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Coverage for grant RA-20216-00

RA-20216-00
Post-doctoral Fellowships in the Humanities for Research in Turkey
G. Kenneth Sams, American Research Institute in Turkey

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-20216-00

Review of Azade Seyhan, "Tales of Crossed Destinies" (Review)
Author(s): Stephan Guth
Publication: Middle Eastern Literatures: incorporating Edebiyat
Date: 11/23/2011
Abstract: review of Tales of Crossed Destinies. The Modern Turkish Novel in a Comparative Context
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1475262X.2011.616736

Review of Nicholas Cahill, Love for Lydia: A Sardis Anniversary Volume Presented to Crawford H. Greenewalt, Jr. (Review)
Author(s): Lynn E. Roller
Publication: American Journal of Archaeology
Date: 10/1/2010
Abstract: Full review of Love for Lydia
Link: http://www.ajaonline.org/sites/default/files/05_L.%20Roller.pdf

Review of Nicholas Cahill, Love for Lydia: A Sardis Anniversary Volume Presented to Crawford H. Greenewalt, Jr. (Review)
Author(s): Naoise Mac Sweeney
Publication: Bryn Mawr Classical Review
Date: 9/11/2009
Abstract: Full review of Love for Lydia
Link: http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2009/2009-09-35.html

Review of Giancarlo Casale, The Ottoman Age of Exploration (Review)
Author(s): Thomas Philipp
Publication: H-Soz-u-Kult, H-Net Reviews. April, 2011
Date: 4/1/2011
Abstract: Full review of Giancarlo Casale, Ottoman Age of Exploration
Link: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=33047

Review of Giancarlo Casale, The Ottoman Age of Exploration (Review)
Author(s): Stephen Dale
Publication: International Journal of Middle East Studies
Date: 8/1/2011
Abstract: Full review of The Ottoman Age of Exploration;DOI: 10.1017/S0020743811000663
Link: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=MES

Looking beyond Time and Place: Azade Seyhan’s "Tales of Crossed Destinies" (Review)
Author(s): Robert P. Finn
Publication: Journal of Turkish Literature
Date: 2/1/2011
Abstract: Azade Seyhan has opened the world of the Turkish novel with a literate, comprehensive, and incisive text that carries the reader through Turkish novels of the last century in what she calls "a dialogue across time." She discusses the spectrum of the 20th century Turkish novel, allying its approaches, concerns, and conclusions to the texture of other world literature. The book is part of the Modern Language Association's series, "World Literatures Reimagined," which aims to bring treatments of world literatures by experienced scholars with a wide audience in mind. Azade Seyhan's examination of Turkish novels is intentionally and essentially rooted deeply in the context of a broad background.
Link: http://tebsite.bilkent.edu.tr/jtl/issue7.html

Review of Blood Ties: Religion, Violence, and the Politics of Nationhood in Ottoman Macedonia, 1878-1908 (Review)
Author(s): Bedross der Matossian
Publication: Nationalities Papers. The Journal of Nationalism and Ethnicity
Date: 8/10/2016
Abstract: Review stresses Yosmaoglu's contribution to the study of ethnic conflict and nationalism.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00905992.2016.1207312

Review of Yilmaz, Caliphate Redefined (Review)
Author(s): Christopher Markiewicz
Publication: H-Ideas, H-Net Reviews
Date: 12/1/2018
Abstract: Caliphate Redefined is a complex and detailed work of intellectual history tied to a relatively simple and straightforward point. Modern interpretations of the caliphate still focus on how the caliph was defined by Muslim jurists as the temporal successor of the Prophet Muhammad charged with the affairs of the entire Muslim community. For decades, modern historians have debated the extent to which Ottoman sultans sought to lay claim to the caliphate on juridical grounds. In this important new book, Yilmaz demonstrates that Ottoman intellectuals certainly redefined the caliphate in the sixteenth century, but not in relation to Islamic jurisprudence. Instead, they offered a new conception of the caliphate as the political expression of the spiritual ideals and expectations articulated by Sufism.
Link: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=53493

