplinary humanities modules for lifelong learners, emphasizing an audience over the age of 65.

Digital Humanities for Lifelong Learners is a research project that will convene leading thinkers in the fields of lifelong learning, humanities education, public media and humanities archives, and multi-platform interactive technology in a series of in-person and virtual meetings and other activities, including online surveys. The key purpose is to research how best to create a significant library of high quality, digital humanities modules, drawn from WGBH's vast archive and other public media sources, for lifelong learners, especially those aged 65+. An initial day-long meeting, held at WGBH and including all project participants, will set the agenda for this six-month research initiative, resulting in a detailed white paper that addresses audience research findings, humanities content, rights, and distribution issues, and technical and design approaches, and charts next steps for this project, including future funding possibilities.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,994 (approved)
$17,976 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 12/31/2015


HD-228966-15

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Johanna Devaney (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)

Automatic Music Performance Analysis and Comparison Toolkit (AMPACT)

The further development of a suite of analytical tools for music scholarship, with a particular focus on the development of a tool for analyzing polyphonic performances from musical scores.

This project proposes to develop a core technology for a suite of automatic software tools for quantitatively analyzing musical performances for which a corresponding musical score is available and an encoding format for storing the analyses, entitled the Automatic Music Performance and Comparison Toolkit (AMPACT). A musical performance can convey both the musicians' interpretation of the written score as well as emphasize, or even manipulate, the emotional content of the music through small variations in timing, dynamics, and tuning. The target audience for AMPACT is music scholars are who are interested in performing empirical analyses of recorded performances but who lack the technical skills or the time necessary to develop their own tools or implement existing algorithms. The proposed project will allow the researchers to develop an algorithm for analyzing polyphonic performances for which musical scores are available.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,843 (approved)
$59,843 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 10/31/2017


HD-228971-15

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Matthew Gold (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)

DH Box: A Digital Humanities Laboratory in the Cloud

Development of DH Box, a web-based platform that enables researcher and student access to multiple digital humanities tools. The project is designed for institutions and individuals with minimal technical infrastructure or expertise, including community colleges and newcomers to the field.
 

DH Box provides an innovative approach to Digital Humanities pedagogy, helping teachers introduce DH tools quickly and effectively. The project increases the speed and ease with which novice users can begin hands-on practice with DH tools and it does so by facilitating interaction with rich datasets from institutions such as the NYPL and the British Library. Because DH Box lowers technical barriers to entry, students in the humanities will be able to bypass set-up and compatibility issues and move more quickly to their own research.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,752 (approved)
$59,752 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 12/31/2018


HD-228990-15

Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)
Susan May (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)
Jane Read (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)
Philip Arnold (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)

Onondaga Lake: Finding a Restorative Center in Digital Space

The development of a prototype digital map that seeks to combine scientific perspectives with non-Cartesian perspectives (such as those of the indigenous population) that don't map easily to spatial coordinates, focusing on the historical, cultural, and economic significance of Onondaga Lake near Syracuse, NY.

Onondaga Lake is small and obscure, but its story touches on indigenous wars and the Great Law of Peace, the writing of the US Constitution, the development of American industry and transportation, legal and technical innovations for environmental recovery, and creative urban planning. We propose a prototype digital atlas of the lake that combines the idea of space as a spiritual center in indigenous and local knowledge with the more decentered idea of space inherent in digital mapping. Our project will employ existing software and experiment with a variety of storytelling and data collection methods, methods of representing "blank spaces" on the map due to environmental change or privacy issues, and ways to use the map to foster ongoing dialogue about contested space and contested terms, such as "restoration." We will apply research about the compatibility of traditional, local, specialized, and scientific knowledge to create a tool for respectful communication.

Project fields:
American Studies; Geography; Religion, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,879 (approved)
$29,879 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 9/30/2017


HD-229002-15

University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9055)
Miriah Meyer (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)
Katharine Coles (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)

Poemage Prototype

Development of a working prototype of a visualization tool that demonstrates the sound patterns and relationships in poetry, including and extending beyond rhyme.

During 2013-14, our group developed the algorithm for a computational framework for interpreting sound in poetry, which allows us to detect sonic patterns and relationships in poetry. We can define these patterns algebraically and so describe them computationally through rules supported by a data abstraction. Using an NEH start-up grant to pay a postdoctoral fellow in English and a graduate student in Computer Science, we will use an innovative interactive design process to develop a prototype visualization tool, Poemage. Because our framework allows us to identify and visualize complex configurations and dynamics of sound, including but not limited to rhyme, in real time, Poemage will allow users to detect these dynamics in poems of their choosing, while inviting them to identify (and adjust for) what they deem interesting.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
English; Languages, General; Literature, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 4/30/2016


HD-229031-15

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Edward Baptist (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)
William Block (Co Project Director: 03/16/2015 to present)

Freedom on the Move: A Crowdsourced, Comprehensive Database of North American Runaway Slave Advertisements

The further design and development of a database of runaway slave advertisements from pre-1865 US newspapers drawing from several historical collections.  The project would also experiment with crowdsourcing approaches to enrich the database records.

