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Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities*
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George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Sharon Leon (project director)
Sheila Brennan (co-project director)
HT-50077-13
Doing Digital History: An Institute for Mid-Career American Historians

A two-week institute for 25 historians, to be hosted by George Mason University's Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, on advanced theory and application of new media tools for teaching and scholarship.

Historians, as a group, are reluctant and anxious to engage in digital research methods and to integrate those methods and accompanying tools into their teaching. Taking a cue from the most recent Ithaka S+R report, "Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians," the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University (RRCHNM) requests support from the National Endowment for the Humanities to host a two-week institute in 2014 to fill a much-needed gap for historians who need instruction and a professional learning community to engage with new media methods and tools, and to push forward with work on their own digital projects. In the spirit of capitalizing on our own expertise and the significant resources in the field, we will solicit our participants from the broad field of American History, without respect to subfield specialty.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $215,718
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 5/31/2015

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Jennifer E. Guiliano (project director)
George H. Williams (co-project director)
HT-50078-13
Building an Accessible Future for the Humanities

A series of four two-day workshops to be held at Northeastern University, Emory University, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and the University of Texas, Austin, on theoretical and practical approaches for making digital humanities scholarship accessible to blind, low-vision, deaf, and hard-of-hearing users. An online guide of best practices with examples of humanities projects would be produced as a part of these workshops.

The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland will partner with the BrailleSC.org project, the Northeastern Center for Digital Humanities, the Emory University Libraries Digital Commons (DiSC), the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities (CDRH) at the University of Nebraska, and the College of Information at the University of Texas-Austin to foster the making of digital environments accessible and usable by blind, low-vision, deaf, and hard-of-hearing users. AccessibleFuture will facilitate four two-day long workshops for one hundred humanists, librarians, and information scholars (twenty-five per workshop) to develop and educate humanities scholars with all levels of expertise from beginner to the most advanced about technologies, design standards, and accessibility issues associated with the use of digital technologies.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,302
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2015

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Clifford Blake Anderson
HT-50080-13
XQuery Summer Institute: Advancing XML-Based Scholarship from Representation to Discovery

This two-week summer institute at Vanderbilt would train 12 participants in the techniques and methodologies of XQuery language, which allows for searching and manipulating texts encoded in XML.

The XQuery Summer Institute at Vanderbilt University will be aimed at archivists, librarians, professors, and students who have experience marking up texts in XML, but do not yet know how to work computationally with those documents. Our institute aspires to recruit twelve members of the digital humanities community to a two week institute in June 2014. The faculty of the institute will teach participants to work productively with their XML-encoded texts using XQuery, a programming language designed specifically for XML. With XQuery, scholars can learn a single language to ingest their texts into an XML database, ask questions of them, connect them with other sources of information, and publish them on the web. Participants will go beyond using XML for representation to querying XML for discovery.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $72,760
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Patrick Murray-John
HT-50059-12
Another Week | Another Tool - A Digital Humanities Barnraising

A one week institute for twelve participants on the principles of humanities-centered tool design, development, and implementation, followed by a year of development support and evaluation.

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University proposes a reprise of One Week | One Tool for summer 2013. Another Week | Another Tool: A Digital Humanities Barnraising will once again bring together a group of twelve digital scholars, students, librarians, and museum professionals of diverse disciplinary backgrounds and practical experience to CHNM to build something useful and useable in seven days. Not for the faint of heart, a one-day course of training in the principles of open source software development will be followed by an intense six days of doing and a year of continued community engagement, development, testing, dissemination, and evaluation. Comprised of designers and programmers as well as project managers and outreach specialists, the group will conceive a tool, outline a roadmap, develop and disseminate a modest prototype, lay the ground work for building an open source community, and make first steps toward securing the project's long-term sustainability.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $230,000
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 9/30/2014

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1094)
Owen Williams
HT-50067-12
Folger Shakespeare Library Summer Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities: "Early Modern Digital Agendas"

A three-week institute, hosted by the Folger Shakespeare Library, for twenty scholars of early modern English studies to gain both applied and theoretical familiarity with digital research resources and methods.

