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Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships*
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FN-255581-17


Summer Institute of Linguistics, Inc. (Dallas, TX 75236-5629)

Documentation of Daats'iin, a Language of Western Ethiopia

Fieldwork and research to produce documentation of Daats'iin, a newly discovered and endangered language of western Ethiopia.

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 10/31/2018


FN-255579-17


Unknown institution

Dictionary and Documentation of the Cahto Language, a Native American Language

Fieldwork and research to create a dictionary of Cahto (Athabaskan-Eyak-Tlingit), a dormant Native American language of Medocino County, California.

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


FN-255574-17


Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)

A Grammar of Pisaflores Tepehua, an endangered language of Mexico

Fieldwork and research to create a grammar of Pisaflores Tepehua, an endangered language of Mexico.

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


FN-255576-17


Unknown institution

Dictionary of Wyandot, a Northern Iroquois Language

Research and analysis to produce a dictionary of Wyandot, a language of the Northern Iroquois.

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 11/30/2018


FN-255577-17


Franklin and Marshall College (Lancaster, PA 17603-2802)

Translation and Recording of Koryak Oral Literature

Research and writing of a translation into English, with commentary, of the oral traditions of Russia's Koryak people, who are located near the Bering Sea and whose language is endangered.

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FN-249650-16

Hiroko Sato
University of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI 96822-2399)

Documentation and Morphosyntactic Analysis of Bebeli, an Austronesian Language of Papua New Guinea

Fieldwork and research for a dictionary, grammar, and scholarly articles on Bebeli, an endangered language of Papua New Guinea.

The purpose of this project is to do research on Bebeli, an endangered Austronesian language spoken in the West New Britain region of Papua New Guinea. Bebeli has been replaced by Tok Pisin, the region's lingua franca. Although there are perhaps 780 speakers with some knowledge of the language, only four elderly individuals are fully competent speakers. Younger generations do not learn Bebeli anymore, and very little information about the language currently exists. The main goals are 1) to elicit and build a corpus of culturally significant Bebeli texts in various genres such as myths, historical stories, legends, and children’s stories, 2) to expand a trilingual dictionary of the language (with English and Tok Pisin) and create a comprehensive grammar, and 3) to research and publish papers comparing morphosyntactic aspects of Bebeli and related languages (Avau, Akolet, and Lesin-Gelimi), which are significant for comparative and historical linguistics. All materials will be stored at Kaipuleohone, the University of Hawai’i Digital Ethnographic Archive, for permanent archiving. (Edited by staff)
 

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FN-249645-16

Alessandro Jaker
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

The Verb System of Tetsot'ine Yatie: Lutselk'e, Dettah, and Ndilo Dialects

Fieldwork and research to produce a verb grammar of the endangered Yellowknife dialect, a Northern Athabaskan language variety, spoken in northwestern Canada.

This project proposes to write a verb grammar of Tetso’t’iné Yatié or Yellowknife (Ethnologue code: chp), a dialect of Dëne Suliné (Chipewyan) previously claimed to have gone extinct in 1928. The project builds on the author’s previous work with the Yellowknives Dene, funded by NSF-1204171 under the Polar Postdoctoral Program from 2013-15 (Phonetics and Phonology of Two Northern Athabaskan Languages). The verb grammar will be loosely modeled on Keren Rice’s 1989 A Grammar of Slave, and will exhaustively catalogue the phonological behavior of every conjugation marker in every mode and classifier and in every position, as well as cataloguing every possible verb theme category and derivational string. Keren Rice has agreed to be involved in this project to ensure accuracy and comprehensiveness of the data, from an Athapaskanist perspective. The finished products will be a print version of the verb grammar, to be published through Alaska Native Language Center Publications, and an electronic version with clickable text and sound files.

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 11/30/2017


FN-249649-16

Jason W. Lobel
University of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI 96822-2399)

Documentation of Ponosakan, a Near-Extinct Austronesian Language of Sulawesi, Indonesia

Fieldwork and research for the preparation of a grammar and dictionary on the endangered Ponosakan language of Sulawesi, Indonesia.

This project is intended to continue work documenting and preserving Ponosakan, a near-extinct Austronesian language of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Once the majority language the town of Belang, Ponosakan has long since been fully supplanted in all contexts by Manado Malay, the regional lingua franca. There are now only four surviving communicatively-competent speakers, aged 71, 81, 87, and 91, and all four have expressed their willingess to continue working on this project. On several trips to Belang over the past nine years, Lobel has elicited wordlists and sentences, built a lexical database, made archive-quality digital audio recordings of the four surviving Ponosakan speakers covering a wide range of subject matter, and transcribed and translated these recordings. The main work to be performed during the fellowship period is: (1) to complete a full reference grammar; and (2) to complete a Ponosakan dictionary based on the PI’s lexical database, which currently contains over 2,200 roots. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FN-249648-16

John M. Keegan
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Sara-Bagirmi Languages Database Project, part 2

Fieldwork and research to document and preserve Africa's endangered Sara-Bagirmi languages.

The Sara-Bagirmi languages form a group of approximately twenty-eight endangered African languages spoken in southern and central Chad and in northern Central African Republic. The goal of the current project is to expand the lexical data for these languages and make them available to Chadian readers, linguists, and internet users. The specific languages for study are Bagirmi (50,000 speakers), Kulfa (10,000), Na (50,000), Ngam (60,000), Laka (60,000), and Sar (183,000).  The data from all ongoing work will be made available on the Sara-Bagirmi Language Database website and by means of printed lexical texts that can be purchased from CreateSpace. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FN-249640-16

Willem J. de Reuse
University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)

Documentation of the Dilzhe'e Variety of Western Apache

Fieldwork and research to create a lexical database, compilation of texts, and sketch grammar of Dilzhe’e, an endangered variety of Western Apache belonging to the Southern Athabaskan language family.

This is a proposal to complete community-driven comprehensive documentation of the critically endangered and poorly documented Dilzhe’e variety of Western Apache, a language of the Southern Athabaskan branch of the Athabaskan language family (Athabaskan-Eyak-Tlingit or Na-Dene phylum). The Dilzhe’e variety (formerly called Tonto) is spoken by fewer than 30 members of the Yavapai-Apache Nation and the Tonto Apache Tribe, in Arizona. The goal of the proposal is to improve on and systematize the documentation of Dilzhe’e, with a focus on its dialectal, phonetic, phonological, morphological and lexical features. Project activities will include the creation of a lexical database, a compilation of texts, and a grammatical sketch. These resources will aid in the study of intra-Dilzhe’e variation and contact-induced change potentially due to Yavapai influence. The resulting documentation will be archived at the Alaska Native Languages Archive, Fairbanks, and ultimately at the Yavapai-Apache Nation as well. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FN-230209-15

Mary Walworth
University of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI 96822-2399)

Preliminary Documentation of Mangarevan

The purpose of this project is to perform initial linguistic research and analysis on the severely endangered language of Mangarevan, spoken in the Gambier Islands of French Polynesia.  Mangarevan appears to exhibit some unusual features (e.g., unique vocabulary and grammatical elements) for Eastern Polynesian languages.  Analyzing Mangarevan’s unique linguistic features with respect to other Eastern Polynesian languages is a necessary step in understanding the culture and migration history of the Mangarevan people and could lead to a more complete understanding of Eastern Polynesian relationships as a whole.  The primary aims of this field investigation are 1) to build a Mangarevan corpus of culturally relevant texts; 2) to produce a sketch grammar; and 3) to provide the groundwork for a detailed classification of the Mangarevan language. This project will be carried out in two parts: field research and analysis.  Field research will be carried out on the islands of Taravai and Mangareva.  Preliminary analyses will be conducted while in Mangareva in order to keep abreast of emerging issues in the data, followed by more in-depth analysis and writing at the Universite de la Polynesie Francaise in Tahiti.  (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


FN-230211-15

Hiroko Sato
University of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI 96822-2399)

Documentation of the Bebeli Language, Papua New Guinea

Bebeli is one of the highly endangered Austronesian languages in the West New Britain region. Tok Pisin, a lingua franca in Papua New Guinea, is the dominant language in all domains among all generations of the Bebeli community. Children are not learning Bebeli anymore, and their parents do not teach it to them. There are about 780 speakers left. The last fluent speakers are in their 70s or older; those who are younger than 40 hardly understand the language. This situation is likely to continue or grow worse due to the area’s increasing accessibility and growing oil palm industry, which brings more contact with speakers of other languages. The main goals of the project are (1) to continue building a Bebeli corpus of annotated recordings, emphasizing culturally significant texts, and (2) to produce a comprehensive grammar and a topical dictionary of the language. The research will be conducted in two ways. First, the University of Hawai’i will serve as a base, and collaborative research will be conducted with several professors in the Linguistics Department there. Second, field research will be carried out on one extended field trip in the Bebeli area. The focus of the fieldwork will be on collecting a large amount of texts and annotating them as well as eliciting linguistic data. The data will be deposited with Kaipuleohone, the University of Hawai’i Digital Ethnographic Archive for permanent archiving. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 8/31/2016


FN-230212-15

Brenda H. Boerger
SIL International (Dallas, TX 75236-5629)

Natügu Dictionary and Legacy Texts

Natugu is an endangered Oceanic language spoken by Melanesians on Santa Cruz Island in Temotu Province of the Solomon Islands, South Pacific. Both the language community and the Solomon Island government support language development work, with an eye to future vernacular education. Such documentation and description needs to be undertaken soon in light of language displacement stemming from increased use of Solomon Island Pijin. The purpose of the research is (1) to produce a Natugu dictionary with an English finder list, for two audiences using two orthographies and different media: books and digital versions for the language community and a digital version for linguists; (2) to annotate legacy texts: an 80-page handwritten autobiography with an oral reading on video, plus 15 hours of digitized legacy cassette recordings. The applicant’s home archive, the Summer Insitute of Linguistics (SIL) language and culture archives, will host the corpus. The work has three phases (1) a two-month pre-field phase to prepare the lexical database in FLEx and to interlinearize the autobiography; (2) a four-month fieldwork phase for semantic domain elicitations, AV recording of the autobiography, and oral processing of the texts; and (3) a six-month post-field phase to refine dictionary entries, generate dictionaries, format books, and archive the full corpus. (Edited by staff)
 

