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Funded Projects Query Form
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Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources*
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American Philosophical Society (Philadelphia, PA 19106-3387)
Timothy Powell (Project Director, 06/30/2014 - present)
PW-226819-15
A New Digital Guide to Native American and Indigenous Collections at the American Philosophical Society

The creation of a comprehensive digital guide for improved access to the library’s archival collections, both print and audio recordings, of Native American language, history, and culture. The collections amount to 1,250 linear feet of manuscripts and images, including the papers of some of the most important linguists, anthropologists, and ethnographers of the 20th century, and recordings totaling 3,100 hours.

The American Philosophical Society Library is the repository for one of the nation’s most substantial and significant collections of records documenting Native American life, culture, and languages. The APS proposes to create a comprehensive digital Guide to these collections in order to (1) provide improved access to these resources for traditional humanities scholars and wider publics, including in particular a newly identified, highly engaged and expanding user community of Native Americans; (2) to insure that these collections are arranged and described consistent with best practices and standards; and (3) to continue to develop the essential operational materials and capacities necessary for the anticipated formal opening of the Library’s nascent Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies in 2018.

Project fields: Native American Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 10/31/2017

Brigham Young University (Provo, UT 84602-1231)
Mark Davies (Project Director, 07/01/2014 - present)
PW-226822-15
Billion Word Extensions to the NEH-funded Corpus del Espanol and Corpus do Portugues

Expansion of the online Corpus of Spanish to 2 billion words from 21 Spanish-speaking countries, and the Corpus of Portuguese to 1 billion words from 4 Portuguese-speaking countries, and development of a more user-friendly interface for these corpora.

The Corpus del Espanol and the Corpus do Portugues were previously funded by the NEH in 2001-02 and 2004-06, respectively. The proposed project will take advantage of advances in technology since that time, to make these corpora between 50 and 100 times as large as the previous NEH-funded corpora (at least for the modern period). This will allow researchers to look at Spanish and Portuguese in ways that are not possible with any other resource. In addition, these new corpora will allow researchers to examine differences between the dialects of these two languages, as well as cultural differences between the countries (which is related to the NEH Bridging Cultures initiative). Finally, there will be a number of related resources that will be based on these new corpora, which are oriented more towards language learning. Overall, hundreds of thousands of researchers, teachers, learners, and translators will benefit from these greatly expanded resources.

Project fields: Latin American Languages
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $200,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 12/31/2017

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Katherine Stefko (Project Director, 07/10/2014 - present)
PW-226836-15
Voices of Change: Preserving Radio Haiti

The processing and reformatting of the Radio Haiti archives, which contains 3,420 audio recordings and 60 linear feet of paper records documenting the pro-democracy station from the 1960s to 2000.

The Radio Haiti Project will result in global online access to the comprehensive audio archives of Radio Haiti, that nation’s oracle of democracy from the 1960s through 2002 when the station was shuttered following its founder’s assassination. The Radio Haiti Archives (RHA) contains 60 linear feet of paper records and 3,420 audio recordings, all of which will be processed and preserved as part of the project. In addition, the audio recordings will be digitized at preservation quality, preserved in Duke’s Digital Repository, and made available online via Duke’s Digital Collections interface, along with descriptive information, such as the name of each radio program or segment, its length, names of participants, and keywords.

Project fields: Cultural History; Ethnic Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $217,500 (approved); $200,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017

American Foundation for the Blind Inc. (New York, NY 10121-1100)
Helen Selsdon (Project Director, 07/14/2014 - present)
PW-226844-15
Digitization of the Helen Keller Archival Collection

The digitization of the Helen Keller papers, comprising 80,000 items (150,000 page images), enabling free online access to the collection.

The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) seeks funding to digitize the Helen Keller Archival Collection comprising over 80,000 items bequeathed to AFB by Keller upon her death in 1968. It is the single largest repository of materials by and about Helen Keller in the world and includes correspondence, speeches, press clippings, scrapbooks, photographs, architectural drawings, and artifacts that span from the late 19th century to the mid-20th. The archive includes materials from or by nine U.S. presidents, as well as leading figures such as Mark Twain, Pearl S. Buck, Margaret Sanger and Albert Einstein. It also contains voluminous correspondence from men, women, and children, sighted and non-sighted, who corresponded with Keller from around the globe and whose stories have never been told. It is an extraordinary source of information on 19th and 20th century American social, political, and cultural history, as well as the history of disability and feminism.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $275,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 6/30/2017

Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Grant Frame (Project Director, 07/15/2014 - present)
PW-228092-15
Completing the Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period (RINAP)

Online and print publication of the official inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian rulers, specifically Ashurbanipal (668-631 BCE) and his successors.

Providing authoritative, modern editions of the official inscriptions of the last five rulers of the Neo-Assyrian Period (Ashurbanipal and his successors), 668-609 BCE, in open access, online and print formats.

Project fields: Near and Middle Eastern Languages
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $250,000 (approved); $250,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2017

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Alan Degutis (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228112-15
North American Imprints Program, 1639-1840: Creation of a Union Catalog

The production of 6,700 detailed catalog records for publications printed in North America from the colonial period up to 1840.

This project seeks funding to continue work on the North American Imprints Program (NAIP). NAIP’s long-term goal is the creation of a machine-readable union catalog of books, pamphlets and broadsides printed in the United States before 1877. With funding requested here, NAIP staff will integrate 2,615 records received from the English Short-Title Catalogue (ESTC) and the Library Company of Philadelphia; will upgrade 4,097 acquisition-level records to rare-book level; will read several recently published bibliographies against the file, creating new records and adding information relevant to existing records; and will improve the consistency of uniform titles, subject headings and genre headings in the file. In accomplishing these goals we will make the pre-1841 NAIP file more complete, more accurate, and more useful to scholars.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 12/31/2016

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (Richmond, VA 23221)
Stephen Bonadies (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228118-15
Uncovering Fabergé: An Archival Digitization Planning and Pilot Project

A planning project for digitizing the museum’s archives relating to its Fabergé and Russian decorative arts collection. The project would result in technical requirements and workflow for linking archival and object catalog records as part of a larger digital initiative at the museum; digitization and linking of approximately 500 archival documents with about 500 already imaged objects; and dissemination of the materials via the museum’s publicly accessible website.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA)seeks the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Foundations program in the amount of $40,000 to develop a comprehensive plan to digitize and disseminate the archival materials related to some of our most significant holdings. The Foundations project will use the Lillian Thomas Pratt Collection of Faberge and Russian Decorative Arts objects for the pilot of its digital archive plan to test methods for a larger plan to digitize VMFA's archival collections. This initiative will provide a methodology for making VMFA's archival collections accessible to researchers and humanities scholars through the museum's website and other digital platforms.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2016

American Folklore Society (Columbus, OH 43210)
Timothy Lloyd (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228123-15
National Folklore Archives Initiative, Phase 2

The second phase of the National Folklore Archives Initiative, which would expand access to archival collections documenting American folklife by increasing the number of institutions in the Folklore Collections portal. The project would enable online searching of the collections of 24 folklife archives around the country, as well as strengthen the capacity of collections staff at each institution to continue expanding the resources.

The American Folklore Society is requesting $271,762 to support the two-year second phase of the National Folklore Archives Initiative (NFAI), a consortial effort to provide open, online, integrated access to information about the archival collections held by folklore programs at academic institutions, community-based cultural and ethnic organizations, non-profit organizations, and state government-based arts and cultural agencies in the United States. The second phase of this initiative includes five interrelated activities: 1. Curate, develop, test, and distribute a scalable solution for larger-scale NFAI user training; 2. Continue work with existing archival partner sites to add content and value to our database; 3. Work with new archival partner sites to add additional content and value to our database and to build the NFAI community; 4. Implement additional organizational infrastructure for sustainability; and 5. Continue our partnership-building efforts.

Project fields: Folklore and Folklife
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $250,000 (approved); $250,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2017

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47401-3654)
Brian Graney (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228126-15
Richard E. Norman and Race Filmmaking: Reprocessing and Digitization

The creation of a comprehensive finding aid and the digitization of 40 linear feet (23,300 items) from the archives of Richard E. Norman, a pioneer in the development of films for African American audiences.

The Black Film Center/Archive (BFC/A) at Indiana University, working in partnership with the Indiana University Libraries, seeks support from the NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Implementation Grant program for the Richard E. Norman and Race Filmmaking: Reprocessing and Digitization project. The project proposes to reintegrate the dispersed holdings of pioneering race film producer and distributor Richard E. Norman; to produce and publish a comprehensive new finding aid to the collection; and to digitize 23,200 unique items in the collection for free public access online.

Project fields: African American Studies; American Studies; Media Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $150,000 (approved); $149,947 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2017

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, Inc. (Boston, MA 02116-2813)
Janet Spitz (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228127-15
Central Web Portal to Maps of the American Revolution

The implementation of a Web portal to deliver 4,000 historic maps covering the Revolutionary War period, with a focus on Boston, the Atlantic region, and North America.
 

Leventhal Map Center is launching a Central Cartographic Web Portal focused on North America and the West Indies during the American Revolutionary War era, namely the time period from 1750 to 1800. Utilizing sophisticated technological functions, the Portal is curated to include the rarest and most informative printed and manuscript maps from 11 partners in the U.S. and U.K. that hold outstanding works which augment LMCs distinctive holdings from this era. It is a freely available online collection of 4,000 digital images, complete with scholarly references to the items, lesson plans for educators, and technology to create and manipulate maps using historic data; thereby enhancing traditional research in the humanities and enabling the creation of new information. The Portal is a resource for students, scholars, and the general public interested in or studying the historical, geographic, and cultural context of events in North America during the second half of the 18th century.

Project fields: Geography; U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2017

Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715)
Matthew Edney (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228132-15
History of Cartography Project

Continued development of the multi-volume reference work "The History of Cartography" with particular attention to Volume Four on the "European Enlightenment, 1650-1800," and Volume Five on "The Nineteenth Century."

We request an implementation grant (July 2015-June 2017) under NEH’s Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program and Bridging Cultures initiative for work on The History of Cartography, a reference encyclopedia. We propose to complete editorial preparation of Vol. 4 in December 2016 and submit it to the University of Chicago Press, while continuing to advance Vol. 5. This award-winning series is the only comprehensive and reliable reference work to study the people, cultures, and societies that have produced and used maps from prehistory to the present. It provides intellectual access to the complex world of maps for scholars and the general public. It promotes and sustains the culturally sophisticated interpretation of maps as evidentiary source materials. Thoroughly researched by its editors and contributors, its content is rigorously checked by an experienced editorial team. The Press is publishing in print and e-book formats and is producing a free online edition.

Project fields: Cultural History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $180,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017

Peninsula Library System (San Mateo, CA 94403-2273)
Barclay Ogden (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228134-15
California Light and Sound: The California Audiovisual Preservation Project

The digitization of up to 1,000 audio and moving image recordings dealing with the history and culture of California, held by cultural heritage repositories throughout the state.

The proposed project has two goals: 1) Build the "California Light and Sound" humanities collection (currently 3,000 recordings) by digitizing and providing free online access to 1,000 additional endangered audiovisual recordings of Californiana with national, regional, and local historical significance. 2) Grow the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP) partnership by adding 20 new California institutions (with audiovisual Californiana) to the existing 77 institutional partners in the Project. The CAVPP provides statewide leadership to facilitate access and accomplish preservation work most individual libraries and archives are unable to undertake. The CAVPP guides institutions through the process, from collection assessment to nomination of titles to selection to description to digitization, and brings to light hidden media collections via the Internet Archive (IA), an online repository that is freely available for non-profit, educational use.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $299,873 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017

Chemical Heritage Foundation (Philadelphia, PA 19106-2702)
James Voelkel (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228135-15
Foundation Proposal for a Chymical Encyclopedia, Database, and Repository (CEDR)

Planning for a reference resource, and development of a prototype, on the theory and practice of chemistry in the medieval through early modern eras, which would contain historical chemistry terminology, encyclopedia entries, digitized primary texts, and demonstrations.

