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58 matches

Program: Landmarks of American History*
Date range: 2009-2011
Sort order: Award year, descending

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Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Caroline Pryor
BH-50415-11
Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois.

"Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois. The program investigates four central themes of Abraham Lincoln's public life: nationalism, power, freedom, and race. The project considers such subjects as nationalism and politics in the Civil War era; Lincoln, slavery, and race; Lincoln and the Constitution; Lincoln, the radicals, and Emancipation; Walt Whitman and Lincoln; visual art on Lincoln and the war, using images from the NEH's Picturing America portfolio; African-American women's experiences as an example of racial issues; and Lincoln's legacy. Participants visit the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, the Lincoln Home, Lincoln's Law Office in Springfield, Illinois, and the historical reconstruction of New Salem Village, where Lincoln began his career. Teachers also explore the exhibit "Lincoln and the Constitution," on display at the Lovejoy Library. Participants read writings by Lincoln, including the Lincoln-Douglas debates, the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address, the Second Inaugural Address, and selected letters; writings by African-American women; and secondary works by Eric Foner, David Donald, John Stauffer, James McPherson, Philip Shaw Paludan, David Potter, Barry Schwartz, Garry Wills, and Lerone Bennett, Jr. The staff includes project director Caroline Pryor (education, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville [SIUE]); historians Stephen Hansen (SIUE), Iver Bernstein (Washington University), Leslie Brown (Williams College), Jason Stacey (SIUE), and Laura Milsk-Fowler (SIUE); art historian Ivy Cooper (SIUE); and site and museum personnel.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,518
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30303)
Timothy J. Crimmins
BH-50416-11
The Problem of the Color Line: Atlanta Landmarks and Civil Rights History

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on southern segregation and the civil rights movement in Atlanta.

"The Problem of the Color Line: Atlanta Landmarks and Civil Rights History" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on southern segregation and the Civil Rights movement in Atlanta. The project is anchored in an observation made by W. E. B. Du Bois in The Souls of Black Folk (1903): "The Problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." In addition to Atlanta University's Stone Hall, where Du Bois penned this famous reflection, the project uses other Atlanta sites as touchstones for examining the history of the "color line," race relations, and the Civil Rights movement in twentieth-century America. Sites include Piedmont Park, the site of Booker T. Washington's 1895 "Atlanta Compromise" speech; the residence of Alonzo Herndon, a former slave who became Atlanta's first black millionaire; the Fox Theatre, which still bears the marks of the segregation era; the State Capitol, which retains monuments to both Jim Crow and the triumph over the color line; and the Auburn Avenue National Landmark District (the site of Ebenezer Baptist Church) and the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site. Georgia State University faculty members Timothy J. Crimmins, Glenn Eskew, Clifford Kuhn, and Akinyele Umoja address such topics as the South before the color line, the debate between W. E. B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington, the Atlanta Race Riot of 1906, and race relations in Atlanta from the 1930s to the 1990s. In addition, Dana White (Emory University), Beverly Guy Sheftall (Spelman College), and Vickie Crawford (Morehouse College) lecture about patterns of segregation in Atlanta during the Jim Crow era and women in the Civil Rights movement. Readings are drawn from varied primary sources (such as Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk, Ray Baker's Following the Color Line, and autobiographies by Walter White and John Lewis), secondary works (such as William Chafe's Remembering Jim Crow and Aldon Morris's Origins of the Civil Rights Movement), and literary texts (from such writers as Margaret Mitchell, Joel Chandler Harris ["Uncle Remus"], Flannery O'Connor, Alice Walker, and Tom Wolfe).

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,997
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 3/31/2013

Massachusetts Historical Society (Boston, MA 02215-3631)
Jayne K. Gordon
BH-50417-11
At the Crossroads of Revolution: Lexington and Concord in 1775

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War on April 19, 1775.

