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Funded Projects Query Form
34 matches

Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants*
Date range: 2008-2008
Sort order: Award year, descending

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Daniel Beraca Visel
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar
HD-50282-08
[View white paper]
Sophie Search Gateway

The development of an interoperable portal within the Web authoring program, "Sophie," for locating and incorporating multi-media sources from the Internet Archive.

This project will add a search gateway allowing search and use of multimedia within the Internet Archive within Sophie, an open source application being developed for K-12 and higher education.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $23,750
Grant period: 4/1/2008 – 6/30/2008

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
Scot A. French (project director)
William Ferster (co-project director)
HD-50291-08
[View white paper]
Jefferson's Travels: A Digital Journey Using the HistoryBrowser

Development of an interactive web-based tool to integrate primary documents, dynamic maps, and related information in the study of history, with the prototype to be focused on Thomas Jefferson's trip to England in 1786.

The Jefferson's Travels Project is a joint undertaking of the Virginia Center for Digital History and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation to develop a highly interactive web-based tool that uses Thomas Jefferson's travels as initial content. A specially constructed interactive browser (the HistoryBrowser) provides for fast and easy navigation along the time and place dimensions. The HistoryBrowser encourages primary source documents to speak more directly to the audience by providing visualizations of the relationships, chronologies, and causal events. They will often contain word-based narrative, in written or oral forms to help connect the resources, but the browser allows for a new form of storytelling, using guided visualizations. These visualizations use new methods of interpreting and presenting historic inquiry, such as animation over time, charts, maps, data, and interactive timelines to graphically show the relationships between multiple kinds of information.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $49,827
Grant period: 3/1/2008 – 11/30/2009

University of Alaska, Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK 99775-0001)
Siri Tuttle
HD-50298-08
[View white paper]
Minto Songs

The collection, digitization, organization, and archival storage, as well as dissemination among the Minto Athabascan community, of recorded performances of Alaskan Athabascan songs.

Among the cultural objects gathered in the last century from indigenous groups in the Americas is a large amount of recorded song. Among Alaskan Athabascans, song serves as a community-internal activity that supports native language use and cultural revitalization, and also as a marker of village identity in the larger communities. The Minto Athabascan community in Alaska is the last village that has speakers of the Lower Tanana Athabascan language, and it has a very strong song tradition. We propose to organize the Minto song data available to us (Alaska Native Language Center @ UAF; Polar Regions collections at Rasmuson Library, and in the Rooth & Lundstrom collections in Sweden) and to make it usable by community members by creating web-ready multimedia pages that can be added to existing websites and controlled by the Village of Minto. Annotations for songs will be recorded with Minto elders who can identify the composers and occasions for which the songs were composed.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $50,000
Grant period: 5/1/2008 – 10/31/2009

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Brian Hoffman (project director)
Kathleen Fitzpatrick (co-project director)
HD-50299-08
[View white paper]
MediaCommons: Social Networking Tools for Digital Scholarly Communication

Development of a set of networking software tools to support a "peer-to-peer" review structure for MediaCommons, a scholarly publishing network in the digital humanities.

New York University, working with the Institute for the Future of the Book, seeks Level II funding in order build a working prototype of a set of networking tools that will serve as the membership system for MediaCommons, an all-electronic scholarly publishing network in the digital humanities. This set of tools, which one might imagine as bringing together the functionalities of e-portfolio software, social networking systems, and electronic publishing platforms, will enable the users of MediaCommons to find one another, collaborate, and disseminate their work in new ways. Within this social network, scholars would be able to make available a wide range of their work, including published texts ranging from the monograph to the article, works-in-progress, blogs and other more informal online writing, and other activities that often go unnoticed as forms of scholarly production, such as reviews of other scholars' work, as well as syllabi and other teaching resources.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $49,657
Grant period: 3/1/2008 – 2/28/2010

Wheaton College (Norton, MA 02766-2322)
Mark David LeBlanc
HD-50300-08
[View white paper]
Pattern Recognition through Computational Stylistics: Old English and Beyond

Development of a prototypical suite of computational tools and statistical analyses to explore the corpus of Old English literature using the genomic approach of tracing information-rich patterns of letters as well as that of literary analysis and interpretation.

