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Coverage for grant FB-50005-03

FB-50005-03
Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Reading Revolution
Barbara Hochman, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FB-50005-03

Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Reading Revolution: Race, Literacy, Childhood and Fiction 1851-1911 (Review)
Author(s): C. Johanningsmeier,
Publication: Choice
Date: 12/1/2011
Abstract: Hochman (foreign literatures and linguistics, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Israel) has built on recent scholarship and created something original. Using an impressively wide array of resources, she documents and analyzes how the meaning of Uncle Tom's Cabin changed--for both adult and child readers, black and white--over the course of time. Clearly and concisely charting the interplay of the text of the novel itself, its societal and print contexts, and readers' responses,this volume will undoubtedly serve as a model for future scholars. Clearly and concisely charting the interplay of the text of the novel itself, its societal and print contexts, and readers' responses, this volume will undoubtedly serve as a model for future scholars. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty.
Link: http://www.choicemag.org

How Uncle Tom's Cabin Changed What and Why We Read (Media Coverage)
Author(s): FRANK O SMITH
Publication: Portland Press Herald
Date: 10/9/2011
Abstract: Hochman analyzes the grounds of popularity and the impact of "Uncle TOm's Cabin"in the antebellum period. She attributes the rapid fall from favor of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" after the Civil War to Americans wanting to look forward, not back. Paradoxically, Stowe's book became popular for a time in the 1880s and 1890s among children and grandchildren of former slaves, for it provided them a glimpse of slavery that their parents and grandparents who'd suffered under it didn't wish to revisit.For anyone who loves literature, Hochman's book illuminates the fluidity of attitudes toward a seminal fictional work, literacy and the very act of reading fiction itself.
Link: http://www.pressherald.com/life/audience/how-uncle-toms-cabin-changed-what-and-why-we-read_2011-10-09.html

Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Reading Revolution (Review)
Author(s): Kristina DuRocher
Publication: Journal of American History
Date: 7/16/2012
Abstract: Although it may seem that there is little that remains unexplored about the impact of one of the most famous abolitionist novels, Barbara Hochman’s work on Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) demonstrates the changing role fiction has played in the American reading experience. She examines the appeal that Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel held for diverse audiences—including African Americans, women, and children—before and after the Civil War . . . .Hochman’s strength is in her self-recognized “eclectic sources” that include published and unpublished reader accounts from whites, blacks, and children; scrapbooks; illustrations; forewords; and reviews (p. 6). These sources offer new and interesting ways to view the novel and remind historians that Uncle Tom’s Cabin functioned as a cultural symbol for decades after the Civil War.

Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Reading Revolution (Review)
Author(s):
Publication: Kritikon Litterarum
Date: 3/2/2012
Abstract: "One of the major accomplishments of Barbara Hochman's latest work,"Uncle Tom's Cabin" and the Reading Revolution, is that her painstaking visual and textual analysis demonstrates beyond a doubt that the form and meaning of a classic novel change over time, very often though deliberate decisions on the part of publishers, illustrators, and other cultural arbiters."

Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Reading Revolution (Review)
Author(s):
Publication: Journal of American Studies
Date: 8/14/2012
Abstract: "In Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Reading Revolution Barbara Hochman provides a thought-provoking, meticulously researched, elegantly written account of the changes in the reception – the transformation in the cultural meaning – of Uncle Tom's Cabin over six decades"
Link: http://jwww.ournals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8665452


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