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


FN-230214-15

Ayla Applebaum
University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)

Phonetic and Phonological Documentation of Hatkoy

This project extends the on-going work of the applicant in documenting Circassian languages to include Hatkoy, an endangered and typologically unusual variety of Circassian which is no longer spoken in the Caucasus. The primary goals of the project are to create a linguistically analyzed and accessible database of recorded Hatkoy speech, and to investigate several hypothesis’s concerning Northwest Caucasian languages. The Hatkoy speech data will include 20 hours of audio materials, with time-aligned transcriptions, multi-tier annotations, “morpheme-to morpheme” and free translations into both English and Turkish. A second outcome of the project will be pedagogical materials for promoting language revitalization; this will be done considering the community’s strong interest in this aspect. The pedagogical materials will consist of wordlists, parts of speech, basic grammar and small texts (e.g. poems, songs). The applicant has prior data archived at the Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR) at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), London, and is discussion with the Endangered Language Archive (ELAR) and the Documentation of Endangered Languages program (DOBES) for arrangements to archive the data from the proposed project. The data will also be made available to the community in Turkey by the Caucasus Federation in Ankara. (Edited by staff)
 

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FN-230216-15

Christine M. Beier
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)

Documenting Iquito: Text Corpus and Archiving

Iquito is a critically endangered Zaparoan language of northern Peruvian Amazonia. There are now only 18 fluent speakers of Iquito, the youngest of whom are in their late 60s. A DEL fellowship will support my ongoing work to document Iquito. Central to meeting this goal is my collaboration with Lev Michael. I will 1) prepare a large corpus of existing Iquito texts for publication, including a small number of new Iquito texts, and 2) archive all existing and new texts and some of their derivative materials with two internet-accessible digital archives, the Archive of Indigenous Languages of Latin America and the California Language Archive. Michael will 1) prepare Iquito-English and Iquito-Spanish bilingual dictionaries and 2) prepare a detailed description of Iquito morphology. Our collaboration will produce two principal types of data: audio recording of texts and their derivatives (my primary responsibility) and a FLEx database [designed for morphologically segmenting and glossing texts] and its outputs (Michael’s primary responsibility). From those data, our work will result in the following products: a publication-ready collection of transcribed, translated, and annotated texts (one set Iquito-to-Spanish; another Iquito-to-English); a publishable Iquito-to-English dictionary, including a detailed morphological description; and a complete Iquito-to-Spanish dictionary, ready for copyediting by a native Spanish speaker. We have the full permission of all relevant parties and authorities in the speech community to carry out the work and meet the objectives described in our collaborative proposals. We, our consultants, and the broader Iquito speech community all feel that it is urgent to bring the documentation of Iquito to a successful conclusion within the next few years. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 8/31/2016


FN-230217-15

Lev Michael
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)

Documenting Iquito: Lexicon and Morphological Description

Iquito is a critically endangered Zaparoan language of Peruvian Amazonia. With only 18 speakers remaining, at a median age of 70, timely documentation of Iquito is essential not only for knowledge of this remarkable language, but also for comparative work on Zaparoan, which will inform our knowledge of the deep social and cultural history of the Zaparoan peoples and western Amazonia more generally. During a DEL fellowship tenure, I will complete two key components of my ongoing work to document Iquito: 1) preparation of parallel English-Iquito and Spanish-Iquito versions of a bilingual Iquito dictionary, which already exists in draft form; 2) write an extensive morphological description of Iquito; and 3) collaborate with Christine Beier on parsing a large corpus of Iquito texts. Beier and I are each submitting DEL fellowship proposals to collaborate on a single documentation project in which we are responsible for complementary but integrated aspects of the overall project. Beier’s work centers on the Iquito text corpus, with the two projects overlapping on the morphological parsing of these texts. The fellowship will provide me with 11 months of support during my 2015-2016 sabbatical year. Beier and I and the Iquito consultants feel it is urgent to bring the documentation of Iquito to a successful conclusion within the next few years while the opportunity to work with multiple consultants remains. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$46,200 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


FN-230218-15

Carolyn J. MacKay
Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)

A Dictionary of Misantla Totonac

The goal of this fellowship project, A Dictionary of Misantla Totonac, is to produce a trilingual (Totonac/Spanish/English) analytical dictionary and an extensive corpus of Misantla Totonac, an endangered Mesoamerican language spoken by fewer than 200 individuals in Yecualta and nearby communities in the Mexican state of Veracruz. The dictionary, of at least 5000 lexical items, will be produced in both print and electronic versions. The project will also result in a corpus of audio and video recordings of naturally occurring speech in different genres (e.g. narratives, conversations, jokes, personal histories, community history, descriptions of current and traditional uses of local flora and fauna and of culturally important activities and events). These materials, to be archived at the Archive of Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) at the University of Texas at Austin, will provide the remaining elderly speakers of Totonac and younger non-Totonac-speaking members of the communities with a basis for developing meaningful and coherent strategies of revitalization and preservation. The PI, together with Frank R. Trechsel, has conducted fieldwork and published on Misantla Totonac since the 1980s. MacKay and Trechsel are each requesting a fellowship in tandem to spend a year in Mexico compiling the dictionary and related recordings. Their experienced teamwork is required for the project’s success. Neither of them could undertake and complete the project alone. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


FN-230219-15

Frank R. Trechsel
Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)

A Dictionary of Misantla Totonac

The goal of this fellowship project, A Dictionary of Misantla Totonac, is to produce a trilingual (Totonac/Spanish/English) analytical dictionary and an extensive corpus of Misantla Totonac, an endangered Mesoamerican language spoken by fewer than 200 individuals in Yecualta and nearby communities in the Mexican state of Veracruz.  The dictionary, of at least 5000 lexical items, will be produced in both print and electronic versions.  The project will also result in a corpus of audio and video recordings of naturally occurring speech in different genres (e.g. narratives, conversations, jokes, personal histories, community history, descriptions of current and traditional uses of local flora and fauna and of culturally important activities and events).  These materials, to be archived at the Archive of Indigenous Languages of Latin America at the University of Texas at Austin, will provide the remaining elderly speakers of Totonac and younger non-Totonac-speaking members of the communities with a basis for developing meaningful and coherent strategies of revitalization and preservation.   The project will supplement other work that the PI and Carolyn MacKay have done on Misantla Totonac since the 1980s. The PI and MacKay are each applying for a one-year fellowship (August 2015-July 2016) in Mexico to devote their time exclusively to the documentation effort.   The PI believes that he and MacKay can accomplish the work of this project within a year.  (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


FN-230222-15

Neil A. Walker
San Joaquin Delta College (Stockton, CA 95207-6370)

Documenting Pomoan Languages: Textual Dictionary of Southern Pomo and Dictionary and Grammatical Sketch of Northeastern Pomo

The seven Pomoan languages of Northern California are mutually unintelligible and now moribund or extinct. The PI has worked extensively with two of these languages, Southern Pomo and Northeastern Pomo and is the last linguist to interact with a native speaker of Southern Pomo (who passed away in 2014).  The PI will archive previously collected data and produce a textual dictionary of Southern Pomo, based on a corpus of traditional narratives.  The PI has also been gathering extant data on Northeastern Pomo, whose last speakers passed away forty years ago.  He will produce a dictionary database and grammatical sketch exploring the unique grammatical and phonological features of Northeastern Pomo, an enigmatic member of the Pomoan family.  The proposed project would make crucial data on Southern Pomo and Northeastern Pomo available to scholars and the public for the first time. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


FN-230224-15

Jason W. Lobel
University of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI 96822-2399)

Documentation of Ponosakan, an Austronesian Language of Sulawesi, Indonesia: Transcription and Translation of Recordings

The purpose of this project is to continue the PI’s work documenting and preserving Ponosakan, an Austronesian language spoken in northern Sulawesi, Indonesia. Once the majority language throughout the town of Belang, Ponosakan has long since been fully supplanted by regional lingua franca Melayu Manado. There are now only four surviving speakers who are communicatively-competent, ages 70, 80, 86, and 90, and all four have signed a letter expressing their willingness to continue working on this project.  The only scholar to have conducted ongoing language research on Ponosakan, the PI has made several trips to Belang over the past eight years, assessing the competency of the remaining speakers, eliciting wordlists and sentences, building a lexical database, and making dozens of hours of archive-quality digital audio recordings.  The main work to be performed during the fellowship period is: (1) to transcribe and translate around 20 hours of the digital audio recordings; (2) to expand the lexical database with all of the new vocabulary found in the transcribed recordings; and (3) to expand the Ponosakan sketch grammar. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


FN-50126-14

Emiliana Cruz
University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)

Chatino Place Names and Local Knowledge: Language Description and Multimedia Documentary Corpus

The goal of this project is to produce the first systematic analysis of place names in the Chatino language of San Juan Quiahije, Oaxaca, Mexico, along with a corpus of audio, video, and mapping files that will ground collective and individual memories of local landscape in examples of speech. Fieldwork will involve close collaboration with five native speaker consultants who are familiar with geographic landmarks such as ritual areas, mountains, rivers, and paths. In addition, I will work closely with seven other native speakers who already know how to write Chatino. While Quiahije Chatino is not urgently endangered, what is disappearing from speech is specialized vocabulary such as the language of landscape, which is a sign of language loss. My research follows an intellectual trajectory represented by numerous scholars including Franz Boas, who highlighted the importance of the study of place-name systems because it tells us a great deal about the people, their cognitive categories, and their history. This research project will generate three concrete products that will benefit researchers of indigenous communities: (1) geographically situated texts, including narratives and oral histories; (2) a lexicon of space; and (3) a heuristic for assessing the vitality and endangerment of undocumented languages. It will also provide a model for organizing future research by indigenous speakers to document the indigenous languages of Mexico and Latin America. All the new data will be deposited into Archive of Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA), and will provide an important resource for understanding the structure of the Chatino language. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistic Anthropology; Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 8/31/2015


FN-50127-14

Jeffrey E. Davis
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37996-0001)