Professors Drout, Kahn, and LeBlanc have prepared a Level II proposal to prototype a suite of computational tools and statistical analyses to explore the Old English corpus. This work will serve as a proof of concept for the larger deployment of corpus-independent tools. Anticipated outcomes include scalable, open-source software to facilitate the computation and organization of word frequencies and other patterns and empirical measures of success when using various statistical analyses on the condensed data. An additional and essential outcome from our perspective is how this research leads to and impacts the development of interdisciplinary course materials for our connected (interdisciplinary) undergraduate courses in English, Statistics, and Computer Science in order that computational analyses become a more inviting option for faculty and advanced research students in the Humanities.

Project fields: English
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $41,950
Grant period: 7/1/2008 – 6/30/2010

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Davison Packard Koenig
HD-50306-08
[View white paper]
Virtual Vault

Electronic access to the world's largest collection of whole pottery vessels from the American Southwest through digital renderings of Arizona State University's Pottery Vault and relevant prehistoric archaeological sites as well as interviews with anthropologists, conservators, and Native American potters.

This project will develop an alpha level test for an interactive artifact browser to share the ceramics of the Arizona State Museum with educational, academic and public audiences. This application is filed under the National Endowment for the Humanities Digital Start Up grants program.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $25,000
Grant period: 3/1/2008 – 9/30/2009

University of Massachusetts, Boston (Boston, MA 02125-3300)
Joanne Marie Riley
HD-50308-08
[View white paper]
Online Social Networking for the Humanities: the Massachusetts Studies Network Prototype

The development and evaluation of a social networking platform for the members of the statewide Massachusetts Studies Project.

The Massachusetts Studies Project (MSP) aims to create an online social network specifically for those who are involved in local studies in Massachusetts. This first, Level I phase of the project will allow us to assess a promising open source development platform called "Ning," which offers powerful new tools for building customized social networks. Building a test network on Ning, and planning and prototyping the code to add functionality tailored to humanities practitioners, will position us to take the next steps in building a full-fledged, model social network to meet the collaborative needs of educators, scholars, librarians, and local studies practitioners.

Project fields: U.S. Regional Studies
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $24,748
Grant period: 5/1/2008 – 6/30/2009

Mississippi State University (Mississippi State, MS 39762-9998)
Paul Frederick Jacobs
HD-50311-08
[View white paper]
Distributed Archives Transaction System

Development of open source web tools for accessing online digitized collections in the humanities via a system that communicates with multiple database types while protecting the integrity of the original data sets.

This project will develop tools for accessing digitized collections in the humanities via a system that provides universal communication with multiple database types and that simultaneously protects the integrity of original data sets. Because the proposed system cuts across database types and sources, in order to establish ease in gathering information, it will offer an efficient way to conduct research. A user will come to a single site to collect data, rather than having to construct individual searches at each of many sites. Key to this project is the integrity of data sources. Unlike other projects, this system will not possess (copies of) databases or sources; nor will it change databases or data sources in order for information to be gathered. This feature permits alteration by data owners to occur routinely and for changes to appear at once. Importance of the project is the shift from site-specific searches to a single seamless search across multiple sites.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $50,000
Grant period: 3/1/2008 – 12/31/2009

Lake Forest College (Lake Forest, IL 60045-2399)
Davis Schneiderman
HD-50312-08
[View white paper]
Virtual Burnham Initiative

The development of the Virtual Burnham Initiative (VBI), a multimedia project that would examine the history and legacy of Daniel H. Burnham's and Edward H. Bennett's Plan of Chicago (1909).