Early Modern Digital Agendas is an expansively defined training institute. Its exercises will instill a working knowledge of the methods and models that are currently broadening the interpretive horizons of early modern scholars. It will create a forum in which participants can historicize, theorize, and evaluate digital tools and approaches, with discussion growing out of, and feeding back into, their own projects. Each week builds on the previous one. During the first, participants will work with online catalogues and textual archives. In the second, they will investigate additions to the textual corpus through digital and interoperable editions. During the third, participants will explore corpus linguistics, the latest methods for visualizing that work, and the implications these advancements have for research in the humanities. With these tools, participants will create a digital footprint to disseminate their period-specific discoveries of the best DH approaches and sources.

Project fields: Renaissance Studies
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $159,056
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2014

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712)
Tanya E. Clement
HT-50069-12
Institute for High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS)

A four-day institute at the University of Texas, Austin, with a follow-up workshop for humanities scholars, librarians, archivists, and advanced graduate students on the use of analytical tools to study digital audio collections of spoken word, such as oral histories, poetry, and Native American oral traditions.

We are applying for an Institutes for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities grant from the NEH to support bringing together librarians and archivists, humanities scholars and students, and computer scientists and technologists invested in understanding and developing infrastructure for computational analysis on poetry, folklore, speeches, and storytelling sound files. The School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin and the Informatics Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign propose to host the High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS) Institute to include meetings in May 2013 and in May 2014. In the interim year, scholars will work on scholarship in consultation with the HiPSTAS team. The second meeting is a symposium on the scholarship produced through the year as well as a meeting to propose recommendations for the development of tools for supporting advanced digital scholarly inquiry in spoken text sound.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $235,000
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 9/30/2014

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Trevor Munoz
HT-50070-12
Digital Humanities Data Curation

A series of three-day institutes to be held at the University of Maryland, College Park, Brown University, and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, for 51 participants on approaches to data curation of humanities research materials for librarians, archivists, and humanities scholars.

Digital Humanities Data Curation (DHDC) will engage scholars in sustained collaboration around issues of data curation in order to educate scholars on best practices and technologies for data curation and their relationship to scholarly methods. The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland will lead a collaboration partnering the Women Writers Project (WWP) at Brown University, and the Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS) at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS), at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign that will foster innovation in digital humanities research by integrating recent advances in the research and practice of data curation to address the specific needs of humanities researchers. DHDC will serve as an opportunity for participants to receive guidance in understanding the role of data curation in enriching humanities research projects.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $248,721
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 9/30/2014

Arkansas State University, Main Campus (State University, AR 72467)
Alyson Ann Gill
HT-50074-12
[View white paper]
Humanities Heritage 3D Visualization: Theory and Practice

A training institute in practical and theoretical approaches to 3D real-time visualization of cultural heritage sites for twenty humanities scholars.

The past thirty years have seen a tremendous upsurge in the use of digital modeling in archaeology as well as in projects and applications based in the humanities. Digital representations can create new forms of visual knowledge, which in turn can lead to new research streams. As such, digital models have become increasingly important tools in a wide range of applications. Despite the power of these models as representational and visualization tools, the tools themselves are often difficult to use and not easily accessible by the novice. This proposal is for a 'digital toolbox' that bridges this gap. A unique feature of this institute is the incorporation of visits to Arkansas State University heritage sites modeled by the University's Center for Digital Initiatives. Beyond this, in bringing together an impressive group of lecturers working in the digital humanities, the institute itself would create an important resource in the form of a community of scholars, encouraging future collaborations between individuals and universities.

Project fields: Architecture
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $186,472
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5000)
Julia Flanders,
HT-50043-11
Taking TEI Further: Teaching and Publication

A series of workshops to be held at Brown University for humanities faculty, related staff, and graduate students to explore advanced uses of digital text encoding for use in humanities scholarship and teaching.

This three-year institute series will offer an opportunity for advanced exploration and training in three areas of critical importance to scholarly users of the TEI Guidelines. Building on two previous seminar series, we will offer advanced three-day institutes on TEI customization, XSLT for digital humanists, and bringing text encoding into the digital humanities classroom. These seminars will be aimed at an audience of faculty, archivists, librarians, and digital humanists who have had some experience with TEI and need grounding in more advanced tools, systems, and approaches. Each seminar will emphasize discussion, hands-on practice, and close attention to the specifics of participants' own projects. The seminars will be led by the WWP staff, who are internationally recognized as experts in TEI encoding, project design, and digital humanities, together with guest instructors with expertise in specific domains appropriate to each seminar.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,974
Grant period: 3/1/2012 – 2/28/2015

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory R. Crane
HT-50044-11
Working with Text in a Digital Age

A three-week institute with follow-up activities at Tufts University on the use of computational and corpus linguistics methodologies for scholarly research for humanities scholars, library professionals, and graduate students.

