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Grant number: BH-50592-13

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BH-50592-13

California State University, Sacramento (Sacramento, CA 95819-2694)
Chloe Burke (Project Director: 03/07/2013 to present)
Marcia Eymann (Co Project Director: 03/24/2016 to present)

The California Gold Rush: Context and History

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to explore California Gold Rush history and its economic, environmental, and cultural setting.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to explore California Gold Rush history and its economic, environmental, and cultural setting. Historians Chloe Burke (Sacramento State University) and Marcia Eymann (Center for Sacramento History) direct a workshop on the regional and national implications of the California Gold Rush. Based in Sacramento, "gateway to the goldfields," the workshop focuses on scholarship produced since the Gold Rush sesquicentennial in 1998. Authors of this new work, who have been drawn from throughout the United States, lecture and visit sites with participants. Kenneth Owens (Sacramento State University), author of Riches for All: The California Gold Rush and the World, introduces Gold Rush themes and leads a walk through Old Sacramento to highlight the historical urban and commercial underpinnings. Albert Hurtado (University of Oklahoma), author of Indian Survival on the California Frontier, describes relations between the first "Argonauts" and the largely native residents of the region. A visit to the Chaw'se Indian Grinding Rock park illuminates these early years. Owens then discusses the arrival of South Americans, Chinese, Europeans, and African Americans, and animates their stories by visiting two state parks, where many buildings inhabited by them still stand. Stacey Smith (Oregon State University), author of Freedom's Frontier: California and the Struggle Over Unfree Labor, Emancipation, and Reconstruction, explains how laws on labor and race relations shaped Gold Rush culture. Andrew Isenberg (Temple University), author of Mining California: An Ecological History, shows how the growth of "deep mining" industrialized the Gold Rush. Visits to two mines illustrate their environmental legacy. Marcia Eymann and Gary Kurutz (Special Collections, California State Library) introduce participants to primary texts and a rich collection of daguerreotypes and paintings. Before departing, teachers share curriculum ideas. A website hosts primary sources, links to other Gold Rush sites, and participants' teaching projects.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$178,353 (approved)
$174,513 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014