'Freedom on the Move' (FOTM) creates a digital resource from an estimated 100,000 runaway slave advertisements from pre-1865 U.S. newspapers. Placed by enslavers when enslaved people attempted to escape, these ads included extensive information about fugitives. They comprise the richest source of information about enslaved individuals in the United States, yet no comprehensive collection of them exists. FOTM will collect these ads and use crowdsourcing to parse their data into a database, enabling sophisticated new analyses of the history of U.S. slavery. A crowdsourcing interface will provide a site for public engagement with an enduring national trauma, supporting lessons for K-12, university, and museum education. The database will be freely available for browsing and exportable for research. NEH start-up funding will enable us to build tools for incorporating large-scale data from contributors, creating a prototype for future expansions of this and similar digital resources.

[White paper]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,989 (approved)
$51,622 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 8/31/2016


HD-229059-15

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Alison Booth (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)
Worthy Martin (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)
Daniel Pitti (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)

Cohorts of Women in Biographical Collections

The development of prototype tools that would shed light on women’s lives and social networks through biographical narratives and archival sources.

Cohorts of Women in Biographical Collections (CWBC), a collaboration of Collective Biographies of Women (CBW) and Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC), enables in-depth research on cohorts of historical women by uniting textual study of 1,200 collections of biographies (CBW) published 1830-1940 with data on persons, documents, entities, and networks extracted from 2.6 million archival descriptions in 3,000 repositories (and growing). CWBC will create innovative procedures for biographical-archival data exchange; a Cohort Analysis Prototype (CAP) for comparison of cohorts (sets of women related by type of book or by occupation, nationality, period, etc.) and diverse networks; visualizations and discoveries in open-access code; a white paper and publications. The tools and process for sharing and maintaining identities and visualizing textual, archival, and social cohorts and networks will be shaped and evaluated by an international board of expert advisors.

Project fields:
Literature, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,479 (approved)
$59,479 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 11/30/2017


HD-229062-15

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Benjamin Miller (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)

Notoriously Toxic: Understanding the Language and Costs of Hate and Harassment in Online Games

A cross-disciplinary workshop and follow-up activities to develop a set of essays and a metadata schema to understand and describe toxic rhetoric in online spaces, with an emphasis on large-scale multiplayer computer games.

A one-year collaboration and two-day working group meeting of scholars from English, Linguistics, Law, Psychology, Education, Game Studies, Communication, and Justice Studies in consultation with industry experts from game development, documenting: 1) best practices for studying and moderating online toxicity, 2) conceptual and legal frameworks for addressing online hate speech, dangerous speech, and toxic speech, 3) patterns of toxic language in digital media, 4) next steps for building a reference corpus of toxicity types and a descriptive taxonomy, and 5) a humanistic perspective on consequences of online toxicity and its moderation procedures.

Project fields:
Computational Linguistics; Media Studies; Psychology

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,403 (approved)
$29,403 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 12/31/2017


HD-229071-15

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Steven Wernke (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)
Jeremy Mumford (Co Project Director: 03/23/2015 to present)

Deep Mapping the Reducción: Building a Platform for Spatial Humanities Collaboration on the General Resettlement of Indians

Prototyping of two resources to enable geospatial scholarship on the Andean region of South America. In particular, the project would shed light on the history of indigenous communities living within the 16th-century colonial Reducción system.

Researchers of antiquity around the world share common fundamental problems of fragmentary and patchy information. Scaling up spatially is especially difficult, as diverse researchers must piece together localized understandings of past social processes. In the Andean region of South America, where no alphabetic textual record exists prior to 1532, understanding the social transformations brought by Spanish invasion is especially challenging. But emerging spatial humanities tools can mitigate such impediments to reconstructing Andean settlement history. This project will adapt and extend such technologies through the development of two integrated, open source tools: 1) LOGAR (Linked Open Gazetteer of the Andean Region), a crowd sourced, edited online gazetteer, and 2) GeoPACHA (Geospatial Platform for Andean Colonial History and Archaeology), a geospatial database and browser-based interface for producing thematic and analytical maps. Together, these tools will enable production of the

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Latin American Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,498 (approved)
$59,498 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 10/31/2017


HD-51863-14

Modern Language Association of America (New York, NY 10003-6981)
Kathleen Fitzpatrick (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)
Rebecca Kennison (Co Project Director: 09/10/2014 to 03/12/2015)
Barbara Rockenbach (Co Project Director: 03/12/2015 to present)

Humanities CORE

The development of software to connect the Commons-In-A-Box (CBOX) social network platform (which is the basis of MLA Commons) to a Fedora-based institutional repository system. This combined system would be called Humanities Commons, a social network and repository system that would be made available for use by other scholarly societies.