Plains Indian Sign Language Digital Corpus Linguistics Project

The Plains Indian Sign Language (PISL) Corpus Linguistic Project will demonstrate how indigenous sign language serves as an alternative to spoken language among deaf and hearing tribal members. Since PISL and other indigenous language varieties in the corpus are endangered, additional documentary linguistic work is critical to advance our knowledge of the cognitive, cultural, and linguistic underpinnings of indigenous signed language varieties and to the survival of these languages. The project objectives are to: 1) transform an extensive collection of PISL documentary linguistic materials into a digital corpus that is accessible to local Native American communities and scholars of linguistics and anthropology, and related disciplines; 2) identify and involve more American Indians who are learning and using indigenous sign language varieties in order to generate linguistic descriptions about sign language usage, lexicon, and grammar; 3) collaborate with expert signers from different American Indian nations; 4) collect additional documentary materials of indigenous signing from archival and contemporary fieldwork; 5) increase awareness about sign language in intertribal and international communities; and 6) disseminate project outcomes to Native American communities, broader audiences, and researchers of indigenous and endangered languages. The digital corpus will contribute to training students in field methods, linguistic analyses, emergent technologies, and engage members of Native communities in documenting and revitalizing their languages. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 7/31/2015


FN-50128-14

Keri Eggleston
Unknown institution

The Next Critical Step in Documenting Tlingit

This project will nearly double the level of documentation of Tlingit verbs by expanding on an existing database containing 575 Tlingit verb paradigms with an additional 500 verbs through fieldwork with speakers. Tlingit is an endangered language spoken in Southeast Alaska and in neighboring parts of British Columbia and the Yukon Territory. There are currently 114 known fluent speakers in both the U.S. and Canada. Nearly all of these birth speakers are over eighty. While there are a fair number of publications in and about Tlingit, the language remains undocumented in a number of areas of its grammar, including hundreds of undocumented (and unpredictable) verb paradigms. The proposed activities rely heavily on collaboration with birth speakers of Tlingit, and with the number of such speakers rapidly dwindling, our window of opportunity for completing this work is probably about five years. The verb in Tlingit houses most of the grammatical complexity of the language and is therefore something that learners truly must master in order to make themselves understood. Expansion of the verb database will assist learners with difficult and unpredictable verb conjugations, will support teachers of the language, most of who are not fluent, and will also reveal general patterns of Tlingit verb classes, which will further inform linguists interested in the Na-Dene language family. The data (both text and audio) will be archived at the Alaska Native Language Archives, and the database will be housed on the Alaska Native Knowledge Network server and website at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and will additionally be linked on the web from a number of existing sites dedicated to the preservation of Alaska Native language and culture, ensuring accessibility by a wide range of users. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 2/28/2016


FN-50130-14

Hiroko Sato
University of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI 96822-2399)

Preliminary Field Investigation of the Bebeli Language, Papua New Guinea

Bebeli is a highly endangered Austronesian language spoken in the West New Britain area of New Britain Island, Papua New Guinea. Tok Pisin, a lingua franca in Papua New Guinea, is the dominant language in nearly all domains, including daily life, among all generations of the Bebeli community. Children are not learning Bebeli any more, and their parents do not teach it to them. The situation is likely to continue or grow worse due to the area's increasing accessibility and the growing oil palm industry, which brings contact with people from different areas. The main goals of this preliminary investigation are (1) to establish a foundation for an ongoing project with the Bebeli community; (2) to build a Bebeli corpus emphasizing culturally significant texts; and (3) to produce annotated recordings and a sketch grammar of the language. With the University of Hawai'i as a base, fieldwork will be carried out on two extended trips to the Bebeli area with the objectives of establishing a relationship with the community and finding consultants; eliciting basic vocabulary, phrases and sentences; and collecting and annotating texts. Data will be archived at the University of Hawai'i Digital Ethnographic Archive. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 8/31/2015


FN-50134-14

John M. Keegan
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Sara-Bagirmi Languages Database Project

The Sara-Bagimi Languages form a group of approximately 29 languages of the Bongo-Bagimi grouping of the Central-Sudanic branch of Nilo-Saharan. They are spoken primarily in southern and central Chad. This project is an expansion of the Sara Languages Database projects (NEH grants FN50074-10 and FN50104-12). The framework for the organization, storage, and distribution of the data has been established through these projects. This project focuses on four languages: the work on Bagirmi and Kulfa, involves creation of lexicons with sample sentences and recordings. The work on Na and Nangnda, involves expanding lexicons to produce dictionaries. Each of the dictionaries will also include sample sentences and recordings. Collaborators for the fieldwork in Chad have already been identified. Grant products will be printed for distribution by language promotion organizations in Chad and copies will be donated to educational institutions in Chad and made available to interested linguists. There also will be a DVD version, and all materials will be available on the project website. The data will be archived at existing major language archives: the Endangered Languages Archive (London) and at Living Tongues (Portland, Oregon). (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


FN-50112-13

Simeon Floyd
Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (Nijmegen 6525 XD Netherlands)

A Grammar of Cha'palaa, with an archival corpus

The goal of this project, "A grammar of Cha'palaa," is to produce the first comprehensive grammatical description of Cha'palaa (cbi, Barbacoan, Ecuador), as well as the preservation of historical documents on the language and the improvement of an already-existing natural speech video corpus, which will constitute the primary data for the grammar. This project will build on previous work on the language (2007-2012), bringing its documentation into the final stages by systematically processing existing data (100+ hours of video, controlled stimulus responses, field notes, historical documents) to produce a comprehensive grammar. The work will involve onsite and remote collaboration with native speaker consultants, two field trips to Ecuador, and a visit to the UC Berkeley rare books collection to work with historical manuscripts. Materials will be archived at the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO, Ecuador) with backups in the Max Planck Institute (MPI), Nijmegen, including a digital version of the grammar. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


FN-50114-13

Pedro Mateo-Pedro
Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)

Acquisition of an Endangered Mayan Language: A Corpus of Child Chuj

The present proposal seeks funding for one year to continue with our previous DEL-funded project on the documentation of the Chuj language of San Mateo Ixtatán, with special emphasis on the verb morphology in simple clauses and Agent Focus constructions. The project will make critical contributions to theories of language acquisition, and, more broadly, to the current understanding of extraction and transitivity. The Chuj corpus will thus contribute to a small but growing body of work on under-documented non-Indo-European languages. Documenting the developmental acquisition of Chuj with particular attention to Agent Focus constructions will encourage more investigation of complex constructions in Mayan languages within the field, while also contributing to our understanding of these constructions in adult Mayan grammar. The project will also validate the intellectual importance of Chuj, one of the most endangered Mayan languages, among the members of the Chuj community and among language scholars. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


FN-50116-13

Bruce E. Nevin
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Building an Achumawi Linguistic Database

This project will complete a linguistic database for Achumawi, the highly endangered language of the Pit River Tribe of northern California, in the northern subgroup of the controversial and poorly understood Hokan superstock. In extensive linguistic fieldwork in 1970-1974 the applicant established a sizeable collection of written and audio records of the language. In this project the applicant will enter these materials into a computer database, which will bring together material on the language from diverse repositories, more or less difficult to access in geographically separate locations, and create a single self-consistent, cross-checked, searchable resource that will be made freely available to researchers and community members. Members of the tribe will be trained to participate in fieldwork with remaining speakers, and to participate in identifying and extracting pedagogically useful material from the database and from the correlated audio recordings. These materials will be used for language revitalization programs funded by the Pit River Tribe. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 5/31/2014


FN-50087-11

Joshua William Brown
Salish Kootenai College (Pablo, MT 59855)

Documenting the Salish Language

The Salish language has fewer than thirty fluent speakers still living, and most of these are over 70. To address the endangered state of the language, which faces complete eradication, this project has three main components: 1) archival review and transcription, 2) the elicitation of new audio and video recordings through interviewing fluent speakers, and 3) the indexing of both archival and newly created materials. In the review of existing audio/video recordings, material will be selected to represent different types of language use including conversations, storytelling in the first person, and interaction between an instructor and students. An interlinear analysis of the transcriptions will be conducted following standard protocols and separation of morphemes. New recordings will be archived in multiple copies at different locations including the Endangered Language Archive. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 6/30/2013


FN-50102-12

Ann Gagliardi
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)

Acquiring an Endangered Language: A Corpus of Child-Directed and Child-Produced Tsez

This project will produce the first ever corpus of the Tsez language as it is spoken to and produced by children. The documentation will be based on the recording of over fifty hours of caretaker-child interactions. The recordings, transcriptions and associated glosses will be archived in the Child Language Data Exchange System (CHILDES) and made available to both the Tsez speaking community and worldwide linguistic research community. Building such a corpus will involve collaboration between researchers in the United States and Dagestan, as well as training both members of the Tsez speaking community and American undergraduates to work as assistants. A crucial part of the project will be the involvement of Tsez women in data collection, something that has never been done before. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2012 – 7/31/2013


FN-50104-12

John M. Keegan
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Sara Language Database Project, Phase 2

The Sara Languages form a group of approximately 17 languages of the Sara-Bagirmi branch of the Nilo-Saharan family, and are spoken primarily in southern Chad. Most of these languages are at risk of disappearing over the course of the 21st century. This project has three principle goals: first, to augment the language data contained in the database created during phase 1 of the project; second, to improve accessibility to the data; and finally, to ensure that the data is stored at a permanent and secure site. During phase 2 of the project, the control list will be expanded, new meanings and expressions sought, and recordings made of new words and sentences as they are added. Special attention will be paid to languages where language associations in Chad have expressed interest in creating a fuller dictionary. I will also add a brief introduction for each language, which will include a description of distinctive aspects of the phonology and morphology. All of the data will be moved to a permanent server at the department of Anthropology at La Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED) in Madrid, and a web application will be written which will allow access to both the written data and the sound files. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 6/30/2013


FN-50107-12

Catherine O'Connor
Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)

Documentation of Northern Pomo

The Pomo languages, spoken throughout the Russian River area of Northern California, are now moribund or extinct. Between 1979 and December of 2005, the principal investigator recorded several hundred hours of audio tapes from three fluent speakers of Northern Pomo, including lexical and sentence-level elicitations, traditional myths, personal stories, and dyadic conversations. Support is requested for the publication of these Northern Pomo texts in paper form and as part of a digital text base, a digital dictionary linked to the text base, a grammar of Northern Pomo, and the preparation of digitized materials for archiving. The materials will be archived in at least two places: the Grace Hudson Museum in Ukiah, CA, and the archive at the U.C. Berkeley Survey of California and Other Indian Languages. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