"At the Crossroads of Revolution: Lexington and Concord in 1775" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War on April 19, 1775. Utilizing Minute Man National Historical Park (including the North Bridge and the preserved "Battle Road"), Freedom Trail in Boston, and sites in Concord itself, the project focuses on the battles of Lexington and Concord to illuminate the following topics: New England life and society on the eve of the Revolution; the developing conflict between Britain and its colonies; the battles themselves; the impact of the events on ordinary farmers, women, and African Americans; the local environment and landscape in relation to the history of the time; and the legacies of the Revolution, particularly in the writings of nineteenth-century Concord authors such as Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau. The project faculty includes co-directors Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker (Massachusetts Historical Society [MHS]), Robert Gross (history, University of Connecticut), William Fowler (history, Northeastern University), Brian Donahue (environmental studies, Brandeis University), and Mary Fuhrer and Joanne Meyers (independent historians).

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $170,937
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Apprend Foundation (Durham, NC 27713-2219)
Laurel Sneed
BH-50419-11
Crafting Freedom: Black Artisans, Entrepreneurs and Abolitionists of the Antebellum Upper South

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American artisans during the antebellum period, using sites in North Carolina.

"Crafting Freedom: Black Artisans, Entrepreneurs and Abolitionists of the Antebellum Upper South" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on African-American artisans during the antebellum period, at sites in North Carolina. The workshop uses the careers of free African-American artisans Thomas Day, a cabinetmaker, and Elizabeth Keckly, a dressmaker, to illuminate the relationship between race-based slavery and African-American enterprise in the antebellum American South. The project utilizes a number of North Carolina sites, including Day's home and shop, his church, Burwell School (where Keckly was enslaved), and the Stagville tobacco plantation. The faculty includes project director Laurel Sneed (Apprend Foundation), John Michael Vlach (American studies, George Washington University), Juanita Holland (independent historian), Peter Wood (history, Duke University), and Michele Ware (English, North Carolina Central University); the program also includes presentations by African-American artisans.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $172,022
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38732)
Luther Brown
BH-50420-11
The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta's rich history, diverse peoples, and impact on the American imagination.

"The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta region, its rich history, its diverse peoples, and its impact on the American imagination. Project director Luther Brown leads the first day's seminar on Delta history and the Mississippi River, including the documentaries LaLee's Kin: The Legacy of Cotton and Fatal Flood alongside a visit to the site of the levee break in the Great Flood of 1927. During day two, historian Charles Reagan Wilson (University of Mississippi) explores the area's ethnic and religious diversity, including its early Chinese, Russian Jewish, Lebanese, and Italian communities. Music scholar David Evans (University of Memphis) guides the third day on "The Blues: American Roots Music and the Culture that Produced It," featuring a visit to Dockery Farms, the plantation viewed as the birthplace of the Blues. On day four, Delta State faculty member Henry Outlaw presents the Civil Rights movement in Mississippi, with the Emmett Till story as a case study in "oppression, revolution, and reconciliation." Participants travel on day five to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, where they also visit other historical landmarks and cultural institutions (including music-related sites). On day six, geographer John Strait (Sam Houston State University) talks about the diaspora of Delta residents to the cities of the North. Readings include The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity (James Cobb), Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 (John M. Barry), and Getting Away With Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case (Chris Crowe), among other works.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. Regional Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $178,872
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Mark Twain House (Hartford, CT 06105-6400)
Craig Hotchkiss
BH-50423-11
Huck, Jim and Jim Crow: a Workshop for Teachers

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, and race in post-Reconstruction America.

"Huck, Jim, and Jim Crow" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, and race in post-Reconstruction America. The workshops explore Mark Twain and his writings in their social, political, and historical contexts. Project director Craig Hotchkiss heads a team of scholars and educators who prepare participants to teach their students about Huckleberry Finn, the important issues it addresses, and the controversies it has engendered. The program opens with a tour of the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Connecticut, where Twain lived from 1871 to 1891. The tour is led by Hotchkiss and chief curator Patricia Philippon, who introduces the museum's library, archives, and collections. Scholarly presentations begin on the first day with Kerry Driscoll (St. Joseph College) on "The Origins of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." Other literary scholars include John Bird (Winthrop University) on the novel's use of dialect; Robert Hirst (General Editor of the Mark Twain Project, University of California at Berkeley) exploring "Mark Twain on Racism" through the author's own notes and drafts of the novel; Stephen Railton (University of Virginia) on Twain's relationship with George Washington Cable and their "Twins of Genius Tour"; Ann Ryan (Le Moyne College) on the era's representations of black men; and Bruce Michelson (University of Illinois) on the novel's ending. Further framing is provided by Wilbert Jenkins (Temple University) on African Americans during Reconstruction and the advent of Jim Crow, and Eric Lott (University of Virginia) on the blackface minstrel tradition. Curator David Pilgrim (Ferris State University) also guides teachers through the exhibition "Hateful Things," on loan from the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia.