Lake Forest Colleges seeks a $25,000 grant from the NEH to begin work on the Virtual Burnham Initiative (VBI). Combining historical research, 3-D models, curriculum development and philosophical debate, the VBI will capitalize on new technology and community networking to facilitate an open, ongoing discussion of Chicagoland's development among educational audiences at the college and high school levels. In the VBI's start-up phase, a Chicago-area coalition led by Lake Forest College will transform the flat images, maps, and text of Burnham's Plan into 3-D models, accessible through an organized project host website. The VBI will serve as a model for other humanities-based initiatives as it is a project about the community that can become part of the community offering a heretofore impossible organization of material related to the Plan with a unique application of different virtual modeling technologies to enhance collaborative humanities scholarship.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $25,000
Grant period: 4/1/2008 – 4/30/2010

Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-0001)
Julia Flanders,
HD-50320-08
[View white paper]
Encoding Names for Contextual Exploration in Digital Thematic Research Collections

The advancement of humanities text encoding and research by refining and expanding the automated representation of personal names and their contexts.

The Brown University Women Writers Project (WWP) seeks Level II funding from the NEH Digital Humanities Startup Grants program for a new project to explore new ways of representing contextual information that will support advanced kinds of user interaction with thematic research collections. In this project we will be focusing on the representation of persons and personal names. We will first examine methods of representing names and the persons they denote, considering in particular the kinds of scholarly work that such representations can support. We will next develop an experimental data representation of the names and persons found in our published collection, Women Writers Online (WWO). Finally, we will build a prototype interface that exposes this data for reader interaction and exploration. The result will be to embed the primary sources in an extensible web of contextual information that can support interface features such as searching, exploration, and pattern visualization.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $49,992
Grant period: 7/1/2008 – 12/31/2009

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712)
Samuel E. Baker
HD-50345-08
[View white paper]
The eCommentary Machine Project

Development of a web-based collaborative commentary and annotation tool.

The eCommentary Machine web application ("eComma") enables groups of students, scholars, or general readers to build collaborative commentaries on a text and to search, display, and share those commentaries online.

Project fields: Literary Criticism
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $45,822
Grant period: 6/1/2008 – 5/31/2009

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum
HD-50346-08
[View white paper]
Approaches to Managing and Collecting Born-Digital Literary Materials for Scholarly Use

A series of planning meetings and site visits aimed at developing archival tools and best practices for preserving born-digital documents produced by contemporary authors.

Digital Humanities Initiative Level 1 Start Up funding is requested to support a series of site visits and planning meetings among personnel working with the born-digital components of three significant collections of literary material: the Salman Rushdie papers at Emory University's Woodruff Library, the Michael Joyce Papers at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin, and the Deena Larsen Collection at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland. The meetings and site visits will facilitate the preparation of a larger collaborative grant proposal among the three institutions aimed at developing archival tools and best practices for preserving and curating the born-digital documents and records of contemporary authorship. Initial findings will be made available through a jointly authored and publicly distributed online white paper, as well as conference presentations at relevant venues.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $11,708
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 3/31/2009

Hofstra University (Hempstead, NY 11550)
John L. Bryant
HD-50351-08
[View white paper]
Melville, Revision, and Collaborative Editing: Toward a Critical Archive

The development of the TextLab scholarly editing tool to allow for analysis of texts that exist in multiple versions or editions, beginning with the Melville Electronic Library.

The project is to initiate the Melville Electronic Library (MEL), an online "critical archive" of primary and substantial secondary materials. To promote the collaborative editing of "fluid texts" (works that exist in multiple revised versions), the team will also create a proof of concept of its innovative editorial feature: TextLab. With this tool, groups of scholars or students may download images of Melville manuscripts, transcribe their "revision text," identify revision sites direcly on the image, and link each marked site to the transcription text. The transcription will also be linked to explanatory revision narratives. These procedures will take place in a version control system that enables users to track their own changes to the transcriptions they are collaboratively building. The project's goals are to inaugurate TextLab using samples from Harvard's Houghton Library, organize a meeting of Melville scholars to plan work flow, and write further grant proposals for MEL.