FN-50109-12

Aviva W. Shimelman
San Jose State University (San Jose, CA 95192-0001)

Documentation of the Five Southern Dialects of Yauyos, Parent Subgroup Quechua II A, Quechuan Family

The goal of this project is to document all five dialects of the southern variety of Yauyos, an extremely endangered Quechuan language. The need for documentation is urgent: with perhaps 1,700 speakers and rememberers, the language is nearly extinct and the materials available on and in the language are extremely limited, consisting, essentially, only of what the applicant has been able to collect to date. Specifically, this project will conduct fieldwork to record four of the five dialects in audio and video format; prepare a database of annotated recordings of the four dialects; and prepare a comparative lexicon and sketch grammar of all five dialects. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


FN-50110-12

Rosa Vallejos
University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)

Kokama: Trilingual Dictionary, Pedagogical Grammar, and Text Corpus with Video Files

The aim of the proposed project is to complete ongoing work to document Kokama, a highly endangered language of the Peruvian Amazon. The PI will produce (i) a Kokama-Spanish-English dictionary, (ii) a pedagogical grammar, and (iii) a corpus of fully transcribed, glossed, and translated video recordings. Given the highly endangered status of Kokama, previous efforts to document the language have focused on the collection of primary data, the grammatical description of the language, as well as on the production of a few resources to support revitalization initiatives put forward by the language community. This project, which is the final component of the PI's long-term plan to document the language, will take advantage of current favorable conditions: community motivation, trained native speakers, a significant amount of extant data, and an efficient workflow. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


FN-50084-11

Timothy J. Thornes
University of Central Arkansas (Conway, AR 72035-5001)

A Grammar of the Northern Paiute Language

This fellowship will support the preparation for publication of a comprehensive grammatical description of Northern Paiute (Western Numic; UtoAztecan), a highly endangered language of western North America. The proposed description will incorporate a more complete understanding of grammatical aspects of the language resulting from 1) a significantly expanded text corpus developed by the Principal Investigator in collaboration with elder fluent speakers and language teachers and 2) access to the extensive grammatical notes of the late Sven Liljeblad and other legacy materials from different dialects currently archived in Special Collections at the University of Nevada at Reno and at the University of California at Berkeley. The entire fellowship tenure will be dedicated to the preparation of the core of the grammatical description. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 7/31/2012


FN-50085-11

Adam Baker
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Wakhi Language Documentation

The project aims to document and describe the Wakhi language, an Indo-European language of the Eastern Iranian group. Wakhi is spoken in Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, and China. This project focuses on the variety spoken in Afghanistan. There is little documentation available on Wakhi, yet the language may prove to be important in the reconstruction of Proto-Iranian--the hypothesized proto-language which gave rise to the present Iranian languages--as it exhibits some archaisms not seen in other Eastern Iranian languages. Speakers of Wakhi are bilingual and shifting to the majority language of the area in which they live. In Afghanistan, the dominant pattern is a shift to Persian, which is the language of education and commerce. It is important to collect language data now, while the language is still used on a day-to-day basis, rather than waiting for a more advanced stage of language shift. The primary goal is to produce an annotated corpus of Wakhi texts, collected from a variety of contexts. Documentation will consist of digital audio and video recordings, texts, a vocabulary, and basic grammatical description. A wide variety of text genres will be collected, including (but not limited to) folk tales, personal narratives, conversations, poetry, and proverbs. The project will enable further study of the Wakhi language by researchers, both in Afghanistan and internationally. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 5/31/2013


FN-50086-11

Rosemary G. Beam-de-Azcona
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Coatec Zapotec Dictionary, Texts, and Video Archival

Coatec Zapotec is an Otomanguean language spoken in the southern part of Oaxaca, Mexico. It is a moribund language with an estimated few hundred speakers, most of them over 50. In the previous round of funding the PI was awarded a DEL fellowship in order to 1) finish revisions and additions necessary to publish a grammar of Coatec Zapotec, 2) enter hand-transcribed texts into a Toolbox database, and 3) create metadata for and archive notebooks and audio recordings made during fieldwork on Coatec from 1996 to 2004. In the previous application these three tasks were prioritized and focused on, while other tasks were identified as ultimately necessary but beyond the scope of a one-year project. The current application requests one additional (and final) year of funding to complete all major work on Coatec. The remaining tasks to be completed during the second phase of the project are 1) to revise, edit, and fill in the gaps of an existing lexical database to be published as a dictionary, 2) to fully process a large corpus of texts to be disseminated to both the Zapotec community and the worldwide community of scholars, and 3) to digitize, create metadata for, and edit (where necessary for archiving) up to 34 hours of video. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


FN-50094-11

Pedro Mateo-Pedro
Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)

Acquisition of an Endangered Mayan Language

The proposed project documents the acquisition of Chuj, an endangered language spoken in San Mateo Ixtatán in Guatemala. The project has two main goals: the first component involves the creation of a publically accessible Chuj child language corpus through the recording, transcription and analysis of naturally occurring speech of children acquiring the Chuj language. The speech of four Chuj-speaking children will be recorded every two weeks as they interact with relatives, caretakers, and trained native research assistants. The work will contribute to a small but growing body of work on the acquisition of under-documented non-Indo-European languages. The PI will train researchers, including student and native Chuj speakers, in data collection, transcription, and morphological analysis. The second goal is to conduct experiments designed to test the comprehension and production of a special type of construction found in many Mayan languages, known as the Agent Focus (AF). Though this construction has been at the center of much recent work, no studies have yet been conducted to understand the path to its acquisition. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2011 – 7/31/2012


FN-50095-11

Kenneth A. McElhanon
Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (Dallas, TX 75236-5629)

Comparative Dictionary and Digital Recordings for Huon Peninsula Languages

This one year fellowship has the objective of completing a project begun by the researcher in the 1960s to document the 23 dialects/languages of the Huon Peninsula group (HP--a subgroup of the Trans New Guinea family, TNG)--spoken in the Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. Most TNG languages are documented with vocabulary lists of less than 250 lexical items. This HP lexical data base of more than 2,500 lexical items and complete noun and verb morphologies for each dialect/language is unprecedented. Of these languages, four are critically endangered, one is endangered, two are unsafe to endangered, and two are unsafe. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 3/31/2013


FN-50096-11

Stacey Oberly
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)

Documenting Naturally Occurring Ute

The main goal of this project is to document the Southern Ute language, a highly endangered language spoken in Colorado. During this project, PI, who is a Southern Ute tribal member and a linguist, will record fifteen hours of high-quality digital audio and video recordings of naturally occurring speech and personal narratives in this moribund Uto-Aztecan language. Although there are 1,419 enrolled members of the Southern Ute tribe, there are only forty remaining speakers who are all over the age of sixty. The naturally occurring speech and personal narratives will be collected by interviewing several Southern Ute speakers. This will greatly expand the knowledge and understanding of this syntactically and morphologically interesting language. Specifically, the audio and video data collection will be translated, transcribed, annotated, entered into an electronic database, archived and disseminated to the community. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 8/31/2013


FN-50097-11

Crystal R. Richardson
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Digital Field Documentation of Karuk: Eliciting Natural Speech through Conversation

This project is a multi-faceted undertaking; at its core is the digital field documentation of Karuk, an extremely endangered language dispersed over a large portion of Northern California. The overarching goal is to gather 300 hours of audio and video language documentation with several of the last fluent Karuk Speakers; the P.I. intends to transcribe 5% of the resulting field documentation (totaling 15 hours), and create a polished 20 minute documentary demonstrating the process of eliciting natural speech from community elders. The proposed field recordings would also capture hours of oral history and cultural instruction that will prove of particular significance to Karuk scholars, tribal people and ethnographers of the future. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2013


FN-50099-11

Aviva W. Shimelman
San Jose State University (San Jose, CA 95192-0001)

Documention of Yauyos

The goal of this project is to document Yauyos, a nearly extinct Quechuan language. Yauyos is not a single language, but a "supralect," a set of seven or more more-or-less mutually intelligible dialects spoken in fourteen villages in the Cañete Valley of Peru, approximately 200 kilometers south-east of Lima. Investigators will conduct fieldwork to record Yauyos in audio and video format; prepare a database of annotated recordings of Yauyos; prepare a lexicon of Yauyos; prepare a sketch grammar of Yauyos; and conduct analysis of Yauyos in light of current theory in formal semantics, in particular with regard to its evidential and modal system. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 8/31/2012


FN-50063-10

Brenda H. Boerger
Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (Dallas, TX 75236-5629)

Natugu: Grammar Sketch and Texts

The purpose of the research is to write a grammar sketch of Natugu based on past and future field data elicitation. Natugu is an endangered Oceanic language spoken by Melanesians on Santa Cruz Island in Temotu Province of the Solomon Islands, South Pacific. Both the language community and the Solomon Island government support language development work, with an eye to future vernacular education. Such documentation and description needs to be undertaken soon in light of language displacement stemming from increased use of Solomon Island Pijin. I have lived on Santa Cruz Island for 16 years doing linguistic, translation, and literacy work in Natugu. This proposal will provide support needed to synthesize my present data in the interest of determining what further structures need to be investigated and to conduct further fieldwork. Outcomes are expected to be a) a revised Natugu grammar for both linguists and Natugu speakers, b) digital recording of texts in audio and some video as well, c) interlinearized versions of the same texts, d) archiving of the grammar and texts, and e) an anthology of the texts for the Natugu community. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2010 – 6/30/2011


FN-50064-10

Mizuki Miyashita
University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)

Blackfoot Documentation: Transcription, Interlinear Analysis, and Electronic Database

The main goal of this project is to document the Blackfoot language, an endangered language spoken in Alberta, Canada, and Montana, United States. The speaker population of Blackfoot is 4,500 in Canada and 100 in the United States. Although a substantial amount of documentation of Blackfoot exists in terms of structural description, texts of stories, and theoretical analysis, there is still much to be documented, especially about how the linguistic properties of Blackfoot are strategically used in conversations. To investigate this aspect, I have been audio- and video-recording spoken Blackfoot that must be transcribed and interlinearly analyzed. The proposed project will be built on my fieldwork and the collaborative project currently underway with support from an NEH digital humanities start-up grant. I will devote my fellowship year to transcribing the audio-video recordings of Blackfoot speech, conducting interlinear analysis of these transcriptions, and creating an electronic database using ELAN. None of the existing documentation and literature in Blackfoot explores conversation and connected speech. Thus, the project will create materials that will complement currently available resources. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2011 – 7/31/2012


