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251 matches

Program: Fellowships for University Teachers
Date range: 2014-2017
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FA-251018-17

Zachary Thomas Wallmark
Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX 75205)

Timbre and Musical Meaning

Preparation of a book-length study about timbre (or tone color), music perception, and musical meaning.

Timbre (or “tone color”) is the most poorly understood attribute of music, despite its importance in the generation of musical affect and meaning. Combining methods from musicology and the cognitive sciences, this project explores how timbre shapes emotional responses to music by focusing on situations of listening that complicate the perceptual boundary between “musical” timbre and “noise.” My book-in-progress contributes three novel perspectives to music scholarship and the public humanities: it (1) advances a dynamic, transdisciplinary model for understanding the material and affective dimensions of sound; (2) investigates issues of timbre interpretation in three historical-cultural case studies (free jazz, Japanese music, and heavy metal); and (3) examines the social and ethical stakes of music listening and performance. The book will add to debates about musical meaning, embodiment, and emotion. An NEH Fellowship will support six months of full-time research and writing.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Psychology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-251067-17

Valerie A. Kivelson
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)

Icons of Eurasian Empire: Early Modern Russian Visions of Encounter, Conquest, and Rule

Preparation of a book employing the study of visual culture to investigate early empire building in Russia during the 16th and 17th centuries.

In the 16th and 17th centuries, the tsardom of Muscovy grew explosively. With state agents following hard on the heels of freelance trappers and profiteers, the empire rapidly extended its reach across the hostile terrain of Siberia, reaching the Pacific by 1637. Along the way, they subjugated indigenous populations, welcomed Bukharan merchants as trading partners and settlers, and attempted to open trade with China. My research examines Muscovy’s version of imperial combat, conquest, and rule, primarily through analysis of visual depictions produced by Russians and their proximate others. On the basis of a wide array of visual sources, I plan to write a scholarly monograph on Russia’s early modern imperial encounters.

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


FA-251098-17

Daniel Wallace Maze
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Painters in Renaissance Venice: A History of the Workshop of the Bellini Family

A book-length study on the workshop of the Bellini, the foremost family of painters in Renaissance Venice.

This book provides the first comprehensive history of the Bellini workshop. It employs cross-disciplinary methods and novel approaches, and draws upon a wide range of primary sources that include civil laws, acts of magistracies, tax registers, home inventories, Scuole records, legal documents, and, of course, paintings and drawings by the Bellini and their contemporaries. It builds upon twenty-five years of research and academic articles that have appeared since the last published monographs on Jacopo Bellini (1989) and Gentile Bellini (1985). And it relies on discoveries that I made during more than four years of research in the Venetian archives. This study answers numerous longstanding questions about the Bellini and their workshop, lays foundational work upon which other Renaissance scholars will rely, and presents new questions that will frame future research on fifteenth-century Venetian painting.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 1/31/2018


FA-251123-17

Sean Armel Kelsey
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)

Aristotle's Soul: Essays on the Classical Scientific Treatise, De Anima

Four scholarly articles on Aristotle’s classical scientific treatise De Anima (On the Soul).

My project will focus on Aristotle's De Anima and will take the form of a series of free-standing articles and eventually a monograph. The topic of the De Anima is what we would call 'life'; the primary object of the book is to get clear about what life is. Aristotle's treatment of this topic does not occur in a vacuum; he is aware that he had predecessors, and though he thinks their views are absurd, he regards this absurdity as an index of the difficulties in this area. Thus I propose to examine Aristotle's conception of life by way of *his* problems, as these are revealed by his critique of his predecessors. I will focus on problems connected with perception and reason in particular. I will argue that, for Aristotle, the main difficulty is to develop a conception of life that respects the fact that perception and reason are sources of objective knowledge, without making this an inscrutable mystery.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251189-17

Leslie Elin Anderson
University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)

Democratic Enclaves in Times of Trouble: The Politics of Resistance in Nicaragua

A book-length study of the survival of democratic enclaves in Nicaragua.

A major concern about democratic consolidation is the presence of authoritarian enclaves that continue nondemocratic practices at the subnational level. Yet subnational politics is not always less democratic than national politics. In Nicaragua municipal government is more democratic than national government. This project shows how democratic enclaves can protect pluralism and help re-democratize a nation. Extensive research finds competitive elections and a subaltern politics of resistance in municipalities. These local dynamics constrain President Ortega’s oppression. We know that democratization comes gradually, requiring years to seep downward into society. This book demonstrates that the coming of authoritarianism is also gradual, allowing time for defiance. A politics of local resistance in Nicaragua is impeding Ortega’s authoritarianism and may outlast him entirely. The book uncovers a new challenge to authoritarianism: a subnational citizen politics of resistance.

Project fields:
Comparative Politics

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-251326-17

Quinn Slobodian
Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA 02481-8203)

The Rise of International Economic Law

A book-length history of the rise of modern international economic law.

The era since the end of the Cold War is often described as the triumph of neoliberalism. Global capitalism, we are told, is governed by market fundamentalism and a faith in self-regulating markets. Yet often overlooked is a development that shadowed the age of globalization: the rise of international economic law. My book project is the first intellectual history of the field of international economic law. It describes the invention of the field since the 1970s as a transformative and world-making political project, modeled on the competition policy of the European Community and culminating in creation of the World Trade Organization in 1995. My book narrates the deregulation of the last four decades as a simultaneous era of re-regulation under systems of international economic law and reveals the political imagination at work in the apparently apolitical domains of legal expertise.

Project fields:
Economic History; Intellectual History; International Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$29,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FA-251362-17

Travis David Stimeling
West Virginia University (Morgantown, WV 26506-6201)

Country Music and Record Production in Nashville, 1955-1973

A book-length study of country music and record production in Nashville, Tennessee, 1955-1973.

Nashville Cats: Record Production in Nashville, 1955-1973 will be the first history of record production during country music’s so-called “Nashville Sound” era. This period of country music history produced some of the genre’s most celebrated recording artists, including Country Music Hall of Fame inductees Patsy Cline, Jim Reeves, and Floyd Cramer, and marked the establishment of a recording industry that has come to define Nashville in the national and international consciousness. Yet, despite country music’s overwhelming popularity during this period and the continued legacy of the studios that were built in Nashville during the 1950s and 1960s, little attention has been given to the ways in which recording engineers, session musicians, and record producers shaped the sounds of country music during the time. Drawing upon a rich array of previously unexplored primary sources, this book will be the first to take a global view of record production in Nashville during this key time.

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-251381-17

Henry Barrett Lovejoy
University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80302-7046)

The Liberated Africans Project: A Digital Publication Documenting Emancipation Courts in Sierra Leone, 1808-1896

The digital publication of an open-source archive relating to emancipation courts in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Between 1808 and 1896, a network of British courts and international mixed commissions emancipated over 200,000 enslaved Africans in a global effort to abolish the slave trade. The website www.liberatedafricans.org will make accessible open-source archival materials from five courts located in Freetown, Sierra Leone, which was Britain’s main base of operation to suppress the Atlantic trade. This project will mobilize knowledge about Liberated Africans with case-by-case summaries of their emancipation trials conducted by the world’s earliest international human rights courts. The digital publication will include primary documents, synopses, maps, images, databases, tables, graphs, videos as well as query-based search engines. The long-term outcome will challenge and transform how we understand, analyze, and teach African and African Diaspora History, post-1807 intercontinental slave trades, the abolition movement, human rights law, and meanings associated with "slavery" and "freedom."

Project fields:
African History; European History; History, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251382-17

Frank Charles Costigliola
University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT 06269-9000)

The Contingent Cold War and the Integrated Thought of George F. Kennan

A book-length study on George F. Kennan’s (1904-2005) diplomacy and Cold War policy recommendations.    

George F. Kennan, the author of America’s Cold War containment policy, felt that his “Russian self” was more genuine than his American one. Examining the emotional dynamics of Kennan’s thinking affords new insights into 1) the personal roots of his policy recommendations and 2) the possibility that the Cold War could have ended sooner. Kennan’s longing for contact with the Russian people conditioned both his recommendations for containment and his subsequent arguments for dismantling that policy. Passion for Russia impelled and enabled Kennan to discern potential turning points in the Cold War. My approach employs concepts about emotion borrowed from psychology, philosophy, political science, and neuroscience. I do a close reading of texts looking for signs of emotion. I also venture beyond the emotional turn by investigating evidence of integrated thought, that is, the brain-wide processing of information that characterizes how the mind actually operates.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-251391-17

Allison Stedman
University of North Carolina, Charlotte (Charlotte, NC 28223-0001)

The Mind-Body Connection in French Literature, 1600-1735

A book-length study of the relationship between body and mind in French literary, religious, philosophical, and medical texts, from 1600 to 1735.

The book reveals an alternative trajectory for the evolution of beliefs about the relationship between body and mind--one in which ancient theories about the ability of emotions to generate physical symptoms are not abandoned with the rise of Cartesian dualism, but rather reoriented to give preference to the agency of the mind as opposed to the dynamic of forms, spirits and bodily humors in influencing the physical manifestations of illness and health. Although the Cartesian view of the body as a machine whose functioning takes place independent of conscious thought gained support from mainstream medical and theological communities during the 1600s, my book provides evidence that many people took the medieval, scholastic view of the mind-body connection in a different direction, creating texts that anticipate the modern notion of "holism"--the idea that the mind is part of the body and that thoughts could thus be direct causes of disease and other physical symptoms.

Project fields:
French Literature; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Intellectual History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-251394-17

Stephen Vincent Bittner
Sonoma State University (Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609)

Wine Production and Culture in Tsarist Russia

A book-length study on the wine economies and cultures of the Black Sea during Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union.

"Whites and Reds: Wine in the Lands of Tsar and Commissar" examines the two centuries of interaction between Russia and the wine economies and cultures of the Black Sea--Bessarabia (Moldova), Crimea, and Georgia. After the Russian Empire annexed these territories in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, wine became an increasingly important part of Russian and Soviet culture--as a luxury item, a mark of refinement, and an object of connoisseurship. Consequently, by the mid-1980s the Soviet Union was the world's fourth largest producer of wine, trailing only Spain, France, and Italy. "Whites and Reds" contributes to two of the most active arenas of debate in the historiography of Russia and the Soviet Union: studies of imperialism and consumption. I intend to use an NEH Fellowship to complete the research and writing of this untold and significant history.

Project fields:
European History; History of Science; Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-251411-17

Erin Elizabeth Benay
Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH 44106-4901)

Early Modern Religious Connections Between Italy and India

Preparation of a book-length study on the cult of St. Thomas Apostle and his pilgrimage sites in medieval and early modern India.

The return of a saint’s body to its rightful resting place was an event of civic and spiritual significance. Legends of St. Thomas Apostle, for instance, claimed that the martyred saint had been miraculously transported from India to Italy during the thirteenth century. However, St. Thomas’s purported resting place in Ortona, Italy did not become a major stopping point on pilgrimage routes, nor did this event punctuate frescoed life cycles or become a subject for Renaissance altarpieces. Instead, the site of the apostle’s burial in Chennai, India has flourished as a terminus of religious pilgrimage. An unlikely destination on the edge of the ‘known’ world became a surprising source of early modern Christian piety.  By disrupting assumptions about how knowledge of Asia took shape during the Renaissance, this project challenges art historical paradigms in which art was crafted by locals to be exported, collected, and consumed by European patrons.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Renaissance Studies; South Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251432-17

Jerma A. Jackson
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)

Born in Slavery, Aging in Modern America, 1900-1940

A book examining how former slaves and their freeborn contemporaries adjusted to the changes of a modernizing and industrializing America.

My project concentrates on aging former slaves and their freeborn contemporaries in the post-slavery modern era and considers their experiences and knowledge spanning the 19th and 20th centuries. How did these elders perceive and cope with mass education, racial violence and increased incarceration of African Americans, developments that all unfolded in the early twentieth century? I turn to a diverse array of materials—court records, memoirs and material culture--to probe the range of feelings elders had about transformations in their families, their communities and society. These materials contain stories and anecdotes, many quite fragmented. The book brings texture and context to the stories, allowing audiences to enter the households and neighborhoods of aging former slaves where they made sense of the thorny challenges brought on by industrialization. Audiences gain fresh insights about the early twentieth and about a group of African Americans often neglected in scholarship.

Project fields:
African American History; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251439-17

Kate Merkel-Hess
Pennsylvania State University, Main Campus (University Park, PA 16802-7000)

The Warlords: Familial Relationships and Power in Modern China

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the role of regional warlords in 20th-century Chinese politics and society.

The Warlords: Intimacy and Power in Modern China addresses the critical collapse of the Chinese Republic, founded in 1912, into rule by regional warlords. It challenges the typical story of the young republic’s disintegration and failure by examining the personal lives of the warlords and the ways their personal intimacies—of love, marriage, family, friendship, enmity, and patronage—were wrapped up in the politics of the day. It argues that factional warlords and their family members cultivated populist emotion and the intimacy of self and state through new political roles for women, new uses of media and technology, and state policies to foster civil society. Through its examinations of elite political life, The Warlords tells the story of how the political disarray of the warlord period created a space for a new politics of intimacy, shedding light on the ways that private life, intimacy, and sentiment became critical building blocks for modern China.

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-251464-17

Michael Thomas Bernath
University of Miami (Coral Gables, FL 33146-2503)

In a Land of Strangers: Northern Teachers in the Old South, 1790-1865

A book-length study on northerners who served as teachers, tutors, and governesses in the antebellum South, their employers, and the growth of sectional differences.

My book project focuses on the thousands of northerners who worked as teachers, tutors, and governesses in the southern states from 1790 to 1865. It analyzes what their experiences, observations, and reception reveal about life and culture in the Old South, paying particular attention to evidence of emerging northern and southern identities during the antebellum period. The presence of these teachers represents the most widespread, sustained, and intimate contact point between northerners and southerners at a time when sectional tensions emerged and then escalated. Uniquely, if sometimes uncomfortably, positioned within southern society, these northern teachers provide the ideal vantage point from which to explore perceptions of sectional difference and distinctiveness and to chart the emergence and contours of American identity.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-251469-17

Paulina Laura Alberto
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)

The Story of Raúl Grigera (1886-1955) and the African Diaspora in 20th-Century Argentina

A book-length study of race in Argentina centered on narrative accounts of the Afro-Argentine cultural figure Raúl Grigera (1886-1955).