The Modern Language Association (MLA) and the Columbia University Libraries/Information Services' Center for Digital Research and Scholarship (CDRS) are currently working together on the development of Humanities Commons, a platform for scholarly societies and related groups across the humanities, enabling members of those organizations to communicate, collaborate, and share their work with one another. Humanities Commons will link a federated group of social networking systems, modeled on MLA Commons, with a library-quality repository, modeled on Columbia's Academic Commons. We propose in this stage of the project to develop a working prototype for the user interface connecting the Commons with the repository system, which we are calling Humanities Commons Open Repository Exchange, or Humanities CORE. This interface will allow Commons members to upload, share, discover, retrieve, and archive digital work and other objects within the same system in which they are already collaborating with one another.

[White paper]

Participating institutions:
Modern Language Association of America (New York, NY) - Applicant/Grantee
Columbia University Libraries (New York, NY) - Participating institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 5/31/2015


HD-51864-14

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Adam Rabinowitz (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

Periods, Organized (PeriodO): A gazetteer of period assertions for linking and visualizing periodized data

The development of a gazetteer that incorporates different scholarly definitions of historical and archaeological periods.

The PeriodO project seeks to create an online gazetteer of authoritative assertions about the chronological and geographic extent of historical and archaeological periods. Starting with a trial dataset related to Classical antiquity, this gazetteer will combine period thesauri used by museums and cultural heritage bodies with published assertions about the dates and locations of periods in authoritative print sources. These assertions will be modeled in a Linked Data format (JSON-LD, a serialization of RDF). They will be given Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) and served from a public GitHub repository, where they can act as a shared reference point to describe data in datasets with periodized information. We will also create a search and visualization tool to view the temporal and geographic extent of an assertion and compare it with others. Authoritative users will be able to add their own period assertions.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Classics; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$54,096 (approved)
$53,907 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


HD-51866-14

West Virginia University Research Corporation (Morgantown, WV 26505-2742)
Charles Baldwin (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

A Search Engine for Electronic Literature

Development of a search interface and implementation of shared metadata standards that would join the databases for nine international research centers in electronic literature, allowing researchers to cross-search the complete archives.

Our Level II grant proposal emerges from the Consortium for Electronic Literature (CELL), a partnership founded by the Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) and joining nine research centers, all developing online database projects devoted to research in electronic literature (e-lit). Building on existing achievements, we request $59,973 to implement the following: a web-based search engine for e-lit to display results from across the consortium databases; a unified name authority system to improve the data harvested by the search engine and to create more faceted and complex search results; and a training/how-to framework to extend our initiative to include future projects and partners and to establish standards and best practices in using the e-lit search engine.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,973 (approved)
$54,518 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 10/31/2015


HD-51828-14

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Patrick Manning (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)
Ruth Mostern (Co Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

World-Historical Gazetteer

A two-day workshop in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and follow-up activities for geographers, historians, and information scientists to consider how a world-historical gazetteer might be created that combines earlier work in regional and historical place name databases.

This project will advance work toward creation of a world-historical gazetteer that will provide comprehensive databases of places throughout the world since 1500 CE, including attention to the range of attributes known for each place. To satisfy the needs of all the large-scale historical data resources now being created, there is need for such a comprehensive and general gazetteer system. The convening of a two-day workshop, including leading figures who have developed gazetteers and the datasets in which they are incorporated, will bring about a research design for this world-historical gazetteer system, which can then be implemented in subsequent work. Four small research tasks concerning services, standards, and content will bring immediate advance toward implementation. The project is organized by the Collaborative for Historical Information and Analysis (CHIA), which has a record in sustaining collaborations for large-scale humanities work.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Geography; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$28,350 (approved)
$25,142 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


HD-51881-14

Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)
Harry Mairson (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

Functional Geometry and the Traite de Lutherie

The development of a software language and protocols for digitally reconstructing and studying historical musical instruments. This stage of the project would focus on historic string instruments.

We propose to design, implement, and experiment with a programming language for describing how to draw string instrument outlines: violins, violas, and especially violoncellos. Based on the historical reconstruction in Francois Denis's definitive monograph, Traite de Lutherie, using straightedge and compass constructions, the software can enhance insights into techniques of eighteenth-century design, provide an archival format for describing the properties of string instrument outlines, and the instructions for generating highly accurate digital drawings for use in construction. Further, it can provide the foundation for a kind of computational art history, where the language and associated software serve as a descriptive tool for analyzing the evolution of instrument designs over time. This work will be integrated with ongoing, active experience constructing violoncellos, connecting the historical and conceptual with the practical.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Architecture; Arts, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$58,625 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 8/31/2015


HD-51895-14

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Matthew Gold (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

The Social Paper: DH Start up Level 1

Development of a free, open-source online writing tool that would allow scholars, students, and teachers to share and receive feedback on works-in-progress from colleagues and broader audiences. The tool would be incorporated into the Commons-In-A-Box software platform, and would allow users to keep an online portfolio of their work.