FN-50065-10

Mark Sicoli
University of Alaska, Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK 99775-7500)

Lachixio Zapotec Conversations: Audio-Visual Archive and Transcription Collection

Lachixio, a Zapotecan language within the Otomanguean language stock, is the last spoken language of West Zapotec, an endangered branch of the Zapotecan language family. Today Lachixio is the only sub-branch of West Zapotec where people interact conversationally in Zapotec. It exhibits uses of voice qualities for pragmatic functions that are found in few other places in Meso-America. The project's main goal is to enrich transcriptions of videotaped Lachixio Zapotec conversations. During the fellowship, I will complete 24 hours of transcription that remain in a 40-hour video corpus and develop a print collection of transcriptions using standards of conversation analysis. The products of this fellowship--a streamable multimedia archive with an accompanying monograph of select transcriptions--will provide local language activists with materials to aid their language maintenance efforts and protect their linguistic heritage in a language archive. The online archive will allow speakers and researchers access to the original video that corresponds to the text transcriptions and translations from which speakers and researchers can develop their own projects based on the corpus. The fellowship will support cooperation with members of the Lachixio community, who have been involved in the video production, transcription, and translation and will continue to be involved during the fellowship year. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2011 – 8/31/2012


FN-50066-10

Shelley DePaul
Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390)

Lenape Language Project

The Lenape tribe, indigenous to the Delaware river valley, was long ago dispersed to Oklahoma, Wisconsin, and Ontario, but a remnant live in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Two dialects of the Lenape language, which is part of the Algonquian family, have received the most attention from linguists. No fluent native speakers of Unami exist. Munsee still has one native speaker and a few competent second-language learners in Ontario and Wisconsin. Recent surveys among the 300+ Lenape community members in Pennsylvania indicate a widespread desire to revitalize the language and to have a reliable Lenape-language program as part of this effort. I seek a DEL fellowship to pursue three main objectives: to develop conversation-based written, audio, and online language resources, to collect and document extant language and analyze previously collected samples of language, and to continue to teach and collaborate with linguistics students at Swarthmore College and maintain work in progress with other Lenape communities. This project will help determine the extent of Lenape language survival in traditional Lenape territory and help develop new dictionary materials and annotated texts for use by scholars of Algonquian languages within and outside native communities. These will be disseminated at the Swarthmore Linguistics website and that of the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2010 – 5/31/2011


FN-50067-10

Rosemary G. Beam-de-Azcona
University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95618-6153)

Publishing and Archiving of Coatec Zapotec Materials

Coatec Zapotec is an Otomanguean language spoken in the southern part of the state of Oaxaca, Mexico. It is a moribund language with an estimated few hundred speakers, almost exclusively older adults in as few as seven towns. Materials currently available on this language are lacking, and the Southern Zapotec subgroup to which it belongs is often said to be the least well understood of the Zapotec group. This project seeks to change that. It will make available, through publishing and archival [sic], both the raw materials and the analytical products of fieldwork conducted over an eight-year period from 1996 to 2004. By the end of the fellowship year, I intend to have a currently incomplete grammar ready for publication, to have significantly increased the electronic corpus of Coatec texts, and to have archived 48 notebooks and 52 units (tapes and minidiscs) of audio recordings. Through this work, current and future generations of Zapotec people, linguists, and other scholars interested in the Zapotec and Oaxaca will have access to a wealth of information which could otherwise be lost. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2011


FN-50072-10

Jessie C. Baird
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Wampanoag Grammar

This proposal will result in the production of a complete Wampanoag Grammar. This work will utilize all of the extant documents available in the language from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It will be the only grammar that uses the entire corpus of available material. Each term will be fully explained in order to make the Grammar completely accessible to the layperson as well as the linguist. The broader impacts resulting from the proposed activity will be the first Algonquian Grammar that can be used as a template for the production of grammars in other Algonquian languages. This will be particularly useful to linguists and community practitioners working toward the survival and reclamation of Algonquian languages in the United States and Canada. (Edited by staff)

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2010 – 5/31/2011


FN-50074-10

John M. Keegan
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

The Sara Language Database Project: Phase 1

The Sara Languages form a group of approximately 17 languages of the Sara-Bagirmi branch of the Nilo-Saharan family, and are spoken primarily in southern Chad. Most of these languages are at risk of disappearing over the course of the 21st century. This project will create a database for 14 of these languages using existing written sources, published and unpublished. This data will then be used to generate a lexicon for each language. Sound recordings will be made from native speakers and the sound files added to the database. Lexicons for languages with sufficient data will be published as individual volumes. Other languages will be gathered into collections of smaller lexicons. A single volume, organized by French word, will unite the data from all project languages. Copies of the lexicons will be provided to educational institutions and local language groups interested in furthering this work. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2011


FN-50078-10

Yoram Meroz
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Salvage Documentation of Yahgan

This project aims at providing the first modern and comprehensive documentation of Yahgan, an isolate language of Chilean Tierra de Fuego. The language is nearly extinct, with only one elderly speaker, out of an ethnic population of 100. Yahgan is typologically unusual for South America, with no clear typological affinities to either the Amazonian languages or those of the Pacific coast. Over the past century, the Yahgan language has nearly ceased to be spoken. For much of that period, no research on the language was carried out. The bulk of existing work on Yahgan is formed by the dictionary, the grammatical notes, and the biblical translations of the 19th century missionary Thomas Bridges. During the fellowship year, I will conduct fieldwork in Puerto Williams, Chile, building on my previous fieldwork in 2007-08. I will complete a summary grammar to serve as a base for a later, more comprehensive grammar, re-edit Bridges's dictionary of the language and produce transcribed textual material. These will serve as a basis for learner's materials to be provided for the Yahgan community. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 11/30/2011


FN-50079-10

Stephen A. Marlett
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Documenting the Me'phaa Genus

This project will undertake a broad and multifaceted documentation and description of the Me'phaa genus (Otomanguean family; Guerrero, Mexico), including digital recordings (video and audio); vocabulary, grammar, and texts; and provide the basis for ongoiong language development and linguistic study. The Me'phaa genus has many interesting features that are still relatively unknown and insufficiently documented. More complete documentation of Me'phaa will contribute to the linguistic community generally and to the study of proto-Otomanguean. It will also contribute to the Me'phaa community as parts of it will be published in Spanish and English. (The Me'phaa community uses Spanish as their language of wider communication.) The publications and public presentations in Mexico will be an important link between this project and three communities in particular: Me'phaa teachers and writers, new researchers from different discipline, and the general public in Mexico. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2010 – 1/31/2012


FN-50053-09

Loretta M. O'Connor
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Documentation Enhancement: Lowland Chontal Archive and Dictionaries

The primary objective of this project is to enrich the basic documentation of Lowland Chontal of Oaxaca, a highly endangered indigenous language of southern Mexico. Lowland Chontal is one of the two surviving sisters of Oaxaca Chontal, a small and still unclassified language family spoken in the language-rich state of Oaxaca. I have worked with the lowland variety since 1997, with accomplishments that include a theoretically-oriented doctoral dissertation and, together with archeologist Peter Krofges, the establishment of a documentary electronic archive housed at Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen. Fellowship tenure will be dedicated to the linguistic annotation of the digitized materials in the archive and the production of dictionaries from the lexical database enriched by that annotation. One dictionary will be Chontal-English-Spanish, geared to academic linguists; the second will be Chontal-Spanish, designed for the Chontal community. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2010


FN-50054-09

Ellavina T. Perkins
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Navajo Grammar Investigations

This is a critical time for the Navajo language. Although most Navajo adults can at least converse in the language, very few children of pre-school age can speak the language at all. Existing reference materials on Navajo focus on its magnificently complex verbal structure. However, there is no existing reference work that exposes the range and use of possible sentence structures. Several native speakers of Navajo have obtained advanced degrees in linguistics and recent years have brought increased momentum in theoretical and descriptive work on the grammar. This has resulted in a large quantity of theoretically significant work. However, much of it is highly technical, and a large portion of it is unpublished or out of print. This project will bring together insights gleaned over the years, complemented by original research to fill in the gaps, to complete a reference grammar that focuses on Navajo sentence structure. An abridged version of the grammar is now in press. This is a proposal for a year of fellowship support to allow Dr. Ellavina Perkins to continue work on this grammar which was begun with a three year NSF grant with two years of subsequent fellowship support. Dr. Perkins is a native speaker of Navajo and a linguist with vast experience teaching Navajo in K through 12 and at the university level. The reference grammar now under development will cover traditional topics but is unusual in that it includes teachers and curriculum planners as part of its target audience along with linguists. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2009 – 8/31/2010


FN-50056-09

Elisabeth Gabrielle Kuenzli
University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)

Acting Inca: Ethnic Identity and Quechua Theater in Early 20th-Century Highland Bolivia

The project will study a form of elite, early 20th-century Quechua language and theater in highland Bolivia. The Quechua language was the central language of communication with the rise and expansion of the Inca Empire, which lasted from the early 1400s until the Spaniards' arrival in 1532. The proposed study deals with both text and context; the source is a theatrical performance of the Spanish conquest in Caracollo, Bolivia, whose origins date back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I hypothesize that the Quechua employed belongs to a specific, elite set of Quechua linguistics--often called "capac simi"-- employed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in some performances of Quechua theater. While several authors have noted the use of the specialized Quechua in performance, nobody has analyzed its linguistic or contextual significance. I am interested in investigating relations and constructions of power and identity as expressed through this distinct form of Quechua as well as through constructions and appropriations of an "Inca" identity in highland Bolivia in the early 20th century. While there are still an estimated 3 million Quechua speakers in Bolivia today, Quechua theater as a linguistic, cultural, and political form is nearly extinct. As enactments of Quechua theater quietly die out across the Andes, the play that originated in the early 20th century and continues to be performed in Caracollo today represents one of the last chances to document and analyze the historic roots of Quechua theater and language. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2009 – 7/31/2010