[Grant products]
Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $145,873
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Maritime Museum Association of San Diego (San Diego, CA 92101)
Raymond Ashley
BH-50424-11
Empires of the Wind: Exploration of the United States Pacific West Coast

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Pacific exploration and the colonization of the American west coast, held at sites in San Diego, California.

"Empires of the Wind: Exploration of the United States Pacific West Coast" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Pacific exploration and the colonization of the American west coast, held at sites in San Diego, California. The program uses resources at the San Diego Maritime Museum, the Cabrillo National Monument, Old Town San Diego State Historic Park, and San Diego Mission de Alcala. Sessions consider early European voyages and mapping; Spanish interactions with Native Americans in Mexico and the southwest; the role of scientific discoveries in exploration; Spanish, British, and Russian imperial rivalries; the Spanish in California; and Americans in the Pacific from the beginnings of the China trade to the Civil War. Primary sources include maps, European accounts of exploration, and native responses; secondary sources mentioned include works by J.C. Beaglehole, William Schurtz, Lynn Withey, and Richard Johnson. In addition to project director Raymond Ashley (Maritime Museum of San Diego), visiting scholar presenters include Stephen Collston (San Diego State University), Jim Cassidy (U.S. Navy Southwest Cultural Resources Program Manager), Stan Rodriguez (Kumeyaay College), Iris Engstrand (University of San Diego), David Ringrose (University of California, San Diego), and Bruce Linder (independent scholar); Maritime Museum of San Diego staff, site specialists, and curriculum experts are also on hand to assist participants.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $168,369
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2527)
Jennifer Masengarb
BH-50430-11
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the origins of the skyscraper in Chicago and its relationship to urbanization.

"The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of such buildings to urbanization. Between 1885 and 1895, as technological innovations (elevators, the steel frame, and fireproof building materials, among others) made tall buildings both physically possible and commercially feasible, Chicago experienced a skyscraper boom. This workshop hosted by the Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) focuses on the central question: How does the rise of the skyscraper stimulate and reflect change in American life? Participants examine the city's geographical features, as well as the interplay of cultural, philosophical, and aesthetic influences that marked the evolution of Chicago's built landscape from the 1880s through the present. Teachers visit several landmark buildings and architectural firms throughout Chicago's "Loop." Lecture/discussion sessions with historian Henry Binford (Northwestern University) and architectural historians Katherine Solomonson (University of Minnesota) and Joanna Merwood-Salisbury (Parsons The New School for Design), as well as with practicing architects, advance exploration of the complexities of the tall building boom. Readings include selections from (among other works) William Cronan, Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; Donald Miller, City of the Century: The Epic of Chicago and the Making of America; Daniel Bluestone, Constructing Chicago; and Carl Sandburg, Chicago Poems. Participants receive CAF's Schoolyards to Skylines: Teaching with Chicago's Amazing Architecture.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $177,523
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2446)
Diane Mutti-Burke
BH-50432-11
Crossroads of Conflict:Contested Visions of Freedom and the Missouri-Kansas Border Wars

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and impact of the Missouri-Kansas border wars during the era of the American Civil War.