The project proposes the creation of a reference resource on chemical processes and terminology pre-dating modern chemical notation that will inform historians, conservators and any other humanists interested in the material culture of the past. We envision a encyclopedia with definitive descriptions of substances and processes, a database of out-of-use chymical terms; and a repository of digitized original sources. We propose primarily an international planning workshop to coordinate a wide range of stakeholders, ranging from historians of technology and science, art historians and conservators, and archaeologists, to historically sensitive chemists and mineralogists. The workshop will establish editorial guidelines, methodology, and scope. We also propose prototyping elements of the encyclopedia, database, and repository, including the digitization of Macquer's 5-volume Dictionnaire de chymie (1789) and a medieval recipe book known as the "Secreti naturali."

Project fields: History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,457 (approved); $39,457 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017

Moravian Archives (Bethlehem, PA 18018-2757)
Paul Peucker (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228138-15
Eastern West Indies Records Planning Project

A planning project to enable the conservation and digitization of 120 linear feet of archival records documenting the work of Moravian missionaries in the eastern West Indies over the past two centuries, with an emphasis on the history of the region’s enslaved populations.

The Moravian Archives in Bethlehem, Pa. (MAB) request a HCRR Foundations grant of $37,982 to assess the records from the Eastern West Indies, held by the Moravian Archives. The goal of the project is 1) prioritization of the material according to its humanities values, resulting in written guidelines for prioritization of treatment and digitization 2) To conduct an item-by-item collection survey of prioritized material, including condition reports, treatment plans and cost estimates 3) To develop a plan for the digitization of the collection and a plan for the long-term digital preservation of the images.

Project fields: History, Other
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $37,982 (approved); $37,982 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 2/29/2016

New York Public Radio (New York, NY 10007-1602)
Andy Lanset (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228139-15
WNYC Audio Preservation and Access Project (Part II)

The digitization of up to 680 hours of radio broadcast recordings (1,360 individual recordings) from 1938 to 1970 pertaining to the political, social, and cultural history of New York.

New York Public Radio (NYPR), parent company of public radio stations WNYC and WQXR, respectfully requests a two-year grant of $325,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support Part II of the WNYC Audio Preservation and Access Project. This project will digitize, catalog, and provide wide access to approximately 680 hours of vintage radio broadcast material relevant to a wide range of humanities disciplines, including political science, urban development and sustainability, foreign affairs, arts and culture, and media history.

Project fields: Cultural History; Media Studies; Urban History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $275,000 (approved); $275,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2015 – 8/31/2017

Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Inc. (New York, NY 10023-6970)
Barbara Haws (Project Director, 07/16/2014 - present)
PW-228144-15
New York Philharmonic Digital Archives Project 1842-1943

The digitization of over 400,000 pages of the New York Philharmonic’s institutional records and 2,100 bound musical scores documenting the history of the organization from 1842 to 1943.

The New York Philharmonic is requesting a grant of $350,000 over three years (September 2015-August 2018) to digitize 404,100 pages of institutional records dating from 1842-1943, and make them freely available to humanities researchers, musicologists, musicians, and the general public on the Digital Archives website. Materials to be digitized as part of this project include Board minutes, correspondence, financial documents, labor contracts, audience lists, orchestral scores, and press clippings, providing a unique perspective on the cultural, political and social history of New York City and the United States. The newly-digitized materials will be added to the existing 1.5 million pages of archival documents from 1943-1970 that have been digitized since 2009. This project will result in further awareness of, as well as instant access to, the rich resources that exist for scholarly research on a variety of humanities themes within the Philharmonic Archives collection.

Project fields: Cultural History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Music History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $325,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2015 – 8/31/2018

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Stephen Mielke (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228165-15
Preserving and Enhancing Access to Non-Commercial Sound Recordings at The Harry Ransom Center

A preservation risk assessment of 13,991 sound recordings from the Harry Ransom Center’s archives documenting 20th-century writers and performers such as John Beecher, Erle Stanley Gardner, Gloria Swanson, David Mamet, and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Anne Sexton.

The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin requests funds to support a $35,132 one-year project to develop and complete a preservation survey of the Center’s archival sound recordings. This survey will establish, enhance, and document preservation digitization priorities, processes, and standards to ensure future access to a significant collection of primary research materials.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $18,900 (approved); $18,900 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2015 – 8/31/2016

Board of Regents, Univ of Nebraska, Univ of Nebraska-Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68583-0861)
Carolyn Heitman (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228168-15
Salmon Pueblo Archaeological Research Collection

The digitization of archaeological field records, original drawings, and photographs, and integration into an existing research archive, along with electronic databases of data pertaining to the Salmon Pueblo site in northern New Mexico, which documents a prehistoric Puebloan cultural center dating to the 11th century CE and which was excavated in the 1970s.

The goal of the proposed Salmon Pueblo Archaeological Research Collection (SPARC) project is to preserve and make accessible incomparable legacy data from the important excavations of Salmon Pueblo. Built around 1090 CE, this ancestral Pueblo site was the first major colony outside of Chaco Canyon and was a cultural center on the north bank of the San Juan River 45 miles north of Chaco. The site of Salmon Pueblo is important both for its place in the larger Chacoan world of the twelfth century and its unique archaeological history. A collaboration exists between four institutions--the Salmon Ruins Museum, Archaeology Southwest, the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities at the University of Virginia. Support for SPARC will go toward three phases: (1) digital acquisition, (2) data integration and management, and (3) online preservation of and access to materials.

Project fields: Anthropology; Archaeology; Social Sciences, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 10/31/2017

Robert W. Woodruff Library of the Atlanta University Center (Atlanta, GA 30314-4207)
Andrea Jackson (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228169-15
Spreading the Word: Expanding Access to African American Religious Collections

The arrangement and description of 126 linear feet of archival records and personal papers and the digitization of 2,139 photos and 1,163 video and audio recordings from 14 collections relating to the history of African American religion from the late 1800s to the early part of the current century.

The Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library (AUC Woodruff Library) seeks $350,000 in grant funding from NEH for an implementation project entitled Spreading the Word: Expanding Access to African American Religious Archival Collections. The cost for the three-year project is $599,994. The AUC Woodruff Library will create a robust digital collection, and prepare for access fourteen collections of rare audio/visual materials which have been underutilized. The resources, documenting African American religion from the late 1800s to the 2000s, include correspondence, diaries, sermons, scrapbooks of missionary work, chapel services, class lectures, photographs, televangelism recordings, and interviews from prominent scholars,such as W.E.B. DuBois, Malcolm X, and Pauli Murray. Scholarship on African American religion, often referred to to as the "cornerstone" of the community, will enhance humanistic study across several disciplines including sociology and history.

Project fields: African American History; Religion, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2018

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Fred Heath (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - 04/06/2015); Lorraine Haricombe (Project Director, 04/06/2015 - present)
PW-228174-15
Texas Archival Resources Online (TARO) Consortium to the 21st Century Project

A planning project to update technical standards and intellectual control for the Texas Archival Resources Online (TARO), which contains over 7,200 finding aids describing collections held by cultural heritage institutions in Texas.

The Texas Archival Resources Online (TARO) consortium based at The University of Texas at Austin, University of Texas Libraries, would like to apply for a Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Foundations Grant, for the purpose of collaborative planning, assessment and pilot activities. Our TARO Project seeks to enhance intellectual control and solidify our collaborative framework for complex reference. Specifically, our Project would create editorial plans for standardization of existing archival finding aids and updating of EAD best practices documentation, devise strategies for technological and programmatic sustainability, and produce a concrete plan for critical changes to our online reference resources.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, Other
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $35,204 (approved); $35,204 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
James Nye (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228181-15
Urdu Publications from Pakistan: Providing Access to Private Collections

Cataloging more than 5,200 humanities texts, including works on history, literature, and religion, published in the Urdu language and recently acquired by the University of Chicago.

The University of Chicago Library proposes a two-year project to catalog more than 5,200 publications in the Urdu language. The books and periodicals are all available at the University because of a generous gift from a private donor, the son of Niaz Fatehpuri, a renowned Pakistani intellectual. At least 4,975 of the catalog records will be unique additions to OCLC’s WorldCat database and more than 230 will be upgrades of brief or deficient records in the database. All of the books will be available via interlibrary loan following cataloging and addition to the University Library collection.

Project fields: Asian Languages
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017

Regents of the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN 55455-2070)
Kris Kiesling (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228182-15
Guthrie Theater Archives (1963-Present): The 21st Century Collection

The arrangement and description of 800 cubic feet of archival material documenting the history of the Guthrie Theater from 1963 to the present.

The University of Minnesota Libraries seeks $137,020 in NEH funding to support an 18-month project to arrange, preserve, and describe the records of the nationally-recognized Guthrie Theater (guthrietheater.org) to current archival standards. Additionally, we will actively work with the Guthrie Theater leadership and staff to review and revise the current records management plan in order to address institutional changes and to create a sustainable plan for future accruals that includes born digital records. The work of gaining adequate intellectual and physical control of the collection is the necessary first step in making these materials publicly available through digitization, which is being planned for 2016. In the course of arranging and describing the materials, we will identify and flag materials that can be digitized at this later stage for thematic inclusion in national digital aggregation initiatives, such as the Digital Public Library of America.

Project fields: History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Theater History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $100,000 (approved); $100,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016

New York City Department of Records & Information Services (New York, NY 10007-1210)
Michael Lorenzini (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228185-15
New York City Police Department Photograph Collection, 1914-1975, Preservation and Access Project

Rehousing, describing, and digitizing a collection of criminal justice photographs taken by the New York City Police Department from 1914 to 1975.

The Municipal Archives requests Endowment support for a project to re-house, describe, digitize, and make publicly accessible on the internet approximately 30,000 photographs (out of a collection totaling 187,000 images). The photographs constitute a substantial addition to the Archives’ collection of records pertaining to the administration of criminal justice. Their significance extends well beyond the simple documentation of criminal activity; they provide a unique visual perspective on numerous important themes in American history. The collection has been deemed a priority in order to prevent further deterioration from damaging storage materials and decaying negatives. There are four components to the proposed project: re-housing, description, digital re-formatting, and public access via the Internet. The proposed work plan specifies that all project activities will be performed in-house. The project timetable is twelve months, from July 1, 2015, to June 30, 2016.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $125,000 (approved); $125,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016

American Congregational Association (Boston, MA 02108-3755)
Margaret Bendroth (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228188-15
New England's Hidden Histories: Providing Public Access to the Records of America's First Founders

Creation of an online, searchable database of 18,000 pages of digitized Congregational Church documents and selected transcriptions from colonial times and the early American republic.

New England’s Hidden Histories is a program aimed at providing wide access to some of the most important early American documents, the records maintained by nearly every local church during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The project, which serves both scholars and the general public, is administered by the non-profit Congregational Library in Boston, a historic, 150-year-old institution with a distinguished record of preserving historic records and providing public access to them. This proposal concerns records in the Library's collection, roughly half of which are newly obtained from local churches and never before accessible to researchers. The digital images, with transcriptions, will be available free of charge on the Library's website.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2015 – 8/31/2018

Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
Daniel Schwartz (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228209-15
Syriaca.org: Advanced Reference Resources for Middle Eastern History

The creation of advanced reference works and user tools for the online reference resource Syriaca.org, for the study of Syriac, a language widely spoken throughout the Near East for more than a millennium.