FN-50060-09

Connie Dickinson
University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)

Distribution, Archiving, and Completion of Tsafiki Documentation Materials

The fellowship will complete the final stage of a five-year project to document Tsafiki, the language of an indigenous group--the Tsachila--who live in seven communes near the city of Santo Domingo de los Colorados in Ecuador's western Andean lowlands. Knowledge of the language, spoken only by some 2,000 people, is threatened by the incursions of the dominant Spanish-speaking culture. The dominance of television and radio programming in Spanish, departures from the Tsachila enclaves for employment reasons, increasing intermarriage with the wider population, and Spanish language instruction in schools have resulted in the narrowing of Tsafiki language use to addressing elders within the community. The project has four interrelated goals: 1) web-based distribution of an electronic lexical database of approximately 10,000 words with standard dictionary information (e.g., definitions in Tsafiki, Spanish, and English; examples with translations; pronunciation guides; and grammatical category information), encyclopedic information, pictures, and sound files, 2) completion of the archiving of some 200 hours of translated and transcribed video and audio files in the Netherlands and at the University of Texas at Austin, 3) completion of a comprehensive, descriptive grammar of Tsafiki, and 4) completion of a manuscript describing verbal classification systems in Tsafiki, to be published by Brill. Upon the project's completion, Tsafiki will be one of the few endangered South American languages to be thoroughly documented. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 5/31/2010


FN-50061-09

Ardis R. Eschenberg
Nebraska Indian Community College (Winnebago, NE 68071-0752)

Documenting the Verbs of Omaha through Narrative

OmoNhoN, or Omaha, is a member of the Siouan language family. It is spoken mainly on the Omaha Nation reservation in northeastern Nebraska. Currently, there are fewer than forty speakers of OmoNhoN. While language revitalization efforts at the public school, the community college, and various community programs, such as the Omaha Alcohol Program, teach fundamentals of the language to a variety of learners from preschool to the elderly, no one has attained fluency in this manner yet. To document the language, this project proposes to 1) create a database of at least twelve fully transcribed digital and audio recordings of fluent speakers of OmoNhoN on a variety of topics in different genres, and 2) develop a verb book for OmoNhoN which documents the conjugation of at least 500 distinct verbs and provides examples of usage, referring especially to data in the series of twelve narratives. The database, to include transcriptions of the audio recordings in UmoNhoN, morphemic glossing in English, English translations, and speech notation, will be given to Nebraska Indian Community College's UmoNhoN Center of Excellence, the UmoNhoN Nation Public School's language program, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln's anthropology department, and the Endangered Language Fund archive. Availability of the database will be advertised via the Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages of the Americas and the Conference on Endangered Languages and Cultures of North America. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 5/31/2010


FN-50030-08

Gary Holton
University of Alaska, Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK 99775-7500)

Pantar Island Project: Documenting Two Endangered Papuan Languages, Western Pantar and Nedebang

This project will support follow-up field work and final write-up for two endangered Papuan (non-Austronesian) languages of Pantar Island, eastern Indonesia: Western Pantar and Nedebang. Primary data, including a corpus of aligned text and audio/video recordings, will be archived and accessible via the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Languages and Cultures, following best practice recommendations of the Electronic Metastructure for Endangered Languages Data project. Publications to be produced include: a reference grammar of Western Pantar; a sketch grammar of Nedebang; and a tri-lingual dictionary of Western Pantar. The work builds on initial exploratory fieldwork conducted in 2004 with support from an NSF Small Grant for Exploratory Research and continued field work in 2006-2007 supported by a DEL fellowship. The resulting documentation will broadly impact linguistic science, providing crucial typological data from a little-known part of the world's linguistic landscape. Furthermore, through close collaboration with indigenous language workers and the development of national language (Indonesian) reference materials, this project will contribute to the continued maintenance and appreciation of Pantar languages. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2008 – 8/31/2009


FN-50031-08

Ellavina T. Perkins
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Navajo Language Investigations

This is a critical time for the Navajo language. Although most Navajo adults can at least converse in the language, very few children of pre-school age can speak the language at all. Existing reference materials on Navajo focus on its magnificently complex verbal structure. However, there is no existing reference work that exposes the range and use of possible sentence structures. Several native speakers of Navajo have obtained advanced degrees in linguistics and recent years have brought increased momentum in theoretical and descriptive work on the grammar. This has resulted in a large quantity of theoretically significant work. However, much of it is highly technical, and a large portion of it is unpublished or out of print. This project will bring together insights gleaned over the years, complemented by original research to fill in the gaps, to complete a reference grammar that focuses on Navajo sentence structure. This is a proposal for a year of fellowship support to allow Dr. Ellavina Perkins to continue work on this grammar which was begun with a three year NSF grant with two years of subsequent NEH fellowship support. Dr. Perkins is a native speaker of Navajo and a linguist with vast experience teaching Navajo in K through 12 and on the university level. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 8/31/2009


FN-50035-08

John Foreman
Utica College of Syracuse University (Utica, NY 13502-4857)

A Dictionary and Wiki of Macuiltianguis Zapotec

The language of Macuiltianguis Zapotec (MacZ) is an endangered Otomanguean language of Oaxaca, Mexico, with immigrant communities in Mexico City and Southern California. Currently, I am engaged with these communities in a project to create an online resource for scholars and native speakers alike that will contain multimedia (photos, audio, video) and multilingual (English, Spanish, and Zapotec) content including a dictionary, a grammar, and pedagogical materials for language revitalization. In addition, the material will be built up as a moderated wiki, a collaborative web site. This will allow other researchers to add content and enable native speakers to also generate content, which will increase the native community's sense of ownership in the material, allow for faster generation of content, and encourage younger, heritage speakers to become involved in the language by drawing on their interest in technology. The dictionary will allow a chance to address some of the shortcomings of previous works on Sierra Juarez Zapotec. In addition it will allow the study of microdialectal variation between MacZ and Atepec Zapotec and the Zapotec of surrounding communities. For the web site we are developing technology to turn wikis into structured databases that could have far-reaching applications well beyond language documentations. We are also testing whether wikis can work for language documentation and revitalization and hope others will adopt our approach and improve upon it. The site can contribute to comparative work on Zapotec and to the study of dialects and microvariation. And eventually it may serve as a foundation for still more ambitious crosslinguistic and crossdialectal comparisons if other scholars and communities contribute to the resource. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2008 – 7/31/2009


FN-50041-08

Marguerite Anne Biesele
Foundation for Interdisciplinary Research (Autsin, TX 78713-7855)

Digital Field Documentation, Processing, and Database for Ju/'hoan Texts: Preservation, Archiving, and Dissemination

Native speakers of the Khoisan family of languages of southern Africa, with distinctive "click" consonants and complex phonetic features, are rapidly dwindling. The economic status of these people is also low on every scale. Because both factors practically guarantee the disappearance of their languages, authoritative documentation is imperative. The applicant, who has researched and published on the Ju/'hoan language, culture, and human ecology for the past thirty-five years, brings together a team including a computational linguistics assistant and trainees experienced in Ju/'hoan. The project is committed to the "open source revolution" with data housed in interoperating digital archives. Project goals are: to digitize and upgrade already-collected recordings; to carry out timely digital audio and video field research; and to prepare materials for archiving through a process of transcription, annotation, translation, interlinearization, and publication. Project outcomes include: digital archiving of sound and mini-DV video; digital return to communities of materials collected prior to digital technology; and publishing books of authoritative Ju/'hoan folklore and other texts with CD-ROM inserts, allowing the actual sounds of the languages to be heard. The project will substantially increase scholarly materials for Khoisan linguistic research and serve as a vehicle for training indigenous communities in the science and technology for conserving and developing their own language heritage. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2008 – 5/31/2009


FN-50044-08

Bryant Garrett
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Penobscot Language Resource Production and Archiving

This project proposes to complete the Penobscot Primer and archive it and other Penobscot research from the NSF-funded "Siebert Stabilization and Archiving Project" at the University of Maine at Orono (UMO). The Penobscot Primer is a visually prompted, digital, interactive multimedia spoken language document. Interdisciplinary cooperation between native people, preeminent Algonquian scholars, the Maine Humanities Council, Colby College, and UMO assisted in the development of this well received beta version. This early version, displayed at the Hudson Museum, UMO, and at the Penobscot's Indian Island School for thirteen years, represents a small fraction of the total fieldwork. Verbiage elicited and recorded in response to visual stimulation of the last Penobscot speaker will be digitized, transcribed, and compiled. The Primer and all additional research, which represents thousands of pages of Penobscot language field notes, audio recordings, and digital files, will be catalogued and transferred to UMO. The intellectual merit of this project lies in its foundation formed through collaborative Native and scholarly research spanning seventy-five years. In addition, the Primer's successful presentation of the Penobscot language, using current technology and following phonemic protocol, allows for culturally framed intellectual study and dissemination. The broader impact resulting from this activity will be the public access to a large body of as yet unpublished Penobscot language information. Placement of this volume of material at the UMO site, which is located adjacent to the Penobscot Indian Reservation, will impact Penobscot studies for generations. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 6/30/2009


FN-50016-07

John G. Fought
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Archiving a Linguistic Corpus of Chorti, Yocotán, and Tumbalá Chol Mayan: Audio Recordings, Field Notes, and Photographs

The project will create and deposit digital copies of analog data on three modern Mayan languages: Chorti, Yocotan, and Chol. The data consist of audio tape recordings, written field notes and transcripts, and photographs. It must be borne in mind that endangerment has both cultural and linguistic dimensions. These languages were, and to some degree still are, repositories of what cultural riches remain from the early history of these Mayan peoples. The materials will contribute to further research, reconstruction and preservation of their histories and cultures, as well as to the comparative reconstruction of the history of the Mayan language family and to the decipherment of Mayan hieroglyphic writing. The materials to be preserved in this project were collected 35 to 40 years ago and could not be duplicated today. Rapid cultural changes have eroded traditional knowledge, but adults are teaching children Chorti in village elementary schools and some of the materials will be made available to them for that effort. Archiving these materials and making them accessible to scholarship will be a significant contribution to historical and comparative Mayan linguistics, folklore studies, Mayan epigraphy (and thus archaeology) and linguistic typology. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 3/31/2009