"Crossroads of Conflict: Contested Visions of Freedom and the Missouri-Kansas Border Wars" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the history and impact of the Missouri-Kansas border wars during the era of the American Civil War. The workshops explore issues and events that precipitated hostilities between settlers in Kansas and Missouri from the Missouri Compromise of 1820 through the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 and on through the Civil War era. Participants examine the struggles between the Kansas Jayhawkers and Missouri Bushwackers. Central to the discussion are two concepts of liberty-freedom to hold slaves versus freedom from slavery. The project utilizes a variety of landmark sites illuminating settlement, economic development, and pro- and anti-slavery activity in the area: Lecompton and Lawrence, Kansas, the John Wornall House, the Watkins Woolen Mill, the Steamboat Arabia Museum, the site of the battle of Westport, and the Jesse James farm. The staff includes project director Diane Mutti Burke (history, University of Missouri-Kansas City [UMKC]), program director Edeen Martin, and faculty members Nicole Etcheson (history, Ball State Univerity), LeeAnn Whites (history, University of Missouri-Columbia), Jonathan Earle (history, University of Kansas), Ann Rabb (archaeology, University of Kansas), Ethan Rafuse (military history, US Army Command and General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth), and other faculty and staff from UMKC. Readings include collections of primary documents and scholarly writings by Etcheson, Mutti Burke, Earle, Michael Fellman, and T. J. Stiles.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,882
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Rebecca Maria Sanchez
BH-50434-11
Contested Homelands: Knowledge, History and Culture of Historic Santa Fe

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the history of interactions between Native Americans and Spanish and Anglo settlers in Santa Fe.

"Contested Homelands: Knowledge, History and Culture of Historic Santa Fe" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty schoolteachers on the history of interactions between Native Americans and European settlers in Santa Fe. The program considers the ways in which Native Americans, Spanish and Mexican colonists, and settlers have interacted in Santa Fe and the surrounding communities over the past 400 years. The workshops begin with a discussion of the framing concept of "homelands," examining the processes of colonization and resistance that characterized the Santa Fe region. They then turn to the ways that religion, artistic production, history, and memory shape the relationship of peoples to their homelands and consider how historic sites reflect contested claims to, and conflicting perceptions of, homelands. Sites under examination include Pecos National Park, where participants learn about the pre-colonial Pueblo system; vestiges of El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the road linking Santa Fe to Mexico City; the Palace of the Governors, built in the early seventeenth century as Santa Fe's administrative center and the site of many workshop sessions; the Governor Bent house, home of the territorial governor who was killed by a group of Indians and Mexicans in protest against American rule; and Taos Pueblo, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Participants also visit the New Mexico Museum of Art and the Wheelwright Museum of the Native American and work with primary sources from the New Mexico State Archives and Library. In addition to project director Rebecca Sánchez, an expert in social studies education, workshop faculty members include historians Estevan Rael-Gálvez (New Mexico State Historian), Joseph Sánchez (Spanish Colonial Research Center, University of New Mexico), and Thomas Chávez (independent scholar and director emeritus, Palace of the Governors); anthropologist Frances Levine (Palace of the Governors); and education professors Quincy Spurlin (University of New Mexico) and Glenabah Martinez (University of New Mexico), as well as artists, archivists, and curatorial staff.

[Grant products]
Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $153,097
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2497)
Rebecca Trivison
BH-50444-11
The War of 1812 in the Great Lakes and Western Territories

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to study the national implications of the War of 1812's northwestern frontier.

"The War of 1812 in the Great Lakes and Western Territories" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the causes, conduct, and consequences of the War of 1812 in the Midwestern United States. Hosted by the Ohio Historical Society [OHS], the workshop investigates the War of 1812 by considering several major topics: the war's causes; the complicated interactions of Euro-Americans, British, Canadians, and Native Americans during the conflict; and the war's short- and long-term effects. The project utilizes important military sites, including River Raisin Battlefield, Fort Meigs, and Perry's Victory and International Peace Monument. The project staff includes co-directors Brian Schoen (history, Ohio University) and Rebecca Trivison (OHS) and visiting faculty members Alan Taylor (history, University of California, Davis), Andrew Cayton (history, Miami University, Ohio), Gregory Dowd (history, University of Michigan), Susan Sleeper-Smith (history, Michigan State University), Gerard Altoff (National Park Service), Ralph Naveaux (Monroe County Historical Museum), and David Skaggs (history, Bowling Green State University). The program includes lectures, discussions, site visits, primary-source sessions, and work on teaching projects. The participants read secondary works by members of the visiting faculty and other scholars. Primary sources include an Indian captivity narrative, missionary letters, correspondence by William Henry Harrison, President James Madison's war message, and the full text of "The Star-Spangled Banner"; participants also receive a primary-source database from the OHS archives for use in creating lesson plans.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $170,258
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum
BH-50445-11
Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

"Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers. The program is offered by the Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and the Lowell National Historical Park, and focuses on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization. During the workshops, historians and other scholars lead lecture/discussions on key themes in Lowell's history. Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) places the local textile industry in an international context; Patrick Malone (Brown University) focuses on Lowell's water power system; Jack Larkin (Old Sturbridge Village) talks about the transition from an agrarian to a market-based economy; Gray Fitzsimons (formerly National Park Service) focuses on the textile industry's management structure and on the experience of Irish and French-Canadian immigrants; Robert Forrant (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) speaks about labor's responses to the new industrial order; and Chad Montrie (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) explores the tensions between the traditional and the modern in the literature of the early nineteenth century. Participants visit historic sites around Lowell and Concord such as Walden Pond and Minute Man National Historical Park; they also visit Old Sturbridge Village. Marie Frank (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) utilizes two selections (by Thomas Cole and Charles Sheeler) from the NEH Picturing America portfolio to explore responses to industrialization and the American landscape. The participants read selections by historians including Thomas Dublin, Merritt Roe Smith, Jack Larkin, Patrick Malone, Chad Montrie and Brian Mitchell, and writings by Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and young women who worked in the mills.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $172,880
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 6/30/2013

Friends of Peralta Hacienda Historical Park (Oakland, CA 94601-0172)
Holly L. Alonso (project director)
Alex M. Saragoza (co-project director)
BH-50461-11
Spanish, Mexican, and American California: Reframing U.S. History at Peralta Hacienda

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on California in the Spanish, Mexican, and American periods, using the Peralta family of northern California as a case study.

"Spanish, Mexican, and American California: Reframing U.S. History at Peralta Hacienda" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on California in the Spanish, Mexican, and American periods, using the Peralta family of northern California as a case study. This program gives teachers the opportunity to examine the connections between United States history and that of Mexico through Luis Peralta, a soldier and colonist, and his family. The Peraltas were among the original californios, descendants of Spanish-speaking settlers who arrived with the Anza expedition to the San Francisco Bay area in 1776. Topics under examination include encounters between Spanish colonists and Native Americans, independence from Spain, the Mexican-American war, repercussions of the Mexican revolution, and the bracero program, a twentieth-century work program that brought temporary laborers from Mexico to the United States. These broad topics are grounded by primary sources, as well as secondary scholarship by Ramón Gutiérrez, Douglas Monroy, and William Deverell, among others. Most workshop sessions take place at Peralta Hacienda Historical Park in Oakland, which features a nineteenth-century Peralta family home and the remains of two earlier adobe houses. In addition to studying the buildings and archaeological record at Peralta Hacienda, participants visit the San Francisco Presidio, Ceja Vineyard, Sonoma Mission, and Oakland's Fruitvale neighborhood. Along with co-directors Alex Saragoza (ethnic studies, University of California, Berkeley) and Holly Alonso (Friends of Peralta Hacienda Historical Park), project faculty members include Charles C. Mann (independent scholar), Ramón Gutiérrez (University of Chicago), Albert Hurtado (University of Oklahoma), Douglas Monroy (Colorado College), Mary Jo Wainwright (Diablo College), Tey Diana Rebolledo (University of New Mexico), Myrna Santiago (St. Mary's College), Rick Tejada-Flores (filmmaker), and David Gutierrez (University of California, San Diego). Participants also meet with former braceros Pablo and Juana Ceja.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $173,302
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Kenneth T. Jackson
BH-50462-11
Empire City: New York from 1877-2001

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate local and national history since 1877.

