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Coverage for grant FT-61594-14

FT-61594-14
The Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the "Imperial Uncanny," 1793-1844
Valeria Sobol, University of Illinois

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FT-61594-14

Gothic Ruins: The Ghost of the Ukrainian Past in Panteleimon Kulish’s Mykhailo Charnyshenko, or Little Russia Eighty Years Ago (Media Coverage)
Author(s): Irina Avkhimovich
Publication: Center E-news for everything Russian, East European, and Eurasian at Illinois
Date: 10/14/2014
Abstract: On September 30, 2014, Dr. Valeria Sobol, Associate Professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Illinois, gave a talk on Gothic tropes in nineteenth-century Russian and Ukrainian literature, and discussed their significance in a novel by Panteleimon Kulish entitled Mykhailo Charnyshenko, or Little Russia Eighty Years Ago (1843). Kulish’s recognizably Gothic plot turns and characters reflect the writer’s complex attitude to the Ukrainian past and identity in their relation to the Russian imperial presence. This presentation is based on a chapter from Prof. Sobol’s current book project on the imperial Gothic in Russian literature.
Link: https://reeecillinois.wordpress.com/2014/10/14/gothic-ruins-the-ghost-of-the-ukrainian-past-in-panteleimon-kulishs-mykhailo-charnyshenko-or-little-russia-eighty-years-ago/

“‘Gloomy Finland’ and the Russian Imperial Gothic”: Valeria Sobol at the Noontime Scholars Lecture (Media Coverage)
Author(s): Olga Makarova
Publication: Center E-news for everything Russian, East European, and Eurasian at Illinois
Date: 10/20/2017
Abstract: On Tuesday, September 26, the current head of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Professor Valeria Sobol gave a lecture entitled “‘Gloomy Finland’ and the Russian Imperial Gothic.” The talk was a part of REEEC Fall 2017 Noontime Lecture Series, but as Professor Sobol pointed out in her opening remarks, the talk could also fit into the “1917: Ten Days that Shook the World / 2017: Ten Days that Shake the Campus” initiative since it was 1917 when Finland finally gained its independence. However, the lecture took us back to the time when Finland became a part of Russia – the timeframe that is of particular interest to Sobol as she is working on her new project, Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850.
Link: https://reeecillinois.wordpress.com/2017/10/20/gloomy-finland-and-the-russian-imperial-gothic-valeria-sobol-at-the-noontime-scholars-lecture/


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