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Funded Projects Query Form
5095 matches (showing first 5000)

Date range: 2011-2017
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Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Jack C. Mutchler (Project Director: April 2015 to February 2017)
Jennifer Lei Jenkins (Project Director: February 2017 to present)

CH-232683-17
Challenge Grants
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$400,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2020

La Busqueda, The Search

Renovation of a donated property as home for La Búsqueda (The Search), a Southwest focused humanities institute, as well as an endowment for its activities.

The Southwest Center at the University of Arizona requests a $500K NEH Challenge Grant to create and support a Southwest-focused humanities institute: La Búsqueda (The Search). La Búsqueda will be a physical and intellectual space where scholars, the community and students convene for thoughtful critical inquiry and discourse, emphasizing the role of the humanities in illuminating society’s humanistic grand challenges. The grant will help fund a $1.25M endowment to support visiting scholars and the dissemination of scholarship and challenge solutions through public outreach programming such as lectures, readings and salons and publication of special issues of the Journal of the Southwest and monographs in the Southwest Center Series. Grand challenge themes in alignment with NEH’s The Common Good frame La Búsqueda’s first three years of programming.

Historical Society of Delaware (Wilmington, DE 19801-3091)
Michele Anstine (Project Director: December 2015 to June 2018)
David W. Young (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

PF-249698-17
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Preservation and Access

[White paper]

Totals (outright + matching):
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 4/30/2021

George Read II House Museum, Environmental Conditions Improvements for Sustainable Collections Preservation

The installation of new energy-efficient HVAC, fire detection, and water drainage systems to help protect the collections of furniture, paintings, decorative items, and archaeological materials contained in the George Read II House, a historic landmark and museum.

This project addresses the implementation of environmental improvements for the Delaware Historical Society’s collections of the nationally significant George Read II House Museum, situated in the Old New Castle (DE) National Historic Landmark District. The on-site Read House collections provide opportunities for wide-ranging humanities-based research and scholarship, interpretive programs for all ages, and undergraduate and graduate training. The application requests support for carefully planned improvements at the George Read II House Museum to improve preventive conservation measures, to improve the environmental conditions for collections, and to improve safety and security of collections with both non-mechanical measures and energy-efficient mechanical systems upgrades. Preventive measures that anticipate changing climate and storm intensities will reduce the threat of future episodic moisture intrusion.

Jodi Magness
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)

FZ-250036-17
Public Scholars
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017

Masada: A New History


A book on Masada, the mountain fortress built by Herod the Great near the Dead Sea, and the Jewish mass suicide that took place there two thousand years ago.  Combining historical, literary, and archaeological research, the book will offer a new history of Jewish resistance to Roman rule.

Two thousand years ago, 967 Jewish rebels chose to take their own lives rather than suffer enslavement or death at the hands of the Roman army. This event occurred atop Masada, a mountain overlooking the Dead Sea that was fortified by Herod the Great. The story of the mass suicide is related by the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus. Josephus ended his account of The Jewish War – which describes the First Jewish Revolt against Rome and the destruction of Jerusalem and the Second Temple in 70 C.E. – with the fall of Masada. Whereas for Jews the revolt was a national disaster, Christians viewed the temple’s destruction as a fulfillment of Jesus’ prophecy. The Jewish resistance at Masada became a symbol of the modern State of Israel as a result of Yigael Yadin’s 1963-1965 excavations. Masada: A New History integrates historical/literary evidence with archaeological findings, yielding a gripping narrative that follows the fate of the Jews under Roman rule through the story of Masada.

Michael Meyer
University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)

FZ-250309-17
Public Scholars
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017

Benjamin Franklin's Last Bet: How a Founding Father's Daring Philanthropy Reshaped the American Will

A book on American philanthropy and founding father Benjamin Franklin, who bequeathed large sums to Boston and Philadelphia with the stipulation that they be paid in two installments only after compound interest had accrued for one hundred and then two hundred years. The book also addresses the implications of Franklin's legacy for contemporary charitable giving.

Before he died, Benjamin Franklin placed a bet on America. His will's final codicil ordered the deposit of funds to be cashed out, with the accrual of compound interest, by the cities of Boston and Philadelphia 100, then 200, years later - should they still stand. Franklin's wager, a response to a dare by a French writer urging him to show his citizens how to apply Poor Richard's example for posterity, did - remarkably - pay out, funding civic projects and vocational training. Leaving money to beautify cities and fund vocational training - usually credited to the likes of Carnegie and Rockefeller - was yet another of Franklin's inventions, and one all but forgotten today. This book will explain how Franklin was the Founding Father of American philanthropy (he also invented the matching grant), and how his example of small, targeted giving can inform the national conversation as the Baby Boom generation prepares to give away $30 trillion, the largest transfer of wealth in U.S. history.

Jared Farmer
SUNY Research Foundation, Stony Brook (Stony Brook, NY 11794-0001)

FZ-250283-17
Public Scholars
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

The Latest Oldest Tree: Survival Stories for a Time of Extinction

A meditation on the challenges that humans face in thinking about long spans of time, the book narrates the history of various searches for the oldest living tree in the world and explains the scientific developments that enable us to measure extreme biological age.

The oldest trees have lasted longer than any civilization. Determining the location and age of these biological record holders is a modern fixation. In my book, I’ll narrate the never-ending search for the oldest living tree in the world, as definitions of “oldest” and “living” and “tree” and “world” have changed over time. I’ll examine individual and clonal longevity, and the tools--including dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating--scientists have developed to measure extreme biological age. Along the way, I’ll ponder scientific-cum-philosophical questions: What does it mean to be young and old? Living and dead? Without minimizing the global environmental crisis, my project stresses persistence amid loss, devotion amid destruction. Arboreal survival stories are vital for contemplating the future of oldness in an anthropogenic epoch.

Bruce J. Schulman
Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)

FZ-250394-17
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 4/30/2018

"Are We A Nation"?: The Emergence of the Modern United States

A new treatment of what historians often call  "the Progressive Era," this book shows how the meaning of American nation-building underwent a profound shift in the years 1896 to 1929--from knitting together geographic regions to knitting together diverse peoples and cultures--just as the U.S. was emerging as a world power, international economic leader, and reservoir of displaced persons from around the globe.

A reinterpretation of the early twentieth century US, the study explores the transformation of American nationhood between 1896 and 1929 -- the era in which the United States emerged as a world power, international economic leader, and reservoir for displaced persons from across the globe. Most studies of the period have focused on the so-called Progressive Era. They overlook the larger processes of national integration and transformation that the Progressives, their rivals and their successors negotiated. At the same time, the book addresses enduring questions about nation-building: both as a process -- how can people build functioning nation-states out of diverse regions and peoples -- and as a matter of concept: what are the constituents of a nation? How do people understand nationhood and how have those conceptions changed over time? The US in this period offers a telling case because nation-building shifted from knitting together regions to integrating diverse peoples and cultures.