I am applying to the NEH to support full-time writing of my second book. Black Legend uses the case of a famous Afro-Argentine man, the dandy-turned-beggar Raúl Grigera, to tell the untold history of blacks and blackness in Argentina’s long twentieth century. I read the hundreds of published stories about “el negro Raúl” alongside archival records of his life to reveal how exaggerated tales of degraded and disappearing blackness sustained national whiteness in the twentieth century, as well as to craft the first counter-narrative of black presence and self-fashioning for that period. More broadly, by exploring Raúl’s case as a striking example of the role of storytelling in disseminating and reinforcing racial ideologies, the book offers a situated contribution from the humanities to scholarship (mostly in social and medical sciences) on narrative’s uniquely compelling powers and on the implications of narrative persuasion for understanding, and combating, racism and its persistence.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-251476-17

Heather Flynn Roller
Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)

Contact Strategies: Independent Indians in the Brazilian Borderlands, 1750-1850

A book-length study of indigenous political life on the Brazilian frontier during the 18th and 19th centuries.

This book project examines the political choices and motivations of independent Indians in the interior of Brazil during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Focusing on their interactions with Brazilian society, the study explores the ways in which Indian nations sought to preserve their autonomy through various forms of contact, and how these strategies changed over the course of Brazil’s transition from colony to republic. The challenges of getting at the perspectives and aims of independent Indians are formidable, because they did not keep their own written records. Despite these limitations, important insights about native political strategies can be reached through a critical reading of the rich documentary record on borderlands conflicts and interactions in Brazil. The project contributes to recent work across the humanities that attempts to reconstruct the perspectives, values, and motivations of illiterate or non-Western peoples.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Native American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251482-17

Karen B. Graubart
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)

Spaces, Authorities, and Jurisdictions in the Iberian Atlantic, 1400-1650

A book-length study of Spanish juridical administration in 15th-century Seville and 16th- and 17th-century Lima.

Neighbors and Others examines governance strategies in 15th century Seville and 16th and 17th century Lima, to show how the laws used to differentiate and administer Muslim, Jewish and sub-Saharan African communities under Christian rule in Iberia were transformed to accommodate the integration of indigenous and African peoples into the new Spanish empire. These systems of governance, which offered limited autonomy to most subject peoples, enabled communities to articulate their own notions of justice and law within the environment of Iberian Christian dominance. By focusing on the local – mapping where urban residents lived and worked, and how they acted through different social and juridical categories – the book demonstrates how Spanish forms of delegated governance created a multi-jurisdictional society that enabled communities to lead themselves via a variety of beliefs and practices.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Medieval History; Urban History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-251491-17

Maggie Popkin
Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH 44106-4901)

Object Memory: Souvenirs, Memorabilia, and the Construction of Knowledge in the Roman Empire

A book-length study of ancient Roman souvenirs and memorabilia and their role in constructing knowledge and memory in the Roman Empire.

My project investigates ancient Roman souvenirs and memorabilia and their profound role in generating and mediating memory and knowledge in the Roman Empire. In Rome, where literacy was limited and visual communication was essential, souvenirs were a critical means for conveying complex ideas. The Roman Empire produced a rich range of souvenirs and memorabilia commemorating cities, sporting events, monumental statues, and religious pilgrimages. I examine how such objects constructed knowledge in an era before mechanical reproduction. Without access to print or digital media, many Romans learned about various sites, monuments, and events through images on souvenirs. Souvenirs and memorabilia are thus critical to understanding how ancient Romans conceptualized their world. Their study has broad implications for understanding the social functions of images in antiquity and beyond and is relevant to scholars concerned with visual culture’s impact on memory, perception, and knowledge.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Classics

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251516-17

Benjamin A. Saltzman
California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, CA 91125-0001)

Secrecy and Divinity in Early English Literature

A cultural and intellectual history of secrecy and concealment in early medieval England (600-1100).

For medieval Christians, the experience of secrecy was inextricably tied to the belief that God knows all human secrets and that God’s secrets remain fundamentally unknowable to human beings. This double-edged conception of secrecy and divinity profoundly affected the ways in which believers acted and thought as subjects under the law, as religious within monasteries, and as readers before books. In Bonds of Secrecy--a cultural and intellectual history of secrecy and concealment in England between the years 600 and 1100--I argue that two of the period’s major institutions (secular law and monastic life) produced a culture of scrutiny that relied heavily upon and sometimes came into tension with this belief in God’s omniscience, shaping the ethics of literary interpretation in the process.

Project fields:
British Literature; Medieval History; Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-251528-17

Lauren Hutchinson Derby
University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)

Sorcery Narratives in the History of Haiti and the Dominican Republic

A book-length study of Hispaniola focusing on the shared folklore, historical memory, and environment of the borderlands between Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

This proposal seeks twelve months of support for completion of a book manuscript on sorcery narratives as a form of historical memory in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, a project that brings the cultural meanings of animals into the social and environmental history of Latin America and the Caribbean. The final product will be a book with supplemental oral history video clips that I plan to submit to Duke University Press.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Latin American History; Rural Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251549-17

David Robinson
Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)

The Mongol Empire's Long Shadow: An Early Modern Chinese Court in Eurasian History

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the political and cultural connections between the Chinese Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and the Mongol Empire.

My project considers the court of China’s Ming dynasty (1368-1644) in the broader context of Eurasian history, focusing on a moment when much of Eurasia shared a common reference point, the Mongol empire. During the thirteenth century, the Mongols created the greatest land empire in history. Their courts in China, Persia, and southern Russia were centers of wealth, learning, power, religion, and lavish spectacle. When the Mongols lost power in the fourteenth century, ambitious men throughout Eurasia wrestled with how best to exploit the memory, institutions, and personnel networks of the fallen empire. This project explores how the Ming court came to terms with the Mongol empire's legacy, variously denouncing the Mongols' "corruption" of China, insisting that the Ming was the exclusive legitimate successor to the Mongols, and inserting the Ming into the story of the rise and fall of the Mongol empire in communications with other Eurasian courts.

Project fields:
Cultural History; East Asian History; East Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251595-17

Mary Lindemann
University of Miami (Coral Gables, FL 33146-2503)

Fractured Lands: Northern Germany in An Age of Unending War, 1627-1721

A book-length study comparing government efforts at rebuilding in two northern German principalities, Brandenburg and Mecklenburg, during the war-torn years between 1627 and 1721.

The project explores a range of topics relative to the process of rebuilding and recovery in a period of unending war between1627-1721. Life in northern Germany was characterized by prolonged crises that were social, political/administrative, and economic, but also environmental in nature. It is based on a rich archival documentation from villages, cities, and districts in Brandenburg and Mecklenburg and includes less frequently exploited records on forests, dams, mills, waterways, epidemics, and epizootics. I argue that the extended period of war and crisis formed a crucible in which were forged new ways of dealing with structural, infrastructural, and exogenous realities. Thus, what may anachronistically be called a study in "crisis management" reveals a decentralization of authority and an acceleration of activity rather than the frequently accepted story of an increasing centralization of initiatives frustrated by local intransigence.

Project fields:
European History; History, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$46,200 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 2/28/2018


FA-251628-17

Evelyn M. Cohen
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Illuminated Hebrew Manuscripts from Renaissance Italy: A Means to Acculturation without Assimilation

The preparation of a catalog and interpretive study of Hebrew illuminated manuscripts from Renaissance Italy during the late 14th to the early 16th centuries.

My book deals with the ways in which members of a religious minority used the patronage of illuminated codices as a means of acculturation within their host country. In emulation of the cultural elite of Italian society, wealthy Jews in Italy commissioned professionally copied and decorated manuscripts. They employed celebrated Christian illuminators to create luxurious books that consciously rivaled those of renowned Christian patrons. My analysis of these codices demonstrates how they reflect an adaptation of Italian practices in the choice of texts that were decorated, as well as a preservation of religious identity through their distinctive illustrations. My study will show how without resorting to assimilation, a unique minority used fine arts as a way to become part of the culture in which they lived. Along the way, some of the most magnificent illuminated manuscripts from the greatest period of book illumination in Italy were produced.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Jewish Studies; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-251630-17

Richard Jankowsky
Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)

The Role of Devotional Music in Modern Tunisia

A book-length study of Sufi music in Tunisia, examining its proliferation among both Sufis and non-Sufis.

In Tunisia, musics involving praise songs to Sufi saints are not exclusive to members of Sufi orders. Rather, a number of distinct healing and devotional musical traditions co-exist, each associated with particular social and devotional communities. In this project, I show how four such traditions, those of women, Tunisians of sub-Saharan descent, the Jewish community, and even hard-drinking laborers, contribute to a larger ecology of Tunisian Sufi music that also includes a variety of Sufi rituals as well as staged concerts. “Ambient Sufism” draws attention to the connections among these different musics and emphasizes their public audibility, which is now at risk in the new socio-religious climate of post-revolutionary Tunisia. Based on fieldwork between 2009 and 2015, this book highlights the voices of participants and analyzes their musical practices to account for the under-acknowledged role of music and pleasure, as well as the importance of minorities, in Islamic practice.

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251663-17

Marcia Chatelain
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)

Restaurant Ownership and Civil Rights History in Chicago

A book about the complicated history of McDonald's, the National Black McDonald’s Operators Association, and inner-city African Americans.

Burgers in the Age of Black Capitalism: How Civil Rights and Fast Food Changed America uncovers the precise moment in which McDonald’s transformed itself from a suburban oasis for white families to enjoy offerings from a three-item menu, to a ubiquitous presence on the busiest corners of urban America. Essentially, this is the story of the racial turn in fast food. While health warriors fight an army of trans fats, value meals, and splashy advertisements, few have considered how fast food planted its flag so firmly into the racially segregated battlefields of this conflict. The stakes are high for this story, told by a historian and of broad relevance to a variety of scholars in American history, food studies, urban studies, and civil rights.

Project fields:
African American History; Economic History; Urban Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-251716-17

Mark Hussey
Pace University, New York (New York, NY 10038-1502)

Clive Bell and the Making of Modernism

The first intellectual biography of British writer Clive Bell (1881-1964), member of the Bloomsbury Group and a pivotal figure in the artistic, social, and political movements of early 20th-century modernism.

An intellectual biography that follows Clive Bell’s life and critical thought from his early pacifist writing and essays on aesthetics, through publication in 1914 of his widely influential book Art, to friendships in the first half of the twentieth century with Picasso, Segonzac, Derain, Vlaminck, Diaghilev, Cocteau and other major figures of European modernism including T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf. Bell’s theory of “significant form” continues to be an important part of the history of aesthetics, and has received attention recently even from neuroscientists as providing insight into brain function in the encounter with visual art. In addition to lecturing internationally and writing many articles and books on modern art, Bell became an outspoken champion of liberty in his post-First World War cultural criticism, continuing to emphasize the vital role of the arts in a free society.

Project fields:
British Literature; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Western Civilization

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$29,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FA-251744-17

Kelly M. Greenhill
Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)

Extra-Factual Sources of Threat Conception and Proliferation in International Politics

A book-length study of extra-factual information in international politics.

When uncertainty is high, and verifiable facts are inconvenient or few, how do individuals learn about what to fear and how to respond to the threats they have identified? This book focuses on the key role played by threat narratives. I argue that across time and space some distinct and oft replicated patterns have emerged, whereby invented, embellished or simply unverified sources of security-related information materially, despite being unproven, inform and influence foreign and defense policy discourse and formulation. Marrying insights from cognitive, behavioral and political science, I hypothesize that by exploiting individuals’ cognitive, psychological and biological predispositions, enterprising actors can transform vague and inchoate objective sources of anxiety into proximate, and even existentially menacing, albeit unverifiable, security threats. To test my theory, I employ a combination of survey data and cross-national historical case studies, from the 19th-21st centuries.

Project fields:
History, General; International Relations; Political Theory

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FA-251761-17

Anne Monahan
Unknown institution

Horace Pippin (1888-1946): Art, Race, and the Construction of American Modernism

Preparation of a book-length study on the American painter Horace Pippin (1888-1946).

Horace Pippin (1888–1946), a self-taught painter and disabled World War I veteran, was arguably the most prominent African American artist of the 1940s. My book, When Does a Primitive Cease to Be a Primitive: Horace Pippin’s Challenge to Art Criticism, examines his complicated position at the intersection of contemporary, African American, and self-taught art of his day, revealing unrecognized aspects of his criticality, agency, authorship, and patronage, and the dynamics of canon and racial formation operative in his success. Organized as a set of microhistorical case studies, the project sheds new light on a transitional moment in American modernism and the diverse constituencies involved in its construction and engages the fields of critical race studies, memory studies, literary criticism, sociology, and non-representational theory.

Project fields:
American Studies; Art History and Criticism; Cultural History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-251789-17

Katina T. Lillios
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)

Prehistoric Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula: The Making of a Cultural Mosaic

The completion of a book-length survey of the archaeology of the prehistoric Iberian peninsula.

For my NEH project I will complete a book entitled Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula: From the Paleolithic through the Bronze Age (currently under contract with Cambridge University Press, scheduled for completion in July 2018). The book will document the rich and diverse histories of the peoples who lived on the Peninsula between 1,000,000 and 3000 years ago (the Bronze Age), through their art, burials, tools, and monuments. Despite recent dramatic discoveries at archaeological sites in Portugal and Spain, which have revolutionized our thinking about human history, the rich archaeological heritage of prehistoric Iberia remains largely unknown outside the Peninsula. My book will be the only up-to-date synthesis of Iberian archaeology, in English, accessible to students, scholars, and the interested public.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251796-17

Daniela Flesler
SUNY Research Foundation, Stony Brook (Stony Brook, NY 11794-0001)

The Memory Work of Sepharad: New Inheritances for 21st-Century Spain

Completion of a book-length study of how modern Spain is addressing and developing its Jewish history.

My book project studies the long-ranging implications of the current “re-discovery” of Spain’s Jewish past. Since the mid 1980s, many cultural and political initiatives have engaged with the memory of Jewish Spain and attempted to officially reconnect Spain with the Jewish world. Today, all things Sepharad are widely marketed throughout Spain, from cultural festivals, museums, former synagogues and Jewish quarters, to historical novels, travel guides, music and cookbooks. The 2015 Law granting Spanish nationality to the descendants of Jews expelled in 1492 is the latest example of this phenomenon. The broad public circulation of new narratives that are putting Spanish Jews at their center has the potential to produce profound social transformations. The book explores the ways in which the memory of Sepharad has allowed Spaniards to rethink long-established notions of cultural identity within the recent debates over Spain's historical memory.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; Spanish Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-251802-17

Ayala Fader
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)

The Internet and the New York Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Community

Research for and writing of a study of a community of ultra-Orthodox Jews who use the Internet anonymously to critique their religious community and share their doubts.