Project fields: American Literature
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $23,591
Grant period: 3/1/2008 – 2/28/2010

Bob Stein
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar
HD-50408-08
Where Minds Meet: New Architectures for the Study of History and Music

Planning activities, including two symposia, to consider the future of scholarly humanities publishing within the networked environment of the Web.

With the advent of the cd-rom in the 80's, a few pioneering humanities scholars began to develop a new vocabulary of multi-layered, multi-modal digital publications. Since that time, the internet has emerged as a powerful engine for collaboration across peer networks, radically collapsing the distance between authors and readers and creating new communal spaces for work and review. To date these two evolutionary streams have mostly been separate. Rich multimedia is still largely consigned to individual consumption on the desktop, while networked collaboration generally occurs around predominantly textual media such as the blogosphere, or bite-sized fragments on YouTube and elsewhere. We propose to carry out initial planning for two ambitious digital publishing projects that would merge these streams into powerfully integrated experiences.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $24,292
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 6/30/2009

American Association for State and Local History (Nashville, TN 37203-2921)
Matthew S. Gibson
HD-50420-08
[View white paper]
Online Encyclopedia Best Practices and Standards

The development of best practices for the production of geographically-based online humanities encyclopedias.

Best practices and Standards for Online Encyclopedias will facilitate long-term planning among geographically based digital encyclopedias and document best practices in content/technical standards for the development of shared innovations in digital encyclopedia projects across the U.S. The project focuses on a summit meeting on technology and content practice in digital encyclopedias, which will produce a guide of best practices for content and technical standards and a roadmap to technological innovation. Project goals are to gather data about the digital encyclopedia community and its needs; to collaboratively publish a white paper on standards and technology; to utilize AASLH's Internet Digital Encyclopedia Alliance (IDEA) committee to maintain and support those standards; and to promote humanities-based, online reference works as authoritative sources for public research.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $35,000
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 3/31/2012

Funding details
Original grant (2008) $25,000
Supplement (2010) $10,000

Haverford College (Haverford, PA 19041-1392)
Richard Freedman
HD-50422-08
[View white paper]
The Chansonniers of Nicholas Du Chemin (1549-1551): A Digital Forum for Renaissance Music Books

Development of an open source bilingual database and collaborative digital forum to facilitate research and scholarly exchange about Renaissance music.

The digital environment offers much that might advance the study, teaching, and performance of early music. Focusing on a neglected but important repertory of chansons from mid-sixteenth-century Paris, this unique project will put old books before a diverse audience of modern scholars and musicians in ways that will prompt renewed understanding of these cultural artifacts and their meanings. Our work will advance scholarship and serious study of Renaissance music in several related ways, offering a searchable image archive, an innovative electronic display for music books, commentaries and examples, and tools for research, transcription and collaboration.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Music History and Criticism
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $22,622
Grant period: 10/1/2008 – 6/30/2010

University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506)
Abigail Firey
HD-50429-08
[View white paper]
Carolingian Canon Law Project: A Collaborative Initiative

The establishment of encoding standards and digital access for multiple versions of medieval Latin legal manuscripts, including bibliographic information, annotations, and English translations.

The Carolingian Canon Law Project (CCL) gives access for the first time to a vast quantity of important medieval legal material, hitherto known only partially, and only by scholars who have been able to consult manuscripts in repositories scattered across Europe, or who have used texts published before the twentieth century. This project initiates digital presentation that matches the dynamic nature of the material, which varies in each manuscript. It will also establish basic "industry standards" for encoding transcriptions of medieval legal manuscripts. This project thus will offer a model for any venture in the Humanities that involves study of multiple versions of a text. The CCL also supplies vital bibliography, annotations, and translations into English of these Latin texts. This project is intensively collaborative, and is designed to sustain collaboration among future as well as present scholars. Level II funding is requested from September 2008 through August 2009.

Project fields: Medieval Studies
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $49,133
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 12/31/2009

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588)
Andrew Wade Jewell
HD-50440-08
[View white paper]
The Crowded Page

The development of data-mining and visualization tools to detail and map relationships in communities of writers and artists within specific geographic and temporal locations.