Steven Horst
Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)

FZ-250420-17
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Exorcizing Laplace's Demon

Examines the assertion made famous by French mathematical physicist Pierre-Simon Laplace (1749-1827)  that a scientific view of the universe leaves no room for God, free will, or human dignity. Starting with LaPlace but leading the reader through the work of thinkers from Galileo and Newton to contemporary philosophers of science, the book considers how theism and humanism might be reconciled with science after all.

This project will produce a book for a general audience examining the widespread assumption that the sciences threaten our humanistic self-understanding because they imply a view of the world that is deterministic and reductionistic. I frame the discussion around Laplace's assertion, when asked the place of God in his physics, that "I have no need of that hypothesis", and the idea of "Laplace's Demon."  The book examines determinism and reductionism, and the challenges they face from quantum mechanics, chaos theory, and contemporary philosophy of science, arguing that a proper understanding of science poses no threat to human dignity, free will, theism, or the possibility of miracles, drawing upon previous works by the author written for scholarly audiences but presenting them in a form geared to the educated public.

Darren Dochuk
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)

FZ-250607-17
Public Scholars
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Anointed With Oil: God and Black Gold in America's Century

A history of the connections between religion and the petroleum industry in the U.S., from the “King of Crude” Patillo Higgins in the 1890s to the Rockefeller and Pew families in the energy crisis of the 1970s to the current era of globalization.

This project examines the subtle but critical relationship between petroleum and religion in the twentieth century, with focus on the United States, its oil-patch regions, and their change over time, but also on the expansion of American oil-patch interests and influences abroad. Blending cultural, political, and economic history, it details and assesses how those living in oil-rich zones have always considered petroleum their special providence, a fragile gift bestowed by God to be used industriously for the advance of “His Kingdom.” Driven by sacred notions of production, stewardship, and dominion over the earth, they have long found a natural ally in the petroleum business, which has grafted these ideals onto an ideology of high-risk, high-reward wildcat entrepreneurialism. This marriage has spawned structures of power with sweeping impact, domestically and globally, and transformed American religion, politics, and culture in profound and lasting ways.

Evelyn M. Cohen
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (New York, NY 10025-1968)

FA-251628-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017

Illuminated Hebrew Manuscripts from Renaissance Italy: A Means to Acculturation without Assimilation

The preparation of a catalog and interpretive study of Hebrew illuminated manuscripts from Renaissance Italy during the late 14th to the early 16th centuries.

My book deals with the ways in which members of a religious minority used the patronage of illuminated codices as a means of acculturation within their host country. In emulation of the cultural elite of Italian society, wealthy Jews in Italy commissioned professionally copied and decorated manuscripts. They employed celebrated Christian illuminators to create luxurious books that consciously rivaled those of renowned Christian patrons. My analysis of these codices demonstrates how they reflect an adaptation of Italian practices in the choice of texts that were decorated, as well as a preservation of religious identity through their distinctive illustrations. My study will show how without resorting to assimilation, a unique minority used fine arts as a way to become part of the culture in which they lived. Along the way, some of the most magnificent illuminated manuscripts from the greatest period of book illumination in Italy were produced.

Richard Jankowsky
Tufts University (Somerville, MA 02144-2401)

FA-251630-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

The Role of Devotional Music in Modern Tunisia

A book-length study of Sufi music in Tunisia, examining its proliferation among both Sufis and non-Sufis.

In Tunisia, musics involving praise songs to Sufi saints are not exclusive to members of Sufi orders. Rather, a number of distinct healing and devotional musical traditions co-exist, each associated with particular social and devotional communities. In this project, I show how four such traditions, those of women, Tunisians of sub-Saharan descent, the Jewish community, and even hard-drinking laborers, contribute to a larger ecology of Tunisian Sufi music that also includes a variety of Sufi rituals as well as staged concerts. “Ambient Sufism” draws attention to the connections among these different musics and emphasizes their public audibility, which is now at risk in the new socio-religious climate of post-revolutionary Tunisia. Based on fieldwork between 2009 and 2015, this book highlights the voices of participants and analyzes their musical practices to account for the under-acknowledged role of music and pleasure, as well as the importance of minorities, in Islamic practice.

University of Alaska, Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK 99775-7500)
Leonard Kamerling (Project Director: April 2016 to December 2019)

PG-251649-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

University of Alaska Museum of the North Film Preservation Assistance

The drafting of a disaster preparedness and response plan and the purchase of storage and rehousing supplies for an audiovisual ethnographic collection that includes approximately 200,000 feet of unedited prints, camera negatives, and release productions, as well as 300 videocassettes. In the early 1970s, Alaska filmmakers Sarah Elder and Leonard Kamerling pioneered a collaborative approach to making films with Native partner communities. They produced dozens of hours of visual and aural materials of subsistence activities; celebrations and ceremonies; interviews with elders, leaders, and community members; gift exchange potlatches; and other observations of daily life. Their film, video, and audio collections have been used in documentaries on Alaska Native culture, as well as in museum exhibitions, public events, classroom instruction, and scholarly and student research. For example, their exhibition “Then and Now: The Changing Arctic Landscape” presented visual evidence of climate change in the North by comparing early 20th-century photos with contemporary views from the same vantage points; personal narratives of Iñupiaq elders helped visitors to understand the consequences of climate change for the Native peoples who subsist on the land.

The Film Collection of the University of Alaska Museum of the North is an ethnographic collection focused on Alaska Native culture and issues from 1970 to the present. It represents a visual and aural record of Alaska Native knowledge during a period of rapid cultural and social change. Use of the collection in museum exhibitions, by scholars, students, Alaska Native communities and schools, speaks to its ongoing significance to the humanities.  We are seeking funding to implement specific recommendations made in the 2013 assessment of the collection (funded by the NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions Program).  This includes the development of a disaster preparedness and response plan, the transfer of film and audio materials to vented storage containers, purchase of a dust-proof cabinet for storing materials undergoing conservation,  and the purchase of essential archive supplies such as film deterioration indicator strips, durable labels, and other essential materials.

Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO 80521-2807)
Linda G. Frickman (Project Director: April 2016 to June 2019)

PG-251651-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Gregory Allicar Museum of Art Collection Storage Enhancement

A preservation assessment and purchase of shelving to house a recently acquired collection of African art that includes beaded jewelry and ceramic vessels, and which complements a larger collection of some 900 objects from across the African continent. The new collection, including 17 large ceramic vessels, documents a variety of forms, pot-making techniques, and surface embellishments and includes objects of the Yoruba, Dogon, and Lobi peoples of West Africa, and the Masai and Kamba peoples of Kenya.  The collections are used for research, teaching, and public programming.

