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4 matches

Program: NEH/DFG Symposia and Workshops Program
Date range: 2008-2009
Sort order: Award year, descending

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HW-50001-09

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Erin L. Mayhood (Project Director: November 2008 to February 2013)
Digital Music Notation Data Model and Prototype Delivery System

Two joint workshops in collaboration with the University of Paderborn in Detmold (DFG request: 31,279 euros) towards developing a music notation data model (based on TEI) and prototype delivery system.

The U.Va. Library requests $44,164 in outright funds from NEH to collaborate with the University of Paderborn in Detmold, Germany, in conducting two workshops, one to be held in summer 2009 and one in spring 2010, which will promote an international collaboration to create a music notation data model and prototype delivery system. We intend to engage a select group of international scholars and technologists with a broad range of expertise in discussing the features and functions required in a scholarly XML music notation model, critically evaluate the existing data models, discuss optimum solutions for achieving the desired features, and plan for future implementation of the solutions. Our long-term plans include applying for further grant funding to continue to develop this project after this basic collaboration is complete.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
NEH/DFG Symposia and Workshops Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$44,164 (approved)
$44,164 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2009 – 4/30/2010


HW-50003-09

American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ 08540-5232)
Jack L. Davis (Project Director: November 2008 to February 2011)
The "Big Digs" Go Digital: Sharing Opportunities and Challenges for Large-Scale German and American Excavations

A joint three-day workshop with the Deutsches Archaeologisches Institut, Abteilung Athen (DFG request: 14,158 euros) on the application of digital technologies to better preserve, study, and make accessible the data from large-scale, long-term archaeological digs.

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the Deutsches Archaeologisches Institut, Abteilung Athen, have conducted excavations at the most important sites in Greece, and since the 1990's have been applying digital technologies to archaeological fieldwork. At the same time, concern has been growing about the best ways to manage, disseminate, and preserve digital resources. Both the ASCSA and the DAI have been investigating the long term preservation and interoperability of data over the last few years, with support from their home countries. This proposal requests funding to support a German-American bilateral symposium, to be held in Athens (November 4-7, 2009) at which specialists in digital archaeology can assess the problems which the "big digs" face in the digital age, discuss the challenges of managing digital assets, and explore opportunities for future transatlantic cooperation in developing a robust cyberinfrastructure to support large-scale excavations.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
NEH/DFG Symposia and Workshops Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$22,776 (approved)
$22,776 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2009 – 4/30/2010


HW-50009-09

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Thomas R. Elliott (Project Director: November 2008 to September 2010)
Epigraphic Interoperability Workshops

Two joint workshops in collaboration with Heidelberg University (DFG request: 5,270 euros) to develop interoperability between the Epigraphische Datenbank Heidelberg (EDH), the Pleiades digital gazetteer, and the "born-digital" epigraphic publications conforming to the EpiDoc/TEI encoding standards.

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (New York University), together with the Seminar fur Alte Geschichte und Epigraphik at Heidelberg University seek support for two three-day workshops. These events will bring together key staff members with a small cadre of external advisers to develop a comprehensive plan for interoperability between a growing suite of unique, essential resources: the Epigraphische Datenbank Heidelberg (EDH), the Pleiades digital gazetteer and "born-digital" epigraphic publications conforming to the EpiDoc/TEI encoding standards. It is our goal to establish both the fundamental prerequisites and a solid plan for incorporating EDH into an emerging, international cyberinfrastructure that will provide scholars and students alike with seamless access, visualization and relevance across multiple, discrete resources for ancient studies.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Ancient History

Program:
NEH/DFG Symposia and Workshops Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$11,390 (approved)
$11,390 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2009 – 4/30/2010


HW-50010-09

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory R. Crane (Project Director: November 2008 to July 2013)
New methods for working with old languages: Corpus Linguistics and the future of Textual Scholarship

Two joint workshops in collaboration with Humboldt University in Berlin (DFG request: 32,200 euros) on the state of the art in digital classics, exploring potential exchanges with other humanities fields, and detailing new areas of research.

We are seeking DFG/NEH support to allow us to host workshops in the US in the summer of 2009 and in Germany in the summer of 2010 in order to explore the application of emerging analytical technologies to classics in particular and the humanities in general. These workshops will focus not only on emerging services (such as named entity recognition, syntactic and morphological analysis, text mining) and knowledge structures (such as domain-specific ontologies), but on the new forms of scholarly knowledge and intellectual analysis that arise as a result. The 2009 workshop will produce a series of papers that document the state of language technologies in the field of classical philology and propose a roadmap for a more general cyberinfrastructure for the study of historical linguistic sources. These papers will circulate during the 2009-10 academic year and lay the foundation for the 2010 workshop in Germany, which will engage other humanities disciplines.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
NEH/DFG Symposia and Workshops Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,133 (approved)
$50,133 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2009 – 3/31/2013