Review of Yilmaz, Hu¨seyin, Caliphate Redefined: The Mystical Turn in Ottoman Political Thought (Review)
Author(s): Guy Burak
Publication: Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies
Date: 5/25/2018
Abstract: This monograph weaves multiple discourses, geographical and temporal scopes, and documents in a coherent narrative. He traces intellectual and cultural trends that span the eastern Islamic lands from the 13th through the late 16th centuries while delineating the Ottoman discourse of leadership.
Link: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0041977X18000563

Review of Azade Seyhan, "Tales of Crossed Destinies" (Review)
Author(s): Robert P. Finn
Publication: Review of Middle East Studies
Date: 7/1/2010
Abstract: The contextualization and ingathering of literatures to make them intellectually available for readers to whom their cultural context is unfamiliar is the goal of a series of works presciently commissioned by the Modern Language Association. The appearance of a seminal Turkish novel such as Yakup Kadri Karaosmanoglu's 1922 "Mansion for Rent" at the very same time as Joyce was completing his "Ulysses" and Fitzgerald came out with his "Tales of the Jazz Age" is not a coincidence. What has been sorely lacking to date has been a work that makes the cross-references and places Turkish works in a frame that makes them easier for the reader to assimilate. Azade Seyhan has done this in an informed, erudite and stimulating work designed to be of utility in the classroom and for the informed reader as well. It is an excellent forward move in the realization of the value of the Turkish literary experience for the comprehension of the universal.
Link: http://mesana.org/publications/review/

Review of Azade Seyhan, "Tales of Crossed Destinies" (Review)
Author(s): Ipek Kismet
Publication: Comparative Literature Studies
Date: 4/25/2016
Abstract: "Tales of Crossed Destinies" makes an invaluable contribution to the nascent critical corpus on modern Turkish literature. Seyhan's work establishes it self as the first cogent study in English that offers a critical analysis of the modern Turkish novel in tandem with the social and political histories of the nation. Drawing on the theories of the novel genre developed by such theorists and writers as Georg Lukacs, Walter Benjamin, Mikhail Bakhtin, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Schlegel, Pierre Bourdieu, and Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar, among others, the author goes beyond what she calls "the convenient binaries and periodizations" that have been utilized to critically engage in the study of modern Turkish literature.
Link: http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_cls.html

Review of Ipek Yosmaoglu, Blood Ties: Religion, Violence, and the Politics of Nationhood in Ottoman Macedonia, 1878 - 1908 (Review)
Author(s): Isa Blumi
Publication: International Journal of Middle East Studies
Date: 2/9/2015
Abstract: Since the 1990s scholars have been challenging the myths of the modern nation-state in the Balkans. The reasons for the violence that erupted in the region at the end of the 19th century (or in the 1990s), they have claimed, are far more complex than the basic fact of “different” people living side-by-side. Unfortunately, in making these points, scholars have largely ignored the considerable archival resources available in Istanbul. With Blood Ties, Ipek Yosmaoglu succeeds where others have failed. Over six information-rich chapters, she harnesses hitherto neglected primary resources to develop valuable corrections to the Macedonian part of the larger late 19th-century Balkans story.
Link: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9547262&fileId=S002074381400169X

Review of Ipek Yosmaoglu, Blood Ties: Religion, Violence, and the Politics of Nationhood in Ottoman Macedonia, 1878 - 1908 (Review)
Author(s): Vsevolod Kritskiy
Publication: Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism Special Issue: Nationalism and Belonging
Date: 4/22/2015
Abstract: Ipek Yosmaoglu explores how Ottoman authorities and local bandits created difference among the local communities in present-day Macedonia using religion and violence, while the European powers fostered this difference by the application of novel ethnographic, ethnic, racial, and national categories to the regional population. Her core argument sees religion as the most effective medium through which nationalism was transmitted to the people, and political violence as the ultimate catalyst in the process that would render free-floating allegiances hard and fixed. The author focuses on the competition for influence over the local population among the Ottoman center, the local authorities and the bandit groups. Underlining the fluidity in local identities, languages, and religious beliefs, she goes beyond traditionally fixed categories in order to show how difference was constructed and compounded resulting in the division of communities and the eventual establishment of nationhoods.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/sena.12123/abstract