The Gregory Allicar Museum of Art at Colorado State University requests a grant for the purchase of a Spacesaver storage carriage, and additional shelves to maximize the use of existing carriages, in order to house recent gifts of African art objects and make more efficient use of existing units. Recent gifts include 40 objects in various media and 17 large ceramic vessels. These additions enhance the eminence of the museum’s African collections by expanding existing categories, broadening artistic representation, and providing CSU with one of the few top quality collections of African ceramics in the country. The original Spacesaver system, installed in 2008, was selected with conservators Eileen Clancy and Judy Greenfield. Greenfield consulted on the preparations for this proposal and the grant will also support her two-day conservation assessment.

Marcia Chatelain
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)

FA-251663-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018

Restaurant Ownership and Civil Rights History in Chicago

A book about the complicated history of McDonald's, the National Black McDonald’s Operators Association, and inner-city African Americans.

Burgers in the Age of Black Capitalism: How Civil Rights and Fast Food Changed America uncovers the precise moment in which McDonald’s transformed itself from a suburban oasis for white families to enjoy offerings from a three-item menu, to a ubiquitous presence on the busiest corners of urban America. Essentially, this is the story of the racial turn in fast food. While health warriors fight an army of trans fats, value meals, and splashy advertisements, few have considered how fast food planted its flag so firmly into the racially segregated battlefields of this conflict. The stakes are high for this story, told by a historian and of broad relevance to a variety of scholars in American history, food studies, urban studies, and civil rights.

Bridgton Historical Society (Bridgton, ME 04009-0044)
Edward Allen (Project Director: April 2016 to August 2019)

PG-251706-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Collections Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of the collections at the Gibbs Avenue Museum and Archives, part of the Bridgton Historical Society. The purpose of the society is to trace the evolution of Bridgton, Maine, from its 1768 incorporation as a farming community, through expansion as a railroad- and canal-supported industrial town, to its present tourist-focused character. Its collections constitute 180 linear feet of archival materials, which include 45 cubic feet of oversized material and over 10,000 photographic images. Highlights include late 18th-century range maps, military regimental records, and patterns used by the Bridgton Machine Company, which invented the Perry Turbine. The proposed preservation assessment would update a 1998 Conservation Assessment Program report and focus on optimizing storage capacity and prioritizing conservation treatment needs.

The project will bring conservator Ronald Harvey to the Bridgton Historical Society to assess the preservation needs of the collections at the Gibbs Avenue Museum and Archives, and produce a report that will outline steps to take to insure the future well-being of the collection.  The collection includes photographs, personal, business, and town records and other documents, as well as transportation vehicles, household artifacts, agricultural and manufacturing tools and equipment, fine arts, textiles, military artifacts, and other items used or produced in Bridgton or by Bridgton residents. It tells the story of the town's social, religious, political, industrial and commercial growth from its agrarian roots in the 1760s, through its heyday as a busy commercial and industrial center, to its growing popularity as a tourist destination, the rise and decline of the narrow gauge railroad, and the economic and demographic transformations of the 20th and early 21st centuries.

Mark Hussey
Pace University (New York, NY 10038-1502)

FA-251716-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$29,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 8/31/2017

Clive Bell and the Making of Modernism

The first intellectual biography of British writer Clive Bell (1881-1964), member of the Bloomsbury Group and a pivotal figure in the artistic, social, and political movements of early 20th-century modernism.

An intellectual biography that follows Clive Bell’s life and critical thought from his early pacifist writing and essays on aesthetics, through publication in 1914 of his widely influential book Art, to friendships in the first half of the twentieth century with Picasso, Segonzac, Derain, Vlaminck, Diaghilev, Cocteau and other major figures of European modernism including T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf. Bell’s theory of “significant form” continues to be an important part of the history of aesthetics, and has received attention recently even from neuroscientists as providing insight into brain function in the encounter with visual art. In addition to lecturing internationally and writing many articles and books on modern art, Bell became an outspoken champion of liberty in his post-First World War cultural criticism, continuing to emphasize the vital role of the arts in a free society.

Kelly M. Greenhill
Tufts University (Somerville, MA 02144-2401)

FA-251744-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 8/31/2017

Extra-Factual Sources of Threat Conception and Proliferation in International Politics

A book-length study of extra-factual information in international politics.

When uncertainty is high, and verifiable facts are inconvenient or few, how do individuals learn about what to fear and how to respond to the threats they have identified? This book focuses on the key role played by threat narratives. I argue that across time and space some distinct and oft replicated patterns have emerged, whereby invented, embellished or simply unverified sources of security-related information materially, despite being unproven, inform and influence foreign and defense policy discourse and formulation. Marrying insights from cognitive, behavioral and political science, I hypothesize that by exploiting individuals’ cognitive, psychological and biological predispositions, enterprising actors can transform vague and inchoate objective sources of anxiety into proximate, and even existentially menacing, albeit unverifiable, security threats. To test my theory, I employ a combination of survey data and cross-national historical case studies, from the 19th-21st centuries.

Anne Monahan
Unaffiliated independent scholar

FA-251761-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017

Horace Pippin (1888-1946): Art, Race, and the Construction of American Modernism

Preparation of a book-length study on the American painter Horace Pippin (1888-1946).

Horace Pippin (1888–1946), a self-taught painter and disabled World War I veteran, was arguably the most prominent African American artist of the 1940s. My book, When Does a Primitive Cease to Be a Primitive: Horace Pippin’s Challenge to Art Criticism, examines his complicated position at the intersection of contemporary, African American, and self-taught art of his day, revealing unrecognized aspects of his criticality, agency, authorship, and patronage, and the dynamics of canon and racial formation operative in his success. Organized as a set of microhistorical case studies, the project sheds new light on a transitional moment in American modernism and the diverse constituencies involved in its construction and engages the fields of critical race studies, memory studies, literary criticism, sociology, and non-representational theory.

Katina T. Lillios
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)

FA-251789-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Prehistoric Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula: The Making of a Cultural Mosaic

The completion of a book-length survey of the archaeology of the prehistoric Iberian peninsula.

For my NEH project I will complete a book entitled Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula: From the Paleolithic through the Bronze Age (currently under contract with Cambridge University Press, scheduled for completion in July 2018). The book will document the rich and diverse histories of the peoples who lived on the Peninsula between 1,000,000 and 3000 years ago (the Bronze Age), through their art, burials, tools, and monuments. Despite recent dramatic discoveries at archaeological sites in Portugal and Spain, which have revolutionized our thinking about human history, the rich archaeological heritage of prehistoric Iberia remains largely unknown outside the Peninsula. My book will be the only up-to-date synthesis of Iberian archaeology, in English, accessible to students, scholars, and the interested public.