Syriac is a dialect of Aramaic once spoken by populations across the Middle East and Asia. Syriaca.org is an online reference hub for the study of Syriac history, literature, and cultures. Syriac sources document key moments in the interaction of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and also offer unique perspectives on the history of the Middle East from the Roman period through Ottoman rule and into the tumultuous present in Iraq, Syria, and the Levant. With past NEH support, Syriaca.org has prepared a collection of reference works (including authority records covering 1000 Syriac authors, 2500 Syriac places, and 1800 works of literature). Using the authority records as a foundation, Syriaca.org can now create advanced reference resources and user modules drawing upon these materials. Further support from the NEH will allow Syriaca.org to leverage its existing digital infrastructure in the creation of a new generation of digital reference works for the study of the Middle East and Asia.

Project fields: History of Religion; Medieval History; Near and Middle Eastern History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 7/31/2017

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Janet Gertz (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228212-15
Language and Culture Archive of Ashkenazic Jewry: Digitizing the Data

The digitization of field notes and supplemental surveys gathered during research for the Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry, documenting Yiddish speakers in Europe and the Americas from the 1960s to the 1970s.

Columbia University proposes a 2-year project to digitize data from the Language and Culture Archive of Ashkenazic Jewry, containing 140,000 pages of notes on the linguistic, cultural and social content of 600 interviews conducted in the 1960-70s with native Yiddish speakers. This will benefit users of Yiddish as a source for historical, literary or anthropological research, and linguists studying languages in contact and the evolution and differentiation of language communities. This project will: digitize the interview answer sheets and interview-data computer printouts, and carry out OCR and mark-up to enable searching and data manipulation; make the digitized content freely available on the Internet; ingest the files into the CUL/IS Fedora-based preservation repository; process correspondence and administrative papers, maps, draft manuscripts, and related materials, and create an EAD finding aid and collection-level MARC record.

Project fields: History, Other; Jewish Studies; Languages, Other
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $150,000 (approved); $150,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017

George Washington University (Washington, DC 20052-0001)
Christopher Brick (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228221-15
An Initiative to Digitize and Disseminate Significant Portions of Eleanor Roosevelt's Audiovisual Legacy

Preparation of an electronic edition of the 390 extant sound and moving image recordings made by Eleanor Roosevelt as a public affairs commentator and nationally syndicated broadcast journalist.

An Initiative to Digitize and Disseminate Significant Portions of Eleanor Roosevelt's Audiovisual Legacy

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $103,900 (approved); $103,900 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2016

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Boston, MA 02115-6027)
Kathryn Hammond-Baker (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228226-15
Medicine at Ground Level: State Medical Societies’ Journals and the Development of American Medicine

The digitization of over 2.5 million pages from 117 historical medical journals produced throughout the United States during the 20th century for free online access as part of the Medical Heritage Library.

The Medical Heritage Library (MHL), a digital curation collaborative among some of the world’s leading medical libraries seeks funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to create a substantial digital collection of American state medical society journals. This proposal describes a collaborative project to digitize 117 titles from 48 states, from 1900 to 2000, comprising 2,500,369 pages in 3,579 volumes. When digitized, content will be fully searchable, preserved, and freely available through the Medical Heritage Library (MHL) collection in the Internet Archive (IA).

Project fields: History, Other
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $275,000 (approved); $275,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2017

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Kathleen Lynch (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228231-15
A Digital Anthology of Early Modern English Drama

The first phase of an initiative to provide advanced digital access, through enhanced bibliographic description and text encoding, to ca. 400 plays written by contemporaries of Shakespeare in the 16th and 17th centuries.

A Digital Anthology for Early English Drama will enrich access to a neglected and largely inaccessible collection of the drama of Shakespeare’s contemporaries. This is a body of nearly four hundred surviving plays printed from 1576 to 1642 (when commercial playhouses first operated in London). The enriched texts will join a suite of interoperable, freely available digital texts at the Folger, including those of Shakespeare’s plays. During Phase One of implementation, the Folger will undertake the collective curation of digital texts; create and host a flexible online platform in the Folger's Drupal CMS repository; and guide and model a variety of research and teaching uses.

Project fields: British Literature
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017

Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504)
Danielle Riou (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228234-15
Milosevic Trial Public Archive

Planning for a digital archive of 1,800 hours of streaming and downloadable video, expert reports, and complete transcripts of the trial of former Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic at the United Nations war crimes court in the Hague.

The Human Rights Project at Bard College, in partnership with the nonprofit Internet Archive, is seeking funds to support the planning of an innovative archive that would provide free and fully-searchable streaming and downloadable video of the trial of former Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic at the United Nations' war crimes court in The Hague. Milosevic was the first head of state ever to be tried for genocide, and the footage of his historic trial, which lasted from 2002 to 2006, includes more than 1,800 hours of testimony and procedure and represents a significant record of the decade of war that engulfed the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s. This archive will feature sophisticated search capabilities and will be of significant value to scholars, educators, researchers, specialists, interdisciplinary artists, and documentary makers as well as to the general public. Jurisprudence, history, and linguistics are a few of the humanities disciplines that this project addresses.

Project fields: Law and Jurisprudence
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2015 – 5/31/2016

New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations (New York, NY 10018-2788)
Matthew Knutzen (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228237-15
Mapping the Nation, 1565-1899

Cataloging, conservation, and digitization of approximately 4,000 single sheet maps dating from the 16th to the 19th century that document the whole of the United States at various periods in the nation’s history, as well as regional and state maps, and detailed maps of counties, towns, and localities.

One of the New York Public Library's (NYPL) most important collections is comprised of antiquarian sheet maps of the whole of the United States, as well its parts (e.g. Southern United States), individual states, counties, and localities. The collection numbers 3,093 titles (in 4,030 sheets) spanning three and a half centuries, with six titles from the 16th century, 37 from the 17th, 235 from the 18th, and 2,815 from the 19th. Mapping the Nation 1565-1899 will allow NYPL’s Lionel Pincus & Princess Firyal Map Division to share these materials with a global audience through the creation of metadata, cataloging, basic preservation, and digitization. Upon completion of this project, 3,093 catalog records and 4,030 digital images will be made publicly accessible, offering a global audience unparalleled access both through wide dissemination of catalog and metadata records and openly licensed, freely downloadable digital images, and through other, future transformational processes.

Project fields: Geography
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2018

International Foundation for Art Research, Inc. (New York, NY 10110-0902)
Sharon Flescher (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228243-15
Enhancements to IFAR's Catalogues Raisonnés Database

Planning for enhancements to an existing database for art historical research, and development of a pilot to test usability of the enhancements.  The current database, Catalogues Raisonnés, contains records to about 3,600 published volumes on approximately 2,300 artists, covering all artistic styles from antiquity to the present, and serves scholars and general users.  The proposed enhancements include linking to digital aggregators to view and search on published texts and locate libraries holding the work, and also adding an ontology of artists’ names and relationships that would deepen search capabilities across the database.

Catalogues raisonnés are essential art historical research tools. Recognizing this, IFAR launched a free interactive Catalogue Raisonné Database in December 2008. It is the only online resource devoted to catalogues raisonnés in all media. Now IFAR intends to enhance its usefulness to humanities researchers by taking advantage of online resources not available in 2008. We plan two enhancements: 1) links to bibliographic aggregators, such as WorldCat, Hathi Trust, Google Books, and others, enabling users to: a) view and search the text of a catalogue raisonné, where copyright permits, and b) locate the closest library housing the book, and 2) creating the first-ever, interactive artist ontology, which will add context and clarify complex connections between artists in our Database--and in so doing--transform the Database into a nexus of information on catalogues raisonnés. This request supports the planning phase of the project and will result in a "mini-prototype" and user survey.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2016

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Jenni Salamon (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228244-15
Little Stories of the Great War: Ohioans in World War I

The development of a plan to construct a statewide digital collection of materials related to Ohio’s contribution to the Great War, which would include diaries, journals, photographs, correspondence, historical artifacts, and posters related to both the soldiers’ and home front experience.
 

The Ohio History Connection (OHC), formerly the Ohio Historical Society, seeks support in the amount of $24,053 for a Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Foundation grant entitled Little Stories of the Great War: Ohioans in World War I. The goal of the project is to develop a comprehensive plan to construct a statewide digital collection of World War I (WWI) materials in order to increase access to and use of WWI scholarly and primary resource materials. The final digital collection will also commemorate the upcoming centennial and Ohio’s role in the conflict.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $24,053 (approved); $24,053 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2016

Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-1406)
Chon Noriega (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228249-15
Providing Access to Mexican American Social History in Los Angeles, 1960s and 1970s

The arrangement and description of 506 linear feet of documents and photographs from seven archival collections pertaining to the Mexican American experience in Los Angeles in the 1960s-70s, along with digitization of 15,000 photographs.

A project to provide public access to seven collections which document Mexican American social history in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s.

Project fields: Hispanic American Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $200,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2018

Regents of The University of California (Irvine, CA 92697-7600)
John Renaud (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228261-15
Piloting Linked Open Data for Artists' Books

A pilot project to create linked open data for a collection of around 500 artists’ books, including works by and about women and contemporary American politics and works produced in Latin American countries.

The University of California, Irvine Libraries seeks planning support for an incubator project to connect scholars to artists’ books through the use of linked open data (LOD). The pilot project will incorporate expertise from special collections, visual arts, metadata, and information technology into development of a scalable resource for facilitating discovery of artists’ books and increase scholarly attention on these highly visual, sculptural, and interactive works of art.

Project fields: Arts, Other
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $36,531 (approved); $36,531 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2016

Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. (Boston, MA 02115-4557)
Bridget Carr (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228265-15
Boston Symphony Orchestra Archives Content Digitization Project: Boston Pops and Tanglewood Music Center History

The indexing and digitization of the program books of the Boston Pops dating from 1885 to the present and Tanglewood Music Center dating from 1940 to the present.

The Boston Symphony Orchestra proposes to digitize and make freely accessible via the internet the full performance history and concert programs of the Boston Pops and Tanglewood Music Center, the BSO's academy for advanced musical study. This is a continuation of a project that the BSO began two years ago with support from the NEH. The BSO recently digitized the entire history of the BSO's primary orchestra concerts, comprising 7,500 program books representing 17,000 BSO concerts. As part of this project, the BSO created HENRY, now available at archives.bso.org. The BSO will use a grant from the NEH to digitize the concert programs for all Boston Pops concerts, 1885 to present and all Tanglewood Music Center programs, 1940 to present. The performance details for the Pops (8,320 concerts) and TMC (2,800 concerts) will also be added to the HENRY search engine.

Project fields: American Studies; Music History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $94,200 (approved); $93,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2015 – 3/31/2017

PEN American Center, Inc. (New York, NY 10012-5258)
Antonio Aiello (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228269-15
Digital Archive of Free Expression

Digitization of 1,200 hours of audio and video recordings gathered from 800 events sponsored by the PEN American Center, documenting the organization’s mission to advance freedom of expression worldwide.