Peer review among graduate students is stuck in the pre-digital age. This project will pilot a new approach to graduate student writing that maximizes the strengths of both social networks and online writing environments with the intended goal of using interactive technology to re-imagine the contours of graduate education. The proposed Social Paper (SP) tool will be a free, open-source, ready-to-use networked writing environment that allows scholars to disseminate and receive feedback on works-in-progress among colleagues and the public. This online platform will enliven graduate work by using robust feedback mechanisms to generate networked discussion around student writing. In addition, the platform will allow students to keep a working portfolio of all writing and an accessible, dynamic archive of feedback from both peers and professors. The startup phase will culminate with a prototype which will be tested across a number of academic communities.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,965 (approved)
$27,851 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


HD-51897-14

University of Nebraska, Board of Regents (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Elizabeth Lorang (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)
Leen Kiat Soh (Co Project Director: 09/17/2003 to present)

Image Analysis for Archival Discovery (Aida)

The development of a prototype tool that would allow scholars and students to apply image processing and machine learning techniques to identify specific visual elements within digitized collections. The project would start with an attempt to identify poetry found in the Chronicling America collection of historic newspapers.

Images created in the digitization of primary materials contain a wealth of machine-processable information for data mining and large-scale analysis, and this information should be leveraged both to connect researchers with the resources they need and to augment interpretation of human culture, as a complement to and extension of text-based approaches. The proposed project, "Image Analysis for Archival Discovery" (Aida), applies image processing and machine learning techniques from computer science to digitized materials to facilitate and promote archival discovery. Beginning with the automatic detection of poetic content in historic newspapers, this project will develop image processing as a methodology for humanities research and analysis. In doing so, it will advance work on two fronts: 1) it will contribute to the reevaluation of newspaper verse in American literary history; 2) it will assess the application of image analysis as a method for discovery in archival collections.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$59,697 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 6/30/2016


HD-51904-14

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218-2625)
Franklin Knight (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to 07/22/2014)
Kim Gallon (Co Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)
Hollis Robbins (Project Director: 07/23/2014 to present)

The Black Press Research Collective Newspaper Project: Visualizing the History of the Black Press in the United States

A two-day workshop to discuss the development of mapping and geocoding tools & data visualization authoring programs to assist scholars working with the Black Press.

In a little over a decade, historical and contemporary black newspapers have been digitized at a rapid rate. Yet a critical body of scholarship of these newspapers' impact continues to lag behind the technological developments, which have made these newspapers available to scholars and students. This dearth, in part, results from insufficient digital tools, which might assist researchers in understanding the geographic scope and social magnitude of the Black Press. The Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University and the Black Press Research Collective (BPRC) propose to develop a two-day workshop to discuss the development of mapping and geocoding tools and data visualization authoring programs to assist scholars in producing traditional and digital humanities scholarship on the Black Press. The workshop will bring together key Black Press scholars, librarians, archivists and data visualization experts to develop plans to create data visualizations from select data on the Black Press. The workshop will result in a white paper on the state of scholarship on the Black Press and proposals to develop a set of visualizations of its history.

[White paper]

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Journalism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$29,117 (approved)
$24,459 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 5/31/2015


HD-51858-14

Northern Kentucky University Research Foundation (Highland Heights, KY 41099-0001)
Tamara O'Callaghan (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

The Augmented Palimpsest: Engaging Students through AR Encounters with the Past

The development of tools that would allow students to access supplementary digital content alongside Geoffrey Chaucer's prologue to The Canterbury Tales using mobile devices.

The Augmented Palimpsest is a digital humanities tool that explores how the medium of Augmented Reality (AR) can be used in teaching medieval literature. Using Chaucer's General Prologue, the tool will deliver digital enhancements that emerge from the printed page via a smart device. They will provide the reader with linguistic, historical, and cultural contexts, thus giving students greater access to medieval material culture and history. The digital content will include 3D models of medieval artifacts and architecture, large and complex enough to be walked around and viewed from multiple angles. Because the enhancements emerge from the printed page, the tool will maintain a pedagogical emphasis on close reading while encouraging students to develop their skills in textual analysis, critical thinking, interdisciplinary study, and new media literacy. It will improve the reader's comprehension of the text by preserving the physical and kinesthetic connection to the text.

[White paper]

Project fields:
British Literature; Medieval Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,924 (approved)
$59,602 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 11/30/2016


HD-51836-14

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Raffaele Viglianti (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

Enhancing Music Notation Addressability

The development of software tools that would facilitate citation and annotation of music notation and capture information about multiple participants' contributions to collaborative digital projects. As an initial case study, the project would focus on an existing effort to compile a critical edition of Nicolas Du Chemin's Chansons Nouvelles.