This Institute will provide 30 participants with three weeks in which (1) to develop hands on experience with TEI-XML, (2) to apply methods from information retrieval, text visualization, and corpus and computational linguistics to the analysis of textual and linguistic sources in the Humanities, and (3) to rethink not only their own research agendas but also new relationships between their work and non-specialists (e.g., an expansion in opportunities for tangible contributions and significant research by undergraduates, new collaborations that transcend boundaries of language and culture, and increased opportunities for the general public both to contribute to our understanding of the past). A two-day conference on the theme of the Institute will then follow in the summer of 2013 with an open call for contributions and will provide both a venue for and a challenge to the issues/ideas raised during the initial Institute and their importance for the digital humanities.

Project fields: Classics
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,727
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 9/30/2014

University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Jijun Tang
HT-50046-11
[View white paper]
High Performance Computing Collaboratory

A series of workshops to be held at the University of South Carolina and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign to consider uses of high-performance computing applications in humanities research and teaching.

The Center for Digital Humanities (CDH) at the University of South Carolina will partner with the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science (I-CHASS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) to foster innovation in the research and development of computational resources for humanities research groups. Humanities High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HpC) will engage scholars in a year-long collaboration with computing specialists in order to: 1) receive a comprehensive education in four computational concentrations; 2) receive instruction in digital humanities project design and management; 3) obtain hands-on experience with a variety of technical platforms; 4) work with technical staff to outline pilot explorations in at least one area of computational concentration; and 5) join a year-long virtual community where scholars will support their peers in authoring digital humanities projects. Participants will come from a wide range of institutions, with a particular focus on recruiting students and faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $248,837
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Todd Presner
HT-50047-11
[View white paper]
Digital Cultural Mapping: Transformative Scholarship and Teaching in the Geospatial Humanities

A three-week summer institute hosted by the University of California, Los Angeles to explore how geospatial technologies like Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be used for teaching, learning, and research in the humanities.

"Digital Cultural Mapping: Transformative Scholarship in the Geospatial Humanities" is a proposal for a three-week summer institute at UCLA for an interdisciplinary group of 12 humanities scholars and advanced graduate students to learn how to develop innovative publications and courses that harness the theoretical and practical approaches of the "geospatial humanities." Situated at the intersection of critical cartography and information visualization, the Institute will combine a survey of the state of the art in interoperable geospatial tools and publication models, with hands-on, studio-based training in how to integrate GIS data into humanities scholarship, develop robust spatial visualizations, and deploy a suite of mapping tools in the service of creating publication- ready research articles and short monographs. The Institute will culminate in an "impact and evaluation" seminar of these publications with representatives from major university presses and journals.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $248,184
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2013

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Thomas R. Elliott
HT-50048-11
Linked Ancient World Data Institute

A two-year series of summer seminars, hosted by New York University and Drew University, for humanities scholars, library and museum professionals, and advanced graduate students on the possibilities of the Linked Open Data model for use in humanities scholarship with a particular focus on Ancient Mediterranean and Near East studies.

We propose two three-day sessions of an Institute designed to train scholars on the use of Linked Data in online publication for ancient studies. Participants will work with a cadre of experienced scholars and technologists who will guide them through a hands-on overview of current best practice, equipping them to make their own intellectual content discoverable and re-usable in a highly networked world.

Project fields: Ancient History
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $217,081
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 9/30/2014

Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202)
David J. Bodenhamer
HT-50049-11
[View white paper]
Spatial Narratives and Deep Maps: Explorations in Advanced Geo-spatial Technologies and the Spatial Humanities

A two-week institute and follow-up activities for humanities scholars to consider the potential for incorporating geospatial theories, methodologies and technologies into humanities research and teaching, with a particular focus on the history of religion in the United States.

The Institute proposes to link and deepen scholarly understanding of complex humanities data and geospatial technologies through a focus on two innovative forms-spatial narratives and deep maps-that bend spatial and other digital technologies to the intellectual traditions of humanists, thereby constituting a bridge between diverse avenues of investigation. In doing so, we address the first and fourth goals of the NEH call for proposals, namely, to bring together humanists and technologists to advance an innovative approach to the digital humanities and to assess the tools and methods available to support it.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $241,513
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 12/31/2013

University of North Carolina, Charlotte (Charlotte, NC 28223-0001)
Marvin J. Croy (project director)
Anthony F. Beavers (co-project director)
HT-50030-10
[View white paper]
Computer Simulations in the Humanities

A three-week institute and follow-up activities on the use of computer simulations and modeling techniques in the humanities for twenty-four humanities scholars.