How do nonliberal religious communities morally struggle with doubt and faith in the digital age? The book project analyzes the lives of ultra-Orthodox Jews living “double lives,” those who doubted the truth of divine revelation at Mount Sinai but made the moral choice to live in their communities as practicing Jews. The Internet made it possible for those living double lives to anonymously critique their communities online (in Yiddish and English) and secretly explore secular knowledge, sensibilities, and sociality offline. In response, ultra-Orthodox Jewish communal leaders called the current period “a crisis of faith.” There has been a community-wide acknowledgement that embodied signs no longer assured the cultivation of shared interior faith; this required new forms of attention to interiority through talk. As a study of a struggle by doubters and the faithful to define authentic ultra-Orthodoxy, the book speaks to humanities scholars of religion, ethics, language and media.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Linguistic Anthropology; Religion, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-251814-17

Jarod Roll
University of Mississippi, Main Campus (University, MS 38677-1848)

American Metal Miners and the Lure of Capitalism, 1850-1950

A book-length study of American miners in Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma and their opposition to labor unions, occupational safety regulations, and environmental reforms.

Poor Man’s Fortune is the history of how some white American workers, in this case, lead and zinc miners in Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, rejected the security of labor unions, government reforms, and environmental safeguards from the 1850s to the 1950s. Rather than seek negative explanations for this pattern, as other labor historians might, I instead show how the pattern emerged as these communities embraced, over several decades, the physical, financial, and environmental risks of industrial capitalism in order to seek its rewards. This study, which is based on research in archives across the U.S., offers a grassroots study of anti-union, anti-government white workers that, unlike dominant trends in American labor and political history, takes their perspective seriously. More broadly, Poor Man’s Fortune speaks to issues of sustainability in industrial society by interrogating the dilemmas of people whose labor undermined the viability of their livelihoods and communities.

Project fields:
Labor History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2019


FA-251827-17

Febe Dalipe Pamonag
Western Illinois University (Macomb, IL 61455-1390)

Patients’ Activism in the Culion Leper Colony, Philippines, 1905-1930s

A book about patient activism at a U.S.-managed leper colony in the Phillipines (1905-1930s).

This project will advance our understanding of Filipino leprosy patients’ engagement with American colonial officials; this is an understudied theme in the literature on empire and public health policy and U.S. occupation of the Philippines. In 1905, American health authorities established a leper colony in Culion, an isolated island in Palawan. Suspected lepers were forcibly removed from their homes and relocated to Culion. Most scholarship on Culion highlights its role as a laboratory for civic experimentation and how it was embroiled in major political issues of the day. In this project, I consider the views and practices of leprosy patients to show their resistance, as well as adaptation and accommodation of certain regulations in order to improve their lives on the island. This project also addresses such issues as the criminalization of disease and the degree to which individual rights may be compromised in the name of public health, all of which have contemporary resonance.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, Other; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-251848-17

Aisha Khan
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)

Obeah and Hosay: Two Religions of the Caribbean Region

A book-length comparative study of two of the Caribbean's most understudied religions--Obeah and Hosay.

My project is a study of the intersections of religious and racial identities through comparative analysis of Obeah and Hosay, two of the Caribbean region’s defining yet understudied religions. My approach is an ethnographic one that draws on the phenomenological tradition. Although Obeah and Hosay are diverse in their beliefs and in their practitioners, they are often treated more categorically, based on their respective African and Indian origins. My project probes assumptions about the inevitable tensions of religious and racial difference in the Caribbean by exploring lived experience filtered through western Enlightenment conceptualizations of religion and race across Caribbean-Atlantic space and colonial and postcolonial time. Inquiring into the relationship between interpretive categories of religion and race, their modes of practice, and the power relations that form their contexts allows better understanding of identities, conflict and governance, and heritage in the Americas.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


FA-251875-17

John P. McCormick
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)

The People’s Princes: Machiavelli, Leadership and Liberty

A book-length study of Machiavelli’s concept of political leadership.

"The People’s Princes: Machiavelli, Leadership and Liberty" argues that Machiavelli, commonly considered a cynical adviser of tyrants, formulated a conception of leadership uniquely facilitating of democracy and the “free way of life.” My project draws on Machiavelli’s cases from Roman and Florentine history, and delineates his literary-rhetorical method of “political exemplarity” to accentuate the interactions between leaders and citizens that he considered indispensible for healthy democratic politics. Moreover, I highlight the relevance of Machiavelli’s thoughts on leadership for our age when democracy is challenged by economic inequality, oligarchic encroachment, failures of political representation and accountability and the rise of populism. Unlike previous interpreters, I show that Machiavelli advises democratic leaders and citizens to diligently pursue policies aimed at thwarting the efforts of socio-economic elites to oppress the people and violate the common good.

Project fields:
Intellectual History; Political Science, General; Political Theory

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251898-17

Anne Elizabeth MacNeil
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)

Italian Songs from the Time of Christopher Columbus: A Critical Edition

Completion of a digital edition of Italian frottole, popular songs of love, war, and politics from the 15th and 16th centuries.

Since the mid-18th century, scholars have been accustomed to thinking of music as embodied in its notation. The restrictions of print culture on the publication of critical editions has entrenched this line of thinking. But with the resources afforded by digital humanities, I am creating a multi-media critical edition of the repertory of Italian songs from the time of Christopher Columbus (known as frottole) that displaces this notion and relocates the object of study in music as a sounding work of art. These songs offer insight into human expression in an era of intense cultural change--a time of war, a time of scientific discovery and the exploration of the New World. Many frottole speak to these cultural anxieties, and the repertory as a whole represents a rejection of French domination over the Italian peninsula in favor of the Italian language, its ancient poetic forms, and traditional practices of singing and reciting to the lyre. These songs give expression to Italian humanism.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251900-17

Matthew Cohen
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)

Thinking across Cultures in Early America

A book-length study of the language of early American cross-cultural interactions.

This book's goal is to revitalize the discussion of inter-cultural relations in early American studies. Much of the most influential scholarship in interdisciplinary colonial studies tries not just to illuminate the past but to provide a new imagination of a shared future among all the descendants of the colonial world. Yet an outdated vocabulary of cultural interchange hinders the field, which has struggled to attract Native American and African American scholars in significant numbers. This lexicon has also kept its work from being taken up in other fields. In five short chapters drawing on both major texts and archival sources, this book traces where terms like "reciprocity," "understanding," "piety," and others came from and how they have evolved from the ways they were used in early colonial contexts. It also looks forward, showing how re-assessing such terms can help students of early America speak to broader questions and bring more diverse voices into the field.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Native American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-251961-17

Gregory Steirer
Dickinson College (Carlisle, PA 17013-2896)

Intellectual Property Law and the History of the Narrative-Based Franchise

Completion of a book-length study of the impact of intellectual property law on narrative-based franchises in film, television, and other media.

Over the last decade, the narrative-based franchise has come to be seen as one of the twentieth-first century’s paradigmatic storytelling forms. Narrative Inc. argues that in order to understand the significance of this form, we must situate it within the practice of intellectual property law. This project thus offers a dual history of narrative-based franchise production and intellectual property law in the United States, beginning in the early twentieth century and ending in the present-day. Arguing that changes in the franchise and the law have been mutually constitutive, each simultaneously the product and cause of the other, I trace how the logic of the franchise as a narrative form has changed in tandem with that of copyright, trademark, and unfair competition law. Narrative Inc. focuses on a series of specific franchises, demonstrating how their production was bound up—often quite literally through lawsuits—with the discourse and practice of intellectual property law.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence; Literature, Other; Media Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251972-17

Whitney Schwab
University of Maryland, Baltimore County (Baltimore, MD 21250-0001)

The Philosophical Origin of the Concept of Knowledge

A book-length study on the concept of knowledge in Stoic philosophy.

Interpreters of ancient Greek philosophy and contemporary theorists typically agree that Plato and Aristotle were both concerned to analyze knowledge. I think that this is a mistake. To be sure, Plato and Aristotle were interested in epistemology, and gave accounts of an important epistemic concept, which they called epistêmê. But, in laying out their accounts of epistêmê they were concerned to describe the optimal or ideal cognitive state human beings can achieve, which is a project that differs in important respects from that pursued by most modern-day epistemologists. Although the idea that Plato and Aristotle were not principally interested in knowledge in the modern sense has experienced some growth in popularity, little work has been done to determine when and how knowledge became a focus of philosophical concern. The central claim of "The Origin of the Concept of Knowledge" is that this occurred in the work of the Stoics and, in particular, in their discussions of katalêpsis.

Project fields:
Epistemology; History of Philosophy; Intellectual History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-251991-17

Anna Marshall Shields
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)

Construction of the Tang Dynasty Literary Legacy by Scholars in the Five Dynasties and Northern Song

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on how Chinese poetry of the Tang Period (618-907) was read and understood by Chinese scholars of the 10th to 12th centuries.

My project investigates the critical works that Chinese scholars of the Five Dynasties (907-976) and Northern Song (976-1127) used to define the literary legacy of their predecessor dynasty, the Tang (618-907). Writing the Tang will explore the multiple, overlapping interpretations of Tang writers and texts found in printed works that circulated widely for centuries. I analyze some of the most interventionist and influential works from the period: biographies of writers in the two Tang dynastic histories; anthologies of Tang prose and poetry; and popular anecdote collections about Tang writers and texts. Together, these works created an enduring portrait of the Tang as Chinese literature's "golden age," a view that idealized Tang literary aesthetics yet increasingly downplayed the political and social role of literary writing in Tang culture. My book will challenge this perspective on the Tang by exposing the interpretative practices that created it.

Project fields:
East Asian Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FA-252032-17

Casey O'Callaghan
Washington University (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)

A Multisensory Philosophy of Perception

A book-length argument for a theory of multisensory perception of human consciousness.

Seeing What You Hear: A Multisensory Philosophy of Perception argues that human perceptual consciousness is richly multisensory. This project’s thesis is that the coordinated use of multiple senses enhances and extends human perceptual capacities in three critical ways: (1) Crossmodal perceptual illusions reveal hidden multisensory interactions that typically make each sense more reliable as a source of evidence about the environment; (2) The joint use of multiple senses discloses more of the world, including novel features and qualities; (3) Through perceptual learning, each sense is reshaped by the influence of others. The implication is that no sense—not even vision itself—can be understood entirely in isolation from the others. This undermines the prevailing approach to perception, which proceeds sense by sense, and sets the stage for a revisionist multisensory methodology that illuminates the nature, scope, and character of perceptual consciousness.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Philosophy, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-252070-17

Chet Adam Van Duzer
Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (Palo Alto, CA 94306-4093)

Annotation for Education in the Princeton/Brussels Copy of the 1525 Edition of Ptolemy’s Geography

Preparation of a digital edition of the annotations on a 1527 copy of Ptolemy's Geography that illuminate the understanding and teaching of geography in the early 16th century.

I seek a ten-month Mellon Fellowship for Digital Publication to fund the completion of my transcription, English translation, and study of the annotations in a copy of the 1525 edition of Ptolemy’s Geography that is currently divided between Princeton and a private collection in Brussels. The annotations, written in Latin in about 1527, are extremely profuse, were made for a student, and contain original geographical thought. They are valuable for studies of the reception of Ptolemy’s Geography, of sixteenth-century geographical education, and of European intellectual networks. The only good format in which to publish them is in a digital edition that shows images of the pages and thus the context of each annotation, with a full transcription and English translation, all searchable. Princeton has agreed to host the digital edition on its server in an instantiation of the open-source Mellon-funded Archaeology of Reading platform for digital editions of annotated early modern books.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (, ) - Applicant/Grantee
Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (Rolling Hills Estates, CA) - Participating institution

Project fields:
Geography; Renaissance History; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 11/30/2017


FA-252088-17

Claire Morgan Gilbert
St. Louis University (St. Louis, MO 63103-2097)

The Arabic Voices of the Spanish Monarchy (1492-1700)

Preparation of a book-length study about the use of Arabic in Spain and Spanish territories during a period of anti-Arabic legislation and expulsions of Arabic speakers, 1492-1700.

I seek the support of an NEH Fellowship to complete a monograph on The Arabic Voices of the Spanish Monarchy (1492-1700). During the early modern period, the history of Spain was marked by anti-Arabic legislation and expulsions of Arabic speakers. This monograph explains how Arabic translators in this context found professional opportunities, and shows the continuous use of Arabic across Spanish territories. This project engages with topics including the administration of minorities, politics of language, family and empire, cultural intermediaries, and religious conversion. By combining archival testimony with analysis of discursive and legal tools that created cultural hierarchies, I show how Arabic translators took advantage of the same hierarchies they helped enforce. The continuous use of Arabic by these translators allows me to explore themes of language use and power relations that continue to resonate in contemporary society and across humanities disciplines.

Project fields:
Arabic Language; Linguistic Anthropology; Renaissance History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-252104-17

Paul E. J. Hammer
University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80302-7046)

Queen Elizabeth I, Robert Earl of Essex and the Politics of the English Royal Succession, 1598-1603

A book-length study on Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, and the politics that led to his trial and execution for treason in 1601 under Queen Elizabeth I.

This project challenges the accepted understanding of how James VI of Scotland was able to succeed Elizabeth I on the English throne in 1603, thereby transforming Tudor England into Stuart Britain. Using an unprecedented range of original sources, it offers a radically new appraisal of the political significance of Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, and of the 'Essex Rising' which resulted in his execution in 1601. Building on this foundation, it outlines a new political narrative for the period 1598-1603, setting English events within a broader British context and revealing a 'secret history' of James's path to the English crown. Methodologically, this project breaks new ground in early modern British history by the quantity and richness of its archival sources, its commitment to reading all key documents in their original manuscript form, and its extensive use of literary sources. The project's chief outcome will be the completion of a substantial monograph entitled The Hunted Hart: Robert Earl of Essex, Queen Elizabeth I, and the Politics of Treason in Shakespeare’s Britain.

Project fields:
British History; Political History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


FA-252126-17

Anne-Maria Boitumelo Makhulu
Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)

The New Financial Elite: Race, Mobility, and Ressentiment After Apartheid

A book-length study of black financial elites in post-apartheid South Africa.

“The New Financial Elite: Race, Mobility, and Ressentiment After Apartheid” sets out to look at the rise of a small, if powerful, class of black financial elites in contemporary South Africa. Focusing on the black upper middle class—their educational backgrounds, professional expertise, aspirations, and pathways to affluence—the project looks at one and the same time at the very particular historical circumstances in which this minority within a minority came to benefit from Black Economic Empowerment legislation soon after democratization in 1994. Adopting both ethnographic and archival methods, "The New Financial Elite" explores the trajectories, desires, and obligations of black elites acknowledging the intensity of contrast between rich and poor in South Africa, a contrast that itself motivates this novel research on class diversity.