FN-50017-07

Kelly L. Maynard
University of Missouri, Columbia (Columbia, MO 65211-3020)

Describing an Endangered Dialect of Albanian Spoken in Samsun, Turkey

This project seeks to describe in a sketch grammar a heretofore unknown dialect of Gheg Albanian, located in the Samsun Province of Turkey and impinged upon by the Turkish language. The Albanian language is classified as belonging to the Indo-European language family, while the Turkish language is classified as belonging to the Altaic language family. The Albanian-speaking community in the Black Sea region of Turkey was originally formed by migrants from the Sancak of Nish (an Ottoman administrative unit north of the contemporary boundaries of Kosovo) who were forced into Kosovo in 1878 and who subsequently fled from there to the inner Ottoman Empire, especially between 1912-1914. The community has been isolated from other Albanian communities since. All the Albanian speakers are also fluent in Turkish. Documenting a Turkish variety of Albanian will add to our pool of data about Modern Albanian, and increase our knowledge of the historical development of Albanian and its dialects. In addition to being significant to Albanian linguistics, the data and texts collected will be made available to language scholars in general thus adding to our corpus of structures found in modern language which must be accounted for by general linguistic theory. The study will produce data particularly important in the fields of language contact and language death. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2007 – 5/31/2008


FN-50021-07

Susan D. Penfield
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)

Community-Based Language Documentation: Mohave and Beyond

I have worked with the Colorado River Indian Tribes (CRIT) in Arizona since 1969 and have been primarily engaged in the study of Mohave, a Yuman language with about 30 remaining speakers. My central goal in this project is to apply what I have learned in my work with Mohave to a broader range of Indigenous languages. The products of this work will be literary material in Mohave with pedagogical import for the CRIT community; a phrase book for Mohave based on recent documentation of conversational practices; languages lessons using MacAuthor, a computer-based tool developed at the University of Arizona, which will incorporate recent documentation of Mohave conversations; a brief guide for Indigenous audiences to the use of OLE (Online Language Environments), another technological tool developed at the University of Arizona which supports both language research and pedagogy; and a manual intended for an Indigenous audience on community language documentation, principles and practices. The materials will expand the understanding of Mohave in actual practice and be accessible both to the Mohave community and particularly to others interested in Yuman languages. The products will apply broadly to other Indigenous communities and to those who work with them, by defining the basic principles and practices needed for community-based language documentation projects. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 6/30/2008


FN-50022-07

Lise M. Dobrin
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)

A Reference Grammar of Cemaun Arapesh

The overarching goal of this project is to document the endangered Arapesh languages, which are traditionally spoken by Melanesian people living along the New Guinea north coast in the East Sepik and Sandaun provinces of Papua New Guinea. Drawing on my past fieldwork on Arapesh, as well as on the fruits of collaborative work currently underway with support from a DEL-NEH institutional grant for the Arapesh Digital Language Archive, I will devote the fellowship year to writing the core chapters of an Arapesh reference grammar. Arapesh is of special significance to linguistic theory for its typologically unusual system of noun classification that elaborates phonological, as opposed to semantic, principles of morphological class assignment and syntactic agreement. Like other Arapesh varieties, the Cemaun dialect of Mountain Arapesh this project documents is seriously endangered; there are fewer than 100 speakers, none of whom are under 40 and none of whom are Arapesh monolingual. The grammar will be theoretically informed but ecumenical, comprehensively describing the Cemaun dialect while synthesizing the data on variation across the Arapesh family as a whole. It will be based on elicited linguistic data and more than 50 texts representing different genres of discourse, including conversation, that I audiorecorded, transcribed, and annotated in the field. Together with the Arapesh Digital Language Archive currently being constructed at the University of Virginia, the grammar will lay the foundation for pedagogical materials to be created later for use in Arapesh village schools. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 5/31/2009


FN-50023-07

Ellavina T. Perkins
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Navajo Language Investigations

This is a critical time for the Navajo language. Although most Navajo adults can at least converse in the language, very few children of pre-school age can speak the language at all. Existing reference materials on Navajo focus on its magnificently complex verbal structure. However, there is no existing reference work that exposes the range and use of possible sentence structures. This project will bring together insights gleaned over the years, complemented by original research, to complete a reference grammar that focuses on Navajo sentence structure. This is a proposal for a year of fellowship support to allow Dr. Ellavina Perkins to complete work on this grammar which was begun with a three-year NSF grant that is now in its final year. This reference grammar will cover traditional topics but is unusual in that it includes teachers and curriculum planners as part of its target audience along with linguists. Another unique feature of the project is the involvement of teachers and community members in the Navajo Language Academy (NLA) summer workshops. The resulting book and CD-ROM will be an important tool for educators developing more advanced language courses as well as for linguists doing pure research on the world's languages. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2007 – 8/31/2008


FN-50024-07

Thurlow Wayne Dye
Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (Dallas, TX 75236-5629)

Documenting the Bahinemo Language and Culture

This project is to document the Bahinemo language spoken by 300 people in Papua New Guinea. The work will comprise new video and audio texts; audio, transcribed, and glossed word lists; comparative analyses of the new language data with data from 20 to 40 years ago; and an analysis of the social dynamics contributing to the rapid decline in the use of the language. All materials will be archived and made accessible in the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures in Australia, which provides a public access website. The Principal Investigator lived in a Bahinemo village part-time for 19 years between 1964 and 1989; he speaks the language and can quickly renew acquaintances and record natural language. He has a significant repository of oral and transcribed texts and analyses from his earlier residence there and will now be able to document language change over the years. Bahinemo is a Papuan language whose speakers followed a traditional life style until late in the twentieth century; the language is an irreplaceable repository of extensive knowledge of flora and fauna and of many other aspects of life in a tropical forest. All the land belonging to these people has been marked for logging, a process that will change their lives and language immensely. Several Bahinemo speakers will be trained to assist in taking video, recording stories, and dictionary making. The project will add new digitized video and audio stories, conversations and narratives, and will provide an extensive lexicon of Bahinemo terms for future study. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2007 – 7/31/2008


FN-50027-07

Paul R. Kroeger
Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (Dallas, TX 75236-5629)

Kimaragang Grammar Outline and Digital Recordings

This fellowship will support the documentation of Kimaragang Dusun, an endangered Austronesian language spoken in northeastern Borneo. The two primary goals for the fellowship period are (1) to write a short descriptive grammar and prepare it for publication as a monograph; and (2) to record and archive at least 10 hours of Kimaragang speech in digital audio format. The descriptive grammar will build on short articles recently published by the applicant, the applicant's field notes, and an unpublished lexical database compiled by Jim Johansson to be supplemented by new data to be elicited during the fieldwork phase of the project. Some native speakers will be trained to do recording, transcription, and data entry tasks, which may lead to future involvement in language revitalization efforts. Local publication of a descriptive grammar should help to gain increased recognition for the language on the state and national levels. This research will be carried out in cooperation with the Kadazandusun Language Foundation. Digital audio files and transcriptions of the Kimaragang texts will be deposited with the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures in Australia. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 12/31/2007


FN-50029-07

Bonnie G. Stalls
University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)

Razihi Grammar, Lexicon, Texts, and Recordings

The language to be documented is spoken by the inhabitants of Jabal Razih, a remote mountainous tribal area of northwest Yemen. Linguistic data collected by Stalls and Shelagh Weir in 1979 revealed the language, called Razihi, to be unusual in that, though similar to Arabic, it is largely incomprehensible to surrounding Arabic speakers and has significant non-Arabic features, some of which have recently been found to be relics from extinct South Arabian languages. In 1979 natural barriers to outside contact were just beginning to give way as new roads were built and electricity was introduced. Many speakers prior to that time were monolingual and seldom traveled far. With modernization the influence of Arabic and other languages is pervasive. In 2005-2006 a team including Stalls, Weir and others investigated the unusual features of Razihi. It is proposed to process the linguistic data already collected, making the results available in book form and on CD-ROM. The tasks are to write a reference grammar; edit and expand an existing 371-page preliminary glossary; provide annotations, translations and linguistic commentary for oral texts and handwritten documents spanning 400 years; and digitize and annotate about 15 hours of audio tapes and place them in a data repository. Razihi is in danger of losing the distinctive grammatical and lexical features which attest to its origins among early Semitic dialects and form part of the inheritance of the people of the region. The study will provide key linguistic information for a hitherto unknown region. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2007 – 11/30/2008


FN-50002-06

Jeffrey E. Davis
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37996-0001)

Preservation of Plains Indian Sign Language: Developing a Digital Archive at the Smithsonian

Plains Indian Sign Language is used within the Plains cultural and linguistic groups of the USA and in Canada. Sign language has been documented at every level of social interaction within most Native American groups and as a widespread medium of communication between members from distinct language groups. The focus of the proposal is documentation of sign language among Indians from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, carried out in large part by some of the first ethnologists and anthropologists connected with the Smithsonian Institution. The best known documentation is found at the Smithsonian's National Anthropological Archives. The goals are to develop an online digital language archive from the 1870s illustrations and 1930s films; create annotations, translations, and captions to accompany the materials; generate additional annotations for the Smithsonian's online catalog; and make it possible to add to the linguistic corpus as more documentation is digitized. The proposal is endorsed by the Smithsonian, which will provide work space for the applicant, and supported by the University of Tennessee, which will also host the digital archive. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 12/31/2007


FN-50003-06

Willem J. de Reuse
University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)

A Searchable Digital Archive of Western Apache Language Texts

Western Apache is a Southern Athabaskan language mostly spoken on the San Carlos and White Mountain Apache Reservations in central eastern Arizona. The language is seriously endangered; few children acquire it. This project continues previously NSF-funded work on a Western Apache grammar and dictionary. The goal is to create a digital audio and written documentary text record of the language. The procedures recommended by the Electronic Metastructure for Endangered Languages Data (E-MELD) project will be followed. Easily accessible and published text material in Western Apache is scant, which is unfortunate considering the well-documented prominent position of Apache groups in the history and culture of the Greater Southwest. Existing collections will be integrated with texts collected by the project director to construct a database. Each text in the database will have a line of transcription using a consistent spelling system along with the original spelling; a morphological analysis; and notes on grammatical, lexical, and ethnographic points of interest. Audio will be time-aligned with transcriptions. The project will facilitate access to the texts for the Apaches themselves as well as for linguists and other scholars. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 5/31/2008