The Enhancing Music Notation Addressability project seeks a Level II DH Startup Grant for developing software to address and extract music notation expressed in the Music Encoding Initiative format. Because addressing music notation segments is central to musicological discourse, we seek to answer such questions as (1) how can one virtually 'circle' music notation? and (2) how can a machine interpret this 'circling' to retrieve music notation? We intend to evaluate our approach by transforming into nanopublications the analytical music annotations already produced by students and scholars as part of the Du Chemin: Lost Voices project, which is reconstructing songs from 16th c. France. Nanopublication is providing the scientific community with a way of outlining attribution and quality of even small contributions to facilitate citation and promote massive collaborative scholarship. We seek to extend its benefits to humanities scholarship.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,971 (approved)
$59,971 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 10/31/2015


HD-51839-14

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Jennifer Guiliano (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to 04/01/2014)
Julie Greene (Project Director: 04/02/2014 to present)

Transforming the Afro-Caribbean World (TAW)

A two-day workshop exploring appropriate digital collections and tools that would facilitate archival research on the relationship between Afro-Caribbean labor and migration history and the construction of the Panama Canal from 1904-1914.

The Transforming the Afro-Caribbean World (TAW) project seeks NEH startup funding to bring together scholars of the Panama Canal, Afro-Caribbean history, and experts in the digital humanities, data modeling, and visualization for a two-day planning workshop that will discuss a large-scale effort to explore Afro-Caribbean labor, migration, and the Panama Canal. The TAW workshop has several aims: 1) digitization of a subset of the proposed records to evaluate potential costs and preservation issues; 2) exploration of structured data tools; 3) the creation of annotated bibliographies for use by teachers and the public as they begin to explore the centennial anniversary; and 4) identification of other archives and repositories to be included in the larger project.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$28,961 (approved)
$28,831 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 8/31/2016


HD-51851-14

Creighton University (Omaha, NE 68178-0133)
Erin Averett (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future: The Potential of Digital Archaeology

A two-day workshop hosted by the Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, Massachusetts, on the uses of mobile tablet technologies in archaeological field work and interpretative analysis.

This project brings together pioneers in the field during a two-day workshop to discuss the use, creation, and implementation of mobile tablet technology to advance paperless archaeology. Session themes will facilitate presentation, demonstration, and discussion on how archaeologists around the world use tablets or other digital tools in the field and lab and how best practices can be implemented across projects. The workshop will highlight the advantages and future of mobile computing and its challenges and limitations. The workshop will consist of formal paper sessions and opportunities for informal discussion of the issues and themes at moderated discussions, demonstrations, round tables, and speaker meals. The workshop's goal is to synthesize current practices and establish a blueprint for creating best practices and moving forward with mobile tablets in archaeology. The data generated will be made available through a website to promote ongoing discussion and information sharing.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$27,277 (approved)
$27,277 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 10/31/2016


HD-51852-14

Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Krysta Ryzewski (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)
Kerry Davis (Co Project Director: 09/29/2015 to present)

Ethnic Layers of Detroit: Experiencing Place through Digital Storytelling

The continued development and testing in the classroom of an interactive, mobile storytelling website that allows for the creation of multimedia narratives of historic sites. This phase of the project would focus on creating narratives that illustrate the traditions and transformation of Detroit's ethnic neighborhoods, with attention to the Corktown, Chinatown, Poletown, and Heidelberg neighborhoods.

Ethnic Layers of Detroit (ELD) seeks to engage students in documenting and sharing the complex layers of Detroit’s ethnic histories though an interactive digital storytelling web portal. We are requesting Level II funding to expand on our pilot project to hire student assistants to develop 20-25 additional multimedia narratives over an 18-month period.This project is innovative in that it facilitates interdisciplinary investigation and collaboration, and uses available technology in new ways to explore the multilayered connections between people, practices and the urban environment through narrative and experientially-based learning activities. By constructing a student-centered project with overlapping creative, intellectual, and technical training opportunities, our project will provide students with the transferable skills and experience to communicate with and contribute to a range of humanities, multimedia, and urban-focused colleagues and careers.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Ethnic Studies; Languages, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$59,984 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 11/30/2016


HD-51907-14

University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA 95211-0110)
Caroline Schroeder (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)
Amir Zeldes (Co Project Director: 06/01/2015 to present)

Coptic SCRIPTORIUM:A Corpus, Tools, and Methods for Corpus Linguistics and Computational Historical Research in Ancient Egypt

The development of a user interface and language analysis tools to facilitate interdisciplinary, collaborative research and annotation of digitized Coptic texts.

Coptic, having evolved from the language of the hieroglyphs of the pharaonic era, represents the last phase of the Egyptian language and is pivotal for a wide range of disciplines, such as linguistics, biblical studies, the history of Christianity, Egyptology, and ancient history. Coptic SCRIPTORIUM provides the first open-source technologies for computational and digital research across the disciplines as applied to Egyptian texts. The project is developing a digitized corpus of Coptic texts available in multiple formats and visualizations (including TEI XML), tools to analyze and process the language (e.g., the first Coptic part-of-speech tagger), a database with search and visualization capabilities, and a collaborative platform for scholars to contribute texts and annotations and to conduct research. The technologies and corpus will function as a collaborative environment for digital research by any scholars working in Coptic.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient Languages; Classics; History of Religion

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 9/30/2016


HD-51912-14

Cleveland State University (Cleveland, OH 44115-2214)
J. Mark Souther (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)
Meshack Owino (Co Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

Curating Kisumu: Adapting Mobile Humanities Interpretation in East Africa

A collaborative venture between Cleveland State University's Center for Public History + Digital Humanities and Maseno University in Kenya to explore how to use the Curatescape mobile framework, which allows for mobile interpretation of historical and cultural sites, in Kenya.