Project fields:
African Studies; Cultural Anthropology; History, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-252136-17

Jane E. Goodman
Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)

Democracy and Cultural Exchange after the Arab Spring

Completion of an enhanced digital edition and book-length study that records and analyzes the intercultural exchange between an Algerian theater troupe and audiences in the United States.

In the humanities, intercultural exchange has been understood as a problem of translation not only between languages but also between cultures. I propose to explore problems of cultural translation, or the act of conveying one group’s history and experiences in terms that another group can understand. I do so via a study of an upcoming US government-sponsored tour by an Algerian theater troupe. The book follows the troupe from Algeria to the United States, showing how actors and audiences confront new views of their own and each other’s culture through theatrical performance. The book is envisioned as a multimedia work that will enable readers to experience (via embedded video) the events analyzed in the text as well as to explore links to primary research materials (such as theatrical scripts) that cannot be accessed via a traditional print book. The enhanced e-book is under contract with Indiana University Press.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Folklore and Folklife; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252150-17

Loubna El Amine
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)

The Foundations of Confucian Political Thought: History, Law, and the Political Community

A book-length study of the foundations of Confucian political thought.

My proposed book project, provisionally titled 'The Foundations of Confucian Political Thought: History, Law, and the Political Community,' will focus on the intersection of the concepts of time and space in Classical Confucian thought. More specifically, the project aims to delineate the Confucian conception of the political community by asking such questions as: What are the criteria for membership in it? Is territory important, why, and how? What explains the Confucian concern for the past? Can this concern with the past be considered sacred? Can history (as opposed to religion or metaphysics more broadly) be the normative foundation of Confucian political thought? The project aims to contribute to the expansion of the study of political philosophy and the history of political thought beyond the Western tradition.

Project fields:
Non Western Philosophy; Political Theory

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-252169-17

Joanna Megan Hearne
University of Missouri, Columbia (Columbia, MO 65211-3020)

Chickasaw Hollywood: The Fox Brothers and the Studio System, 1914-1954

A book-length study of brothers Finis Fox, Wallace Fox, and Edwin Carewe (the stage name of Jay Fox)--the first family of Native American writer-director-producers in the Hollywood studio era.

Chickasaw Hollywood: The Fox Brothers and the Studio System, 1914-1954 retrieves the history of the first Indigenous family of writer-directors in Hollywood—the Chickasaw brothers Finis Fox, Edwin Carewe (stage name for Jay Fox), and Wallace Fox. Taken together, the Fox brothers’ careers writing, directing and producing films in Hollywood spanned 40 years, from Carewe’s directorial debut in 1914 to Wallace Fox’s last television show in 1954. This project expands our understanding of Indigenous, American, and international film history beyond stereotyped images of Indians on screen to consider issues of creative control, production practices, and the breadth, complexity and mobility of Indigenous representational politics in the studio era, bringing together theoretical models from Indigenous studies and cinema studies, and close textual analysis with extensive archival research.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies; Native American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


FA-252177-17

Grant Arndt
Iowa State University (Ames, IA 50011-2000)

Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) “Indian News” in Depression-Era Wisconsin

A book-length study of the weekly newspaper columns of four Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) writers in 1930s and 1940s Wisconsin.

In the 1930s and 1940s, four members of the Ho-Chunk Nation in Wisconsin developed an innovative form of indigenous media activism, writing weekly “Indian News” columns in local white-run newspapers published in towns near their homes. Their columns became popular with non-Indian readers even as they gave voice to Ho-Chunk frustrations and outrage over the discrimination and poverty they faced in American society. This book project examines the unique and previously forgotten corpus of over 1,300 articles they wrote, exploring how the four columnists addressed some of the most important years in American Indian history, during which they confronted the challenges of the Great Depression and World War II and debated the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act. The latter allowed Indian communities to create new tribal governments, offering Ho-Chunk people the most significant opportunity for collective action they had encountered since being forced to cede their homeland a century earlier.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Native American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


FA-252192-17

April Eisman
Iowa State University (Ames, IA 50011-2000)

Angela Hampel: A Contemporary Artist in East Germany

Preparation of a book-length study on the painter Angela Hampel (b. 1956) and the situation of female artists from East Germany.

This book focuses on one of East Germany’s most successful and outspoken contemporary artists, Angela Hampel, an installation and performance artist and Neo-expressionist painter who exhibited on both sides of the Berlin Wall in the 1980s. It seeks to understand the impact of social policies on women’s art and position in the art world by investigating the challenges Hampel faced in a society that claimed women’s equality without having actually achieved it. By examining Hampel’s work and reception within the social, cultural, and political contexts of East Germany, this book will offer a deeper understanding of the obstacles women artists faced in the Socialist East as well as an alternative perspective from which to consider women’s conditions in the West since 1945.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


FA-252195-17

Julie Françoise Tolliver
University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)

A Poetics of Solidarity in Francophone Independence Literatures

A book-length study of connections among global francophone writers and intellectuals.

During the independence period (1950 to 1980), francophone intellectuals from Quebec, Africa, and the Caribbean read each other and, animated by transnational solidarity, imagined alternatives to colonialist and neocolonialist formations. This project examines the affective bond that made this process possible, a poetics of solidarity that orients texts and the political imaginaries they elaborate. The “tongue ties” of francophone anticolonial intellectuals bound them together (they were connected through the French language) but also offered a set of linguistic and ideological constraints (their imaginaries were determined by the French language as it was, itself, shaped by francophone history and culture). In its investigation, this project disrupts the racial logic evinced by francophone literary studies in the US, tracing literal and figurative racial permeability on both sides of the French literary Atlantic.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


FA-252258-17

Rachel E. Zuckert
Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)

The Naturalist Aesthetics of German Philosopher J. G. Herder (1744-1803)

Completion of a book-length study of the aesthetics of German philosopher Johann Gottfried Herder (1744-1803).

This project, to write a book presenting J. G. Herder’s aesthetic theory, has three central arguments. First, I interpret Herder's aesthetics as a naturalist theory, accounting for aesthetic value and art production on the basis of understanding human beings as organisms conditioned by and responding to their environments, both natural and social. I argue that Herder’s theory thus constitutes a pivotal moment in the philosophical tradition: the transition from eighteenth-century philosophies of taste to nineteenth-century systematic philosophies of the arts. For Herder argues that to understand aesthetic response (taste), one must understand the objects and socio-historical contexts that elicit and form such responsiveness. In emphasizing the place of aesthetics within embodied human existence and cultural contexts, third, Herder’s aesthetics is also a neglected alternative to the dominant understanding of aesthetics and art in the tradition, as disembodied and disinterested.

Project fields:
Aesthetics; German Literature; History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-252261-17

Sharon M. Leon
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)

A Study of the Enslaved Persons Owned (and Sold) by the Maryland Province Jesuits

An online publication on the history of Jesuit slave ownership beginning in 1717 and culminating in the sale of 272 slaves in 1838, the proceeds of which assisted the financing of Georgetown University.

On June 19, 1838, Thomas Mulledy, S.J. signed his name to an agreement with Jesse Batey and Henry Johnson to seal the fate of 272 enslaved persons who resided on Jesuit-owned estates in Southern Maryland, selling them south to Louisiana. With an eye to the events and relationships that formed the warp and woof of the daily lives of this enslaved community between 1717 and 1838, I will work to identify each individual enslaved person present in the documentary evidence and to situate them within their families and larger community. Focusing on the enslaved community itself makes this project ideal for a digital publication. Rather than writing a single linear narrative treatment that could only include a number of individual vignettes standing in for the whole, I will employ linked open data and social network analysis to visualize the entire community of enslaved people and their relationships to one another across space and time.

Project fields:
History, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


FA-252304-17

Haydon Leslie Cherry
Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)

Dao Duy Anh (1904-1988), Vietnamese Intellectual: A Biography

Researching and writing of a biography of Dao Duy Anh (1904-1988), a leading Vietnamese intellectual, teacher, and journalist.

My project is an intellectual biography of Dao Duy Anh (1904-1988), arguably the most important Vietnamese scholar and intellectual of the twentieth century. Dao Duy Anh was a pioneering journalist, lexicographer, historian, and literary scholar. He had a profound effect on the modern Vietnamese language, the writing of history in Vietnam, institutions of higher education and research, and the training of an entire generation of Vietnamese humanistic scholars and academicians. Dao Duy Anh always had a fraught relationship with the state: the French colonial state arrested him for radical political activism and the Democratic Republic of Vietnam sent him into exile for political dissidence. My project traces the development of Dao Duy Anh’s extraordinary scholarly career and the challenges of intellectual production in twentieth-century Vietnam.

Project fields:
East Asian History; Intellectual History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-252310-17

Silvia Marsans-Sakly, PhD
Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)

A History of Democratic Protest and Memory in Tunisia, 1864-2011

A book-length study of the Tunisian revolt of 1864 and the impact of the memory of the revolt on subsequent Tunisian history—in particular the 2011 uprisings in Tunisia that launched the Arab Spring.

In 2010 a Tunisian street vendor set himself on fire, igniting a movement that toppled a dictator and engulfed the Arab world. Stunned by this revolution in a place typically considered a quiet destination for Western tourists, experts explained the tumult via references to European historical experience: 1789, 1848, 1989. Tunisians saw it differently, through the uprising of 1864. This was the pivotal year when intransigent tribes joined the coastal cities in an attempt to bring down the ruling bey, and failed. The event has been debated ever since. Through periods of liberal reform, French colonialism, and national liberation the events of 1864 have remained a battleground of memory, one that informs contradictory ideals of change in Tunisia. The ouster of Ben Ali in 2011 revived this contested legacy. We cannot grasp the meaning of 2011 or the Arab Spring without understanding 1864. This book explains what happened and the living politics of its memory.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-252317-17

Philip Yampolsky
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Documenting Vaihoho, a Form of Sung Poetry in Southeast Asia

The documentation, through recordings and in a book, of vaihoho, a musical-poetic form of Timor-Leste. 

 

This is a project to document (in recordings and a book) the music, texts, performance practice, and ethnographic context of vaihoho, an endangered musico-poetic form with deep cultural significance for Fataluku-speakers in rural Timor-Leste (TL). The study will also contribute new data to discussions of Timor as a border zone for Austronesian and Papuan cultures. In addition to making new recordings, the project will repatriate to source communities a corpus of field recordings made in the 1960s by French anthropologists. These recordings plus the new ones will be deposited in the source communities and will also form the nucleus of a new national audio-visual archive for TL. This Fataluku research is the final phase of a larger project, under way since 2012, to document endangered traditions of sung poetry in Indonesian Timor and TL. The Fataluku material will be combined with comparable documentation of Tetun, Ema, and Bunaq sung poetry.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Ethnomusicology; Literature, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-252319-17

Nomi Dave
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)

The Revolution's Echoes: Music, Politics and Pleasure in Guinea

A book-length study of Guinean music in relation to politics.

An NEH fellowship will support completion of my book, The Revolution’s Echoes: Music, Politics and Pleasure in Guinea (solicited by University of Chicago Press). The book examines the pleasures and aesthetics of authoritarianism, through an ethnographic study of music and performance in Guinea. Representations in the scholarly and popular literature often emphasize music as a site for resistance and oppositional politics, while musicians who support the state are framed as unwitting tools of propaganda. Moving beyond these assumptions, my book examines the subjectivities and experiences of musicians who sing for an authoritarian state, and of audiences who derive pleasure from this music. The book offers new theorizations of pleasure and its relationship to politics. It will be the first English-language volume on Guinean music, and contributes to broader conversation in the social sciences and humanities on emotion, sound and the senses in constituting political / public culture.

Project fields:
African Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Ethnomusicology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-252332-17

Tait Siddhartha Keller
Rhodes College (Memphis, TN 38112-1624)

A Global Environmental History of the First World War

Research for an environmental history of World War I.

I am applying for NEH funding to write "A Global Environmental History of the First World War." My book project focuses on how energy geopolitics linked the battle lines and home fronts with industry and agriculture in ways that fundamentally shaped the twentieth century. While battlegrounds seemingly suffered devastation, the resulting damage to nature was normally short-lived. Paradoxically, major environmental change occurred behind the lines, away from the killing fields. To keep soldiers and engines in action, belligerent countries commandeered food and fossil fuels throughout the biosphere, which in turn transformed relationships from global geopolitics down to individual consumption patterns. By understanding how warfare and energy regimes coevolved over the course of the First World War we can better appreciate the intersections of armed conflict, human victimization, and environmental exploitation during the twentieth century.

Project fields:
History, Other; Military History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-252373-17

Kristin Lanzoni
Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)

Jacopo De' Barbari's View of Venice (ca. 1500): A Digital Exhibition Catalog

Completion of a digital exhibition catalog on Jacopo De Barbari's View of Venice (c. 1500).

A Portrait of Venice is an online digital exhibition catalogue that features Jacopo De’ Barbari’s View of Venice, ca. 1500. Even though scholars across a range of disciplines consistently use the print as an historical document, no publication has considered the View as a visual narrative for engaging with the life of a city and its connections to the Early Modern world, and no catalogue publication has yet permitted readers/viewers to explore content thematically in a non-linear format that includes interactive entries as “works of art.” This digital publication includes not only video and imagery with scholarly essays written by art and architectural historians, but also interactive 3D models, mapping timelines, annotated digital books, image comparison tools, and augmented realities. The catalogue will enable users to navigate historical material according to unique interests and needs, resulting in many access points, countless different reading pathways, and exploratory learning.

Project fields:
Architecture; Art History and Criticism; Renaissance History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FA-252380-17

Henry Justin Steinberg
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)

Boccaccio’s Realism, Legal Institutions, and the Rise of the Novella

A book-length study of the relationship between literary realism in the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375) and the emergence of the inquisitorial trial in Western Europe.

This project examines the influence of the inquisitorial trial—the most important development in legal procedure in Western Europe—on the most important development in Western literary style: the emergence of realistic representations of daily life. I trace this phenomenon through the novellas of 14th-century author and poet Giovanni Boccaccio, arguing that his celebrated realistic narratives, lifelike characters, and naturalistic dialogue are a response to the emergent prosecutorial trends of the period. By exploring the rhetorical and literary underpinnings of probable cause, legal representation, police surveillance, and discretionary punishment, Boccaccio’s work puts into critical dialogue two pillars of early modernity that otherwise might appear unrelated: realism and inquisition.