The Digital Archive project is intended to digitize, preserve and make available free of charge online to scholars, researchers, and the public at large more than 1200 hours of audio and video recordings from 800 events currently unavailable to the public. This would result in a collection of valuable original-source reference materials that can be used for research, teaching, and learning across a broad spectrum of humanities disciplines. The vast majority of the materials that we propose to digitize are unique to PEN American Center, having been conceptualized, produced, and curated by PEN American Center and are therefore not to be found in other archives or collections. PEN intends to engage with an audiovisual preservation and digitization specialist in order to process, catalogue, and digitize the materials. The digitalized materials will be made available in Princeton University's online reference systems and on PEN's website.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2017

Philadelphia Museum of Art (Philadelphia, PA 19101-7646)
Alexandra Kirtley (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228276-15
Early American Furniture Cataloging Project

A project to complete basic and in-depth descriptive catalog records of a collection of 1,034 pieces of pre-1840 American furniture manufactured primarily in Philadelphia.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) respectfully requests a $175,000 Humanities Collections and Reference Resources grant to support a three-year curatorial research project on our renowned collection of early (pre-1840) American furniture. The PMA’s holdings of early American furniture rank among the finest in this country, particularly with regard to the central role that Philadelphia played in the development of American furniture and decorative arts during the 18th and 19th centuries. Yet the current level of information we have assembled on the majority of the works in the collection is both insufficient and, in terms of cataloguing standards, uneven. Grant support will enable both a broader scholarly understanding of, as well as provide greater public access to, this important subject of American art and history.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism; Arts, General; U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $162,500 (approved); $150,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2018

Chugachmiut (Anchorage, AK 99508-3463)
Phyllis Wimberley (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-228281-15
Becoming Aware of Our Beginnings: A Digital Archive of Chugach Cultural Heritage

The creation of an online digital archive of approximately 700 ethnographic objects, art works, and photographs, representing the cultural heritage of the Chugach people of southern Alaska.

TThrough this NEH project, we will gather, upload, display, and disseminate historical information about all Chugach ethnographic collections worldwide on a dedicated website that will be accessible to researchers at varying levels, depending on the user’s purpose and relationship to Chugachmiut intellectual copyright.

Project fields: Cultural Anthropology; Cultural History; Native American Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $250,000 (approved); $250,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 10/31/2016

Chapman University (Orange, CA 92866-1005)
Doug Dechow (Project Director, 07/18/2014 - present)
PW-228297-15
Chapman University Center for American War Letters Foundations Grant Proposal

A pilot project to digitize a group of 2,000 letters written by American military servicemen and women as a prelude to digitizing the complete collection of 90,000 war letters. The project would also entail preliminary arrangement and description of the collection.

Chapman University acquired author/historian Andrew Carroll’s unique collection of more than 90,000 war letters. Beginning with the American Revolutionary War and continuing through present-day conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, these letters are a vital record of the collective memory of the American people, as witnessed by servicemen/women, and their loved ones. Through the Center for American War Letters (CAWL) this project will enable Chapman to develop a digital archiving plan to provide educators, veterans, historians and scholars access to these primary source materials as to provide a deeper insight into the national experience portrayed in the letters.

Project fields: Military History; Public History; U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,850 (approved); $39,850 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 4/30/2016

George Eastman House (Rochester, NY 14607-2219)
James Layton (Project Director, 07/18/2014 - 04/27/2015); Jared Case (Project Director, 04/27/2015 - present)
PW-228298-15
Technicolor Online Research Archive

The creation of a digital resource that would provide access to an archival collection of 35,000 records from the corporate history of Technicolor, with an emphasis on the period from 1915 to 1955, documenting business decisions and scientific research that led to unique processes to record and project moving images in color.

George Eastman House will create a Technicolor Online Research Archive that will allow access to its vast and significant Technicolor collection. This free, web-based resource will be available to researchers, academics and historians to study, understand and appreciate the tremendous influence that Technicolor had on film making and popular culture during the 20th century. In collaboration with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Science’s Margaret Herrick Library and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, we will make important documentation, photographs, and equipment accessible for the first time in a comprehensive, annotated digital format. The project goal is is to digitize and make available online 35,000 core artifacts from the Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation history from 1915 to 1955. Project activities will commence in May 2015 and will be completed by November 30, 2017.

Project fields: Film History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $161,192 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2015 – 7/31/2017

University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Patricia Fumerton (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51517-14
EBBA: Early Broadside Ballads at Houghton Library, Harvard University

The digitization and incorporation into an electronic archive of images of more than 1,100 works of English broadside ballads from the 17th century, as well as illustrative woodcuts, facsimile transcriptions, contextual essays, and audio files of sung versions of the ballads.

The University of California-Santa Barbara requests critical funding to launch an important 5th stage of its digital English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA) and include Harvard University's Houghton Library broadside ballads--1,137 works. Houghton has granted UCSB unprecedented permission to add its ballad holdings to EBBA. The expanded archive will provide high-quality digital facsimiles as well as "facsimile transcriptions," which preserve the ballads' original "look," with all their ornament, while transcribing the original font into easily readable roman type. In addition, we will offer deep cataloging according to TEI/XML/MARC standards, song recordings, informative essays, flexible search functions, and an improved technological infrastructure to both automate and enhance human cataloging of ballad "groupings" that are visually and textually similar. An expanded EBBA will open up new ways of understanding early modern popular culture, literature, art, music, and collectors.

[Grant products]
Project fields: British Literature
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 5/31/2016

National Film Preservation Foundation (San Francisco, CA 94102)
Annette Melville (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - 11/16/2014); Jeff Lambert (Project Director, 11/17/2014 - present)
PW-51519-14
Recovering "Lost" American Nonfiction Films

The repatriation and restoration of 26 U.S. nonfiction films from the 1910s and 1920s, currently located at EYE Film Institute Netherlands.

The NFPF requests $300,000 to preserve and present 26 American nonfiction films of the 1910s and 1920s, the period from which the fewest films survive. A time capsule of industry, agriculture, explorations, natural wonders, and current events, the works were found at EYE Film Institute Netherlands, evaluated onsite, and selected for their research value by a team of American scholars and archivists. Three-quarters no longer exist in the U.S.; the remainder are represented by poorer copies. With NEH support, the nitrate prints will be preserved to 35mm film with reconstructed English-language intertitles, in collaboration with EYE, AMPAS, GEH, LOC, and the Oregon Historical Society, and digital copies will be made available on the web, with new essays and music. Building on our successful repatriation efforts with Australia and New Zealand, this NFPF-led collaboration will recover "lost" resources for the humanities and pave the way for further film preservation partnerships in Europe.

Project fields: American Studies; Film History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $260,000 (approved); $260,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2017

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-0001)
Hannah Gill (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51527-14
NEW ROOTS: Improving Global Access of Latino Oral Histories

Enhancement of public access to a collection of 175 oral histories documenting the migration and settlement of Latinos in the southern United States, particularly North Carolina, from the 1980s to the present.

We seek funding to enhance public access to The New Roots Latino Oral Histories, a collection of oral histories based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill that documents the recent migration and settlement of Latinos in the southern United States. The project will enable better management and enhanced access to the oral histories, particularly within Spanish-speaking communities throughout the Americas. We will create a bilingual digital archive and a visually engaging website to connect public audiences to audio recordings, oral history transcripts, and a catalogue in English and Spanish. We will create an online publishing platform that will draw content from a larger repository at UNC Libraries using open source Omeka software. Funding will also support processing and translation of the collection's oral histories into Spanish and English and the creation of materials that will enable public audiences to better use and understand the collection.

Project fields: Immigration History; Latino History; Public History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $240,000 (approved); $240,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2017

University of Toronto (Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A5 Canada)
Antonette Healey (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - 06/30/2014); Roy Liuzza (Project Director, 07/01/2014 - 03/10/2015); Robert Getz (Project Director, 03/10/2015 - present); Stephen Pelle (Co Project Director, 03/10/2015 - present)
PW-51530-14
Dictionary of Old English [DOE]

The preparation of entries for the "Dictionary of Old English," a historical dictionary based on the entire extant corpus of Old English texts written between 650 and 1150 C.E.

The aim of the Dictionary of Old English (DOE) is to define the vocabulary of records written in English between 600 and 1150 C.E., using the technology of the twenty-first century. Because of its Electronic Corpus, comprising at least one copy of every Old English text, the DOE is based on a comprehensive examination of the surviving evidence. The DOE complements the other major historical dictionaries of English: the Middle English Dictionary (1100-1500 C.E.), and the Oxford English Dictionary (which catalogues English up to the present). DOE: A to G online (2007), the first Web version of the first eight letters (out of 22), created links to the online OED; in 2010 OED created reciprocal links to DOE. The 2013 internal version of DOE online displays links to MED and now for the first time to thumbnail manuscript images represented by Parker on the Web, providing users with the visual evidence for DOE's interpretation of some textual difficulties.

Project fields: English
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $200,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2016

Rutgers University, Camden (Camden, NJ 08102)
Charlene Mires (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51539-14
The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia

Development of about 450 entries for the "Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia," an online reference resource that focuses on the history and culture of the region, which encompasses the City of Philadelphia and portions of the states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware.

The Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at Rutgers University-Camden seeks funding for The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, a civic project to build knowledge and understanding about the region encompassing the City of Philadelphia and portions of the states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. This multi-phase project is a collaborative, digital-first initiative to create, aggregate, and share information about a region and its history. With essential planning and demonstration projects completed and initial digital publishing underway, the project seeks support for a new phase of content development and temporary expansion of editorial staff for two years of accelerated digital publishing, resulting in a minimum of 450 new published essays within the grant period. The priority for content development will be to broaden and deepen the project's metropolitan scope with essays that define and illuminate "Greater Philadelphia" as a region.

Project fields: U.S. History; Urban History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2016

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Afsaneh Najmabadi (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51546-14
Women's Worlds in Qajar Iran

The expansion of digital archives and a Web site that make available primary sources related to the social and cultural history of women during the Qajar dynasty (1785-1925) in Iran. This project would expand the resource's coverage of socio-economic classes, ethnicities, and geographic locales.

The WWQI project is a comprehensive digital archive and website that addresses a significant gap in the scholarship related to the Qajar dynasty in Iran by making available writings and other personal documents created by, and reflecting the lives of, women during the Qajar era. To date, the WWQI archive contains 33,000-plus digital facsimiles of primary source materials held by 43 private families and individuals and 10 major archival institutions. New funding will enable the WWQI project to not only increase the volume of its collections, but also to substantially expand the range of socio-economic classes, ethnicities, and geographic locations represented within the WWQI archive. The WWQI project draws upon the Harvard Libraries' robust and stable structure for cataloging, archiving, and maintenance-through-time of digital research collections, thus ensuring long-term access to all materials digitized under the auspices of NEH funding.

Project fields: Near and Middle Eastern History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2014 – 3/31/2016

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6243)
Nancy Shawcross (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - 05/28/2014); David McKnight (Project Director, 05/29/2014 - present)
PW-51547-14
Providing Global Access to Penn's Indic Manuscripts, circa 1527-1930

The cataloging and digitization of 2,850 South and Southeast Asian manuscripts dating from the 16th to the 20th centuries from the University of Pennsylvania's Rare Books and Manuscripts Library to enable free online access.

With the largest collection of Indic manuscripts in North America, the University of Pennsylvania Libraries propose to catalog and create digital facsimiles for all of its holdings. The images will be available to view, download, and harvest--free of charge, under a Creative Commons license--via the website, Penn in Hand: Selected Manuscripts. The project will provide more accurate metadata--which can be openly harvested and downloaded as XML files--than is contained in H. I. Poleman's 1938 publication, A Census of Indic Manuscripts in the United States and Canada, and will offer more access points--such as genres, uniform titles, subjects, and scribes--for researchers looking for relevant material. In addition, the names of authors and titles will be entered in their original scripts, making this Philadelphia-based collection a truly international resource. The outcome will afford global accessibility for Penn's unique materials, enhancing teaching and research worldwide.

Project fields: Asian Languages; South Asian History; South Asian Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $230,000 (approved); $230,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2017

University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-3585)
Siobhan Senier (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51549-14
Writing of Indigenous New England: Building Partnerships for the Preservation of Regional Native American Literature

Collaborative planning for creating access, through an online portal, to regional Native American writings held by small tribal archives across New England. Three pilot projects to test workflow for digitizing these materials would be undertaken and protocols and agreements for future collaborative work would be drafted.