This project will advance research in the humanities by adding a variety of simulation techniques to the standard repertoire of methods already employed by humanists. Interested humanists from a range of disciplines including philosophy, history, archeology, linguistics, anthropology and political science, among others, will work not only with technical experts but also with humanists already familiar with methods involving computer simulations and models. Our aim in bringing technologists and humanists together in precisely this way is to promote the dual notion of "the humanities shaping technology" as well as "technology shaping the humanities." Modeling experts will be pressed to not merely present existing techniques but to shape those techniques in ways that address questions and on-going inquiries pursued by humanists. Twenty-four humanists will spend 3 weeks in June 2011 and 3 days in 2012 interacting with modeling experts.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Philosophy, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $154,589
Grant period: 9/1/2010 – 8/31/2012

University of Denver (Denver, CO 80208-0001)
Adrienne Russell
HT-50032-10
[View white paper]
University of Denver's Institute for the Digital Humanities

A series of three workshops held over 18 months for twenty humanities faculty and advanced graduate students on the use of digital media in scholarship and teaching.

This institute brings together 20 humanities scholars from a variety of disciplines with little or no technical expertise to collaborate with each other and with experts in the field of digital humanities who are at the forefront of developing tools and methods for using digital media in their scholarly work. Institute fellows participate in a series of 3 workshops over an 18-month period. The institute program is designed to introduce and train fellows in the use of cutting-edge technological tools and methods, and to offer support and guidance as they work in groups to carry out a research project that involves collaboration with the public. Focus will be on the use of digital tools to facilitate collaboration among humanities scholars across various disciplines, to present and consider new strategies of representation and knowledge in emerging digital literacies, and to forge more engaging relationships with the public.

[Grant products] [Media coverage]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,433
Grant period: 2/1/2011 – 7/31/2013

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
Andrew M. Stauffer
HT-50034-10
[View white paper]
NINES Summer Workshops: Emerging Issues in Digital Scholarship

A two-year series of summer workshops engaging scholars and institutional administrators in concerns relating to peer review and evaluation of digital scholarship in the humanities.

NINES proposes a two-year series of summer workshops with emphasis on institutional concerns surrounding digital scholarship in the humanities, specifically in regard to peer-review and the tenure-and-promotion process. We plan to host 22 people each year for a 5-day workshop, in which digital project leaders will interact with institutional representatives with a stake in the evaluation of scholarship. We will come at issues under rubrics: "markup and metadata," "interface," "documentation," "collaboration," and "sustainability." We hope to guide the development of projects and use the group to generate public working papers towards a rationale for peer-review and promotion. Both workshops will be held at the University of Virginia, with its rich supporting environment in the digital humanities. In combining opportunities for technical, theoretical, and institutional training and discussions, NINES hopes to cultivate digital scholarly production and reception in the humanities.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $180,811
Grant period: 6/1/2011 – 5/31/2013

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Philip J. Ethington (project director)
Tara L. McPherson (co-project director)
HT-50036-10
[View white paper]
Broadening the Digital Humanities: The Vectors-CTS Summer Institute on Digital Approaches to American Studies

A four-week summer institute to explore ways digital scholarship and new media publication can advance research in the fields of American Studies and Ethnic Studies.

We propose to bring fifteen (15) scholars with strong interests in digital publication both in the fields of new media and in traditional areas of American Studies and Ethnic Studies to attend a four-week summer institute at the University of Southern California (USC) from mid-July to mid-August, 2011, that will explore how digital scholarship can address the needs of the changing fields of American Studies and Ethnic Studies. This summer institute will be administered by USC’s Center for Transformative Scholarship (CTS) and held at the Institute of Multimedia Literacy (IML), also the operational base for Vectors, the international electronic journal. The institute will be an introduction to key issues in the digital humanities within the context of American Studies and also a hands-on practicum in the creation of digital scholarship. The projects created will enrich participants’ understanding of the digital humanities and will model the field for other scholars in American Studies.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $248,822
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 8/31/2012

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701)
Jesse J. Casana
HT-50038-10
[View white paper]
Institute for Digital Archaeology

A semester-long program of advanced training in geospatial technologies critical to the practice of modern archaeology, followed by participation in field projects.