Daniela Flesler
SUNY Research Foundation, Stony Brook (Stony Brook, NY 11794-0001)

FA-251796-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

The Memory Work of Sepharad: New Inheritances for 21st-Century Spain

Completion of a book-length study of how modern Spain is addressing and developing its Jewish history.

My book project studies the long-ranging implications of the current “re-discovery” of Spain’s Jewish past. Since the mid 1980s, many cultural and political initiatives have engaged with the memory of Jewish Spain and attempted to officially reconnect Spain with the Jewish world. Today, all things Sepharad are widely marketed throughout Spain, from cultural festivals, museums, former synagogues and Jewish quarters, to historical novels, travel guides, music and cookbooks. The 2015 Law granting Spanish nationality to the descendants of Jews expelled in 1492 is the latest example of this phenomenon. The broad public circulation of new narratives that are putting Spanish Jews at their center has the potential to produce profound social transformations. The book explores the ways in which the memory of Sepharad has allowed Spaniards to rethink long-established notions of cultural identity within the recent debates over Spain's historical memory.

Ayala Fader
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)

FA-251802-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

The Internet and the New York Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Community

Research for and writing of a study of a community of ultra-Orthodox Jews who use the Internet anonymously to critique their religious community and share their doubts.

How do nonliberal religious communities morally struggle with doubt and faith in the digital age? The book project analyzes the lives of ultra-Orthodox Jews living “double lives,” those who doubted the truth of divine revelation at Mount Sinai but made the moral choice to live in their communities as practicing Jews. The Internet made it possible for those living double lives to anonymously critique their communities online (in Yiddish and English) and secretly explore secular knowledge, sensibilities, and sociality offline. In response, ultra-Orthodox Jewish communal leaders called the current period “a crisis of faith.” There has been a community-wide acknowledgement that embodied signs no longer assured the cultivation of shared interior faith; this required new forms of attention to interiority through talk. As a study of a struggle by doubters and the faithful to define authentic ultra-Orthodoxy, the book speaks to humanities scholars of religion, ethics, language and media.

Jarod Roll
University of Mississippi (University, MS 38677-1848)

FA-251814-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2019

American Metal Miners and the Lure of Capitalism, 1850-1950

A book-length study of American miners in Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma and their opposition to labor unions, occupational safety regulations, and environmental reforms.

Poor Man’s Fortune is the history of how some white American workers, in this case, lead and zinc miners in Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, rejected the security of labor unions, government reforms, and environmental safeguards from the 1850s to the 1950s. Rather than seek negative explanations for this pattern, as other labor historians might, I instead show how the pattern emerged as these communities embraced, over several decades, the physical, financial, and environmental risks of industrial capitalism in order to seek its rewards. This study, which is based on research in archives across the U.S., offers a grassroots study of anti-union, anti-government white workers that, unlike dominant trends in American labor and political history, takes their perspective seriously. More broadly, Poor Man’s Fortune speaks to issues of sustainability in industrial society by interrogating the dilemmas of people whose labor undermined the viability of their livelihoods and communities.

Febe Dalipe Pamonag
Western Illinois University (Macomb, IL 61455-1390)

FA-251827-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017

Patients’ Activism in the Culion Leper Colony, Philippines, 1905-1930s

A book about patient activism at a U.S.-managed leper colony in the Phillipines (1905-1930s).

This project will advance our understanding of Filipino leprosy patients’ engagement with American colonial officials; this is an understudied theme in the literature on empire and public health policy and U.S. occupation of the Philippines. In 1905, American health authorities established a leper colony in Culion, an isolated island in Palawan. Suspected lepers were forcibly removed from their homes and relocated to Culion. Most scholarship on Culion highlights its role as a laboratory for civic experimentation and how it was embroiled in major political issues of the day. In this project, I consider the views and practices of leprosy patients to show their resistance, as well as adaptation and accommodation of certain regulations in order to improve their lives on the island. This project also addresses such issues as the criminalization of disease and the degree to which individual rights may be compromised in the name of public health, all of which have contemporary resonance.

Aisha Khan
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)

FA-251848-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018

Obeah and Hosay: Two Religions of the Caribbean Region

A book-length comparative study of two of the Caribbean's most understudied religions--Obeah and Hosay.

My project is a study of the intersections of religious and racial identities through comparative analysis of Obeah and Hosay, two of the Caribbean region’s defining yet understudied religions. My approach is an ethnographic one that draws on the phenomenological tradition. Although Obeah and Hosay are diverse in their beliefs and in their practitioners, they are often treated more categorically, based on their respective African and Indian origins. My project probes assumptions about the inevitable tensions of religious and racial difference in the Caribbean by exploring lived experience filtered through western Enlightenment conceptualizations of religion and race across Caribbean-Atlantic space and colonial and postcolonial time. Inquiring into the relationship between interpretive categories of religion and race, their modes of practice, and the power relations that form their contexts allows better understanding of identities, conflict and governance, and heritage in the Americas.

University of Central Oklahoma (Edmond, OK 73034-5209)
Mary Huffman (Project Director: April 2016 to June 2019)

PG-251862-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$5,989 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

UCO Fashion Museum Collection: Assessment and Preservation Training

A general preservation assessment, conservation assessment of selected items, and a preservation workshop related to the museum’s collection of 800 pieces of clothing and accessories from the 1890s through the 1970s.  They include designer items as well as fashions representing social, economic, and cultural changes during this period. Some items of note include costumes, uniforms, and formal dress worn by students at the university and a collection of flapper dresses and accessories.

The University of Central Oklahoma is requesting $6,000 for a general preservation assessment of the Fashion Museum Collection on campus, as well as for education and training of preservation techniques by a textile conservator. This collection is the only collection of designer clothing available in the state on a college campus available for research and study. It contains over 800 pieces of designer and/or representative clothing from the 1890s through the 1970s, and over 300 hats, 100 shoes, and miscellaneous accessories.  All items were collected by and/or donated by prominent women in Oklahoma. The textile conservator will be contracted to: 1) perform a collections survey, 2) develop detailed plans for improving storage, 3) assess the conservation treatment of selected items in the collection, 4) provide a one day workshop on preservation techniques, and 5) serve as a mentor for an advanced student or recent graduate from UCO's Museum Studies program on this project.

John P. McCormick
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)

FA-251875-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

The People’s Princes: Machiavelli, Leadership and Liberty

A book-length study of Machiavelli’s concept of political leadership.

