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Grant number: BH-50586-13

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BH-50586-13

Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (Seattle, WA 98104-2948)
Charlene Mano Shen (Project Director: 03/07/2013 to present)

From Immigrants to Citizens: Asian Americans in the Pacific Northwest

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to explore the history and culture of Asian immigrant groups in the Pacific Northwest and their significance to the nation.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to explore the history and culture of Asian immigrant groups in the Pacific Northwest and their significance to the nation. The Wing Luke Museum offers a workshop on the nineteenth-century wave of Asian Pacific immigration to the Pacific Northwest. Participants study the distinct histories of Native Hawaiians, Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, and Asian Indians, exploring the contrasts between the groups' contributions to the region's economy, the protracted history of legal exclusion, and the tensions that emerged as they sought inclusion as Americans. Readings by workshop scholars, drawn from throughout the United States, and documents and artifacts from the Wing Luke collection augment the core text, Ronald Takaki's 1989 classic, Strangers from a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans. The scholars include Erika Lee (University of Minnesota), author of At America's Gates: Chinese Immigration During the Exclusion Era; Gary Okihiro (Columbia University), author of Whispered Silences: Japanese Americans and World War II); and Chris Friday (Western Washington University), author of Organizing Asian American Labor: The Pacific Coast Canned Salmon Industry. Visits to key buildings, some of which are closed to the public, as well as to existing immigrant communities are into the daily schedule. In Seattle, participants visit Japantown, Chinatown, and Manilatown. Further afield, they see the Japanese American Exclusion Memorial and Filipino Community Hall on Bainbridge Island and a number of Chinese buildings, gardens, and archives in Port Townsend. They also visit the Port Gamble Historic District, former home of Native Hawaiians, and a Sikh religious center. Several sessions help teachers develop curriculum projects that are incorporated into a website along with primary texts, maps, and historic timelines.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$179,914 (approved)
$177,440 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014