The Center for Public History + Digital Humanities (CPHDH) at Cleveland State University and Maseno University in Kenya seek NEH Level II Start-Up funding for Curating Kisumu to extend best practices for mobile interpretation to the developing world. CPHDH will explore how to use the Curatescape mobile interpretive framework to facilitate interchange between the humanities and pressing needs in East Africa. Faculty and students on both sides of the Atlantic will conduct collaborative research. Our team will also explore how to modify Curatescape to enable bilingual user inputs on the administrative backend and to allow the richest possible experience for users who use still-prevalent feature phones. Our team will develop an educational exchange to create content; develop, implement, and test an app that we adapt thoughtfully to local needs and technical constraints; and collaboratively identify a set of recommendations for overcoming barriers to mobile curation in Africa.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
African History; Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,494 (approved)
$59,301 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


HD-51918-14

Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Ann Armstrong (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

Orientation for the Mississippi Freedom Project: An Interactive Quest for Social Justice

Development of a prototype for a location-based game centered on historical events surrounding orientation sessions at Western College for Women in preparation for the Mississippi Summer Project, in which students trained for civil rights activism in Mississippi in June 1964. The grant would fund a prototype of the first level, which provides historical content and context, drawing in a number of humanities consultants and offering an initial evaluation period.

Freedom Summer brought together a diverse group to advocate for citizen rights. The two orientation weeks represented a microcosm of the civil rights movement. During that period, disparate groups met in Oxford, Ohio. While there, they shared stories, leveraged networks, and enacted change. Because of this experience, this project will prototype a location-based game that interprets the Mississippi Summer Project on the site of the 1964 orientation at Western College for Women. Using Augmented Reality Interactive Storytelling (ARIS), the game will inspire interest in these events and facilitate skill building for citizen engagement. Furthermore, this project draws from the prototype process to conceive a web-based platform for nonlocal audiences. An interdisciplinary team of game designers, public historians, historic participants, educators, and museum professionals will consider how the tools of place-based learning and distance learning animate civil rights movement themes.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,994 (approved)
$59,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 10/31/2016


HD-51921-14

Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)
Michael Carrasco (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

The Mesoamerican Corpus of Formative Period Art and Writing

The development of a prototype database and complementary tools to facilitate analysis of Mesoamerican iconography and art objects from the Formative period, 1500-400 BCE.

This project explores the origins and development of the first writing in the New World by constructing a comprehensive database of Formative period, 1500-400 BCE, iconography and a suite of database-driven digital tools. In collaboration with two of the largest repositories of Formative period Mesoamerican art in Mexico, the project integrates the work of archaeologists, art historians, and scientific computing specialists to plan and begin the production of a database, digital assets, and visual search software that permit the visualization of spatial, chronological, and contextual relationships among iconographic and archaeological datasets. These resources will eventually support mobile and web based applications that allow for the search, comparison, and analysis of a corpus of material currently only partially documented. The start-up phase will generate a functional prototype database, project website, wireframe user interfaces, and a report summarizing project development.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,993 (approved)
$59,948 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


HD-51944-14

University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)
Alyson Gill (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)
Angel Nieves (Co Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

Dangerous Embodiments: Theories, Methods, and Best Practices for Historical Character Modeling in Humanities 3D Environments

The development and testing of a comprehensive typology for avatar (graphical representations of a user or the user's character) creation in historical simulations in digital heritage environments.

This proposal calls for the development of a comprehensive typology for avatar creation, and deployment of representative avatars in two Unity environments chosen because of their difficult heritage. We will then study responses to different representative avatars within these environments using tools drawn from experimental philosophy, culminating in a Dangerous Embodiments symposium and resulting publication.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Ethnic Studies; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,510 (approved)
$59,510 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 6/30/2018


HD-51957-14

Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum (Chicago, IL 60605-2403)
Jodi Lacy (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to 10/02/2015)
Pedro Raposo (Project Director: 10/02/2015 to present)

Digital Historic Skies

Preliminary planning and development of a web-based project to crowdsource information about historical astronomical maps, as well as a mobile application that would offer both humanistic and scientific interpretation of these materials.