The Crowded Page is an Internet-based humanities computing project whose goal is to create data-mining and visualization tools that will allow researchers to map out the intricate connections between the members of artistic and literary communities. In most accounts of literary and art history, a work of art or literature is said to be the product of a single creative mind. In an effort to make visible what is often obscured in traditional histories of art and literature, The Crowded Page seeks to take advantage of the unique capabilities of the digital medium to foreground the ways in which a complex network of friends, editors, neighbors, lovers, and fellow artists and writers informs the creative process.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $49,577
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 3/31/2011

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Douglas L. Reside
HD-50441-08
[View white paper]
Electronic Broadway Project

The development of a prototype interface for producing electronic editions of the musical theater texts and related materials.

The Electronic Broadway Project, based at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), seeks to create an interface for electronic editions of musical theater texts and, as a prototype, develop an electronic edition of the new Broadway musical Glory Days. We will also explore, in this project, the problem of editing a text that was mostly composed electronically. Like so many new literary works, Glory Days was written using digital tools (Word processors, digital music recorders, etc) and so the primary sources are, in many cases, preserved as bits on magnetic media rather than as ink on paper.

Project fields: Theater History and Criticism
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $48,316
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 8/31/2010

University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Andrew J. Torget
HD-50442-08
[View white paper]
Visualizing the Past: Tools and Techniques for Understanding Historical Processes

A two-day workshop on issues relating to visualization and historical processes and the first steps toward the creation of new tools for overcoming obstacles to data visualization work.

The University of Richmond requests a Level I Digital Humanities Start-Up grant to bring together experts for investigations about how to overcome limitations that prevent most humanities scholars from taking advantage of visualization techniques in their research. The grant will fund a two-day workshop where invited scholars will discuss current work on visualizing historical processes, and together consider: (1) How can we harness emerging cyber-infrastructure tools and interoperability standards to explore, visualize, and analyze spatial and temporal components of distributed digital archives to better understand historical events and processes? (2) How can user-friendly tools or web sites be created to allow scholars and researchers to animate spatial and temporal data housed on different systems across the Internet? The grant will also fund initial experiments toward creating new tools for overcoming obstacles to data visualization work. Results will be presented as a white paper.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $19,942
Grant period: 10/1/2008 – 9/30/2009

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-1168)
William Hart-Davidson
HD-50445-08
[View white paper]
Archive 2.0: Imagining the Michigan State University Israelite Samaritan Scroll Collection

Development of a project that would use new Internet tools and design practices to study and discuss fifteenth-century bible scrolls.

This project will work with Michigan State University units and the A.B. Samaritan Institute in Holon, Israel to create using the latest in Web 2.0 technologies an accessible, useable and living archive for the Israelite Samaritan community in Holon and Nabulus as well as biblical scholars. To facilitate this work we will digitize over the next several years three 15th century Israelite Samaritan Pentateuch scrolls, and provide a unique suite of tools to help facilitate collaboration: social networking, tagging, social bookmarking, zoomify view, and multilingual support. The aim is to bring together two distinct groups of users - textual scholars and members of the Israelite Samaritan community - both of whom have a significant stake in the cultural and scholarly value of the Samaritan Archive, via an online environment in which they can view and interpret the Samaritan texts, interact with members of their respective communities, and interact with one another.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $33,327
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 6/30/2009

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Robert Squillace
HD-50461-08
[View white paper]
Simonides: A Student-Centered Humanities Learning Tool

The development of a collaborative e-portfolio software tool intended to support a liberal arts curriculum and built on the Sakai Open Source Portfolio platform.