Project fields:
Italian Literature; Medieval Studies; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-252385-17

Michele Currie Navakas
Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)

19th-Century Literary and Scientific Inquiry on the Nature of Marine Life

A book-length study of coral in works by James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and other writers of early American literature.

Animated Stones marshals a broad range of imaginative reflections on coral—from classic works of American literature and natural history, to archival material such as personal letters, periodical essays, and songs, to decorative arts and paintings—attesting that coral confounded many assumptions that early Americans made about the natural world. In particular, coral appeared to be indeterminate matter that blurred the boundaries between subject and object, living and nonliving, and gave early Americans a rich, yet largely unexamined, language of growth, relationship, production, collaboration, and fluidity. I argue that early Americans applied this language to questions of human being and belonging: at a period in the nation’s history when ever-stricter forms of biological classification, division, and description determined one’s political and legal value, the language of coral gave a diverse set of Americans a way to question their culture’s most cherished conventions of personhood.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-252423-17

Erik S. McDuffie
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61820-5711)

Marcus Garvey and the American Heartland, 1920-1980

A book on the impact of Marcus Garvey (1887-1940) in the American Midwest in the 20th century.

Garveyism in the Diasporic Midwest: The American Heartland and Global Black Freedom, 1920-80 is the first book to connect the Midwest to transnational black political protest. Through Garveyism and the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), the largest black protest movement in world history, the U.S. industrial heartland emerged as an epicenter of black internationalism. Its global manufacturing centers and political infrastructures offered blacks opportunities that they could not find elsewhere – fertile ground for the region to emerge as a stronghold of the UNIA and subsequent black freedom movements. Attending to the paradoxes and gendered contours of Garveyism, my book uses the framework of the diasporic Midwest to globalize African American history and to reorient the study of the African diaspora by taking into account the significance of the American heartland in shaping the history of the twentieth-century black world.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Gender Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252460-17

Sabri Ates
Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX 75205)

Sheikh Abdulqadir Nehri (d. 1925) and the Pursuit of an Independent Kurdistan

A book-length study explaining why an independent or autonomous Kurdistan never came into being, anchored in the biography of the Kurdish leader Seyyid Abdulqadir Nehri (1851-1925).

What historical conditions account for how the Kurds became the largest ethnic group without its own nation? Constraining Kurdistan sets out to answer this question on the basis of a wide variety of primary sources in Modern Turkish, Ottoman Turkish, Persian, English and French. Anchored in the biography of its protagonist, Seyyid Abdulqadir of Nehri, it explores efforts to establish or prevent the creation of Kurdistan as an independent state or autonomous entity starting in the mid 1870s. In particular, it focuses on the tumultuous period between 1880-1925, during which the creation of a Kurdish state emerged as a distinct possibility and then quickly unraveled. Moreover, it studies what role the Kurds themselves played in making or unmaking a state of their own.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252471-17

Katherine Henninger
Louisiana State University (Baton Rouge, LA 70808-4600)

Southern Childhood in U.S. Literature and Film

A book-length study on representations of childhood in southern literature and film.

Made Strangely Beautiful is an interdisciplinary rhetorical analysis of tropes of childhood in literature and film of or about the South. Rather than the experiences of actual children, southern or not, I am interested in how ideas of childhood, southern-ness, and American-ness have been made through and against each other. A long tradition of strangeness (queer, grotesque, Other) attached to representations of the South is reflected in representations of its children. But as much as a peculiar South has served to contrast a normative nation, the South--particularly, I argue, its children--has been and continues to be central in narratives drawing region and nation together. Figures of both innocence and corruption, purity and ambiguity, southern children are made to embody the fissures of race, sexuality, gender expression, and class that threaten to undermine liberal rhetorics of U.S. national identity, and also to represent the nation’s best hope of transcending those divisions.

Project fields:
American Literature; Film History and Criticism; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252475-17

Lara Harb
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)

The Concept of Imitation in Classical Arabic Literature

A book-length study of the ways in which classical Arabic philosophers and writers understood the relation between literature and reality, focusing on their transformation of the Aristotelian concept “mimesis.”

Mimesis in Classical Arabic Literature promises to be the first comprehensive study of literary representation in medieval Arabic literature. In it I try to reconstruct medieval Arab conceptions of the relationship between a literary work and reality, on the one hand, and the psychology and ethics of how one experiences and is affected by such representations, on the other. Mimesis in the Arabic context seems to have been understood as comparison instead of the standard Western understanding of it as imitation. As a result, the aesthetic goal of representational arts in Arabic literature is not verisimilitude but similarity. This requires a different strategy of reading on the part of the one who experiences the text. In addition to deepening our understanding of classical Arabic representational literature, the project exposes an alternative understanding of a concept so central to Western Aesthetics.

Project fields:
Arabic Literature; Comparative Literature; Literary Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-252507-17

Deborah Yalen
Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO 80521-2807)

Ideologies on Display: Jewish Ethnography in the Age of Lenin and Stalin

A book-length study on Soviet-Jewish ethnography in the age of Lenin and Stalin.

This project offers a comprehensive history of state-sponsored Jewish ethnographic scholarship and related museum curation in the USSR during the interwar years. It examines the study of Jews of Ashkenazi descent, primarily in Soviet Ukraine and Belorussia, as well as the numerically smaller non-Ashkenazi Jewish populations in the Caucasus, Central Asia and Crimea. Drawing on the expertise of an international team of scholars, the project, for which I serve as editor and coordinator, will result in an English volume of critical essays and translations of rare archival materials, and a free, publicly accessible, English-Russian website featuring virtual tours of ethnographic expeditions conducted in Soviet Jewish communities in the 1920s-1930s. Each format will probe the relationship of knowledge production and power, exploring how ethnographers navigated the opportunities and perils of state-subsidized scholarship under a regime that selectively promoted and repressed Jewish identity.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-252520-17

Danielle R. Olden
University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9055)

Mexican Americans, School Desegregation, and the Making of Race in Post-Civil Rights America

A book-length study on school desegregation in Denver, Colorado, focusing on the impact on the Mexican American community.

Racial Uncertainties complicates understandings of school desegregation and racial formation in post-civil rights America. In a school desegregation case that was built around a black-white color line, Mexican Americans presented a challenge. Were they white or nonwhite? This debate was pivotal to the transformation of racial knowledge in the 1970s. As the courts wrangled over this question, Denverites tried to maneuver around the desegregation plan by claiming alternative races or by highlighting the arbitrariness of race, the elimination of which would have made it nearly impossible to create racial balance. Mexican Americans were central to these processes. The existence of such racial uncertainty is one of the hallmarks of the operation of race in modern America. It served an important ideological and political purpose: in the post-civil rights era anti-integrationists utilized the indeterminacy of Mexican American racial identity to frame their opposition to school desegregation.

Project fields:
Latino History; Legal History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


FA-252523-17

Carol Symes
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61820-5711)

Activating Texts: Mediated Documents and Their Makers in Medieval Europe

A book-length analysis of the people and processes involved in the creation of six medieval documents made in northwestern Europe, 1000-1215 CE.

Many medieval texts were created through the participation of multiple historical actors, some of them illiterate, whose contributions to the documentary process have since been silenced. As a result, the contemporary meanings of these texts, which were bound up with a shared knowledge of their making, have also been lost. My project models an innovative methodology for re-activating these written records and the popular literacies that informed them, in order to re-assess their evidentiary status. It examines six significant documentary initiatives, the complex motivations behind them, and the cultural work they performed. These case studies deal with different textual genres and the many relationships among official and lay uses of writing which do not map onto Latin/vernacular or written/oral binaries. Although focused on the years 1000 to 1215, and on northwestern Europe, the book’s methods are broadly applicable to any era when the status of writing is contested or in flux.

Project fields:
Media Studies; Medieval History; Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252536-17

Joan Marie Titus
University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)

Dmitry Shostakovich and Music for Stalinist Cinema, 1936-1953

Preparation of a book on the film music of Soviet composer Dmitry Shostakovich (1906-1975) from 1936 to 1953.

Despite Dmitry Shostakovich’s celebrated reputation as a concert and stage composer, his film music only recently has garnered attention from audiences and scholars. A history of his scoring for Soviet cinema, and generally of Russian film music, has yet to be substantively written. My proposed research project fills this gap. This project will be used to write a book, titled Dmitry Shostakovich and Music for Stalinist Cinema, which traces his development as one of the Soviet Union’s preeminent film composers from 1936 until Josef Stalin’s death in 1953. This book provides an examination of his scoring practices, his unique relationship with directors and with the film industry, and his engagement with cultural politics and audiences. It is based on archival materials, provides detailed musical and cinematic analysis, and provides a review of contemporaneous reception. The NEH Fellowship would be used to complete this manuscript, and to create a video companion website.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252546-17

Benjamin MacDonald Schmidt
Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5000)

Creating Data: The Invention of Information in the 19th-Century American State

The digital study, with accompanying data visualization, of the origins of modern computational culture in the American government's data collection practices of the 19th century.

Creating Data is a history that uses data collected by the US government in the late 19th century to explore how the American state laid the foundation for modern practices of processing and displaying digital information. The project pioneers new methods for using machine learning and data visualization to engage in critical humanistic reading of three massive datasets produced by government bureaucracies: shipping logs collected by the US Naval Observatory after 1830, population records and maps at the Census Office after 1870, and book cataloging at the Library of Congress after 1890. By integrating narrative historical scholarship and archival research with richly interactive data visualizations, it shows how putatively objective data, still in active use decades later, still promotes the agendas and interests of the state actors who created it.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Intellectual History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


FA-252548-17

Leslie Paris
University of British Columbia (Vancouver V6T 1Z1 Canada)

American Children, Parents, and the State, 1960-1980

A book-length study on children’s experiences and parenting during two decades of political and social change.

My book project explores why and how children figured so centrally both as icons and as historical actors amid the cultural upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s. Both parenting and children’s experience were reconfigured in an era of political and social turbulence. During this period, challenges to traditional forms of authority took many forms. My work intervenes in the Americanist historiography by placing children, adolescents, and the adults who cared for them squarely at the center of this story instead of the margins to which they have generally been relegated. Using age as my central category of historical analysis, I explore the ways in which American children, their caretakers, and concerned policy-makers navigated an era of increasing options amid increasing rancor, and examine how these experiences differed across age and generational divides.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-252561-17

Federico Buccellati
Alexandria Archive Institute (San Francisco, CA 94127-2036)

Calculating the Costs of Ancient Buildings: A Modern Tool

The creation of an interpretive digital tool and user manual to study cost calculations for ancient buildings.

Architecture is one of the main elements of material culture that archaeologists find in the archaeological record. One of the most important aspects of architecture is the process of construction leading up to the first use of the building. Cost-calculation-algorithms can be applied to the volumes of ancient architecture to explore the temporal, material or energetic ‘cost’ of the steps of that process. Up to now this has been done on an ad-hoc basis, with scholars finding appropriate comparisons. This project will produce an interactive interface where scholars enter volumetric data from their research. The algorithms draw from a wide variety of sources from across diverse cultural spheres. The final result will be a web-based interface published on GitHub so that future scholars can add to the algorithms and sources.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 4/30/2018


FA-252595-17

Monica Kittiya Lee
California State Los Angeles University Auxiliary Services, Inc. (Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226)

A Linguistic Study of Brasilica, the Hybrid Portuguese Language of Colonial Brazil

A book-length study of Brasílica, the linguistic middle ground in Brazil between speakers of indigenous and Portuguese languages.

My book is a social and cultural history that revises the historiography of colonial and imperial Brazil. It demonstrates that indigenous peoples, far from fading from sight, actively engaged society and shaped history. Through spoken utterance, the Indians infused the medieval Catholicism brought by the Portuguese with their own concepts and forged a syncretic religion. My detailed study of the translation manuals of the Brasílica, the lingua franca spoken between peoples of different languages, introduces new and understudied archival materials. It sheds light on linguistic evolution and on the relations sustained between colonizer and colonized. The heart of this project examines the social practices that reflect how peoples have dealt with diversity, and how variety innovated practices, constructed communities, engendered divisions, and so, molded identities.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Latin American History; Native American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-252602-17

Meegan Kennedy Hanson
Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)

The Microscope and the Language of Wonder in Victorian Literature

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252618-17

Andrew James Francis Morris
Union College, Schenectady (Schenectady, NY 12308-3256)

Race, Rights and Disaster Relief: Hurricane Camille, Mississippi, and the Transformation of American Disaster Policy

Race, Rights, and Disaster Relief: Hurricane Camille, Mississippi, and the Transformation of American Disaster Policy argues that Hurricane Camille, which devastated the Mississippi Gulf Coast in the summer of 1969, was a decisive turning point in the history of disaster relief in contemporary America. The sheer scale of destruction and the racial inequities in the subsequent relief programs of the Red Cross and the State of Mississippi, opened a political window for the federalization of disaster relief. Told through archival research and the experiences of survivors, policymakers, civil rights activists and others, and contextualized in the broader history of disaster relief policy, the Nixon Administration, and the Civil Rights Movement, the project offers the first comprehensive history of this watershed period for disaster relief in the modern United States—and offers insights to the dynamics that would play out in Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Project fields:
African American History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$21,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2018 – 8/30/2018


FA-252681-17

Dawn V. Odell
Lewis and Clark College (Portland, OR 97219-7879)

Chinese Art in Early Modern Europe and America

Preparation of a book on André Everard van Braam Houckgeest (1739-1801), who worked for the Dutch East India Company in Asia, settled in Philadelphia, and was one of the first to promote Chinese art and culture in the city.

My project studies a rich moment in the history of artistic engagement between China, Europe, and the United States by focusing on a remarkable figure, André Everard van Braam Houckgeest. Author, draughtsman, art collector, and active member of the French-Dutch émigré community in Philadelphia, van Braam lived in Guangzhou and Macao and served as a member of the Dutch East India Company's diplomatic mission to the Beijing court. Van Braam became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1784 and presented Philadelphia audiences with the first public display of Chinese art in America. Through the lens of his confrontation with Chinese visual culture, and specifically through his curation of Chinese landscape painting and porcelain, I explain how van Braam’s experience forms the basis for today’s conversations about global art markets, ethnicity, trade imbalances, and diplomatic negotiations.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; East Asian Studies; European History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$29,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FA-252705-17

Amy Chazkel
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)

Urban Chiaroscuro: Rio de Janeiro and the Politics of Nightfall

A book-length study about the changing meaning of the night in urban Brazil from the early-19th to the mid-20th century, focusing primarily on the capital city of Rio de Janeiro.