This proposal seeks funding to support a program designed to provide junior scholars in archaeology with advanced training in geospatial technologies and their application to archaeological research. While geospatial technologies ranging from satellite remote sensing, to subsurface geophysical prospection, to three dimensional scanning and visualization have all become increasingly critical to modern archaeology, few practitioners have the necessary technical skills to integrate these technologies into research and teaching programs. Participants in this program will have the opportunity to spend an entire semester taking a series of intensive courses in geospatial technologies and make use of the hardware, software and instrumentation available at the University of Arkansas's Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies on independent research projects. On-campus training will be followed up by participation in one of numerous archaeological field projects.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,756
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 6/30/2013

SUNY Research Foundation, Albany (Albany, NY 12222-0001)
Jon Rubin
HT-50041-10
[View white paper]
Institute for Globally Networked Learning in the Humanities, SUNY - COIL Center

A three-year institute for 60 humanities scholars and staff that includes a three-day workshop, online discussion, and a capstone conference on developing international team-taught courses in the humanities.

The proposed Institute for Globally Networked Learning in the Humanities is a four-phase, three year long initiative (start July 1 2010 - June 30 2013) aimed at preparing and supporting humanities faculty, instructional design and international programs staff in their development and implementation a globally networked course. These courses allow students to work cross-culturally with their peer students from other countries, without leaving their home campus, using digital technologies such as the internet. These courses help humanities scholars bring a global perspective to the content of their course, and are a means to internationalize content in an engaging and affordable way. The Institute will consist of five discipline-specific 3-day workshops, an online course, ongoing support for the development and implementation of the course, and a capstone conference for sharing of lessons learned.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,938
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 9/30/2013

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
Bethany Nowviskie
HT-50015-09
Institute for Enabling Geospatial Scholarship

The creation of two institutes, aimed at scholars, librarians, museum officials, and advanced graduate students, to explore how geospatial technologies like Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be used for teaching, learning, and research in the humanities.

The Scholars' Lab at the University of Virginia Library requests $162,457 from NEH to host two rounds of an Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities, on the theme of Enabling Geospatial Scholarship. The first four-day event would invite 20 competitively selected library, museum, and digital humanities center professionals to shape policy and begin building the technical capacity of the institutions they represent, to support boundary-pushing geospatial scholarship. Ongoing work in implementing a standards-based, open source infrastructure for discovery, delivery, and manipulation of geospatial data would be supported through an online clearinghouse and open-access community to be maintained long-term by the Scholars' Lab. The second Institute would invite 20 humanities scholars and advanced graduate students to train with and critique the open source and standards-based GIS tools and geospatial approaches to humanities scholarship being developed by the University of Virginia Library.

Project fields: Geography
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $162,457
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 6/30/2011

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Timothy R. Tangherlini
HT-50016-09
Network Analysis for the Humanities

A ten-day workshop and follow-up symposium for humanities faculty members and advanced graduate students on the use of large-scale network analysis for humanities topics and questions.

We propose to host an Institute in Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities focusing on techniques for the discovery, visualization and analysis of networks in Humanities corpuses. Networks in this context are broadly defined to include both external networks (networks of production, networks of circulation, networks of influence, and networks of reception) and internal networks (networks of characters, networks of text, networks of language) in the data. The institute will consist of two main parts: a ten day intensive institute, taking place over two weeks in June 2010, and a shorter three day research symposium in June 2011. Both events will be housed at NSF's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics on UCLA's campus.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $232,737
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 12/31/2011

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Joseph Thomas Scheinfeldt
HT-50021-09
One Week, One Tool: A Digital Humanities Barn Raising

A one week institute for twelve participants on the principles of humanities-centered tool design, development, and implementation, followed by a year of development support.

For one week in June 2010, the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University will bring together a group of twelve digital humanists of diverse disciplinary backgrounds and practical experience to build a useful and useable software tool for digital humanities research. A short course of training in principles of open source software development will be followed by an intense five days of brainstorming and development. Following the workshop will be a year of continued development, testing and evaluation. The group members will be comprised of designers and programmers as well as project managers and outreach specialists. The group will conceive a tool, outline a roadmap, develop and disseminate a prototype, lay the ground work for building an open source community, and make first steps toward securing sustainable funding for the project.