The General Studies Program at New York University (NYU), an interdisciplinary two-year liberal arts program, seeks a Level II Start-up grant to finish a prototype and begin implementation of Simonides, a hybrid tool that combines the collaborative capabilities of blogs and wikis with the repository features of an e-portfolio. This tool will provide students with a flexible electronic palette for storing and annotating digital humanities materials from their coursework, as well as for building and sharing their own multimedia documents created with these materials. The Simonides project will re-center instructional technology on the educational experience of the individual student, making the way a student understands the connections between his or her work in the humanities the pedagogical focus. The result will be an instrument of dynamic learning that will embody the spirit of our liberal arts program: to give students a personal stake in the cultural traditions investigated by our curriculum.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $49,351
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 8/31/2009

Ohio State University Research Foundation (Columbus, OH 43212)
H. Lewis Ulman
HD-50462-08
[View white paper]
Reliable Witnesses: Integrating Multimedia, Distributed Electronic Textual Editions into Library Collections

Development of strategies for integrating distributed electronic editions and digital projects into library collections, with attention to matters relating to acquisition, description, and preservation of these materials.

The Reliable Witnesses project addresses current vulnerabilities of distributed electronic textual editions and integrates such projects into library collections through workflows for acquisition, description, and preservation. Electronic editions of unique manuscript materials represent an important part of our cultural heritage, providing access to materials otherwise inaccessible to most users, serving as incubators for cutting-edge scholarship, and providing a platform for technological innovation. However, e-text projects frequently employ infrastructures from a variety of resources, and such innovative, distributed designs can result in projects that are not easily integrated into library collections, which consist primarily of traditional print and subscription digital resources. The Reliable Witnesses project will result in local best practices for meeting these challenges as well as a generalized life-cycle model that other institutions can adapt to their needs.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $35,925
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 8/31/2009

Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Nardina Nameth Mein
HD-50464-08
[View white paper]
The Digital Learning and Development Environment

The development of a prototype learning tool to incorporate digital humanities collections housed in a university's digital repository, beginning with two collections housed in the Wayne State University Library System.

The Office for Teaching and Learning (OTL) of the Wayne State University Library System (WSULS) seeks to develop the prototype for an innovative approach to digital learning using image repositories. The project will integrate easy-to-use technical tools with instructional design principles and resources for teaching and learning, utilizing two of the Digital Image Collections created by the WSULS in collaboration with partner museums and archives (Virtual Motor City and Digital Dress). The web-based workspace of the "Digital Learning and Development Sandbox" that we will create represents the next step in instructional design for using digital collections. It will enable faculty and students to export images then reimport them into multi-modal "learning objects, supported by a comprehensive research and learning system. The final product will promote wider use of the Collections while also providing a generic model for working with digital repositories using open source technology.

Project fields: Education
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $50,000
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 8/31/2009

Connecticut Humanities Council (Middletown, CT 06457-3204)
Stuart L. Parnes
HD-50466-08
Connecticut's Heritage ECHOsystem: Resolving the Challenges to Interoperability Across Disparate Digital Repositories

A unique electronic system bringing together digitized records, images and documents, Connecticut-focused curricula, Connecticut history-centered media resources, indexes of related museum exhibitions and events, and scholar-written essays and short entries.

"Connecticut's ECHOsystem" addresses the dwindling appreciation of the Connecticut past and its influence on the national story through the creation of an online reference text of authoritative scholar-written content enriched by essential institutional, archival, curricular and media resources in Connecticut history. ECHOsystem partners envision the project as a national model both in the integration of historical content from multiple databases in a single,easily accessible, user-friendly reference source and in the development of a new software code to assist other multiple database digitalization projects. During the 12-month NEH Digital Start-Up II period, the ECHOsystem partnership expects to retain the services of an experienced software development firm to resolve issues of interoperability across the project's disparate digital repositories.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $50,000
Grant period: 10/1/2008 – 9/30/2009

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Purchase (Purchase, NY 10577-1402)
M. Jon Rubin
HD-50468-08
[View white paper]
Internationalizing Humanities Education through Globally Networked Learning

The development of a faculty development model for international online collaborative humanities education, focusing initially on partnerships with universities in Russia, Ghana, and Canada.