In 19th-century Rio de Janeiro, sunset triggered a legal regime distinct from the one that prevailed in daylight; nightfall turned an artisan carrying a tool into a criminal wielding a weapon, and a free person of color into a presumed slave. Changes in the built environment and urban culture in the early 20th century attenuated the legal and political importance of nightfall. Yet the long history of the distinction between day and night bore a lasting impact on urban legal culture. This fellowship would allow me to devote the year to completing a book that uncovers a crucial but unexplored dimension of the development of the politics of everyday urban life. Returning to an era before commercial nightlife, my study places the history of Rio and other Brazilian cities by night in the context of the Atlantic world as the Americas underwent decolonization to explore how the study of urban temporality can reveal new insights into the global processes that shaped the modern world.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies; Urban History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


FA-253004-17

Frank Biess
University of California, San Diego (La Jolla, CA 92093-0013)

Fear and Democracy in West Germany during the Cold War

A book-length study on fear and democracy in West Germany.

Drawing on multidisciplinary research on emotions, my project explains how recurrent waves of fear and anxiety shaped the history of West Germany and influenced the process of democratization from the 1940s through the 1980s. It challenges dominant teleological narratives of the Federal Republic's successful postwar stabilization and "arrival in the West" by taking seriously Germans' own apprehensions of their imagined futures. Based on a series of empirically rich case studies, the project analyzes the shifting objects of fear and anxiety, as well as the changing norms governing the experience and expression of these emotions. A synthetic analysis draws these cases together to offer a unique perspective on the development of the Federal Republic—one that underlines the importance of emotions for understanding the process of historical change. An epilogue analyzes the implications of the history of fear and anxiety before 1989 for the political culture of post-unification Germany.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Political History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-231837-16

Margot Canaday, PhD
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)

LGBT Workers in the Shadow of Civil Rights, 1945-2000

A book-length study on the employment of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual people in the U.S.'s late 20th-century work force.
 

While historians of sexuality have written extensively about working class cultures, an assumption that workplaces were "straight spaces" in which LGBT people passed has limited inquiry into the workplace itself. Yet the workplace shaped LGBT life as much as the bar or the street. Avoiding exposure/fear of job loss was a central fact of queer life for most of the 20th century. Moreover, because of a modern equivalence between work and personal identity (the job makes the person, said Marx), occupations have been central to establishing sexual identity. Workplaces, finally, are considered both arenas where norms are enforced and compulsion reigns, and a site of tolerance where diversity is nurtured. I draw on over 100 oral histories I conducted with LGBTs born in the 1930s, court cases, and business and labor records to explore these themes.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-231864-16

Peter J. Ahrensdorf
Davidson College (Davidson, NC 28036-9405)

Homer and the History of Political Philosophy: Encounters with Plato, Machiavelli, Nietzsche, and the Bible

A book-length study of Homer and the history of political philosophy.

I seek support for a book on Homer and the history of political philosophy, a book for which I have received an advanced contract from Cambridge University Press. This book provides something that does not exist in the scholarly literature on Homer or on the history of political philosophy: a compact, focused, and accessible study of Homer as a philosophic thinker in conjunction with Plato, Machiavelli, Nietzsche, and the Bible and an account of the history of political philosophy that begins, not with Plato, but with Homer. My book seeks to demonstrate Homer's crucial importance as a philosophic thinker by explaining the critical role he plays in the thought of Plato, the founder of classical political philosophy; Machiavelli, the founder of modern political philosophy; and Nietzsche, the principal philosophic source of postmodernism. This book will also shed important light on the relation between rationalism and religion in the history of political philosophy by comparing and contrasting Homer and the Bible with respect to their presentations of the divine and their understanding of human excellence.
 

Project fields:
Political Theory

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-231915-16

Susanah Shaw Romney
University of Arkansas, Little Rock (Little Rock, AR 72204-1000)

Personal Interactions and Imperial Geographies in Early Modern Dutch Colonies

No project description available

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-231944-16

Cynthia Anne Connolly
University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)

Children, Drug Therapy, and Pharmaceuticals in the United States, 1906-1979

A book-length history of the development, use, and marketing of drugs for children.

This historical study traces the development, use, and marketing of drugs for children. This project’s central argument is that a history of children and drugs is an important lens through which to study children’s place in American life. It spotlights the ways in which evolving constructions of health and disease, shifting child-rearing notions, and changing beliefs about children, have helped medicalize childhood. It is the first book length history of this topic, joining a body of scholarship that attends to age as a historical variable. It is especially important to study this issue historically because almost every twentieth century drug law was enacted because of a pediatric disaster. But drug safety improved for adults, not children, and remains a vexing problem. Most research into this phenomenon is ahistorical. This project is also significant because it shows the novel insights that can be gained by the use of a humanities framework to study scientific and ethical issues.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-231945-16

Eugene Michael Avrutin
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61820-5711)

The Velizh Affair: Jews and Christians in a 19th-Century Russian Border Town

A book-length study analyzing the complex relationships between Jews and Christians based on an extensive murder case from the 1820s-30s in Velizh, a small town about 300 miles west of Moscow.

The Velizh affair was the longest ritual murder case in the modern world. The investigation lasted twelve years (1823-1835), generating an astonishing number of documents. The archive includes hundreds of depositions and petitions, official government correspondence, reports, memos, and personal letters. The case opens a window onto a time, place, and people that seldom appear in studies of either the Russian Empire or East European Jewry. Furthermore, it offers a unique window onto not only the multiple factors that caused ruptures and conflicts in everyday life, but also the social and cultural worlds of a multi-ethnic population that had coexisted for hundreds of years. Using the newly discovered documents, the book project: (1) reconstructs the mental universe of a multi-ethnic border town and analyzes otherwise opaque realms of human experience; and (2) rethinks the role that antisemitism played in the ritual murder charge.

Project fields:
European History; Jewish Studies; Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


FA-231969-16

Asuka Sango
Carleton College (Northfield, MN 55057-4044)

Debate in the Buddhist Monasteries of Medieval Japan

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the role of debate among Buddhist monks in shaping medieval Japanese culture.

This project examines the role of Buddhist monastic debate (rongi) in shaping the intellectual, religious, and cultural contours of medieval Japan from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries. Since participating in debates was an official requirement for monks’ promotion, both medieval critics and modern scholars have dismissed them as a tool of self-aggrandizement. However, by examining the lives of the intellectual giants, their famous debates, and the largely unnoticed “behind-the-stage” moments of regular scholar monks (e.g., daily training in debate skills and doctrinal learning), my book argues that the debate skills that these monks developed were not only a means of social advancement, but also a dynamic mode of internalizing and producing doctrinal knowledge and contesting its established interpretation. Thus my project challenges a popular conception of Buddhism as more experientially rooted and reveals the largely neglected, scholastic dimension of Japanese Buddhism.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies; History of Religion; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 3/31/2017


FA-232028-16

Romita Ray
Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)

The Visual Cultures of Tea Consumption in Colonial and Modern India

Research for a book-length study on the development and visual culture of tea in India from the late 17th century to the present.

Transformed into a prized beverage and a botanical novelty, Chinese tea spawned a vibrant culture of tea drinking in Britain, while triggering revolutions and wars in two continents. It also altered the landscape of India where Britain’s vision to become a self-sufficient producer of tea eventually crystallized in the wake of the Opium Wars in China. Ushered through the Canton trade, tea united the histories of China, Britain, India, and North America, transforming swathes of land into plantations in India and Sri Lanka, and producing botanical specimens, tea utensils, and furniture. These artifacts in turn engendered scientific research, social exchange, medical debate, commercial advertising, and patriotic zeal. It is against this backdrop that I examine the visual cultures of tea consumption in India, first under the auspices of the East India Company; next, under the Victorian Raj; and finally, in the post-Independence era when tea became widely recognized as a national drink.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; British History; South Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232037-16

Charlotte Brooks
CUNY Research Foundation, Bernard Baruch College (New York, NY 10010-5585)

Immigrants from America: The Chinese American Second Generation in China, 1900-1949

A book-length study of the history of Chinese Americans who migrated back to China in the first half of the 20th century, and of their contributions to the Republic of China.

Before World War II, people of Chinese ancestry born in the United States enjoyed few opportunities in America because of racial discrimination there. After the 1911 collapse of China's last imperial dynasty, many Chinese American citizens began to see the young republic that replaced it as a land of opportunity. Almost twenty percent of Chinese American citizens between 1912 and 1937 eventually left the United States and moved to China for careers, education, and to build the new nation. This project is the first study of these people, who helped shape Republican China's early institutions, organizations, companies, schools, cities, and politics. Through examining the lives and experiences of these forgotten Chinese Americans, the project will offer new perspectives on nation-building and economic development in China, the evolution of US citizenship and expatriation policies, and the fraught Sino-American relationship during the first half of the twentieth century.

Project fields:
East Asian History; Immigration History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-232214-16

Elizabeth Ann Foster
Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)

Catholics and the End of the French Empire in Sub-Saharan Africa

A book-length study of Catholic positions on the future of French Africa from 1945 until 1965.

Decolonizing Faith will be an innovative historical book-length study that crosses borders between France and its sub-Saharan African colonies to delve into the complexity of Catholic positions on the future of French Africa before and just after independence, from 1945 until 1965. Linking European history, African history, and religious studies, it will examine decolonization from an entirely new angle. It will bring to life a Franco-African Catholic world that had been forged by conquest, colonization, missions, and conversions. Its denizens, who included French missionaries in Africa, their superiors in France, African Catholic students in France destined to become leaders in their home countries, African Catholic intellectuals, young African clergymen, and French and African lay activists, were all preoccupied with the future of France’s African colonies, the place of Catholicism in Africa, and whether their loyalties should lie with the Vatican, France, or emerging African states.

Project fields:
African History; European History; History of Religion

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232235-16

Kai Frederick Wehmeier
University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92617-3066)

A Critique of Philosopher Saul Kripke's Work on Identity and Necessity

A book-length study on the logician Saul Kripke and his concepts of identity and necessity.

I propose to re-examine currently orthodox philosophical views concerning the logic, metaphysics and semantics of identity and necessity. The resulting alternative theory dispenses with the notion of a two-place relation that every object bears to itself, and to itself only, and proposes a more sophisticated conception of logical form for necessity statements that accounts, by way of explicit notation, for the distinction between indicative and non-indicative verb moods. It will be shown that a number of prominent philosophical theses, many of which were first articulated by Saul Kripke in the 1970s, require substantial revision or become outright untenable when the background logical framework is modified in the manner proposed. These include the necessity of identity, the existence of contingent a priori truths, and the principled non-synonymy of proper names with definite descriptions. The results will be of interest to philosophers, logicians and linguists.

Project fields:
Logic; Metaphysics; Philosophy of Language

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-232243-16

Michael D. Chasar
Willamette University (Salem, OR 97301-3922)

Beyond the Book: Poetry and New Media in Modern America

A book-length study of American poetry and new media.

Focusing on magic lanterns, radio, film, TV, and digital platforms, this book studies how "new" non-print media affected American poetry and how poetry in turn affected emergent media and media dynamics. Many people have felt that the twentieth century was an era of poetry's disappearance from public life, but I argue that, thanks to its absorption by non-print mass media, poetry changed forms and proliferated in tandem with those media, necessitating new critical models for poetry scholars to use in assessing poetry's social and cultural lives. As most twentieth-century poetry scholarship focuses on poetry as a feature of print culture, this project thus aims to: 1) expand the archives and media forms considered important to poetry studies; 2) assess the cultural impact of poetry outside of traditional frameworks like schools and high culture; and 3) develop new critical models for understanding poetry in non-print contexts and in relation to popular culture.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Media Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$29,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232263-16

Cara Anne Finnegan, PhD
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61820-5711)

American Presidents and the History of Photography from the Daguerreotype to the Digital Revolution

A book-length study of the impact of the U.S. presidency on the history of photography and photographic technology.
 
 

The Camera Politic contends that a history of photography told through the lens of its most official subject, the President of the United States, shows us how generations of Americans learned to understand photography's role in public life. The book will analyze images, texts, and archival material to study how presidents participated in and shaped the public experience of photography at four transformative moments: the introduction of the daguerreotype in 1839; the rise of halftone after 1880; the arrival of 35-mm photography in the late 1920s; and the digital revolution of the early twenty-first century. By challenging the narrow characterization of photography as a political tool and extending political communication scholarship back into the pre-television era, my project invites us to think more broadly about how presidential photography participates in the public sphere, and reminds us that every era negotiates the challenges and opportunities of its own "new media."

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; Communications; Composition and Rhetoric

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232317-16

Zachary McLeod Hutchins
Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO 80521-2807)

Newspaper Reading and Early American Narratives of Slavery

An online database of early American newspaper references to slavery and a book-length study of the impact of early newspaper accounts on the development of American slave narratives.

The first North American slave narratives, written by Briton Hammon and Olaudah Equiano, were not published until the late eighteenth century, but stories of enslaved African Americans circulated in colonial newspapers long before those accounts were published. Before Equiano will survey slave-for-sale advertisements, advertisements for runaways, accounts of ships sunk during the Middle Passage, and other textual fragments related to slavery in 6,000 issues of ten colonial American newspapers published before 1760, a project of unprecedented scope. This book will identify rhetorical patterns in newspaper reports of African American experience and identity, providing a linguistic baseline against which the modulations and flourishes of Equiano and later slave narratives can be measured. Transcriptions of the materials related to slavery in these newspapers will subsequently be published in a searchable database accessible to the general public.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FA-232362-16

Barbara Ellen Mann
Jewish Theological Seminary of America (New York, NY 10027-4649)

The Object of 20th-Century Jewish Literature: A Material History

A book-length study of the material qualities of texts and literary depictions of objects in modern Jewish literature.

My project reads 20th-century Jewish literature through the lens of material culture, analyzing the material qualities of texts, the depiction of things, and discourse about materiality during a period shaped by migration, the Shoah and social, political upheaval. Examining how transition and rupture have refashioned Jewish textuality as material culture will enrich our sense of literature's complex relation to its physical surroundings. Jewish writing emerges from a culture whose theological tradition has an ambivalent relation to embodied forms such as idols. Thus Jewish writing is an ideal forum for exploring how literature deploys objects as emblems of ideas and emotions, and how books may function as things. Treating a wide variety of genres, a material analysis of Jewish writing will sharpen our understanding of how secular culture is indebted to traditional religious forms. Moving beyond language and place, my material reading suggests new, transnational models of identity.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Jewish Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232383-16

Julia Viglione Douthwaite
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)

Worrying about Money in France: The Art and Literature of Financial Crisis, from Regency to Restoration

A book-length study of how 18th- and 19th-century French cultural expressions responded to economic crises in France between 1720 and 1820.
 