The project will convene a group of regional Native American knowledge keepers, humanities scholars, and digitization and intellectual property experts for project and planning activities associated with the online portal, "Writing of Indigenous New England." At present our growing collaboration includes scholars, librarians, web developers and tribal historians from New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. We seek NEH funding to accomplish three initial goals: (1) convene a 2-day editorial board meeting and planning session, from which we will (2) write up our editorial guidelines and priorities, agree on culturally-sensitive intellectual property protocols, and establish technical specifications for the website; and (3) run three pilot projects at the Tomaquag Museum (RI), Indigenous Resource Collaborative (MA), and Passmaquoddy Heritage Center (ME), to help us establish workflow, clarify budget and staffing expectations, and begin drafting some larger funding proposals.

Project fields: Native American Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,655 (approved); $39,655 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1302)
Bethany Davis (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51553-14
Preserving, Digitizing, and Providing Access to the Keith/Albee Vaudeville Theater Collection

The conservation treatment, digitization, and preparation for crowdsourced transcription of 150 oversize scrapbooks documenting the Benjamin Keith and Edward Albee vaudeville theater circuit.

With this three-year project, the University of Iowa Libraries proposes to (1) provide conservation treatment for the 150 oversize scrapbooks in the Keith/Albee Vaudeville Theater Collection held by the UI Libraries Special Collections department, (2) create digital facsimiles of these scrapbooks for inclusion in the Iowa Digital Library, and (3) consequently, preserve and expand access to a highly used humanities research collection that is rapidly deteriorating as a result of brittle book syndrome and frequent handling.

Project fields: Film History and Criticism; Theater History and Criticism; U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2017

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305)
Michael Keller (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51566-14
Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue: Discovering the Art of Helen and Newton Harrison

Processing papers and digital files, reformatting audio and video recordings, creating finding aids for, and providing digital access to a collection documenting the work of eco-art movement artists Helen and Newton Harrison, encompassing 230 linear feet of mixed materials and 1.5 million digital files.

Researchers and practitioners alike have found it necessary to take account of the dissolution of disciplinary boundaries in their work as they articulate the complex problems of the 20th and 21st centuries. The Harrisons have played leading roles in both inciting this methodological change and demonstrating where this kind of work can lead. The collection contains a wide variety of formats of materials and is coupled with their ground breaking integration of both analog and born-digital materials. A processing and preservation project is therefore an efficient option informed by key intellectual intersections. The grant project will take 1.5 years to complete. At the end of the project, we will have processed 230 linear feet of mixed materials, reformatted all the audio and video elements, captured and processed born-digital material (0.5 terabytes or 1.5 million files).

Project fields: Arts, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $250,000 (approved); $250,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Peter Der Manuelian (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51569-14
The Giza Project: Consolidated Archaeological Reference Database

The creation of an integrated database of archaeological data from excavations at the Egyptian site of Giza, distributed across ten institutions in the United States, Europe, and Egypt, representing some 170,000 digital files.

The Giza Project is an international initiative dedicated to the collection, electronic preservation, scholarship, and popular presentation of the world's most famous archaeological site: the Giza Pyramids. We are currently poised to present Giza's rich cultural legacy to the global community by undertaking the creation of the GizaCARD, a core database with the innovative goal of being the central repository and research hub for all Giza data from all collections worldwide and spanning all periods. GizaCARD will represent an unprecedented global collaborative effort and will in future feed a new public website that embeds traditional archaeological documentation into an immersive 3D computer model of the entire site of Giza. The Giza Project provides a model of archaeological and archival information management and demonstrates how digital archaeology may become a new public forum for inquiry and discovery for all.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, Other
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6243)
Carol Ransom (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51580-14
The New Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts: A Research Tool for Tracking the Current and Historic Locations of Manuscripts

Development of an online collaborative catalog for researching the historic and current locations of manuscript books produced before 1600.

The New Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts: A Research Tool for Tracking the Current & Historic Locations of Manuscripts is a three-year project to redevelop the current Schoenberg Database into an online, collaborative tool for researching the historic & current locations of the world's manuscripts produced before the age of print. This project will result in a simple, innovative solution to a historic problem & a global task. Starting with existing data from the current version, the new Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts will be an online, user-driven, collaborative tool for creating a "meta-catalogue" for indexing & finding the world's manuscripts. The New Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts will employ numerous strategies to build, maintain & encourage a vibrant & proactive user-community & will seek partnerships with other similar, online resources to strengthen the content of the database as well as our partners' content by allowing cross-searching capabilities across platforms.

Project fields: Medieval Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2017

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-1168)
Helen Veit (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51583-14
What America Ate: U.S. Foodways of the Great Depression

The digitization of primary sources about the history of food in the United States from 1930 to 1942, including surviving materials created by the Works Progress Administration, 200 community cookbooks, and a selection of commercial food advertising and packaging. These written materials, photographs, and recipes will be made openly accessible through "What America Ate," a digital archive on American eating and foodways during the Great Depression.

Michigan State University (MSU), in cooperation with two other university libraries and three state archives, will create a digital archive on the history of American eating during the Great Depression. The What America Ate archive will feature a range of digitized culinary sources from 1930 to early 1942, including papers from the original Works Progress Administration America Eats project, housed at the U.S. Library of Congress, Montana State University Library, and the state archives of New York, North Dakota, and Kentucky, and 200 community cookbooks produced around the country during the Depression, held in the MSU Library's Special Collections and the University of Michigan Library's Janice Bluestein Longone's Culinary Archive. The digital archive will also include over 700 rare advertisements, food packaging materials, and commercial cookbooks produced by food companies in the 1930s from MSU's Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Culinary Ephemera Collection.

Project fields: Cultural History; U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $299,994 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2017

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
James Nye (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51584-14
Digital Dictionaries of South Asia: Scholarly Resources for the Advanced Study of the Subcontinent

The completion of monolingual dictionaries for inclusion in the Digital Dictionaries of South Asia project for the following eight languages: Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Panjabi, Prakrit, Sindhi, Sinhala, and Telugu. In addition, access tools for these resources would be developed, including improved search and display capacities for the online interface, new analytical tools, complete content delivery and access for mobile devices, and the addition of audio pronunciation examples for two of the languages.

The University of Chicago proposes a two-year project to convert and disseminate monolingual and etymological dictionaries as electronic resources. This will extend the coverage of the Digital Dictionaries of South Asia (DDSA) and support humanities research and advanced language learning in Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Panjabi, Prakrit, Sindhi, Sinhala, and Telugu. Additionally, the dictionaries currently available from DDSA will be enhanced through improved facilities for searching and displaying data, content delivery to mobile devices, and other improvements. This project addresses the significant lack of authoritative on-line lexical resources for several major South Asian languages. The scholarly importance of these dictionaries ensures their wide usage by both academicians and the general public.

Project fields: Asian Languages
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

California State University, Dominguez Hills Foundation (Carson, CA 90747)
Gregory Williams (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51585-14
[View white paper]
California State University Japanese American Digitization Planning Grant

Planning and implementation of a pilot project to digitize archival sources at six California State University (CSU) system schools dealing with Japanese American internment during World War II.

A consortium of California State University archives requests support for a Foundations project to plan for the digitization of documents concerning the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. The goal of the proposal is to identify Japanese American collections and unite those collections digitally through a website.

Project fields: Asian American Studies; Immigration History; U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,956 (approved); $39,956 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

Academy Foundation (Los Angeles, CA 90211-1907)
Teague Schneiter (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51595-14
[View white paper]
Academy Motion Picture Oral History Digital Archive - Planning Project

A strategic planning effort for and initial development of the Academy Motion Picture Oral History Digital Archive, a repository that would include more than one thousand oral history interviews with screen and radio actors, directors, writers, composers, cinematographers, editors, and other production staff, which have been collected from 1947 to the present.

To support the development of a comprehensive strategic plan to create the Academy Motion Picture Oral History Digital Archive, the first industry-wide collection of motion picture-related oral and visual histories. With interviews recorded in 1947 through the present, the Archive will bring together the oral and visual history collections of a founding consortium of the Academy, Art Directors Guild, Film Music Foundation, International Cinematographers Guild, Motion Picture Editors Guild, Screen Actors Guild Foundation, Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA), and Writers Guild Foundation.

Project fields: Film History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Rio Piedras, PR 00931-3300)
Flavia Marichal-Lugo (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51606-14
Digitizing the Puerto Rican Poster Collection of the Museum of History, Anthropology and Art at the University of Puerto Rico

Cataloging and digitization of 4,000 art posters dating from the 20th and 21st centuries that illuminate many aspects of Puerto Rico's social, political, and cultural life.

The proposed Digitizing the Puerto Rican Poster Collection of the Museum of History, Anthropology and Art at the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras Campus is a three-year project that will digitize 4,000 posters of the 20th and 21st centuries. Digitizing this collection will preserve the collection and enable the transfer of information about them from a manual record into a computerized collections management system, and will make the museum's unique holdings accessible globally.

Project fields: Arts, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $220,000 (approved); $220,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2014 – 4/30/2017

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Henry Fulmer (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present); Colin Wilder (Co Project Director, 07/07/2014 - present)
PW-51607-14
Plants and Planter: Henry William Ravenel and the Convergence of Science and Agriculture in the Nineteenth-Century South

The digitization and reunification of over 6,200 plant specimens and nearly 5,000 pages of documents collected or created by South Carolinian naturalist Henry William Ravenel (1814-1887). The resulting digital collection will allow full-text searching and browsing by subject heading for archival materials and provide a map to browse the locations where botanical specimens were collected.

Plants and Planter explores the life, business pursuits, and natural history interests of South Carolina planter, botanist, and agricultural writer Henry William Ravenel (1814-1887). Digitizing and reuniting over 6,200 botanical specimens collected by Ravenel with his voluminous and multifaceted journals and other primary source materials totaling almost 5,000 pages. Plants and Planter will digitize fragile archival and specimen materials; OCR text of archival materials to allow for full-text searching and geographic information visualization; establish a Web site accessible by the general public as well as researchers and students and powered by the Drupal 7 content management system which will unite the digitized materials and interpretive texts in an easy-to-use interface allowing for keyword and full-text searching, thematic browsing, and mapping of specimen locations. The Web site will allow for the research and teaching of 19th-century natural science and regional history.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $84,870 (approved); $84,870 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA 02139-4307)
Christine Walley (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51624-14
[View white paper]
Preparing to Preserve, Digitize, and Catalog the Southeast Chicago Historical Museum Collection

Producing detailed plans for cataloging and digitization of the Southeast Chicago Historical Museum's collection on the history of Chicago.

The proposed project will complete detailed plans for preserving, digitizing, and cataloguing a portion of the incredible wealth of multi-media materials collected by the Southeast Chicago Historical Museum. This will be the first step in making the collection accessible to scholars as well as the general public via a searchable, interactive website. The Southeast Chicago Historical Museum emerged in the early 1980s as the regional steel industry was collapsing and became a central repository for area residents to collect and preserve artifacts relating to the industrial as well as social, cultural, and environmental history of this once vibrant region. The proposed work includes: 1) assessing the condition of the collection; 2)developing criteria for prioritizing content for preservation and digitization; 3)creating a metadata scheme that supports exploration and analysis;4)developing technical standards for preserving assets; and 5)structuring a preservation & digitization work plan.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,610 (approved); $39,610 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
Charles Faulhaber (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51633-14
PhiloBiblon: Primary Sources for the Study of the Literature and Culture of Medieval and Early Modern Iberia

Updating PhiloBiblon, a bio-bibliographical database of texts written in the vernacular Romance languages of medieval and early modern Iberia-Portuguese, Castilian, Catalan, and Galician. The project would enhance the project's software and would incorporate 7,000 15th-century Spanish lyrics.