"The People’s Princes: Machiavelli, Leadership and Liberty" argues that Machiavelli, commonly considered a cynical adviser of tyrants, formulated a conception of leadership uniquely facilitating of democracy and the “free way of life.” My project draws on Machiavelli’s cases from Roman and Florentine history, and delineates his literary-rhetorical method of “political exemplarity” to accentuate the interactions between leaders and citizens that he considered indispensible for healthy democratic politics. Moreover, I highlight the relevance of Machiavelli’s thoughts on leadership for our age when democracy is challenged by economic inequality, oligarchic encroachment, failures of political representation and accountability and the rise of populism. Unlike previous interpreters, I show that Machiavelli advises democratic leaders and citizens to diligently pursue policies aimed at thwarting the efforts of socio-economic elites to oppress the people and violate the common good.

Southeast Missouri State University (Cape Girardeau, MO 63701-4710)
Roxanne Dunn (Project Director: April 2016 to June 2019)

PG-251882-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,910 (approved)
$5,759 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

General Preservation Assessment in Special Collections and Archives, Kent Library

A preservation assessment and the development of disaster preparedness plans for the university’s archives and special collections, comprising 3,300 linear feet of historical records, manuscript collections, and rare books.  The collection includes personal papers, business records, maps, oral histories, and photographs documenting the economic and cultural history of rural southeastern Missouri and the broader Mississippi Valley region, primarily during the 19th and 20th centuries. Among the rare books are European and Arabic works, dating to the Middle Ages, that support study in the history of printing and bookmaking.  Also contained are numerous first editions of notable authors, including Charles Dickens and Mark Twain and an internationally prominent collection of published works by and about William Faulkner, along with original research materials accumulated by Faulkner biographer Joseph Blotner.

Kent will hire a recognized, award-winning preservation consultant to assess environmental conditions, storage policies, and provide strategies to optimize preservation. Assessment will include development and implementation of a disaster preparedness and recovery plan. The assessor will provide condition reports pertaining to the needs of the University Archives, the regional history collections of southeast Missouri and the rare book collection. While the department contains a substantial rare book collection considering its University’s size, this assessment will provide insights pertaining to all aspects of the operations of Special Collections and Archives. Recommendations will be used to establish policies and procedures to integrate preservation practices into daily work, strategic planning, and development activities. Outcomes will improve the level of care and use by focusing on the needs of collections and by increasing communication with stakeholders.

Anne Elizabeth MacNeil
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)

FA-251898-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Italian Songs from the Time of Christopher Columbus: A Critical Edition

Completion of a digital edition of Italian frottole, popular songs of love, war, and politics from the 15th and 16th centuries.

Since the mid-18th century, scholars have been accustomed to thinking of music as embodied in its notation. The restrictions of print culture on the publication of critical editions has entrenched this line of thinking. But with the resources afforded by digital humanities, I am creating a multi-media critical edition of the repertory of Italian songs from the time of Christopher Columbus (known as frottole) that displaces this notion and relocates the object of study in music as a sounding work of art. These songs offer insight into human expression in an era of intense cultural change--a time of war, a time of scientific discovery and the exploration of the New World. Many frottole speak to these cultural anxieties, and the repertory as a whole represents a rejection of French domination over the Italian peninsula in favor of the Italian language, its ancient poetic forms, and traditional practices of singing and reciting to the lyre. These songs give expression to Italian humanism.

Matt Cohen
University of Nebraska (Austin, TX 78712-0100)

FA-251900-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017

Thinking across Cultures in Early America

A book-length study of the language of early American cross-cultural interactions.

This book's goal is to revitalize the discussion of inter-cultural relations in early American studies. Much of the most influential scholarship in interdisciplinary colonial studies tries not just to illuminate the past but to provide a new imagination of a shared future among all the descendants of the colonial world. Yet an outdated vocabulary of cultural interchange hinders the field, which has struggled to attract Native American and African American scholars in significant numbers. This lexicon has also kept its work from being taken up in other fields. In five short chapters drawing on both major texts and archival sources, this book traces where terms like "reciprocity," "understanding," "piety," and others came from and how they have evolved from the ways they were used in early colonial contexts. It also looks forward, showing how re-assessing such terms can help students of early America speak to broader questions and bring more diverse voices into the field.

University of Vermont and State Agricultural College (Burlington, VT 05405-0160)
Margaret M. Tamulonis (Project Director: April 2016 to June 2019)

PG-251921-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,742 (approved)
$5,742 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Assessing and Improving the Housing of the Access to Works on Paper

The purchase of new flat file cabinets and environmental monitors to support the care of the Fleming Museum’s 5,300-item collection of works on paper. This project addresses two high-priority recommendations from a 2010 Conservation Assessment Program survey, namely better care of and access to high-use and oversized works on paper, and more accurate recording of temperature and relative humidity in storage spaces. Works to be rehoused include 33 etchings by 18th-century Italian printmaker Giovanni Piranesi, a collection of propaganda posters from World War I and World War II, and original Disney animation cels from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Oversize modern and contemporary prints and drawings by Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, and Andy Warhol would also be stored in the new flat files, allowing museum staff to accommodate requests from students and faculty to access these important works.

The Fleming Museum of Art proposes to improve its collections storage facilities with the addition of two new flat file cabinets and three environmental monitors. The Fleming collection consists of 24,978 items, including fine arts, ethnographic, and historical material, amassed since the University’s original “Curator’s Cabinet” began in 1827. We seek to significantly improve our storage of works on paper—primarily European and American prints, drawings, paintings, and photographs from the seventeenth century to the present—by replacing one outdated and difficult-to-use flat file cabinet and adding two new ones. By easing access to and handling of this part of our collection, which is frequently used by curators, faculty, students, and scholars, we will improve the condition of the works and prevent damage. Furthermore, the acquisition and installation of PEM2 monitors on 3 levels of collections storage will greatly improve environmental monitoring of our spaces.

Gregory Steirer
Dickinson College (Carlisle, PA 17013-2896)

FA-251961-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Intellectual Property Law and the History of the Narrative-Based Franchise

Completion of a book-length study of the impact of intellectual property law on narrative-based franchises in film, television, and other media.

Over the last decade, the narrative-based franchise has come to be seen as one of the twentieth-first century’s paradigmatic storytelling forms. Narrative Inc. argues that in order to understand the significance of this form, we must situate it within the practice of intellectual property law. This project thus offers a dual history of narrative-based franchise production and intellectual property law in the United States, beginning in the early twentieth century and ending in the present-day. Arguing that changes in the franchise and the law have been mutually constitutive, each simultaneously the product and cause of the other, I trace how the logic of the franchise as a narrative form has changed in tandem with that of copyright, trademark, and unfair competition law. Narrative Inc. focuses on a series of specific franchises, demonstrating how their production was bound up—often quite literally through lawsuits—with the discourse and practice of intellectual property law.

Whitney Schwab
UMBC (Baltimore, MD 21250-0001)

FA-251972-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

The Philosophical Origin of the Concept of Knowledge

A book-length study on the concept of knowledge in Stoic philosophy.