"Empire City: New York from 1877-2001" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate major themes in local and national history since 1877. The workshops use lectures, discussions, and site visits to situate New York City within broader urban history and American history. Co-directors are Kenneth Jackson (Columbia University) and Karen Markoe (State University of New York, Maritime College). The program opens with consideration of Manhattan's rise to national dominance after the Civil War, followed by a walking tour of Central Park and visit to the New-York Historical Society, where Sandra Trenholm (Gilder Lehrman Collection) guides participants in working with primary documents. Day two's focus on Gilded Age New York includes prizewinning biographer David Nasaw (Graduate Center of City University of New York) on "Andrew Carnegie and His Gospel of Wealth," and a visit to magnate Henry Clay Frick's mansion. To explore immigration, participants read Jacob Riis's How the Other Half Lives and E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime, then experience immigrant neighborhoods including Five Points, Little Italy, and Chinatown. The program also addresses the "Black Metropolis," including visits to Harlem and the Bronx as well as readings from Langston Hughes and Ralph Ellison. On the final day of the workshop, Joshua Freeman (Queens College) covers the transition from industrial to service and residential use, as seen in the Meat Packing District. Concluding the site visit at Ground Zero, project director Kenneth Jackson discusses the local and national effects of 9/11.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $158,969
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Chicago Metro History Education Center (Chicago, IL 60610-3305)
Lisa Oppenheim
BH-50464-11
Renaissance in the Black Metropolis: Chicago, 1930s-1950s

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Chicago Black Renaissance of the 1930s to 1950s.

"Renaissance in the Black Metropolis: Chicago, 1930s-1950s" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the Chicago Black Renaissance of the 1930s to 1950s. The workshops explore the cultural, social, economic, and political experience of Chicago's "Black Metropolis" and are led by Chicago Metro History Education Center's Lisa Oppenheim. NEH Summer Scholars learn about Great Depression Chicago and significant figures such as Margaret Burroughs, Charles White, Langston Hughes, John Johnson, Claude Barnett, Vivian Harsh, and St. Clair Drake. Historian Darlene Clark Hine (Northwestern University) leads off the scholarly program by setting out the context for and significance of the Chicago Black Renaissance. In a session at the Chicago Bee's former offices, Adam Green (University of Chicago) discusses the role of black journalism in the community. The South Side Community Art Center provides both site and subject for a lecture by Andrea Barnwell Brownlee (Spelman College Museum of Fine Art), followed by a visit to the DuSable Museum. Co-director Erik Gellman (Roosevelt University) and Lionel Kimble (Chicago State University) address labor and politics, with sites including the former United Packinghouse Workers union office and the Pullman Porters Museum, where participants learn about the predominantly African-American Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. The end of the week features Jacqueline Goldsby (New York University) on literature, including writers Richard Wright, Lorraine Hansberry, and Gwendolyn Brooks; Davarian Baldwin (Trinity College) on the meaning of Chicago's music; and an extended afternoon of archival work at the Harsh Collection for AfroAmerican History and Culture.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $176,592
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Caroline Pryor
BH-50362-10
Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $157,564
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Montana Historical Society (Helena, MT 59601-4514)
Paula E. Petrik (project director)
Kirby Lambert (co-project director)
BH-50363-10
The Richest Hills: Mining in the Far West, 1865-1920

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on gold, silver, and copper mining in the American West, with visits to Virginia City, Helena, and Butte, Montana.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,998
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

California State University, Northridge (Northridge, CA 91330-0001)
Josh Sides
BH-50366-10
The Spanish and Mexican Influences on California, 1769-1884

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Spanish and Mexican influence in California, using sites in the Los Angeles area.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $157,005
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Florida Humanities Council (St. Petersburg, FL 33701-5005)
Ann S. Schoenacher
BH-50367-10
Jump at the Sun: Zora Neale Hurston & Her Eatonville Roots

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American folklorist and author Zora Neale Hurston and her formative years in Eatonville, Florida.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,745
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2012

Niagara University (Niagara Falls, NY 14305-1500)
Thomas A. Chambers
BH-50371-10
Crossroads of Empire: Old Fort Niagara

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers that focus on the interaction and mutual influence of Iroquois, European, and North American colonists at Old Fort Niagara.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $178,746
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Laura R. Nash
BH-50372-10
Duke Ellington and the Development of American Popular Culture

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington.