The goal of this eighteen-month project is to take steps to provide for the sustainability of PhiloBiblon, which serves as a vehicle for four major bio-bibliographical databases on the Romance vernacular cultures (Castilian, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan) of medieval and early modern Iberia (containing a total of almost 315,000 records). Succession planning is under way for staff and host institutions, but we must also ensure that both the database application software and the web-hosting software will remain viable vehicles for the dissemination of materials critical for the study of medieval and early modern Iberia, and, more importantly, that the data themselves remain available for the foreseeable future.

Project fields: Medieval History; Medieval Studies; Spanish Literature
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $55,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 11/30/2015

University of Southern Maine (Portland, ME 04103-4864)
Yolanda Theunnissen (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - 12/14/2014); Ian Fowler (Project Director, 12/15/2014 - present)
PW-51635-14
Thinking Globally: Conservation of an Historic Globe Collection and Creation of an Online Resource on Geographic Education

Conservation and digitization, through 3D imaging, of 21 historic globes, dating from the 17th to the 19th century, that document the history of cartography and exploration; and the creation of an online resource with digital access to 30 globe manuals and 300 instructional texts from the same period.

We propose to create an open, online resource that will present historic globes (1603-1900) in innovative, interactive 3D animations together with a corpus of 330 works (1668-1900) about the use of globes in education. This resource will support the further cultural and material analysis of historic globes as well as their incorporation in to K-12 education in history, geography, and spatial and visual literacy. A precondition of the project is to stabilize and restore to legibility 21 rare and irreplaceable globes (1603-1856) that form the essential core of our unique collection; we request NEH support specifically for this necessary conservation work.

Project fields: Cultural History; Geography; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $260,000 (approved); $260,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2016

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-1168)
Candace Keller-Claytor (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51639-14
MSU Archive of Malian Photography

The cataloging and digitization of 100,000 prints and negatives from the archives of five Malian professional photographers who have been active from the 1940s to the present. These works document traditional cultural and religious practices, the history of dress, gender, and status, and colonialism and modernization in southern Mali.

The MSU Archive of Malian Photography will digitize, catalog, preserve, and render freely accessible to a worldwide audience 100,000 rare images from the original archives of five professional photographers in Mali. Created by prominent African practitioners whose work was commissioned by private patrons as well as State governments, these images document traditional cultural and religious practices, rural festivals, early colonial developments, and processes of modernization in Ségu, Mopti, and Bamako, as the latter transitioned from a small agrarian trading village into an urban center and national capital. Recording local practices from African perspectives, these visual materials contain important twentieth century representations of local aesthetics, methods of identity construction and preservation, and documentary strategies.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $299,989 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

Bryn Mawr College (Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899)
Jennifer Redmond (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - 03/31/2014); Eric Pumroy (Project Director, 04/01/2014 - present)
PW-51645-14
History of Women's Education Open Access Portal Project

A Foundations-level project to plan and conduct pilot work for an online portal to archival sources pertaining to the history of women's higher education in the United States.

Bryn Mawr College, in collaboration with Barnard College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, Vassar College, Wellesley College, and the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, seeks support for a Foundations project to develop a shared approach to cataloging and providing access to the letters, diaries, and scrapbooks from the first generations of women to attend college. The seven colleges, once known as the Seven Sisters and regarded as the equivalent of the Ivy League before those institutions admitted women, contain extensive holdings of student personal writings dating back to the late-nineteenth century, an unparalleled and only partially tapped resource for the study of a wide range of women's history issues over the last century and a half. The seven institutions propose to make their collections more widely accessible through the development of a common search portal and shared standards for metadata and thematic vocabulary.

Project fields: American Studies; Women's History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,650 (approved); $39,650 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 5/31/2015

Jewish Theological Seminary of America (New York, NY 10027-4649)
Naomi Steinberger (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51659-14
Conservation and Digitization of the Cairo Genizah

The conservation and digitization of 6,000 manuscript fragments from the Library's Cairo Genizah collection.

The Library of The Jewish Theological Seminary proposes to conserve, catalog, and re-house material from its Cairo Genizah collection and, in partnership with The Friedberg Genizah Project, digitize and provide online access to this material for scholars and the public. The Cairo Genizah is a valuable source of information about Jewish and non-Jewish religious, economic, social, and personal life in North Africa and the eastern Mediterranean from the 9th to the 19th century. The Library's Genizah collection is comprised of 43,000 fragments--the second-largest in the world. This project will make approximately 6,000 of these fragments that are currently unreadable or too fragile to be handled and digitized widely available for research for the first time, and complete The Library's part in an ongoing international collaboration.

Project fields: Jewish Studies; Medieval History; Near and Middle Eastern History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $231,880 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

Getty Research Institute (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688)
Andra Darlington (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51670-14
Creating Access to the Knoedler Gallery Archive

The arrangement and description, and partial digitization, of an art gallery archive containing 1,400 linear feet of records documenting the acquisition and sale of European and American art in the United States between 1848 and 1971.

This application seeks support to accelerate processing and partial digitization of the recently acquired M. Knoedler & Co. Archive (1848-1971). The Knoedler Archive is one of the most important collections on the formation and history of the American art market, and development of private collections that later formed the central collections of the first American art museums, including the National Gallery of Art, the Frick Collection, the Huntington Library, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The proposed project will arrange, preserve, and describe the files of the twelve series, and digitize client correspondence, index cards, and 42 volumes of stock and sales books. Once processed, the Knoedler Archive will be freely accessible to scholars, researchers, curators, artists, and the interested public for new research, education, and programming. This 30-month project is scheduled to begin July 1, 2014 and end December 31, 2016.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 10/31/2016

University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
J. Ritchie Garrison (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51671-14
The Sampler Archive Project: Phase 2

The second phase of development of the Sampler Archive, an online digital repository and searchable database of images and descriptive information about American girlhood samplers and pictorial embroideries from the 17th through the 19th centuries.

The purpose of the Sampler Archive Project is to create an online digital repository and searchable database that brings together digital images and detailed descriptive information on American girlhood samplers and pictorial embroideries from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. The Sampler Archive Project: Phase 2 will build on the work already completed in Phase 1 by: (a) increasing the number of museum objects in the online database from 300 to 2300; (b) increasing the types of contributors the project can work with by developing protocols for non-institutional partners; and (c) enhancing the Sampler Archive's website to increase functionality for scholars and other audiences.

Project fields: American Studies; Arts, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA 95211-0110)
Caroline Schroeder (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present); Amir Zeldes (Co Project Director, 06/01/2015 - present)
PW-51672-14
Coptic SCRIPTORIUM: Digitizing a Corpus for Interdisciplinary Research in Ancient Egyptian

Planning for the creation of a digitized corpus of Coptic texts of importance to scholarship in biblical studies, early Christian history, and linguistics. The project would develop a pilot text corpus and establish technical standards to ensure interoperability of the corpus with other digital projects on the ancient world.

Coptic, having evolved from the language of the hieroglyphs of the pharaonic era, represents the last phase of the Egyptian language and is pivotal for a wide range of disciplines, such as linguistics, biblical studies, the history of Christianity, Egyptology, and ancient history. The Coptic language has proven essential for the decipherment and continued study of Ancient Egyptian and is of major interest for Afro-Asiatic linguistics and Coptic linguistics in its own right. Coptic manuscripts are sources for biblical and extra-biblical texts and document ancient and Christian history. Coptic SCRIPTORIUM will advance knowledge in these fields by increasing access to now largely inaccessible texts of historical, religious, and linguistic significance. The project designs digital tools and methodologies and applies them to literary texts, creating a rich open-access corpus.

Project fields: Classical Languages; Computational Linguistics; History of Religion
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 8/31/2016

New-York Historical Society (New York, NY 10024-5152)
Henry Raine (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51674-14
Access to the New-York Historical Society's American Historical Manuscripts Collection

The cataloging and conservation of 6,000 manuscript collections documenting the history of New York City and the United States more generally, spanning the 17th to 20th centuries.

The New-York Historical Society respectfully requests funds to support the first two years of a four-year project to catalog and conserve the American Historical Manuscript Collection. This collection consists of 12,000 distinct, small collections, averaging about 40 pages each, and dating from the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. The contents, a range of physical formats including account books, baptism records, bills, certificates, date books, deeds, diaries, indentures invoices, leases, letters, receipts, tax records and wills, comprise a powerful amalgam of multiple creators, subject areas, time periods, and geographic locations that offer unprecedented views into the history of New York and the United States. Funds will support the hire of two cataloguers and two cataloging assistants over a two-year period.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum (Chicago, IL 60605-2403)
Jodi Lacy (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51687-14
Celestial Cartography Digitization Project

The digitization of 5,300 celestial maps and star charts, works on paper, scientific instruments, and prints from the 15th to 20th centuries, documenting humanity's visual depictions of the cosmos.

The Adler Planetarium seeks NEH support to digitize and make accessible all celestial cartography in the Adler collections. Dating from the fifteenth to the twentieth century, the Adler's celestial cartography focuses on European astronomy, but also includes significant examples from China and the Islamic world. The intellectual content of the Adler's celestial cartography reaches well beyond the history of astronomy. Researchers use the collection to study subjects related to the history of religion, navigation, technology, art, and printing. From antiquity to the present day, maps of the heavens are tools for understanding human life on Earth. As a result of the celestial cartography digitization project, fragile collections materials will be preserved and available for use in Adler programming. Digitizing celestial cartography and making it freely accessible will open new interdisciplinary research possibilities in art, history, and science.

Project fields: Arts, Other; History of Science; Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $109,164 (approved); $109,164 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

University of Southern Mississippi (Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001)
Louis Kyriakoudes (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - 05/21/2015); Jeanne Gillespie (Project Director, 05/21/2015 - present)
PW-51692-14
The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi: Providing Access at the 50th Anniversary

The digitization, indexing, and online publication of 483 oral history interviews documenting the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi.

The Center for Oral History & Cultural Heritage at The University of Southern Mississippi seeks two years of funding in order to preserve and to make widely available to scholars and the public oral histories related to the history of the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi. Recorded on analog media, these media are currently available only to scholars who can access the collection in person and they are in danger of degradation due to age and media. We ask for funding to support the digitization of these oral histories, compilation of detailed recording logs, and cataloging through the University Libraries. Digital media will then be shared, with complete metadata, to scholars and the public by publishing not only in the Southern Mississippi card catalog, but also through the Mississippi Digital Library (http://www.msdiglib.org) and the Civil Rights Digital Archive.

Project fields: African History; U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $260,000 (approved); $260,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

Philadelphia Museum of Art (Philadelphia, PA 19101-7646)
Susan Anderson (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present); Matthew Affron (Co Project Director, 06/09/2014 - present)
PW-51697-14
Building a Duchamp Research Portal at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

A planning grant for the development of an online research portal for digitized archival materials created by or related to the artist Marcel Duchamp.

Home to the largest and most significant collection of Marcel Duchamp artwork in the world, as well as an unparalleled collection of Duchamp-related archival materials, the Philadelphia Museum of Art seeks a one-year planning grant to pursue the first online research portal for digitized archival and reference materials created by or related to the artist. This work will be undertaken in collaboration with the Association Marcel Duchamp and the Musée National d'Art Moderne and Bibliothèque Kandinsky at Paris's Centre Georges Pompidou. Planning activities include consultation with copyright and technical specialists; collections surveys; and a meeting of an Advisory Board, representing Duchamp scholars, arts institutions, and technology and humanities advisors to formalize plans for designing, creating, and maintaining the Research Portal. A comprehensive white paper will document all planning efforts and guide project implementation.

Project fields: Arts, Other; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 3/31/2016

Museum of the City of New York (New York, NY 10029-5287)
Lindsay Turley (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51704-14
Illuminating New York City History: Processing, Cataloging, Digitizing, and Rehousing the Museum's Ephemera Collections

Assessment, processing, cataloging, digitization, and rehousing of the Museum of the City of New York's 7,200-item Ephemera Collections documenting a wide range of topics in the history of New York and the United States.