Review of Giancarlo Casale, The Ottoman Age of Exploration (Review)
Author(s): Sam White
Publication: Technology and Culture
Date: 10/1/2013
Abstract: The Ottoman Age of Exploration offers an original and insightful narrative of imperial expansion into the Indian Ocean world at the height of Ottoman power in the sixteenth century. Drawing on both Ottoman and Portuguese sources, author Giancarlo Casale overturns the older view that Muslim powers responded slowly or ineffectually to European maritime expansion. Instead, he explains Ottoman actions in terms of a deliberate geopolitical strategy and domestic factional politics. While this is a valuable contribution to early modern Ottoman and world history, the work is not necessarily targeted toward historians of science or technology; it remains firmly focused on the political and military narrative, with only occasional forays into Ottoman geography, cartography, and navigation.
Link: http://muse.jhu.edu/article/530522

Ottomans in Early Modern Global History (Review)
Author(s): Sam White
Publication: Journal of Global History
Date: 7/1/2011
Abstract: This is a comparison of three studies of global Ottomans, including Casale, Ottoman Age of Exploration. In the growing field of early modern global history, few regions remain so poorly understood as Ottoman lands. Although they have played their part in narrative accounts of the rise and fall of empires, the Ottomans have figured little if at all in most comparative or structural analyses of history. Ottoman studies has produced few historians who have crossed over from their regional specialty into major global and comparative studies. Three authors are reviewed here who have taken promising initial steps in that direction. Unfortunately, none offers the truly global perspective or rigorous comparative framework that global historians might want. Yet each does provide a preview of how the history of the Ottoman empire might come to play a new, more prominent role in the study of the early modern world.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1740022811000325

The Second Ottoman Empire: Political and Social Transformation in the Early Modern World (review) (Review)
Author(s): Alan Mikhail
Publication: Journal of Interdisciplinary History
Date: 1/1/2012
Abstract: The singular achievement of Tezcan's The Second Ottoman Empire is to offer the first cogent and holistic model other than decline for understanding the entirety of the period from 1580 to 1826. This book thus represents an enormous contribution to the field of Ottoman history and stands to impact more general understandings of early modernity beyond the eastern Mediterranean.
Link: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_interdisciplinary_history/v042/42.3.mikhail.html N1

Review of Biography of an Empire: Governing Ottomans in an Age of Revolution by Christine M. Philliou (Review)
Author(s): Hasan Kayali
Publication: The Historian
Date: 9/2/2012
Abstract: Historians of the Balkans and the Middle East have moved away in recent years from nation-centered history writing to paying attention to the region's long Ottoman past and imperial legacy. Christine M. Philliou goes one step further in employing the local vantage to shed light on late Ottoman history by examining modalities of Ottoman governance in the first half of the nineteenth century through the lens of a group of Ottoman Christians, the Phanariots.
Link: 10.1111/j.1540-6563.2012.00328_5.x

Review of Everyday Life & Consumer Culture in 18th-Century Damascus by James Grehan (Review)
Author(s): Najwa al-Qattan
Publication: Journal of Social History
Date: 4/28/2014
Abstract: Summary and review.
Link: http://proxy.library.upenn.edu:2388/journals/journal_of_social_history/v043/43.2.al-qattan.html

Review of Everyday Life & Consumer Culture in 18th-Century Damascus by James Grehan (Review)
Author(s): Randi Deguilhem
Publication: Journal of the American Oriental Society
Date: 4/28/2014
Abstract: Full review article covering documentary sources and historical context.
Link: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25766967


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