Interpreters of ancient Greek philosophy and contemporary theorists typically agree that Plato and Aristotle were both concerned to analyze knowledge. I think that this is a mistake. To be sure, Plato and Aristotle were interested in epistemology, and gave accounts of an important epistemic concept, which they called epistêmê. But, in laying out their accounts of epistêmê they were concerned to describe the optimal or ideal cognitive state human beings can achieve, which is a project that differs in important respects from that pursued by most modern-day epistemologists. Although the idea that Plato and Aristotle were not principally interested in knowledge in the modern sense has experienced some growth in popularity, little work has been done to determine when and how knowledge became a focus of philosophical concern. The central claim of "The Origin of the Concept of Knowledge" is that this occurred in the work of the Stoics and, in particular, in their discussions of katalêpsis.

Anna M. Shields
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)

FA-251991-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 8/31/2017

Construction of the Tang Dynasty Literary Legacy by Scholars in the Five Dynasties and Northern Song

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on how Chinese poetry of the Tang Period (618-907) was read and understood by Chinese scholars of the 10th to 12th centuries.

My project investigates the critical works that Chinese scholars of the Five Dynasties (907-976) and Northern Song (976-1127) used to define the literary legacy of their predecessor dynasty, the Tang (618-907). Writing the Tang will explore the multiple, overlapping interpretations of Tang writers and texts found in printed works that circulated widely for centuries. I analyze some of the most interventionist and influential works from the period: biographies of writers in the two Tang dynastic histories; anthologies of Tang prose and poetry; and popular anecdote collections about Tang writers and texts. Together, these works created an enduring portrait of the Tang as Chinese literature's "golden age," a view that idealized Tang literary aesthetics yet increasingly downplayed the political and social role of literary writing in Tang culture. My book will challenge this perspective on the Tang by exposing the interpretative practices that created it.

Casey O'Callaghan
Washington University (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)

FA-252032-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

A Multisensory Philosophy of Perception

A book-length argument for a theory of multisensory perception of human consciousness.

Seeing What You Hear: A Multisensory Philosophy of Perception argues that human perceptual consciousness is richly multisensory. This project’s thesis is that the coordinated use of multiple senses enhances and extends human perceptual capacities in three critical ways: (1) Crossmodal perceptual illusions reveal hidden multisensory interactions that typically make each sense more reliable as a source of evidence about the environment; (2) The joint use of multiple senses discloses more of the world, including novel features and qualities; (3) Through perceptual learning, each sense is reshaped by the influence of others. The implication is that no sense—not even vision itself—can be understood entirely in isolation from the others. This undermines the prevailing approach to perception, which proceeds sense by sense, and sets the stage for a revisionist multisensory methodology that illuminates the nature, scope, and character of perceptual consciousness.

Chet Adam Van Duzer
Unaffiliated independent scholar

Participating institutions:
Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (Rolling Hills Estates, CA) - Participating Institution

FA-252070-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 11/30/2017

Annotation for Education in the Princeton/Brussels Copy of the 1525 Edition of Ptolemy’s Geography

Preparation of a digital edition of the annotations on a 1527 copy of Ptolemy's Geography that illuminate the understanding and teaching of geography in the early 16th century.

I seek a ten-month Mellon Fellowship for Digital Publication to fund the completion of my transcription, English translation, and study of the annotations in a copy of the 1525 edition of Ptolemy’s Geography that is currently divided between Princeton and a private collection in Brussels. The annotations, written in Latin in about 1527, are extremely profuse, were made for a student, and contain original geographical thought. They are valuable for studies of the reception of Ptolemy’s Geography, of sixteenth-century geographical education, and of European intellectual networks. The only good format in which to publish them is in a digital edition that shows images of the pages and thus the context of each annotation, with a full transcription and English translation, all searchable. Princeton has agreed to host the digital edition on its server in an instantiation of the open-source Mellon-funded Archaeology of Reading platform for digital editions of annotated early modern books.

Claire Gilbert, PhD
St. Louis University (St. Louis, MO 63103-2097)

FA-252088-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

The Arabic Voices of the Spanish Monarchy (1492-1700)

Preparation of a book-length study about the use of Arabic in Spain and Spanish territories during a period of anti-Arabic legislation and expulsions of Arabic speakers, 1492-1700.

I seek the support of an NEH Fellowship to complete a monograph on The Arabic Voices of the Spanish Monarchy (1492-1700). During the early modern period, the history of Spain was marked by anti-Arabic legislation and expulsions of Arabic speakers. This monograph explains how Arabic translators in this context found professional opportunities, and shows the continuous use of Arabic across Spanish territories. This project engages with topics including the administration of minorities, politics of language, family and empire, cultural intermediaries, and religious conversion. By combining archival testimony with analysis of discursive and legal tools that created cultural hierarchies, I show how Arabic translators took advantage of the same hierarchies they helped enforce. The continuous use of Arabic by these translators allows me to explore themes of language use and power relations that continue to resonate in contemporary society and across humanities disciplines.

Paul E. J. Hammer
Regents of the University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80309-0001)

FA-252104-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 5/31/2018

Queen Elizabeth I, Robert Earl of Essex and the Politics of the English Royal Succession, 1598-1603

A book-length study on Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, and the politics that led to his trial and execution for treason in 1601 under Queen Elizabeth I.

This project challenges the accepted understanding of how James VI of Scotland was able to succeed Elizabeth I on the English throne in 1603, thereby transforming Tudor England into Stuart Britain. Using an unprecedented range of original sources, it offers a radically new appraisal of the political significance of Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, and of the 'Essex Rising' which resulted in his execution in 1601. Building on this foundation, it outlines a new political narrative for the period 1598-1603, setting English events within a broader British context and revealing a 'secret history' of James's path to the English crown. Methodologically, this project breaks new ground in early modern British history by the quantity and richness of its archival sources, its commitment to reading all key documents in their original manuscript form, and its extensive use of literary sources. The project's chief outcome will be the completion of a substantial monograph entitled The Hunted Hart: Robert Earl of Essex, Queen Elizabeth I, and the Politics of Treason in Shakespeare’s Britain.

Anne-Maria Boitumelo Makhulu
Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)

FA-252126-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018

The New Financial Elite: Race, Mobility, and Ressentiment After Apartheid

A book-length study of black financial elites in post-apartheid South Africa.

“The New Financial Elite: Race, Mobility, and Ressentiment After Apartheid” sets out to look at the rise of a small, if powerful, class of black financial elites in contemporary South Africa. Focusing on the black upper middle class—their educational backgrounds, professional expertise, aspirations, and pathways to affluence—the project looks at one and the same time at the very particular historical circumstances in which this minority within a minority came to benefit from Black Economic Empowerment legislation soon after democratization in 1994. Adopting both ethnographic and archival methods, "The New Financial Elite" explores the trajectories, desires, and obligations of black elites acknowledging the intensity of contrast between rich and poor in South Africa, a contrast that itself motivates this novel research on class diversity.