Project fields: History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,221
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 6/30/2011

University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92697-1900)
David Theo Goldberg (project director)
Tara L. McPherson (co-project director)
HT-50022-09
Broadening the Digital Humanities: The Vectors-IML/UC-HRI Summer Institute on Multimodal Scholarship

A four-week summer institute to investigate scholarly research methods in the digital age, to include thematic discussion seminars and hands-on workshops in collaboration with technologists.

The Vectors-IML/UCHRI Summer Institute on Multimodal Scholarship is a four-week program designed for the humanities scholar who does not have a great deal of computing experience but who has begun to express an interest in the digital humanities and in digital media more broadly. The Institute will offer a new cadre of scholars the opportunity to explore the benefits of interactive media for scholarly analysis and authorship, illustrating the possibilities of multimodal media for humanities investigation. The scholars participating in our program will learn both by engaging with a variety of existing projects and also through the production of their own project in collaboration with the Vectors-IML and UCHRI teams.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,895
Grant period: 11/1/2009 – 10/31/2010

University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Duncan A. Buell
HT-50025-09
Humanities Gaming Institute: Serious Games for Research and Pedagogy

A three-week institute on the role of immersive, interactive technologies and games within the context of the humanities, with a year of follow-up support for the twenty participants.

We propose a three-week Institute on Humanities Gaming to develop the intellectual frameworks necessary to support gaming as an active area of humanities research and pedagogy. Our institute aims to reduce the technical barriers to the adoption of gaming as a research and teaching platform by leveraging investments in the infrastructure of computing and digital media. The institute will (a) investigate the cognitive components of games that inform and enable successful game play, including immersive structure, rule governance, interactivity, and simulation; (b) provide hands-on research into existing serious games from a variety of fields, including history, literature, linguistics, philosophy, and economics; (c) produce, under the guidance of experienced game developers, games that can scale to meet participants' research and teaching needs in the humanities.

[Media coverage]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $232,096
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 5/31/2011

Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-0001)
Julia Flanders,
HT-50006-08
Advanced Topics in TEI Encoding

A series of workshops for humanities faculty and graduate students to explore advanced uses of digital text encoding as an essential method in humanities scholarship.

This project offers a series of nine advanced 3-day and 4-day institutes in text encoding for scholarly humanities projects with TEI. Aimed at an audience with a working knowledge of the TEI Guidelines, these institutes provide an intensive environment for more advanced project development, including schema customization, encoding strategy, and documentation. The institutes will focus on three topics of particular interest to scholars working on digital humanities projects: the encoding of manuscripts, the representation of contextual information, and the development of large thematic research collections.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $196,000
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 6/30/2011

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Holly Willis (project director)
Tara L. McPherson (co-project director)
HT-50010-08
Broadening the Digital Humanities: The Vectors-IML Summer Institute on Multimodal Scholarship

A four-week summer institute to investigate scholarly research methods in the digital age, to include thematic discussion seminars and hands-on workshops in collaboration with technologists.

This proposal requests funding to support a four-week summer institute for 12 participating scholars. The Institute, set to take place at the University of Southern California's Institute for Multimedia Literacy from mid-July to mid-August, 2009, will serve as an introduction to key issues in the multimodal digital humanities and as a hands-on practicum in the creation of digital scholarship. Scholars will learn both by engaging with a variety of existing projects but also through the production of their own project; these projects will at once enrich the participants??? own understanding of the digital humanities and model the field for other scholars through their publication in the electronic journal Vectors, and elsewhere online. The Institute will provide the opportunity to explore the benefits of interactive media for scholarly analysis and authorship, illustrating the possibilities of multimodal media for humanities investigation.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $200,000
Grant period: 11/1/2008 – 10/31/2009

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Champaign, IL 61820-6903)
Kevin D. Franklin
HT-50013-08
Humanities High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HpC): Coordinating High Performance Computing Institutes and the Digital

A total of nine institutes and one joint conference for humanities scholars, to be hosted by three different high-performance computer centers: the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, and the San Diego Supercomputer Center.

The Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science (I-CHASS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will lead a collaboration partnering the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), the Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center (PSC), and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) that will engage scholars in sustained collaboration with high performance computing specialists in order to identify, create, and adapt computational tools and methods. The Humanities High Performance Computing Collaboratory will serve as a portal for humanities scholars to receive technical support, access to high performance computing, and products and services associated with the digital technologies. Participants will consult with each computing staff about digital technology, discuss these technologies via a virtual community, and develop long-term technological goals for their projects via nine mini-residencies and a two-day conference.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $249,997
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 2/28/2011

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