Project fields: Music History and Criticism
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $177,096
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

National Constitution Center (Philadelphia, PA 19106)
Kerry Sautner (project director)
Kerry Sautner (co-project director)
BH-50375-10
A Revolution in Government: Philadelphia and the Creation of the American Republic

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the historic formation and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U. S. Constitution.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $167,360
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Fort Ticonderoga (Ticonderoga, NY 12883-0390)
Richard Strum
BH-50379-10
The American Revolution on the Northern Frontier: Fort Ticonderoga and the Road to Saratoga

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers focused on the role of Fort Ticonderoga and the northern frontier as a critical outpost in the early years of the Revolution.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,518
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2356)
Timothy D. Walker
BH-50386-10
Sailing to Freedom: New Bedford and the Underground Railroad

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to explore New Bedford, Massachusetts as a historical landmark for abolitionism and the Underground Railroad.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $177,781
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
William F. Harris
BH-50387-10
James Madison and Constitutional Citizenship

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for school teachers on James Madison's role in the creation and implementation of the U. S. Constitution, held at Montpelier.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,217
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

California State University, Dominguez Hills Foundation (Carson, CA 90747)
Laura Talamante (project director)
Alison Bruesehoff (co-project director)
BH-50390-10
American History through the Eyes of a California Family, 1780s - 1920s

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers using the history of the Dominguez family and related sites to illuminate California's history from colonial days to the 1920s.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $171,788
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Henry Ford, The (Dearborn, MI 48121-1970)
Paula Gangopadhyay
BH-50392-10
America's Industrial Revolution at The Henry Ford

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on America's Industrial Revolution as interpreted through the historic buildings and archival collections at Henry Ford's Greenfield Village and the Ford Rouge factory.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,964
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

National-Louis University (Chicago, IL 60657)
Mark A. Newman (project director)
Costas Spirou (co-project director)
BH-50394-10
The Chicago Lakefront as Public Space

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Chicago lakefront and public space.

Project fields: Architecture
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $149,175
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Stephen P. Rice (project director)
Meredith Davis (co-project director)
BH-50395-10
The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty teachers that will use the Hudson River as a focus for the study of nineteenth-century intersections of art, culture, commerce, and nature.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $175,114
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Funding details
Original grant (2010) $167,282
Supplement (2011) $7,832

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Richard S. Newman (project director)
Jose Torre (co-project director)
BH-50399-10
Abolitionism, Women’s Rights, and Religious Revivalism on the Rochester Reform Trail

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to examine Rochester's central role in American reform history through its iconic landmark geography.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $156,981
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 6/30/2013

Pennsylvania State University, Main Campus (University Park, PA 16802)
George W. Boudreau
BH-50400-10
A Rising People: Benjamin Franklin and the Americans

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to explore Benjamin Franklin's influence on the American people through the sites and environs of eighteenth-century Philadelphia.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $180,000
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 6/30/2012

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum
BH-50402-10
Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $170,051
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 6/30/2012

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Linda Heywood
BH-50406-10
African Americans in Massachusetts: From Slavery to Today

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the African-American community in Massachusetts and the role of New England in African-American history.

Project fields: African American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $180,382
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Apprend Foundation (Durham, NC 27713-2219)
Laurel Sneed
BH-50409-10
Crafting Freedom: Black Artisans, Entrepreneurs, and Abolitionists in the Antebellum Upper South

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American artisans during the antebellum period, using sites in North Carolina.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $172,823
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann
BH-50411-10
Pearl Harbor: History and Memory Across Asia and the Pacific

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, its global context, and its place in cultural memory.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $180,000
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002)
Cynthia Dickinson
BH-50412-10
Emily Dickinson: Person, Poetry, and Place

Two five-day Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the poet Emily Dickinson.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $167,917
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Florida Humanities Council (St. Petersburg, FL 33701-5005)
Ann S. Schoenacher
BH-50302-09
Jump at the Sun: Zora Neale Hurston & Her Eatonville Roots

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American folklorist and author Zora Neale Hurston and her formative years in Eatonville, Florida.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,430
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38732)
Luther Brown
BH-50303-09
The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, Culture, and History in the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta region, its rich history, its diverse peoples, and its impact on the American imagination.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,985
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Maritime Museum Association of San Diego (San Diego, CA 92101)
Raymond Ashley
BH-50304-09
Empires of the Wind: Exploration of the United States Pacific West Coast

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on Pacific exploration and the colonization of the American west coast, to be held at sites in San Diego, California.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $158,303
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Caroline Pryor
BH-50308-09
Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $152,328
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Middle Tennessee State University (Murfreesboro, TN 37132-0001)
Janice M. Leone
BH-50309-09
The Hermitage, Andrew Jackson, and America 1801-1861