John Tresch
University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)

FA-252132-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2018

Poet Edgar Allan Poe and the Forging of American Science

A book-length study of the role of science and technology in the life and writings of Edgar Allan Poe.

In Edgar Allan Poe’s famous tales, delusional narrators recount gory scenes of murder, madness, and despair. Yet he also wrote in depth about science, technology, and certainty. Trained as an engineer at West Point, he published a seashell guidebook and wrote on daguerreotypes and cryptography. By the 1830s, the “American experiment” had acquired astonishing equipment powered by electricity and steam; audiences confronted theories of species change, convertible fluids, and the birth and death of stars. Yet the USA's lack of stable scientific institutions opened the way for confusion, controversy, and hoaxes. The proposed book sets Poe's life and work in the tumultuous spaces in which new knowledge was debated, from Richmond and Baltimore to Philadelphia and New York, revealing his unique combination of visionary romanticism, skepticism, and enthusiasm for new sciences and machines. It casts new light on both a fascinating author and a decisive period in American science and culture.

Jane E. Goodman
Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)

FA-252136-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

Democracy and Cultural Exchange after the Arab Spring

Completion of an enhanced digital edition and book-length study that records and analyzes the intercultural exchange between an Algerian theater troupe and audiences in the United States.

In the humanities, intercultural exchange has been understood as a problem of translation not only between languages but also between cultures. I propose to explore problems of cultural translation, or the act of conveying one group’s history and experiences in terms that another group can understand. I do so via a study of an upcoming US government-sponsored tour by an Algerian theater troupe. The book follows the troupe from Algeria to the United States, showing how actors and audiences confront new views of their own and each other’s culture through theatrical performance. The book is envisioned as a multimedia work that will enable readers to experience (via embedded video) the events analyzed in the text as well as to explore links to primary research materials (such as theatrical scripts) that cannot be accessed via a traditional print book. The enhanced e-book is under contract with Indiana University Press.

Loubna El Amine
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)

FA-252150-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018

The Foundations of Confucian Political Thought: History, Law, and the Political Community

A book-length study of the foundations of Confucian political thought.

My proposed book project, provisionally titled 'The Foundations of Confucian Political Thought: History, Law, and the Political Community,' will focus on the intersection of the concepts of time and space in Classical Confucian thought. More specifically, the project aims to delineate the Confucian conception of the political community by asking such questions as: What are the criteria for membership in it? Is territory important, why, and how? What explains the Confucian concern for the past? Can this concern with the past be considered sacred? Can history (as opposed to religion or metaphysics more broadly) be the normative foundation of Confucian political thought? The project aims to contribute to the expansion of the study of political philosophy and the history of political thought beyond the Western tradition.

Joanna Megan Hearne
Mizzou (Columbia, MO 65211-3020)

FA-252169-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

Chickasaw Hollywood: The Fox Brothers and the Studio System, 1914-1954

A book-length study of brothers Finis Fox, Wallace Fox, and Edwin Carewe (the stage name of Jay Fox)--the first family of Native American writer-director-producers in the Hollywood studio era.

Chickasaw Hollywood: The Fox Brothers and the Studio System, 1914-1954 retrieves the history of the first Indigenous family of writer-directors in Hollywood—the Chickasaw brothers Finis Fox, Edwin Carewe (stage name for Jay Fox), and Wallace Fox. Taken together, the Fox brothers’ careers writing, directing and producing films in Hollywood spanned 40 years, from Carewe’s directorial debut in 1914 to Wallace Fox’s last television show in 1954. This project expands our understanding of Indigenous, American, and international film history beyond stereotyped images of Indians on screen to consider issues of creative control, production practices, and the breadth, complexity and mobility of Indigenous representational politics in the studio era, bringing together theoretical models from Indigenous studies and cinema studies, and close textual analysis with extensive archival research.

Grant Arndt
Iowa State University of Science and Technology (Ames, IA 50011-2000)

FA-252177-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) “Indian News” in Depression-Era Wisconsin

A book-length study of the weekly newspaper columns of four Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) writers in 1930s and 1940s Wisconsin.

In the 1930s and 1940s, four members of the Ho-Chunk Nation in Wisconsin developed an innovative form of indigenous media activism, writing weekly “Indian News” columns in local white-run newspapers published in towns near their homes. Their columns became popular with non-Indian readers even as they gave voice to Ho-Chunk frustrations and outrage over the discrimination and poverty they faced in American society. This book project examines the unique and previously forgotten corpus of over 1,300 articles they wrote, exploring how the four columnists addressed some of the most important years in American Indian history, during which they confronted the challenges of the Great Depression and World War II and debated the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act. The latter allowed Indian communities to create new tribal governments, offering Ho-Chunk people the most significant opportunity for collective action they had encountered since being forced to cede their homeland a century earlier.

Monroe County Historical Society Inc. (Bloomington, IN 47408-3518)
Hilary Renee Fleck (Project Director: April 2016 to June 2019)

PG-252190-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Collections Storage Shelving Upgrade

The purchase of archival quality storage units to rehouse the small and medium-sized objects in the permanent collection of the Monroe County History Center (MCHC). These objects make up approximately 40% of MCHC’s 50,000-item collection and are currently stored on cantilever shelving which is both dangerous for the objects and an inefficient use of space. Objects contained in the collection pertain to the history of Monroe County, Indiana, and include cultural and historical items such as children’s toys, antique medical devices, and limestone carving tools. Of particular importance are objects and archives pertaining to the history of Indiana University and the locally started, but nationally famous, Gentry Brothers Circus.

The Monroe County History Center (MCHC) houses a collection of approximately 50,000 objects, documents, and photographs that relate to the history and culture of Monroe County, Indiana. The mission of the MCHC is to foster a deeper understanding and appreciation of Monroe County's history, culture, and natural environment; we accomplish this through the use of items from our collection in exhibits, displays, programs, and research made available to the public. The items covered in this request include our small to medium-sized objects, which constitute about 40% of our entire collection. Our current storage for the majority of these smaller objects consists of steel cantilever library shelving, which poses significant risks to the integrity of the artifacts. The funds requested here would support the purchase of four professional storage furniture units to rehouse the small and medium-sized objects in the permanent collection.

April Eisman
Iowa State University of Science and Technology (Ames, IA 50011-2000)

FA-252192-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Angela Hampel: A Contemporary Artist in East Germany

Preparation of a book-length study on the painter Angela Hampel (b. 1956) and the situation of female artists from East Germany.