The Adler Planetarium’s Digital Historic Skies will create an interactive mobile application that teaches the general public about art, history, and science in cultures throughout the world through the use of historic celestial maps and the current night sky. The application will incorporate citizen science data, a smartphone’s GPS, historic celestial cartography from different cultures, and current astronomical data. When users look at any region of the sky, they will easily access engaging and relevant historic, cultural, and contemporary astronomical information. The project has three major goals: 1) to develop an alpha prototype citizen science project to catalog celestial objects in Adler’s historic maps; 2) to develop a proof-of-concept prototype mobile phone application that teaches about cultures through historic celestial cartography; and 3) to draft implementation plans.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Arts, Other; History of Science; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016


HD-51978-14

Cultural Heritage Imaging (San Francisco, CA 94102-5867)
Mark Mudge (Project Director: 09/17/2013 to present)

Data Sustainability and Advanced Metadata Management for Scientific Imaging in the Humanities

The completion of two case studies examining documentation of computational photography methods applied to humanities collections, as well as dissemination of best practices and enhancement of relevant software tools.

This project will provide enhanced data sustainability, along with metadata and knowledge management, for computational photography (CP) software tools. CP technologies are based on the algorithmic extraction of information from multiple photographs, a process that generates new information not found in any of the original photos. The project will be based on not yet deployed prior work, providing metadata harvesting and knowledge management tools for Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) and Algorithmic Rendering (AR), which are undergoing rapid adoption by humanities practitioners. The project will evaluate and update these tools, exploring practical methods of organizing this data for archival ingest and reuse on site at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and the Institute of Classical Archaeology at the University of Texas at Austin. The project will study extending the management tools to other CP technologies, such as Structure from Motion photogrammetry and multispectral imaging.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Arts, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


HD-51735-13

University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)
Conrad Rudolph (Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)

FACES: Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems, Phase II

The refinement of additional techniques for using facial recognition software to help with the identification of human subjects in portraiture for art historical research.

Before the advent of photography, portraits were, almost by definition, depictions of people who were important in their own worlds. But, as a walk through almost any major museum will show, a large number of these unidentified portraits from before the nineteenth century--many of them great works of art--have lost the identities of their subjects through the fortunes of time. Traditionally, identification of many of these portraits has been limited to often quite variable personal opinion. FACES (Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems) proposes to establish the initial potential of face recognition technology to this highly subjective aspect of art history while at the same time retaining the human eye as the final arbiter.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 5/31/2015


HD-51709-13

Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274-4182)
Todd Hanneken (Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)
Michael Phelps (Co Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)

Integrating Spectral and Reflectance Transformation Imaging for the Digitization of Manuscripts & Other Cultural Artifacts

The establishment of best practices for the application of spectral imaging and Reflectance Transformation Imaging technologies to reveal new information about objects of study in the humanities. Activities would include the imaging of three test objects and follow-up quality evaluation undertaken by humanities scholars.

This project will bring together the nation’s leading experts to integrate two proven technologies for imaging cultural artifacts. The first technology is spectral imaging, which excels at collecting detailed color information in order to recover information which is indistinguishable to the naked eye, such as unreadable text on a manuscript or stages of revision in a painting. The second technology is Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), which captures the detailed surface texture of artifacts. RTI images can be viewed interactively and enhanced, allowing scholars and conservators to reconstruct the methods by which an artifact was produced and to analyze its current physical condition. The team will test two experimental integration procedures on three representative test objects. Humanities scholars will be responsible for evaluating the benefits. The work scripts and benefit analysis will be published for use in imaging major artifact collections around the world.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$58,338 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 4/30/2014


HD-51718-13

Loyola University, Chicago (Chicago, IL 60611-2147)
David Chinitz (Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)
Pamela Caughie (Co Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)

Metadata Schema for Modernist Networks

A one-day workshop to engage humanities scholars and technical experts in the development of a standardized metadata schema and vocabulary that describes and enables discovery of digital projects in modernist studies.

Loyola University Chicago will host a workshop for 16 participants in digital modernist projects in the U.S., Canada, and abroad which will result in the launching of ModNets as the most recent "node" in the Advanced Research Consortium (ARC). ModNets, a federation of digital projects in the field of modernist studies, faces unique challenges as it joins the ARC organization: we will address issues specific to the field of modernist studies, particularly the metadata needs for new media, such as film and phonography. The purpose of this workshop, which will include project directors, ModNets and ARC leaders, and metadata analysts, is to review ARC's RDF (metadata) vocabulary in the light of modernist scholarship and enhance it to meet the particular needs of modernist artifacts. The outcome will be a list of proposed changes to the existing ARC vocabularies and a working set of RDF documents for two existing projects.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$27,671 (approved)
$17,661 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 8/31/2014


HD-51719-13

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Noah Wardrip Fruin (Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)

A unified approach to preserving cultural software objects and their development histories

A Level 1 pilot project focusing on the preservation of software relevant to humanities scholars.