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers at The Hermitage, Andrew Jackson's home, on major themes in nineteenth-century American history.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,972
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Rebecca Maria Sanchez
BH-50311-09
Contested Homelands: Unpacking the Knowledge, History and Culture of Historic Santa Fe, New Mexico

Two one-week workshops for eighty schoolteachers on the history of interactions between Native Americans and European settlers in Santa Fe.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,754
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Drury University (Springfield, MO 65802-3791)
Randall Fuller,
BH-50312-09
Wilson's Creek: Understanding the Civil War's Second Major Battle

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the 1861 battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri, and its place in the history and culture of the Civil War era.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,243
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Appalachian State University (Boone, NC 28608-0001)
Neva Jean Specht
BH-50313-09
Not Just a Scenic Road: The Blue Ridge Parkway and Its History

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and culture of the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $189,917
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Molly Brown House Museum (Denver, CO 80203-2417)
Anne Robb Levinsky
BH-50316-09
Molly Brown and Western Biography: A Look at Life and Legend

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers using the life and biography of Molly Brown to examine the American West in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $155,892
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center (Cortez, CO 81321-9408)
Marjorie R. Connolly
BH-50317-09
Seeking the Center Place: The Mesa Verde Cultural Landscape and Pueblo Indian Homeland

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the archaeology and history of the Pueblo people in the Mesa Verde region.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $158,060
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30303)
Timothy J. Crimmins
BH-50319-09
The Problem of the Color Line: Atlanta Landmarks and Civil Rights History

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on southern segregation and the Civil Rights movement in Atlanta.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $176,069
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 1/31/2011

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2527)
Jean Linsner
BH-50321-09
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of such buildings to urbanization.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $162,951
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
William F. Harris
BH-50326-09
James Madison and Constitutional Citizenship

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on James Madison's role in the creation and implementation of the U.S. Constitution, held at Montpelier, Madison's home.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,000
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Massachusetts Historical Society (Boston, MA 02215-3631)
Jayne K. Gordon
BH-50327-09
At the Crossroads of Revolution: Lexington and Concord in 1775

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War on April 19, 1775.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,982
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Pennsylvania State University, Main Campus (University Park, PA 16802)
George W. Boudreau
BH-50329-09
A Rising People: Benjamin Franklin and the Americans

Two Landmarks workshops for eighty teachers on Benjamin Franklin's life and social environment in eighteenth-century Philadelphia.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $168,012
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum
BH-50331-09
Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution - Summer 2010 Teacher Workshops

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,999
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 6/30/2011

Nebraska Wesleyan University (Lincoln, NE 68504-2760)
Kevin Bower
BH-50332-09
Shifting Power on the Plains: Fort Robinson and the American West

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers at Fort Robinson National Historic Landmark on the role of the fort in American history from 1868 until the end of World War II.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $166,395
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Henry Ford, The (Dearborn, MI 48121-1970)
Paula Gangopadhyay
BH-50334-09
America's Industrial Revolution at The Henry Ford

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on America's Industrial Revolution as interpreted through the historic buildings and collections at Henry Ford's Greenfield Village.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,987
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Minnesota Humanities Center (St. Paul, MN 55106-2046)
Casey DeMarais
BH-50336-09
Building America: Minnesota's Iron Range, U.S. Industrialization, and the Creation of a World Power

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers to explore the role of Minnesota's Iron Range in American history.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,000
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2446)
Edeen Joyce Martin
BH-50337-09
Crossroads of Conflict: Contested Visions of Freedom and the Missouri-Kansas Border Wars 2010

Two Landmarks workshops for eighty teachers on the history and impact of the Missouri-Kansas border wars that preceded the American Civil War.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,000
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (Birmingham, AL 35203-1911)
Martha V. Bouyer
BH-50339-09
Stony the Road We Trod: Using America's Civil Rights Landmarks to Teach American History

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and legacy of the Civil Rights movement in Alabama.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,728
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

National Constitution Center (Philadelphia, PA 19106)
Steve M. Frank
BH-50344-09
A Revolution in Government: Philadelphia and the Creation of the American Republic

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the founding of the United States, to be held in Philadelphia.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,801
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010

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