The Museum of the City of New York seeks a grant of $142,056 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support a two-year project to improve stewardship of and increase public access to a major collection of printed and three-dimensional ephemera through archival assessment and processing, cataloging, digitization, and rehousing. This initiative will extend the useful life of these holdings for research, exhibition, and public programming. Containing over 7,200 objects of material culture, the Museum's Ephemera Collections include advertisements, handbills, pamphlets, menus, invitations, medals, pins, buttons, badges, three-dimensional souvenirs, and printed textiles, such as ribbons and sashes. These objects-the minor and transient documents and souvenirs of everyday life-provide visual and material insight into New Yorkers' engagement with the social, creative, civic, political, and physical dynamics of the city, from the Colonial era to the present day.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $125,000 (approved); $125,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016

Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274-4182)
Chet Van Duzer (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51707-14
Multi-spectral Imaging of the World Map by Henricus Martellus (c. 1491) at the Beinecke Library, Yale University

Multi-spectral imaging and digitization of a 15th-century world map, drawn by Henricus Martellus, a German cartographer who worked in Florence, and documenting knowledge of cartography and the world's geography at the time.

This proposal seeks NEH funding to create and make available to scholars and the interested public world-wide multi-spectral images of one of the most important and influential maps of the fifteenth century, which was made by Henricus Martellus and resides in the Beinecke Library at Yale. This large and unique map probably influenced the geographical ideas of Christopher Columbus, but fading and scuffing of the map have rendered most of the texts on the maps illegible. Multispectral images of the map should render many of those texts legible, and thus make deep scholarly study of the map possible. The images would be made permanently and freely available to the public for use via the internet on the Beinecke Digital Library in both Jpeg2000 and TIFF formats.

Project fields: History of Science; Renaissance History; Renaissance Studies
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $34,268 (approved); $34,268 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

American Numismatic Society (New York, NY 10032)
Andrew Meadows (Project Director, 07/22/2013 - present)
PW-51711-14
Online Coins of the Roman Empire

Cataloging and digitization of approximately 46,000 Roman Imperial coins in the society's collection, and creation of an online reference database describing Roman imperial coin types, with links to specimens in other major coin collections.

Implementation of Online Coins of the Roman Empire (IOCRE) is a project with four fundamental aims. 1. To publish fully online, for the first time, the major reference collection of Roman Imperial coinage of the American Numismatic Society. 2. To use the principles of Linked Open Data to aggregate data on existing specimens of Roman imperial coins from international collections so as to supplement data from the ANS's own collection to create a virtual catalog (OCRE) that for the first time makes the entirety of Roman Imperial coinage easily accessible to all audiences. 3. To ensure that OCRE leverages existing vocabularies, such as Dublin Core and the specialized numismatic vocabulary hosted at nomisma.org. 4. To implement and publish OCRE as an open access tool for the identification, cataloging and research of Roman coinage by a broad range of users, from museum professionals and archaeologists to students and researchers in related humanities disciplines.

Project fields: Ancient History; Archaeology; Art History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2017

Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc. (Charlottesville, VA 22902-0316)
Jillian Galle (Project Director, 08/01/2013 - present)
PW-51724-14
Beyond the Mansion 2.0: Completing a Digital Archive for Thirty Years of Archaeological Research at The Hermitage

Cataloging and digitization of 365,000 artifacts from Andrew Jackson's home, The Hermitage, located near Nashville, Tennessee, that document socio-cultural relations between the owners and the enslaved population from the late 18th century through emancipation.

From 1804 until 1845 The Hermitage was home to Andrew Jackson and scores of enslaved men, women, and children who labored in the fields of Jackson's cotton plantation near Nashville, Tennessee. To shed needed light on the daily lives of The Hermitage's enslaved community, archaeologists excavated hundreds of thousands of artifacts from twelve domestic sites of slavery. Despite extensive excavations, compelling insights, based on archaeological evidence, into the economic, social, and cultural dynamics of The Hermitage plantation community have remained elusive. This proposal requests funds to catalog, analyze, digitize and disseminate data on hundreds of thousands of artifacts and archaeological contexts from six excavation areas at the First Hermitage. These collections are currently virtually inaccessible to researchers and the public and making the data available will yield new insights into changing lifeways of enslaved people during the 19th century in the Upper South.

Project fields: African American Studies; Archaeology; U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 5/31/2017

Middle Tennessee State University (Murfreesboro, TN 37132-0001)
Dale Cockrell (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51264-13
American Vernacular Music Manuscripts, ca. 1730-1910

The cataloging and digitization of 230 American vernacular music manuscripts dating from 1730 to 1910.

This is a collaborative project between the Center for Popular Music at Middle Tennessee State University and the American Antiquarian Society to digitize, catalog, and provide web-based public access to their American vernacular music manuscripts collections, dated ca. 1730-1910. We will: take conservation measures where necessary; digitize all materials to archival standards; develop a bibliographic description of each manuscript; catalog the materials in MARC format record structure that includes content (song-level) inventories; build the "American Vernacular Music Manuscripts" website, which will direct users to appropriate page images stored on Internet Archive; develop a system for long-term/redundant storage of all digital files; launch the resulting website onto the Internet; and advertise its public access. We will also establish vernacular music manuscript cataloging guidelines and create a cataloging manual that other repositories may employ.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $127,956 (approved); $127,956 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 11/30/2015

Des Moines Art Center (Des Moines, IA 50312-2099)
Rose Wood (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51270-13
Sculpture Conservation Project

Conservation treatment of up to 11 sculptures in the collection of the Des Moines Art Center. Works are by artists Scott Burton, Alexander Calder, John Chamberlain, Carl Milles, Henry Moore, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenberg, George Segal, David Smith, Robert Smithson, and Frank Stella.

The Sculpture Conservation Project involves the conservation of 11 sculptural artworks of varying ages, sizes, mediums, and artistic genres. Proactive measures have been taken to develop the best strategies for a Long Range Preservation Plan for the organization, of which this project is a KEY component. Treatment of these works involves the preservation of artwork that contributes to the cultural record - works that in many cases are considered the most important in an artist's oeuvre. The works are part of a long, rich history, one that defines not only the time and place of its creation, but also the history of the our permanent collections. The sculptures are viewed, researched, and appreciated by hundreds of thousands of individuals each year. Without the necessary conservation of the sculptures the public, worldwide, is at risk for losing access to each work. Without proper treatment the sculptures will progress beyond repair.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $80,000 (approved); $80,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 12/31/2015

Sanskrit Library (Providence, RI 02906-4629)
Peter Scharf (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51273-13
Cataloging, Digitizing, and Integrating the Houghton Library's Indic Manuscript Collection

Cataloging of up to 1,700 Sanskrit manuscripts in the Houghton Library at Harvard University for future digitization and integration into a digital library of Sanskrit. Ultimately, about 75,000 manuscript pages would be made searchable together with Sanskrit-English lexica and other linguistic tools developed for analysis of machine-readable texts.

The proposed project aims to enhance access to primary cultural heritage materials of India housed in American libraries by integrating them with digital texts, lexical resources, and linguistic software in a digital library of Sanskrit, one of the world's richest culture-bearing languages. Integrating primary cultural materials with the Sanskrit Library will enable broad use of Indic collections for research and education. The project catalogs all the Sanskrit manuscripts in the Houghton Library at Harvard University as the first phase of a larger project to catalogue, digitize and integrate them with corresponding digital texts in the Sanskrit Library. The result serves as a model for collections of Indic materials throughout the U.S. and the world, and for digitization projects of cultural materials in other major culture-bearing languages such as Greek, Latin, Arabic, Persian, and Chinese.

Project fields: Asian Languages
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $195,000 (approved); $195,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2013 – 7/31/2016

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
Rebecca Welzenbach (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51275-13
Early English Books Online-Text Creation Partnership EEBO-TCP Collections: Navigations

The transcription and textual encoding of nearly 2,000 early English works (1473-1700) for an open access collection on travel-related literature. The collection would also become part of the larger text-encoded collection produced by the Text Creation Partnership in collaboration with Early English Books Online.

Early English Books Online (EEBO) is a commercial product that provides digital facsimiles of more than 125,000 early English books. The Text Creation Partnership (TCP) is a non-profit, library-based effort to produce the corresponding electronic text. The great virtue of EEBO is that it provides a single point of access to rare books housed in libraries around the world. The contribution of the TCP is to transcribe these books into accurate electronic text, that is, to produce a fully searchable digital version of every unique English-language work represented in EEBO, leveraging the EEBO pageimage resource into an invaluable text corpus of around 70,000 works.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $275,000 (approved); $275,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 10/31/2015

Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)
Sean Quimby (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - 08/20/2014); K. Matthew Dames (Project Director, 08/21/2014 - present)
PW-51278-13
Marcel Breuer Digital Archive, 1953-1981

The second phase of digitization of and creation of access to the papers of architect and designer Marcel Breuer (1902-1981), focusing on the second half of his career, and enhanced functionality of the current online resource.

The Marcel Breuer Digital Archive, 1953-1981, will digitally unite source materials from the second half of Breuer's career, during which Breuer's services were sought by powerful business, governmental and religious institutions. These source materials (70,000 items in total) will join those relating to Breuer's early life, which have already been digitized as part of an NEH-funded grant received by Syracuse University Library's Special Collections Research Center in 2009 and made accessible through the website, http://breuer.syr.edu. Syracuse University will enhance the functionality of the existing site through the creation of a "lightbox" feature that will allow users to save images that they intend to use for further research or for teaching purposes. A digital humanities pilot project, Mapping Marcel Breuer, will create a geospatial mapping tool that will help users visualize Breuer's professional networks and the locations of his buildings.

Project fields: Architecture
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $280,000 (approved); $280,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 12/31/2015

Art Center College of Design (Pasadena, CA 91103-1999)
Robert Dirig (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51281-13
[View white paper]
American Innovation: Preserving and Providing Access to 80 Years of Industrial Design History

A planning and pilot project to establish protocols and practices for digitization and preservation of 100,000 photographs, 2,000 films and videos, and 500 linear feet of print materials documenting industrial design education.

From washing machines to computers, and sports cars to space capsules, America's infatuation with invention has fueled industrial design. Design history helps us understand American culture in a whole new way. By engaging an interdisciplinary team of diverse experts, Art Center College of Design proposes to advance historical knowledge of American culture through an archival preservation and access management pilot project. As the country's leading school of industrial design, Art Center archives include photos, films, and print material documenting American innovation over an 80-year period. New policies and procedures will be tested for digitization and public access, while immediately preserving assets at greatest risk for deterioration. The pilot project will build Art Center Archives' organizational capacity to ensure that the history of American innovation and imagination can be told for years to come.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2014

Oregon Shakespeare Festival (Ashland, OR 97520-2749)
Maria DeWeerdt (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51283-13
Digitizing and Creating Access to the Audiovisual Collection in the Oregon Shakespeare Festival Archives

The cataloging and digitization of 3,098 items in an audiovisual collection that documents the performance history of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF), among the oldest and largest professional regional repertory theater companies in the United States. The materials will be cataloged and digitized along with a six-volume, 900-page descriptive finding aid for the audio collection.

Digitization of 3,098 deteriorating films, audiotapes and videos that comprise a comprehensive record of Shakespeare and theatrical performance by a single U.S. theater company. The digitized recordings and a descriptive finding aid will be freely accessible on-line. The collection documents the eight-decade history of one of the oldest and largest repertory theaters in the country and holds essential insights into the origin of the Shakespearean festival tradition in the United States and its impact in individual American communities and on a national level.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $200,000 (approved); $200,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2016

University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506)
Mary Molinaro (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - 06/15/2014); Deirdre Scaggs (Project Director, 06/16/2014 - present)
PW-51288-13
Coal, Camps, and Railroads: Digitizing Primary Sources on Appalachian Economic Development

The digitization of ten manuscript collections, comprising 132 linear feet, pertaining to the history of the coal and oil industries in the Eastern Kentucky Appalachian region.