French literature has received a lot of attention lately from an unexpected public: economists. Nineteenth-century novels have particular appeal for economists seeking information on the wealth needed to frequent the elite of the 1820s, or the harsh consequences of bankruptcy laws. But the 1720s were actually more important for the history of finance than the 1820s. They saw the rise and fall of the Law System, which caused the first boom and bust in asset prices and left a long shadow over the years ahead. I argue that the Law System impacted an entire corpus of artifacts that I seek to study and combine in a new narrative of financial calamity. My book addresses how novelists, artists, and journalists kept fears of credit and borrowing in the air at four crucial moments: 1) during and after Law's system (1718-31); 2) during the early Revolution when the assignat was created 1789-91); 3) in the Directory period (1795-99); and (4) during the reign of Louis XVIII (1815-24).

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; European History; French Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FA-232411-16

William John Mitchell, PhD
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)

Seeing Madness: Insanity, Media, and Visual Culture

The writing of a book on how a range of media informs understandings of mental illness.

The mentally ill constitute one of the fastest growing underprivileged minorities in advanced societies today, suffering from a range of disabilities that seem to grow even faster than the number of pharmacological “cures” that are developed to treat them. I propose to write a book entitled “Seeing Madness: Insanity, Media, and Visual Culture,” re-framing the question of mental illness in relation to its representations in the arts, media, and visual culture. Madness, I will argue, should not be “seen as” a simple physical or even psychological disability, but as a complex set of intersubjective and social syndromes that range across individual and collective pathologies. My account will accordingly be designed as a counterpoint between a “big picture” of madness in relation to its long history of representations, and the singular case of an artist and filmmaker who suffered from schizophrenia, and whose lifetime project was to make madness visible both from inside and outside.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232416-16

David W. Tell
University of Kansas, Lawrence (Lawrence, KS 66045-7505)

Emmett Till, Geography, and the Rhetoric of Place

A book-length study on the rhetoric of, and geography surrounding, the murder, trial, and memory of Emmett Till.
 

In August 1955, fourteen-year-old Emmett Till was tortured and murdered for whistling at a white woman in the Mississippi Delta. The murder has been a staple of American public memory. In the sixty years since Till's murder, only eight years have passed without the case being covered by the New York Times. Scaling Emmett Till uses the constant commemorations of Emmett Till to explore the intersections among race, geography, and memory. It does so by foregrounding the geographic variables in Till’s murder. This book project focuses on the contested murder site, sixty years of inconsistent maps, and, above all, the various geographic regions through which Till’s murder has been given meaning: the state of Mississippi, the Mississippi Delta, and Tallahatchie County. It argues that as the scale of his murder has shifted from the state to the Delta to the county, the basic geographic facts of the case have been altered and the role of race has been called into question.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FA-232431-16

Sumarsam Sumarsam
Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)

Expressing and Contesting Java-Islam through Performing Arts in Indonesia

Preparation of a book on Islam and the performing arts in Indonesia.

Religion and culture are intrinsically linked. As they travel around the world, they create transcultural practices and perspectives manifested in both spiritual and artistic domains. In Indonesia, the performing arts serve as one of the major venues for this blending of beliefs and practices. This study will yield a book-length monograph that examines discourses of transculturalism, the performing arts, and Islam among the Javanese, the largest cultural group in the largest Muslim country in the world. Stemming back to the 15th century, Indonesia’s long process of Islamization has given rise to rich variations in the content and context of the performing arts, such as wayang shadow puppetry and gamelan music. Ultimately, this study aims to address the history and diversity of both traditional and popular Indonesian Muslim expression, while unpacking Indonesia’s modern sociocultural and religious development.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-232445-16

Eric Calderwood
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61820-5711)

The Memory of Al-Andalus and Spanish Colonialism in Morocco, 1859-1956

A book-length study on how Spanish and Moroccan writers used the history of al-Andalus (medieval Muslim Iberia) as a framework for understanding Spanish colonialism in Morocco (1859-1956).

My book explores how Spanish and Moroccan writers used the history of al-Andalus (medieval Muslim Iberia) as a framework for understanding Spanish colonialism in Morocco (1859-1956). During the colonial period, Spanish writers revived the historical memory of al-Andalus in order to justify Spain’s colonial projects in Morocco. Moroccan nationalists appropriated the Spanish celebration of al-Andalus and repurposed it as a tool of anti-colonial resistance. Thus, the Spanish insistence on Morocco’s Andalusian legacy, which had served as a justification for Spanish colonialism, sowed the seeds of the Moroccan national culture that would supplant colonial rule. My book illuminates the surprising intersections of Spanish colonial discourse and Moroccan nationalist discourse, and it also highlights how the historical memory of al-Andalus has been used to structure debates about Europe’s evolving relationship with the Muslim world.
 

Project fields:
Arabic Literature; Comparative Literature; Spanish Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232463-16

Lori J. Walters
Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)

The Books of Christine de Pizan (1365-ca. 1431)

A book-length study of French author Christine de Pizan (1365-ca.1431), including her position as court writer and producer of works in her manuscript workshop.

My study presents Christine de Pizan (1365-ca.1431) as the first nonreligious female public intellectual. If we have acknowledged her importance as a writer, we have not understood the significance of her role as supervisor of her own, eminently prolific scriptorium, which produced an astonishing 54 manuscripts. I approach Christine through the optic of her workshop's tour de force, MS Harley 4431. She authored its 30 texts, transcribed some or all of them in her own hand, and oversaw the execution of its extensive iconographic cycle. I will show how she used her position of authority as a bulwark against the time's rabid antifeminism and as a platform to address matters crucial to the proper functioning of the French body politic. Her genius was to grasp the necessity of controlling the means of production to ensure that her voice be heard as she intended. My project contributes not only to studies of the material book, but speaks to a host of other humanistic issues.

Project fields:
French Literature; Medieval Studies; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232475-16

Victoria W. Wolcott
SUNY Research Foundation, University at Buffalo (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)

The Utopian Strain in the Long Civil Rights Movement

A book-length study of the long civil rights movement.

"Living in the Future: The Utopian Strain in the Long Civil Rights Movement" explores the contributions intentional utopian communities that practiced interracialism, cooperative economics, and nonviolence made to the long civil rights movement. As early as the 1920s there were significant experiments in interracial communalism at labor colleges, folk schools, and urban and rural cooperatives. By the 1940s members of the Congress of Racial Equality and the Fellowship of Reconciliation living in interracial utopian communities began to actively train activists in radical nonviolence. By living cooperatively and communally they were creating a new reality that would serve as a model for civil rights activists. More pragmatically, these communities’ members trained activists and created real change in the economic and political fortunes of African Americans. Their vision of a future with full racial equality and economic justice fueled the utopian strain in the long civil rights movement.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FA-232503-16

Alexis McCrossen
Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX 75205)

A History of New Year's Observances in the United States, 1800-2000

A book-length study of the history of New Year’s observances in the United States.

I seek a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to support the completion of a book-length manuscript about the history of New Year's observances in the United States titled "Resolutions and Revelry." The book moves from the first years of the republic to the millennial events of 2000, highlighting how the turning point in the calendar promised a fresh beginning, the hopes for which were, in turn, aimed at renewing faith in democracy and individual promise. The three parts of the book focus on the White House New Year’s Day reception hosted annually between 1800 and 1932; watch-night services and other celebrations associated with freedom held since December 31, 1862 when African-Americans and abolitionists waited for the stroke of midnight; and the festivities characterizing Times Square since the first ball drop in 1908. Recovering New Year’s celebrations over time is a dramatic way to study the impact of democracy and modernity on American society and culture.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 4/30/2017


FA-232505-16

Barbara Milewski, PhD
Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390)

Hidden in Plain View: The Music of Holocaust Survival in Poland's First Postwar Feature Film

Preparation of the first authoritative English translation and article-length study of Forbidden Songs (screenplay by Holocaust survivor Ludwik Starski), the first feature film released in Poland after World War II.

My scholarship illuminates a hidden story of Jewish survival during the Holocaust embedded in the first feature film released in Poland after WWII. Forbidden Songs, a light musical comedy based on satirical street songs that were banned by the Nazis, is replayed annually in Poland as a commemorative symbol of national resilience. Yet within the larger context of this work that celebrates the abiding pluck and wit of Poles lies a subtler message, told through the music, about the experience of the screenwriter, Ludwik Starski, a Polish Jew who survived in hiding during the War. Relying on archival sources and interviews with those who knew the film’s creator, I will produce the first comprehensive analysis of the film's music. In addition to publishing my research, I will create the first authoritative English translation of the film and its songs, ensuring that both researchers and the general public outside of Poland have access to a significant treasure of heritage cinema.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
European History; Film History and Criticism; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FA-232523-16

Hugh Howard Benson
University of Oklahoma, Norman (Norman, OK 73019-3003)

Plato's Maieutic Method: Inquiry in Plato's "Theaetetus"

A book-length study on Plato’s dialogue Theaetetus.

I propose a fresh reading of the "Theaetetus"—one of Plato's most influential and sophisticated dialogues. Despite appearances Plato does not return to an earlier form of dialectic depicted in dialogues like the "Euthyphro", "Laches", "Charmides", and "Protagoras" which conclude with the various interlocutors' recognition of their ignorance—their aporia. Rather, Plato depicts in the "Theaetetus" a form of dialectic which follows upon this aporia and which he has developed in the "Meno", "Phaedo", and "Republic". The "Theaetetus" thus depicts the method by which Plato recommends that we and his interlocutors are to acquire the knowledge we have recognized that we lack. Such a reading enhances our understanding of Plato's method of philosophical inquiry developed in the "Meno", "Phaedo", and "Republic", deepens our understanding of the arguments in the "Theaetetus", and looks forward to the method of inquiry displayed in the "Sophist", for example, in Aristotle, and beyond.

Project fields:
Classical Languages; Classics; History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232527-16

Jill Robbins
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)

We Were All on Those Trains: Poetry and the March 2004 Madrid Train Bombing

Completion of a book-length study of the poetry written in response to the March 11, 2004, train bombings in Madrid, Spain.

We Were All on Those Trains: The Poetry of 11-M examines the poetic texts that responded to the March 11, 2004, train bombings in Madrid, Spain, that were left at the spontaneous shrines erected at the bombing sites, published in books, newspapers and anthologies, incorporated into monuments, stored in the Archive of Mourning and/or posted on blogs and other electronic forums. There are literally thousands of these poetic texts, including original poems and books written by well-known and anonymous Iberian and Latin American poets; a novel by a US poet; poems by mourners; songs and prayers; and texts by children. These texts reveal competing notions about the nature and functions of poetry in Spain today, and they serve as a prism to make visible conflicting narratives about identities, technology, genres, and modernity dating back to the Spanish Civil War and the Franco dictatorship, which lay just below the city’s gleaming surface in 2004.
 

Project fields:
Literature, General; Literature, Other; Spanish Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 2/28/2018


FA-232534-16

Barbara J. Skinner
Indiana State University, Terre Haute (Bloomington, IN 47401-8032)

Religious Conversion, Culture, and Identity in Russia’s Western Borderlands, 1800-1855

A book-length study on the consequences and impact of the forced mass conversions of Greek Catholics from Belarus and Ukraine to Russian Orthodoxy in 1839.

The year 1839 witnessed the largest mass conversion in the history of the Russian Empire, as 1.5 million Greek Catholics became Eastern Orthodox, with profound long-term implications for the cultural orientation and political loyalties in Eastern Europe. This study delves into multinational archives to assess the day-to-day experience of transforming parish material and liturgical culture, the impact of changes in religious education, and tensions expressed on all sides before, during, and after the conversion in eight Belarusian and Ukrainian provinces. It examines how both imperial officials and Belarusian and Ukrainian subjects adapted to the demands of each other with a variety of local results, challenging our understanding of Belarusian, Ukrainian, and Russian imperial identity development. In doing so, it offers a valuable contribution to European religious history and a deeper understanding of the cultural divisions that continue to shape contemporary events in the region.

Participating institutions:
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (, ) - Applicant/Grantee
Indiana State University, Terre Haute (Terre Haute, IN) - Participating institution

Project fields:
Area Studies; Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232540-16

Jennifer Anne Saltzstein
University of Oklahoma, Norman (Norman, OK 73019-3003)

Medieval Learning and Vernacular Music: The Songs of the Cleric-Trouvères

Preparation of a monograph on the history of 13th-century French songs and the rise of vernacular languages.

In the thirteenth century, Old French first emerged from the shadow of Latin as a language suitable for documentation, literature, and transmitting knowledge. My book, Medieval Learning and Vernacular Music: The Songs of the Cleric-Trouvères, demonstrates that by positing their vernacular songs as worthy of study, emulation, and preservation in writing, educated composers (cleric-trouvères) were central to the cultural legitimization of Old French. Through a cross-generic, interdisciplinary examination of vernacular musical and poetic genres, this book shows how medieval clerics fused scholastic writing methods with contemporary vernacular song traditions, elevating vernacular expression. The book expands our histories of song, languages, literature, and the university, and places the rise of Old French in a trans-historical and global context as one of many cases in which the vernacular has challenged, amalgamated, or even upended languages of cultural dominance and power.

Project fields:
French Language; Medieval Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232542-16

Ellen Lewin
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)

Traditional Spiritual Practices and the LGBT Community In a Black Pentecostal Church Coalition

An ethnographic study on the experiences of black LGBT Pentecostals who belong to the Fellowship of Affirming Ministries.

The proposed project will cover the final writing up phase of a six-year study of the Fellowship of Affirming Ministries, a coalition of predominantly black, LGBT, Pentecostal churches located across the United States. The group uniquely embraces worshippers otherwise excluded from full participation in black churches, but who ardently seek a collective spiritual experience in an expressive worship setting, as well as a way to reaffirm their connection with the black church, a foundational African American community institution. Filled With the Spirit is an ethnography focused on personal narratives by church leaders and lay members, on analysis of liturgical language, testimonies, and other ritual expression, and on how these spiritual experiences facilitate members’ choices of “ministries” to carry out in their churches and communities. The book focuses on a largely neglected aspect of anthropological studies of religion and LGBT studies in anthropology (and other disciplines).

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Gender Studies; Religion, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FA-232547-16

Suzanne R. Westfall
Lafayette College (Easton, PA 18042-7625)

Records of Early English Drama: Northumberland

Archival research on the history of early drama in Northumberland, England, as part of the Records of Early English Drama series.
 