This Level 2 Internationalizing Humanities Education through Globally Networked Learning Project will test and implement models that will assist humanities faculty to internationalize their classes by using available Internet-based tools to create a cross-cultural curriculum. Faculty will be trained to use learning management software and socio software tools to generate collaborative assignments that challenge students to negotiate and build shared learning cultures online. The project?s goal is to demonstrate that any humanities faculty member can teach a course in a globally networked learning environment if given the appropriate technological, pedagogical and intercultural support. A blog-based process journal will be used to track the challenges faced and lessons-learned during the implementation of humanities courses in Medieval Literature, Art History, and Drama Studies that will conducted with foreign partners in Russia, Ghana, and French Canada.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $49,864
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 3/31/2010

Willamette University (Salem, OR 97301-3922)
Michael Spalti
HD-50473-08
[View white paper]
Bridging the Gap: Connecting Authors to Museum and Archival Collections

The creation of an open source link between the digital resources available through the commonly-used asset management system, CONTENTdm, with the multimedia Web authoring application, Pachyderm.

This project improves the ability of multimedia authors to interact with the digital collections of museums, archives, and libaries, thereby enhancing experimentation in new forms of humanities scholarship. The project envisions development of an open sources bridge between a widely used digital asset management system (CONTENTdm) and applications that support the Open Knowledge Initiative's standard for interoperability, including open source, multimedia authoring tools. In a collaborative scholarly endeavor, we will use this software bridge to develop a multimedia presentation on the Pacific Northwest Artist Carl Hall (1921-1996) that directly incorporates images and audio from museum and archival digital collections.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $49,020
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 1/31/2011

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Nadine Moeller
HD-50482-08
[View white paper]
Digital Documentation of a Provincial Town in Ancient Egypt

The development of new digital image capturing techniques enabling researchers to process data from archaeological excavations more accurately and efficiently at the site of Tell Edfu, one of the last well-preserved ancient cities in Egypt.

This project will develop new digital image capturing techniques that enable researchers to process data from archaeological excavations more accurately and efficiently than ever before. The site of Tell Edfu, which is the focus of this project, is one of the last well-preserved ancient cities in Egypt. The incredibly rich and complex stratigraphic record with its numerous well-preserved building levels at Tell Edfu are ideally suited for the development of new technical methods for the recording and analysis of archaeological data.

[Grant products] [Media coverage]
Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $50,000
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 8/31/2010

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Champaign, IL 61820-6903)
S. Max Edelson
HD-50495-08
[View white paper]
The Cartography of American Colonization Database Project

The development of a database of 1000 historical maps illustrating the trajectory of colonization in the Americas. The database will provide a searchable introduction to the mapping of the western hemisphere in the era of European expansion, ca. 1500-1800.

The Cartography of American Colonization Database (CACD) is a joint effort of S. Max Edelson and the Institute of Computing in the Humanities, Art and Social Science (I-Chass) at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA at the University of Illinois. The database provides a highly searchable introduction to the mapping of the western hemisphere in the era of European expansion, ca. 1500-1800. Its first object is to gather and organize metadata, especially bibliographical information and links to high-resolution digital scans of historic maps, plans and charts. By featuring 1,000 Milestone Maps that illustrate colonization in the America's, the CACD will be the first universal digital cartobiliography to organize the increasing digital content available on the Web. Its innovative research modules will showcase the possibilities for map scholarship.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $24,997
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 8/31/2010

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Jennifer Golbeck
HD-50505-08
[View white paper]
Visualizing Archival Collections

The development of visualization tools for assessing information contained in electronic archival finding aids created with Encoded Archival Description (EAD)

The proposed project will build on the research and prototype development work done in the creation of ArchivesZ. This project has two goals. The first is to design and evaluate interfaces for visualizing aggregated data harvested from EAD encoded archival finding aids. The second is to analyze and develop recommendations for handling issues related to the lack of subject term standardization in the description of archival collections. This will lay the foundation for future work to develop a tool for use in visualizing archival collections from institutions using EAD to encode their finding aids. A tool for visualizing this broad range of archival collections would support both experienced and amateur researchers in their efforts to locate new materials. Any set of archival collections could be evaluated an an aggregated manner. Visualization tools can support discovery of relationships among time periods and subjects that otherwise may never be detected.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $14,050
Grant period: 8/1/2008 – 7/31/2009

University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)
Steven W. Hackel
HD-50507-08
[View white paper]
The Early California Cultural Atlas

Development of an interactive website that would use maps and other tools to examine the historical development of colonial California from 1769 to 1850.