The University of Kentucky Libraries seeks funding to digitize and make available 132 cubic feet, an expected 264,000 pages, of a nationally significant body of historical evidence. The selected portions of the Bert T. Combs Appalachian Collection focus on 189 years of critical economic development in the Eastern Kentucky coalfields from 1788 to 1976. The ten individual collections document the search for, extraction, and distribution of coal, oil, and natural gas resources in Appalachia. The records follow the creation of the railroads that brought these raw materials to industrial manufacturers and electrical power generators across the United States. The ten selected collections provide evidence of the company towns, their services, and the individual lives that grew up to sustain and make possible this economic development and struggle.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $139,596 (approved); $139,596 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2016

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Joseph Hurley (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51290-13
Planning Atlanta: A New City in the Making, 1930s - 1990s

Creation of a digital collection related to the development of Atlanta during the 20th century. It would be comprised of 1,550 georeferenced city planning maps, 235 city planning publications, 300 photographs, 12 new oral histories, and a demographic dataset for 1955 to 2000.

Georgia State University Library proposes to create a new digital collection, Planning Atlanta: A New City in the Making, 1930s - 1990s, which will consist of 1550 digitized and georeferenced city planning maps, 235 digitized city planning publications, 300 digitized photographs, 12 new oral histories, and a digitized dataset of annual Atlanta demographic data from 1955 to 2000.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $210,000 (approved); $210,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

University of Florida Libraries (Gainesville, FL 32611)
Matthew Loving (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - 07/16/2014); Laurie Taylor (Project Director, 07/17/2014 - present)
PW-51301-13
[View white paper]
French Pamphlet Planning Project: An International Collaboration for Improvement of Collection Access

A 12-month planning project that will engage multiple partnering institutions -- including the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Brigham Young University, Brown University, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, the Newberry Library, and others -- to conduct an initial analysis of pamphlet collections published during the French Revolution era (1780-1810). The systematic identification and organization of corresponding data sources, item descriptions and online collection content would improve the overall discoverability of all pamphlet collections and contribute to the preliminary planning of a French Pamphlet Digital Portal.

The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida request $39,246 to support assessment, and planning activities that will leverage expertise from a mix of professional domains. In partnership with the Libraries, the following French Pamphlet Planning Project partners agree to work together towards collaborative data collection, analysis and the establishment of standards, workflows and project goals: the Center for Research Libraries, institutional members of the Collaborative Initiative for French Language Collections, University of Michigan, Brigham Young University, Stanford, Yale, Johns Hopkins University, University of Alabama, University of Kansas, the Newberry and the National Library of France. Partners agree the proposed 12-month (May 2013 – April 2014) planning project will yield important collection access outcomes.

Project fields: European History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,246 (approved); $39,178 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2015

California State University, Northridge, University Corporation (Northridge, CA 91330-8316)
Kent Kirkton (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51305-13
A Digital Archive of the African American Photography Collection of the Institute for Arts & Media

Processing of 551,000 photographs and creation of a digital archive of 19,820 selected images from collections of three prominent photojournalists in the African American Photography Collection.

This project will create a digital archive of 19,820 images from the African American Photography Collection of the Institute for Arts & Media at California State University, Northridge, between May 1, 2013 and April 30, 2016. The collection documents the social, cultural, and political aspects of African American life in post-war Los Angeles and Southern California and in doing so illuminates nationally significant themes such as racial segregation and discrimination, the civil rights movement, African American entertainment and cultural leaders, and major political and cultural events. The project will focus on the work of prominent photojournalists Harry Adams, Charles Williams, and Guy Crowder, whose collections together total 551,000 images. The digital archive will expand access to and use of these images, furthering NEH efforts to bridge cultures within our society.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $290,000 (approved); $290,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 9/30/2016

Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715)
Amanda Seligman (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51309-13
The Encyclopedia of Milwaukee

Production of the Encyclopedia of Milwaukee, in print and digital form.

The project constitutes the middle phase of the production of The Encyclopedia of Milwaukee, to be published in online and print formats in 2017. The print volume will be organized as a traditional, one-volume, A-Z encyclopedia to be published by Northern Illinois University Press. The digital version, to be hosted by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, will include the contents of the print volume, along with two other components powered by the digital format, which we call the "Underbook" and the "Overbook." The NEH project period consists of two distinct but interrelated activities: 1) developing the intellectual content of the encyclopedia, approximately 320 original entries and other content, thereby aggregating and synthesizing existing knowledge about Milwaukee and its region; and 2) creating a digital platform to acquire, preserve, and disseminate that intellectual content, in digital and print text, audio, and video form.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $250,000 (approved); $249,997 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2013 – 8/31/2016

Society of Architectural Historians (NFP) (Chicago, IL 60610-2144)
Gabrielle Esperdy (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51312-13
SAH Archipedia

The continuation and expansion of "Archipedia," an online state-by-state resource on architectural history, by commissioning writing teams to document representative buildings from states not yet added to this resource, preparing essays on landscape and settlement/urban settings, and incorporating materials from existing and new print volumes of "Buildings of the United States."

The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) seeks funding to complete SAH Archipedia, an online encyclopedia of American architecture, which was created with a $262,881 start up grant from NEH Preservation and Access in 2010. On October 1, 2012 SAH will launch the online encyclopedia in two versions: (1) SAH Archipedia, a subscription resource containing 11,000 illustrated and mapped building histories from 12 print books in the award-winning Buildings of the United States (BUS) series; and (2) SAH Archipedia Classic Buildings, an open-access encyclopedia featuring 100 of the most representative buildings from those 12 states. SAH wants to complete SAH Archipedia and requests funding to hire 37 teams of architectural historians to write histories of the 100 most significant buildings, landscapes and historic settlements/urban settings in each of the states not yet included in SAH Archipedia. In addition, SAH requests funding to add legacy material from 8 print BUS volumes.

[Media coverage]
Project fields: Architecture
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2013 – 6/30/2016

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
Niek Veldhuis (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51319-13
Reading the Signs: Digital Editions of Ancient Cuneiform Sign Lists

Digitization and enhanced access to sign lists compiled by Mesopotamian scribes and scholars, which document the cuneiform writing system. Editions with translations of about 1,500 texts dating from 2,500 BC to AD 100 would be made freely accessible online with links to images of the cuneiform tablets, indexes, bibliographic data, and glossaries.

"Reading the Signs" will provide comprehensive digital access to an important corpus of ancient cuneiform sign lists (dating between 2,500 BCE and 100 CE), yielding essential evidence for the correct reading of cuneiform signs and for the understanding of intellectual culture and its development in Ancient Mesopotamia. Sign lists are clay tablets (often school texts) which document for each sign that was in use in the cuneiform writing system the proper reading (pronunciation) as well as the meaning of the words that could be represented by that sign. Editions with translations of this corpus of about 1,500 texts will be made freely accessible under the Creative Commons Share-Alike license 3.0 through the NEH-funded Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Lexical Texts, itself a partner in the open-source open-access ORACC (Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus) consortium. The editions will be provided with links to images of the cuneiform tablets, indexes, bibliographical data and glossaries.

Project fields: Ancient Languages
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $194,152 (approved); $194,152 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2013 – 6/30/2016

American Museum of Natural History (New York, NY 10024-5193)
David Kohn (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51320-13
Foundations of Darwin's Science: A Digital Manuscripts Collection

The digitization of 30,000 scientific manuscripts and letters produced and received by Charles Darwin for access via the Darwin Manuscripts Project and Darwin Correspondence Project websites as well as the Cambridge Digital Library.

Foundations of Darwin's Science will fund a digital manuscript collection comprising 30,000 of the most important Darwin scientific manuscripts extant. The project will create high-resolution digital images of these manuscripts that will then be disseminated by the Darwin Manuscripts Project at the American Museum of Natural History.

Project fields: History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $210,000 (approved); $209,994 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 5/31/2016

University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53706-1314)
Matthew Edney (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51325-13
History of Cartography Project

Continued development of the multi-volume reference work "The History of Cartography" with particular attention to Volume Four on the "European Enlightenment, 1650-1800," Volume Five on "The Nineteenth Century," and Volume Six on the "Twentieth Century."

The award-winning History of Cartography is the only comprehensive and reliable reference work that studies the people, cultures, and societies that have produced and consumed maps from prehistoric times to the present. It provides intellectual access to the complex world of maps for scholars, teachers, students, librarians, and the informed general public. It thus promotes and sustains the culturally sophisticated interpretation of maps as evidentiary source materials. Thoroughly researched by its editors and international contributors, its content is rigorously checked by an experienced editorial team. In addition to publishing in print, as befits a definitive source of information, the University of Chicago Press is producing an online edition to maximize access.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $320,000 (approved); $320,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2013 – 6/30/2015

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, Inc. (Boston, MA 02116-2813)
Janet Spitz (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51334-13
[View white paper]
Planning a Central Cartographic Web Portal for the Revolutionary War Era, 1750-1800

A planning project to establish protocols and agreements for creating digital access to 3,000 cartographic images, held by multiple institutions, that document the Revolutionary War era (1750-1800).

The Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library is developing a Central Cartographic Web Portal, focusing on the American Revolutionary War Era. This curated database will provide broad access to primary source documents that will include a judicious selection of the best and most informative printed and manuscript maps from approximately ten collections in the U.S. and Europe. The materials will focus on military mapping; 18th century American maritime charts; and urban mapping. The theme of the American Revolutionary War Era will serve as a pilot and model for additional themes in future years. Two advisory teams, one composed of curators and humanities experts, the other of technical expertise for cataloging and data management, will advise and create protocols for all aspects of the project. The site will improve access to vastly expanded resources through technology; advancing the scholarly, educational and cultural enrichment missions of all participating institutions.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 3/31/2015

Walters Art Museum (Baltimore, MD 21201-5185)
Kate Blanch (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51338-13
Access to Art in Encyclopedic Context

Planning for the creation of access to the museum's curatorial files, representing approximately 262 linear feet of correspondence, photograph albums of exhibit installations, an object index catalog, and bibliographic references for an encyclopedic collection of 35,000 works of art that were collected from the mid-19th century through the present and range from ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance works to decorative arts and modern European painting.

The Walters Art Museum requests $40,000 to arrange and describe content of the curatorial files, compile records stored across disparate locations, assess records for value to the humanities, prioritize materials for digitization, and create an online finding aid to inform the public of the information available. The content of these curatorial records pertains to the artworks in the Walters' world-renowned collection and reveals the origins, experiences, and journeys of the treasures in our collection.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,720 (approved); $39,720 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 5/31/2015

Portland Art Museum (Portland, OR 97205)
Donald Urquhart (Project Director, 07/24/2012 - present)
PW-51339-13
Northwest Art Initiative, Phase II

Cataloging and digitization of 7,750 works of Northwest regional art, including textiles, baskets, masks, photography, paintings, prints, and drawings.

The Portland Art Museum in Portland, Oregon requests a grant in the amount of $171,765 over two years from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support Phase II of the Museum's Northwest Art Initiative (NWAI). The NWAI seeks to further establish Northwest art as a recognized art historical tradition by digitizing and sharing the Museum's vast collection of works created by artists working in the American Northwest. In Phase II, the Museum will digitally capture and disseminate more than 7,750 works from its permanent collection, offering national and international exposure for Northwest artists and allowing their works to be studied in an art historical context. The NWAI builds on the Museum's ongoing commitment to sustainability and access. The complete, 3-year project (Phases I & II) will successfully digitize and share nearly 30% of the Museum's permanent collection online while increasing its discoverability through enhanced metadata and inclusion in federated resources.