This book focuses on one of East Germany’s most successful and outspoken contemporary artists, Angela Hampel, an installation and performance artist and Neo-expressionist painter who exhibited on both sides of the Berlin Wall in the 1980s. It seeks to understand the impact of social policies on women’s art and position in the art world by investigating the challenges Hampel faced in a society that claimed women’s equality without having actually achieved it. By examining Hampel’s work and reception within the social, cultural, and political contexts of East Germany, this book will offer a deeper understanding of the obstacles women artists faced in the Socialist East as well as an alternative perspective from which to consider women’s conditions in the West since 1945.

Julie-Françoise Tolliver
University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)

FA-252195-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2018

A Poetics of Solidarity in Francophone Independence Literatures

A book-length study of connections among global francophone writers and intellectuals.

During the independence period (1950 to 1980), francophone intellectuals from Quebec, Africa, and the Caribbean read each other and, animated by transnational solidarity, imagined alternatives to colonialist and neocolonialist formations. This project examines the affective bond that made this process possible, a poetics of solidarity that orients texts and the political imaginaries they elaborate. The “tongue ties” of francophone anticolonial intellectuals bound them together (they were connected through the French language) but also offered a set of linguistic and ideological constraints (their imaginaries were determined by the French language as it was, itself, shaped by francophone history and culture). In its investigation, this project disrupts the racial logic evinced by francophone literary studies in the US, tracing literal and figurative racial permeability on both sides of the French literary Atlantic.

East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania (East Stroudsburg, PA 18301-2999)
Kelly Jo Smith (Project Director: April 2016 to July 2017)
Jingfeng Xia (Project Director: July 2017 to June 2019)

PG-252207-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,900 (approved)
$5,876 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

General Preservation Assessment of the Special Collections at East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

A preservation assessment of special collections at East Stroudsburg University. A consultant would provide preservation recommendations to provide better long-term care for two collections in particular: the Al Cohn Memorial Jazz Collection, consisting of 16,000 items with oral histories, photographs, sheet music manuscripts, audio recordings, and accompanying materials, mostly from the 1940s; and the Sterling Strauser Collection of outsider art, including about 200 works by folk artists.

Concerns related to the storage and management of the Sterling Strauser Collection and the Al Cohn Memorial Jazz Collection, in addition to the preparation for a move to the new building, necessitate a preservation assessment by a professional consultant trained in the care of cultural collections. The consultant will survey the collections, review policies regarding collection management, and evaluate storage and exhibit areas to identify strengths and potential vulnerabilities, and will recommend steps to take to ensure the longevity of the collections. A written report created by the consultant will assist those involved with the management of the collections in prioritizing time and funds for future projects.

Aaron S. Moore
Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)

FO-252221-17
Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$46,200 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

Engineering Asian Development: The Cold War and Japan's Post-Colonial Power in Asia

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Japan's rise as a donor of development aid on the Asian continent, covering the time from its pre-World War II empire to 1989.

My project examines the history of Japan's overseas development system in Asia from its origins in Japan's colonial rule over much of Asia before 1945 to its rise into the world's leading aid donor by the Cold War's end in 1989. By analyzing how Japan’s international development system evolved at major project sites in East and Southeast Asia, I examine how Japan projected economic and political power as a US Cold War ally through overseas development based on its earlier colonial legacies and networks in Asia. Challenging a Western-focused narrative of the Cold War, I examine the concrete flows of capital, ideas, people, and technology at specific Japanese infrastructure projects throughout Asia, thereby highlighting how regional dynamics and exchanges within Asia over the trans-war era dynamically shaped the Cold War.

Amy Borovoy
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)

FO-252232-17
Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 8/31/2017

Organ Donation and Medical Practices in Modern Japanese Culture

Research and writing leading to publication of two articles on the cultural, economic, and ethical issues affecting live organ donation in contemporary Japan.

In technologized societies, traditional moral notions of kinship obligation are being stretched and challenged as medical advances extend life. I seek to explore how imperatives to care for others are being conceptualized and materialized in the context of emerging choices around organ donation and life extension in Japan. Japan is an important site to explore these tensions, a country with the highest per capita rate of people on kidney dialysis in the OECD, and a small yet growing number of citizens living with kidney transplants, mostly received from living donors who are family members. The project seeks to explore medical decision-making and the cultural and social meaning accorded to live kidney donation in the context of the massive business of dialysis in Japan and a system of social welfare that relies heavily on women’s care for family members.

Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living Memorial to the Holocaust (New York, NY 10280-1502)
Erica Blumenfeld (Project Director: April 2016 to June 2019)

PG-252251-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Storage Rehousing Materials for Textile Collection

Purchase of storage equipment and preservation supplies for rehousing 900 textiles dating from the late 19th century to the present that document Jewish ritual and communal and private life.  The collection includes historic and contemporary garments and theatrical costumes, household linens, flags and banners, and items of personal adornment.  The textiles are used in permanent and traveling exhibits and are loaned to institutions around the world.  They are also used in classroom lessons on world history and Holocaust studies and for research by individuals and other institutions that focus on Jewish history and cultural traditions.

The Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust requests funding for the purchase of storage racks and archival materials for the second phase of its textile rehousing project. The Museum’s collection includes 900 textiles dating from the late 19th century to the present and represents all aspects of Jewish ritual, communal, and private life. This broad-ranging collection includes garments, household linens, theater costumes, and ritual textiles which require storage solutions beyond the Museum’s current box housing methods. As recommended in a recent assessment of the textile collection, the Museum’s rehousing plan focuses on the introduction of hanging and rolled storage systems and plans to update our current box supply. Implementing this tri-part system will allow the Museum to house each piece in its textile collection in the manner best suited to that item’s condition, construction, and needs.

Rachel E. Zuckert
Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)

FA-252258-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018

The Naturalist Aesthetics of German Philosopher J. G. Herder (1744-1803)

Completion of a book-length study of the aesthetics of German philosopher Johann Gottfried Herder (1744-1803).

This project, to write a book presenting J. G. Herder’s aesthetic theory, has three central arguments. First, I interpret Herder's aesthetics as a naturalist theory, accounting for aesthetic value and art production on the basis of understanding human beings as organisms conditioned by and responding to their environments, both natural and social. I argue that Herder’s theory thus constitutes a pivotal moment in the philosophical tradition: the transition from eighteenth-century philosophies of taste to nineteenth-century systematic philosophies of the arts. For Herder argues that to understand aesthetic response (taste), one must understand the objects and socio-historical contexts that elicit and form such responsiveness. In emphasizing the place of aesthetics within embodied human existence and cultural contexts, third, Herder’s aesthetics is also a neglected alternative to the dominant understanding of aesthetics and art in the tradition, as disembodied and disinterested.