FN-50004-06

Scott O. Farrar
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)

Documentation and Preservation of Western Beboid Languages of Cameroon

This project, a collaborative venture by Scott Farrar and Jeff Good, will result in (1) the creation of primary documentary resources of the languages in the form of audio and video recordings and transcriptions; (2) the creation of descriptive materials on the languages in the form of annotated recordings and information on their grammar; (3) the construction of a comparative database based on the collected data; and (4) recommendations for tool design for field linguistics, with a specific focus on tools allowing for structured annotation of grammatical data containing links to linguistic ontologies. Current documentation of the Western Beboid languages is limited to word lists and sketches of noun class systems, and the number of speakers is quite small, ranging from, perhaps a high of 1600 for Fang to a low of 600 for Mbu'. Their small speaker populations and the increasing use of Cameroonian Pidgin in the Western Beboid area puts them at risk for extinction within the span of a few generations. These languages offer crucial links between Bantu languages and the rest of the Benue-Congo language group, the sub-branch of Niger-Congo to which the Bantu languages belong. From the perspective of linguistics and prehistory, the languages occupy what is believed to be the Bantu homeland. They can offer valuable insights regarding the nature of the Bantu expansions; and the comparative database will open the languages to research by linguists and specialists from other disciplines. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 12/31/2007


FN-50005-06

Jeffrey C. Good
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (Leipzig 14222-1004 Germany)

Documentation and Preservation of Western Beboid Languages of Cameroon

This project, a collaborative venture by Jeff Good and Scott Farrar, will result in (1) the creation of primary documentary resources of the languages in the form of audio and video recordings and transcriptions; (2) the creation of descriptive materials on the languages in the form of annotated recordings and information on their grammar; (3) the construction of a comparative database based on the collected data; and (4) recommendations for tool design for field linguistics, with a specific focus on tools allowing for structured annotation of grammatical data containing links to linguistic ontologies. Current documentation of the Western Beboid languages is limited to word lists and sketches of noun class systems, and the number of speakers is quite small, ranging from, perhaps a high of 1600 for Fang to a low of 600 for Mbu'. Their small speaker populations and the increasing use of Cameroonian Pidgin in the Western Beboid area puts them at risk for extinction within the span of a few generations. These languages offer crucial links between Bantu languages and the rest of the Benue-Congo language group, the sub-branch of Niger-Congo to which the Bantu languages belong. From the perspective of linguistics and prehistory, the languages occupy what is believed to be the Bantu homeland. They can offer valuable insights regarding the nature of the Bantu expansions; and the comparative database will open the languages to research by linguists and specialists from other disciplines. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2007 – 8/31/2008


FN-50006-06

Gary Holton
University of Alaska, Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK 99775-7500)

Documentation of Western Pantar (an endangered language of Pantar Island, Indonesia)

During this fellowship, the Principal Investigator will carry out latter stages of linguistic documentation for Western Pantar, an endangered Papuan language spoken on Pantar Island, Indonesia. Materials to be produced include: a short lexicon; a reference grammar; aligned texts and audio; and a media corpus. The reference grammar will be written in a clear and accessible style, avoiding theory-internal explanations of grammatical phenomena. The use of aligned text and audio and the publication of a media corpus will ensure that future researchers have maximal access to original field data. All field data will be archived digitally at the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures, following best practice recommendations of the Electronic Metastructure for Endangered Languages Data project. The Pantar region remains one of the least documented linguistic areas in Indonesia, and almost no documentary information is available for Western Pantar and many of the other non-Austronesian languages of Pantar. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2006 – 7/31/2007


FN-50007-06

Stephen A. Marlett
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Seri Reference Grammar and Workshops

The project will complete a comprehensive reference grammar of Seri, a morphologically complex language of northwestern Mexico. This grammar will complement the trilingual dictionary which was published in 2005 with only a brief grammar included. It will also complement the corpus of glossed texts that was produced and which continues to be expanded. Three workshops are planned that will enhance the value of this grammar: one for the linguistic community in northwestern Mexico, to help improve understanding and appreciation of the Seri language (and the importance of its continued documentation); and two for the Seri community, to help prepare a group of people to continue the development and archiving of written materials. Digital recordings of the bulk of the material in the grammar will also be made and archived. The Principal Investigator's work on the dictionary and texts was funded by NSF in 2002-2004. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 12/31/2007


FN-50008-06

Todd A. McDaniels
Comanche Nation College (Lawton, OK 73501-7434)

Linguistic Characteristics of the Comanche Language

The Principal Investigator requests support for a project to document the linguistic characteristics of the Comanche language. The goal is to collect and archive narrative and expository discourse as well as elicited linguistic data from from the c30 speakers of Comanche. Comanche is a Uto-Aztecan language from the Numic subfamily. Speakers are located nowadays mainly in southwest Oklahoma in and around the city of Lawton. The language is highly endangered. The project would benefit those within the tribe who maintain an interest in learning the language. The clearest effect would be yielded by the gathering of texts. Comanche stories have an intrinsic value for the Comanche community which is partly a matter of an appreciation of the sound of the language and partly a matter of an appreciation of the content. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 5/31/2007


FN-50009-06

Deogratias S. Ngonyani
Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)

Documenting Kikisi

The proposed project aims at conducting fieldwork on Kikisi, a Bantu language spoken in the southern highlands of Tanzania. The language belongs to the Southern Highlands Language group of Tanzania. The objectives of the project include (a) describing the linguistic features of the language and writing a descriptive grammar; (b) audio and video recording of cultural texts such as folktales, conversations, rituals, songs and language games; (c) compiling folktales and oral traditions for wider readership in the community; and (d) using data from Kikisi to explore the nature of words in language. The documentation and descriptive grammar will generate new data for issues studied by linguists of diverse theoretical persuasions. The study will also add invaluable data to the field of Bantu linguistics, where the genetic classification and sub-classification of languages in southern Tanzania remains unclear. The broader impacts of this study include a significant contribution to the Languages of Tanzania project to document all languages and produce a linguistic atlas. For the Kikisi people the documentation will constitute a rare opportunity to record and preserve the language. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 7/31/2007


FN-50010-06

Ellavina T. Perkins
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Navajo Language Investigations

This is a critical time for the Navajo language. Although most Navajo adults can at least converse in the language, very few children of pre-school age can speak the language at all. Existing reference materials in Navajo focus on its magnificently complex verbal structure. However, there is no existing reference work that exposes the range and use of possible sentence structures. Several native speakers of Navajo have obtained advanced degrees in linguistics and in recent years have brought increased momentum in theoretical and descriptive work on the grammar. However, much of it is highly technical, and a large portion is unpublished or out of print. This project will bring together insights gleaned over the years, complemented by original research to fill in the gaps, to complete a reference grammar that focuses on Navajo sentence structure. The project began with a three-year NSF grant, and this fellowship will allow the applicant, a linguist who is a native speaker of Navajo, to complete the work. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 8/31/2007


FN-50011-06

Anton S. Treuer
Bemidji State University (Bemidji, MN 56601-2699)

Chippewa Grammar Project for Southwestern Chippewa Dialect

This is a collaborative project between Dr. David Treuer (University of Minnesota) and Dr. Anton Treuer (Bemidji State University). Together they will record Chippewa language speakers from the St. Croix, Mille Lacs, Leech Lake, and Red Lake Reservations in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Creative recording protocols will be used in order to capture as many of the nuances of the major variants of Southwestern Chippewa and to ensure the recordings include the verb forms and inflections that one does not hear in everyday speech. Recording and translating will occupy the researchers for 12 months after which their findings will be compiled into a two-volume series. The first volume will be the first and only Chippewa language grammar, the second volume will include many of the original recordings and will function as a grammar companion, where researchers and language learners can see the grammar and syntax in play. The material will be made available as an Internet-based database and the grammar book will be the first of its kind for this threatened language. (Edited by staff)

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 9/30/2007


FN-50012-06

David Robert Treuer
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)

Chippewa Grammar Project for Southwestern Chippewa Dialect

This is a collaborative project between Dr. David Treuer (University of Minnesota) and Dr. Anton Treuer (Bemidji State University). Together they will record Chippewa language speakers from the St. Croix, Mille Lacs, Leech Lake, and Red Lake Reservations in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Creative recording protocols will be used in order to capture as many of the nuances of the major variants of Southwestern Chippewa and to ensure the recordings include the verb forms and inflections that one does not hear in everyday speech. Recording and translating will occupy the researchers for 12 months after which their findings will be compiled into a two-volume series. The first volume will be the first and only Chippewa language grammar, the second volume will include many of the original recordings and will function as a grammar companion, where researchers and language learners can see the grammar and syntax in play. The material will be made available as an Internet-based database and the grammar book will be the first of its kind for this threatened language. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 12/31/2007


FN-50001-06

Linda A. Cumberland
Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)

Assiniboine Texts

This project will transcribe, translate, analyze, and disseminate texts from one of the last fluent speakers of Assiniboine, a Siouan language of the northern Plains. Today there are fewer than one hundred fluent speakers of Assiniboine, all elderly. Recent efforts to document the language include a dictionary and Cumberland's own grammar. However, there are few published texts available. The proposed corpus includes twenty narratives encompassing the experiences of four generations of a single family, from the pre-reservation period to the present, plus shorter narratives, including advice/exhortation, legends, folk tales, and songs. The texts will be presented in printed format and as part of a digital library at the American Indian Studies Research Institute (AISRI) at Indiana University. In addition to transcribing and translating the texts, the project director will provide cultural and historical annotations, to enable users to understand the texts more fully as cultural, historical, and literary documents. The project will substantially increase the body of linguistic data currently available for this severely endangered language, expand the recorded lexicon, and allow enhancement of the grammatical analysis. It will provide a more complete view of the Assiniboine that illuminates contrasts with other Plains tribes; it will permit an improved analysis of Assiniboine in particular and Siouan languages in general; it will promote further refinement of the Indiana Dictionary Database and its Annotated Text Processor; and it will return to the Assiniboine people an extraordinary account of their own history and traditions. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Anthropology; Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 8/31/2007