Software is an increasingly important part of our culture, and the humanities has responded with approaches such as digital culture studies, game studies, and software studies. Simultaneously, we face a growing erosion of computational history as the cycle of technological advancement and obsolescence continues. This project will pilot a new approach to software preservation -- one that draws on the best practices so far identified by those seeking to preserve scientific research and its context (on one hand) and games and virtual worlds (on the other) while being consistently informed by our growing knowledge of the research questions most important to the digital humanities. A team of librarians, computer scientists, and humanists will pilot this methodology by archiving UCSC's groundbreaking social simulation game Prom Week -- making progress towards a more unified approach to preserving software objects and their development histories for future scholars, students, and the public.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


HD-51728-13

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5000)
Ryan Cordell (Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)

Uncovering Reprinting Networks in Nineteenth-Century American Newspapers

The development of models, using tools from computational linguistics, to help track the spread of prints and reprints of poetry and short stories throughout 19th-centry newspapers, using the sources found in the Chronicling America database of digitized newspapers.

Uncovering Reprinting Networks in Nineteenth-Century American Newspapers seeks to develop theoretical models that will help scholars better understand what qualities--both textual and thematic--helped particular news stories, short fiction, and poetry "go viral" in nineteenth-century newspapers and magazines. Prior to copyright legislation and enforcement, literary texts as well as other non-fiction prose texts circulated promiscuously among newspapers as editors freely reprinted materials borrowed from other venues. What texts were reprinted and why? How did ideas--literary, political, scientific, economic, religious--circulate in the public sphere and achieve critical force among audiences? By employing and developing computational linguistics tools to analyze the large textual databases of nineteenth-century newspapers newly available to scholars, this project will generate new knowledge of the nineteenth-century print public sphere.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Computer Science; English; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$59,805 (approved)
$59,805 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


HD-51636-13

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218-2625)
Susan Weiss (Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)
Ichiro Fujinaga (Co Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)

Digital Prosopography for Renaissance Musicians: Discovery of Social and Professional Networks

The continued development of a prosopographical database tracing the social and professional networks of Renaissance musicians, using automated methods to identify individuals and biographical information within relevant sources and to establish relationships between them.

As part of Web 2.0 (Semantic Web), there is a new technology called FOAF (Friend of a Friend), describing relationships between people. We will investigate the applicability of FOAF for describing relationships between musicians of the past, thereby establishing a new biographical tool. Musicians have complex relationships,particularly those between teachers and students and those within ensembles of various sizes. Visual artists may have similar teacher-student relationships, but typically do not create their work together. Dancers may perform together, but they are usually taught in groups. Similarly, athletes may compete in groups, but they do not usually perform in public with their coaches. For this project we will focus specifically on relationships among Renaissance musicians and how to extract the biographical and relational data automatically from existing documents using natural language processing technology, creating a model applicable to other time periods and disciplines.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$54,466 (approved)
$54,466 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 10/31/2015


HD-51640-13

Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
Lilla Kopar (Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)
Nancy Wicker (Co Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)

Project Andvari: A Digital Portal to the Visual World of Early Medieval Northern Europe

A two-day workshop bringing together an international group of humanities scholars, cultural heritage professionals, and technical experts to begin planning for an online resource that would facilitate access to digital collections of the art and artifacts of the early medieval period in northern Europe, drawn from a range of dispersed institutional holdings.

Project Andvari is designed to provide integrated access to dispersed collections of northern European art and artifacts of the early medieval period (4th-12th centuries). Our goal is to create a digital portal offering aggregated search options and enhanced metadata. Funding is requested to convene an international workshop for humanities scholars, museum professionals, and technology experts to refine the conceptual design of the proposed research tool and identify its technological requirements in preparation for a pilot project. Ultimately, Project Andvari will facilitate interdisciplinary research in art, archaeology, history, and literary and religious studies of the northern periphery of medieval Europe. It will allow users to study visual culture across media and beyond traditional geographical and disciplinary boundaries. Its innovative application of search methods will promote analyses of relationships of artifacts and cultures, and help us discover the hitherto unnoticed.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$27,921 (approved)
$24,457 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


HD-51642-13

Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)
Brian Graney (Project Director: 10/01/2012 to present)

Representing Early Black Film Artifacts as Material Evidence in Digital Contexts

A scholarly workshop and follow-up activities that will bring together film studies scholars, moving image archivists, and library professionals to consider how digitization of early motion picture film might be improved to better capture the physical attributes of the film print. The workshop would focus on early twentieth-century films made for African-American audiences.

The study of "race movies," the early motion pictures produced for black audiences in the first decades of the 20th century, presents an ideal humanities context for framing important questions bearing on the digital representation of film artifacts as material evidence: How must we reevaluate and amend current best practices for digitization of motion picture film which by design omit or obscure physical attributes of the original artifact?; And how might this representation of film as a material object offer a conceptual bridge for integrating audiovisual media within a wider network of related visual and textual documentation? The Black Film Center/Archive (BFC/A) at Indiana University proposes in this Level I Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant to explore these questions by convening an interdisciplinary group of scholars, moving image archivists, and technology specialists in digital humanities for a two-day conference and workshop to be held in November 2013.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$26,400 (approved)
$26,400 (awarded)