The Early California Cultural Atlas (ECCA) is envisioned as an interactive website that will integrate and manage historical resources, enable analysis of historical data related to the colonization and settlement of California, display research results in the form of maps and other visualizations, and educate students from elementary school to the university. This project is interdisciplinary and collaborative; it will draw upon the expertise of librarians, archivists, research scholars, software engineers, technical experts, California Indians, and primary school teachers. The ECCA represents a new partnership between existing programs, innovative scholars, and accomplished educators.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $25,000
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 2/28/2010

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Matthew K. Gold
HD-50537-08
[View white paper]
Looking for Whitman: the Poetry of Place in the Life and Work of Walt Whitman

Development of a series of courses at four partner institutions that would engage students in online investigations of Walt Whitman's work in geographical context

This Level 1 Digital Humanities project, " Looking for Whitman: The Poetry of Place in the Life and Work of Walt Whitman," will engage faculty and students at four academic institutions--New York City College of Technology; New York University; University of Mary Washington; and Rutgers University, Camden--in a concurrent, connected, semester-long inquiry into the relationship of Whitman's poetry to local geography and history. Each class will explore the interrelationship between a specific locale and a particular phase of the poet's work. Utilizing open-source tools to connect classrooms, the interdisciplinary project will create a collaborative, online space in which students can participate in a dynamic, social, web based learning environment. In its conception and articulation, this project reflects the central themes of Whitman's work: democracy, diversity, and connectedness.

[Grant products] [Media coverage]
Project fields: American Literature
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $24,042
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 12/31/2009

Center for Independent Documentary (Sharon, MA 02067-2868)
Michael Abraham Epstein
HD-50542-08
[View white paper]
Murder at Harvard Mobile

Development of a multi-media, historical, mobile walking tour of Boston.

The MURDER AT HARVARD MOBILE project (wt) will re-version a well-known N.E.H.-funded historical documentary about a notorious 1849 Boston murder into the basis of a 40-minute audio/video walking tour that will be accessed through a hand-held device similar to the iPhone. By using the compelling story of a famous crime as its narrative spine, this project will provide student groups and cultural tourists with a layered look at the social and cultural history of some of Boston's most significant downtown areas while it provides a road map for use of open source Mobile Narrative Software. The project will start in September, 2008 and end in February, 2009.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $50,000
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 10/31/2009

State of Vermont Division for Historic Preservation (Montpelier, VT 05620-0201)
Giovanna Peebles
HD-50543-08
[View white paper]
Creating A Sense of Place Through Archeology: Moving Archeology From Deep Storage Into the Public Eye Through the Internet

Development of a prototype for an integrated Internet-based virtual archaeology museum for Vermont.

The Vermont Division for Historic Preservation seeks a Level I Start-Up Grant to revolutionize current practices of disseminating archeological information to scholars, educators, students, communities, and the general public. It seeks to transform the typical archeological investigation "end products" -- an unpublished technical paper report and boxes full of artifacts and other data -- into an integrated virtual archeology museum. This project is the first step towards creating a sustainable Internet-based Vermont archeology virtual museum that we call "A Sense of Place through Archeology" and will lead the way for other states and organizations to use similar tools and formats. The grant will fund development of a plan, a proof of concept, and a prototype for a virtual archeology museum that can be used by any interested organization to reveal the information and stories now locked in inaccessible files and storage cabinets. Other states have expressed great interest in the project.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $25,000
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 1/31/2010

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