I seek a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship in order to continue my research in primary source documents for performances in Northumberland, England, from the earliest surviving manuscript evidence to the closing of the theaters by Parliament in 1642. The Records of Early English Drama (REED) Project has commissioned me to make a thorough search, to gather and edit all extant primary source documentary evidence of drama, minstrelsy, performance and public ceremony in England before 1642 from the private collections and public records offices throughout Northumberland, in archives that maintained an economic or political relationship with civic authorities or patrons in Northumberland, and in repositories to which records have been transferred. In addition to scholarly papers and articles that will be prepared throughout the course of this project, the end products will include the final hard copy volume of the REED series and a digital version of the Northumberland records.

Project fields:
British History; Music History and Criticism; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FA-232597-16

Gabriel Said Reynolds
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)

God of Vengeance and Mercy: On the Qur'an's Theology in Relation to Jewish and Christian Tradition

A book-length study of the interplay between vengeance and mercy in the Qur'an and its roots in Judaism and Christianity.

The Qur'an describes its God as a "possessor of revenge" (dhu l-intiqam) and relates numerous accounts of God's vengeance against those who refuse to believe in God and God's messengers. At the same time the Qur'an insists that God is merciful, indeed that God's mercy "encompasses all things" (Q 7:156). In this book project I will discuss the way in which this interplay between vengeance and mercy in the Qur'an has roots in Jewish and Christian discussions of the "God of vengeance" (Psalm 94:1). In light of this discussion I will examine how later Muslim commentators understand the notion of God's right to avenge himself and in particular the question of when and why God forgoes that right in order to show mercy, even on unbelievers. I will emphasize in the conclusion how certain currents of Islamic theological thought see the mysteriousness of divine mercy as an argument against militant activism.

Project fields:
History of Religion

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FA-232617-16

Lise-Ségolène Schreier
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)

The Gifting of African and South Asian Children in 18th- and 19th-Century France

Completion of a book-length study of the practice of giving African and South Asian children as gifts to affluent women in 18th- and 19th-century France.

This book project follows the changes in French textual and iconographic representations of dark-skinned children used as gifts, pets and fashion accessories over the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. These texts and images often echoed actual cases of toddlers who were purchased or kidnapped in Senegal, Algeria, India, and the Ottoman Empire to be offered as travel souvenirs to upper-class French women. They also tell a troubling story about how the slave trade, its abolition, and the changing nature of the French Empire shaped French ideals of femininity between the 1780s and the end of the Belle Époque. Notably, these child-gifts and their fictional counterparts helped grant femininity a new political weight by using its traditional modes of beauty, charity, and maternity to link women to France’s increasingly global commercial and political presence.

Project fields:
Cultural History; French Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FA-232632-16

Donald James Fader
University of Alabama School of Music (Tuscaloosa, AL 35405)

Italian Music in Louis XIV’s France: The Goûts-réunis, Noble Patronage Networks, and the Roots of the Musical Enlightenment

Preparation of a book on French music and patronage networks during the late reign of King Louis XIV (ca. 1685-1715).

This is a study of the social, intellectual, and musical implications of a mixed Italo-French musical idiom (the goûts-réunis) that emerged during the late reign of Louis XIV (ca. 1685-1715). This phenomenon brought an end to the dominance of a style established by Jean-Baptiste Lully as a touchstone of French "good taste" defined against Italian "extravagance." I propose a reevaluation of the period’s cultural history--heretofore seen as a product of the rise of a bourgeois public sphere--by documenting the critical role played by experiments with the Italian style among networks of princely patrons, their courtiers, and artistic clientèles. Their writings and scores reveal the goûts-réunis to be a tectonic shift in French musical language emphasizing the expressive effects of Italian harmonic techniques promoted as part of their broader artistic opposition to royal classicism, and an incubator for Enlightenment concepts of the sublime and the irrational in the arts.

Project fields:
European History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232633-16

Lisa H. Cooper
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53706-1314)

Ars Vivendi: The Poetics of Practicality in Late Medieval England

Completion of a book-length study on the relationship between medieval manuals of practical instruction and medieval English literature.
 

The late Middle Ages saw the creation of a vast syllabus of "how-to" books in English, works whose purpose was to help their readers to do something or to make something tangible in the world beyond the page: cookbooks, calendars, hunting manuals, and more. This project reveals the many intersections of these medieval "arts of living" with the more frequently studied forms of medieval "literary" fictions. It takes explicitly practical writings seriously in their own right, arguing that the Middle Ages show us how to imagine a world in which the aesthetically pleasing and the technically proficient, the beautiful and the necessary, need not just warily coexist but might rather mutually enrich one another. The project joins ongoing scholarly conversations about material culture, animal studies, ecocriticism, and the history of the book, and contributes to discussions about the role of the humanities both then and now.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
British Literature; Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232643-16

Lynn M. Voskuil
University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)

Horticulture and Imperialism: The Garden Spaces of the British Empire, 1789-1914

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the historical and literary relationship between British gardens and imperialism during the long 19th century.

"Horticulture and Imperialism: The Garden Spaces of the British Empire, 1789-1914" is an interdisciplinary book manuscript that explores the role of horticulture in shaping the imperial and ecological ambitions of nineteenth-century Britain. Significant for its attention to the collaborative concerns of empire and environmental studies, this project traces the effects of imperialist perspective on garden design and on the discovery and cultivation of non-native plants for British landscapes. At the same time, it shows how plants themselves, especially exotic specimens with aggressive habits of growth, attenuated the cultural confidence in imperial power by challenging the human expectation of dominance and mastery over the environment. By focusing on horticulture, this study addresses the ideas of both empire and environment as humanist paradigms, reconfiguring our knowledge not only of gardens but also of the concepts of nature and culture that gave rise to them.

Project fields:
British Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


FA-232662-16

Enrique R. Rodriguez-Alegria
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)

The Material Worlds of 16th-Century Colonial Mexico City

The writing of a book on the material culture of 16th-century Mexico City.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Latin American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232675-16

Nina Ariane Rowe
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)

The World in a Book: Weltchroniken and Society at the End of the Middle Ages

The completion of a book-length study on German medieval World Chronicle manuscripts and an interpretation of their illustrations.

This study will be the first comprehensive account of illuminated World Chronicle manuscripts and their relationship to the tastes and preoccupations of urban audiences in an era of growing middle class city life, from roughly 1330 to 1430. I investigate sixteen richly decorated manuscripts, filled with texts of a versified world chronicle, written in Middle High German, and adorned with illustrations. My book focuses on texts and images that evince a range of social preoccupations among late medieval city dwellers—commercial and political ambitions, skepticism about Christian religious practices, appreciation of artistic ingenuity, and ultimately the implications of the new technology of print. While most art historical considerations of the late medieval era consider sacred works, my project investigates the secular sphere.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Medieval History; Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232685-16

Michael Alex Wachtel
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)

A Biography of Viacheslav Ivanov (1866-1949), Russian Poet and Intellectual

A biography on the influential Russian poet and intellectual, Viacheslav Ivanov (1866-1949).

My project is to write the first biography ever of the poet and thinker Viacheslav Ivanov (1866-1949). Having studied Roman history in Berlin with Theodor Mommsen, classical archeology in Athens with Wilhelm Dörpfeld, and Sanskrit in Geneva with Ferdinand de Saussure, Ivanov returned to Russia in 1905 to become the guiding force behind the Russian Symbolist movement. Every poet of the time knew his work and valued his judgment. But beyond the poets, Ivanov profoundly influenced people as diverse as Vsevelod Meyerhold (the theater director), Aleksandr Skriabin (the composer), Nikolai Berdiaev (the philosopher) and Mikhail Bakhtin (the scholar). After emigration in 1924 he found a new circle of interlocutors including Martin Buber, Benedetto Croce, E.R. Curtius, Gabriel Marcel, and Jacques Maritain. My approach to Ivanov's life is not simply to tell the fascinating story of his intellectual development, but to do so against the background of the tumultuous era in which he lived.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FA-232741-16

Carolina López-Ruiz
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)

Phoenician Networks in the Mediterranean from Greece to Iberia, ca. 700-500 BCE

A book-length study on the impact of Phoenician traders and colonists in the Mediterranean region during the late Iron Age, from about 700-500 BCE.

Between the eighth and early sixth centuries BCE, flourishing cultures from Greece, Italy, and Iberia engaged in a process of contact and adaptation of Near Eastern styles and technologies known as the "orientalizing" phase or "orientalizing revolution." These include tangible as well as non-material cultural capital (literacy among them). The Phoenicians in particular, in their mercantile and colonial expansion in this period, were crucial agents in this story of encounters, offering and exploiting the "oriental" models of the urban, sophisticated, complex societies of the Near East. This novel monograph will offer the first systematic, comparative treatment of this transformative period across the Mediterranean, focusing on the process through which Iron Age societies entered the first transnational cultural and economic network. It will also call into question our stark, artificial historical division between "classical" and Semitic cultures and their respective civilizing roles.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology; Classics

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232749-16

Christine C. Shepardson
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37996-0001)

A Memory of Violence: The Radicalization of Religious Difference in the Middle East (431-750 CE)

The writing of a book-length history of the origins of the anti-Chalcedonian Christian tradition in the context of religious conflict.

Religious violence flared up in the eastern Mediterranean as the controversy surrounding the Council of Chalcedon (451 CE) became sharply politicized, leaving the church permanently divided in schism to this day. The early history of this Chalcedonian conflict and its crystallization into permanent schism is the subject of my third book, which will argue that the writings of 5th- and 6th-century Syriac-speaking church leaders constructed a shared memory of persecution and resistance that equipped their anti-Chalcedonian Christian community to survive decades of imperial hostility. This study will newly integrate Syriac and Greek sources through the lens of memory studies and recent studies on religious violence. Such analysis will shed new light on this historical example of religious conflict, radicalization, and schism, while making the mechanics of these processes more visible as our world struggles to understand and respond to new religious conflicts in the region today.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Religion, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232782-16

Tore Carl Olsson
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37996-0001)

The Shared Struggle to Remake the U.S. and Mexican Countryside in the 20th Century

A book-length study of the interaction between U.S. and Mexican efforts to modernize agriculture in the 1930s and 1940s, and their influence on the attempt to modernize Third World agriculture during the Cold War.

During the 1930s and 1940s, government and civil society in the United States and Mexico waged unprecedented campaigns to remake their countrysides in the name of agrarian justice and agricultural productivity. This book project examines how those campaigns were intertwined and forged in dialogue with one another. It examines key historical moments – the Mexican Revolution and its push for land reform, the New Deal's agrarian program, and the global "Green Revolution" to promote scientific agriculture – and unshackles them from the separate national frameworks to which they are frequently bound. In doing so, the book reveals that the rural histories of the United States and Mexico share far more than is often imagined.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; Latin American History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2016 – 1/31/2017


FA-232786-16

Breandán Aodh Mac Suibhne
Centenary College, New Jersey (Hackettstown, NJ 07840)

At the Famine Pot: A Whispered History of Ireland's Great Hunger, 1845-1851

Preparation of a book length study of the various ways the poor experienced and responded to the Irish Famine (1845-1851).

Studies of Ireland’s Great Famine (1845–51) have been burdened by a preoccupation with what was done to and for the poor—by the state, landlords and charities. Here, innovative recent writing on the Famine (and famine generally) informs a new approach, which directs attention to what the poor did to and for each other. Hence, the focus is on a) agency—protests by the poor, and practical self-help endeavors; b) poor-on-poor violence, theft, the unequal allocation of food within families, and also cannibalism; c) accommodation, including 'souperism,' conversion to obtain food from evangelicals; and d) exploitation of the poor by people who were not themselves much better off. Central to the book are accounts of the Famine collected from survivors and their children. As such, it is a 'whispered history,' attentive to that of which the poor spoke, albeit quietly, and it bears comparison to recent work on China’s Great Famine (Zhou Xun) and reflections on ethics in extremis (Primo Levi).

Project fields:
Economic History; European History; Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232791-16

Suzy Kim
Rutgers University, New Brunswick (New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8559)

Women Behind the Iron Curtain: A Cultural History of North Korea

Research leading to publication of a scholarly article and book on the role of women and the significance of gender in North Korea during the Cold War.

This project examines the role of women and the significance of gender in North Korea during the Cold War. Rather than duplicating histories of the Cold War as a masculine battle of political acumen, this research emphasizes the affective dimensions of power and dominance of feminine tropes as key to understanding North Korea. Women proved to be the primary cultural icons, and feminine tropes became models for emulation throughout society. If the construction of modern citizenship has always been a gendered process of delineating appropriate masculine and feminine roles in service of the state, this project explores how North Korean women (and men) were mobilized throughout the Cold War as sacrificial mothers. While there are parallel sacrificial women in other contexts, North Korean developments were unprecedented in the ascription of motherhood to men to create a new model of militarized citizenship that was at once masculine and feminine, drawing on transnational Cold War cultures.

Project fields:
Cultural History; East Asian History; Gender Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232797-16

Joan Weiner
Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)

The Significance of Gottlob Frege's Language for Science

A book reinterpreting Gottlob Frege's philosophy for application to epistemology, logic, and the sciences.

It is difficult to overstate Frege’s importance for contemporary analytic philosophy. He is widely taken to be among the first to see the importance of giving a theory of the workings of language and his work is the source of fundamental contributions to this project. But, I have argued, something is amiss in this story: it attributes views to Frege that conflict with many of his actual statements. I have argued that Frege’s writings on language were meant as contributions to a different project: that of showing that the truths of arithmetic belong to logic. And, I have argued, it follows that his actual views about language are different from those typically attributed to him. But are these unfamiliar views of purely antiquarian interest? I think they are not. I propose to argue that these views cast new light on a number of contemporary issues, including puzzles about mathematical knowledge and numbers, puzzles about vagueness and problems with the notion of natural kinds.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; Philosophy of Language; Philosophy of Science

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232806-16

Michael A. Tueller
Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)

New Edition and Translation of Greek Epigrammatic Poetry

The completion of volume 3 of the Loeb Classical Library series of the Greek Anthology, a critical edition and translation of ancient Greek epigrammatic poetry.

My project is a new edition and revised translation of The Greek Anthology for the Loeb Classical Library. The Anthology is a collection of more than four thousand ancient Greek epigrams dating from the 6th century BCE to the 6th century CE. The current edition most in use by English speakers is now a century old, and scholarship has advanced considerably. Greek epigram provides the ancient seeds both of European love elegy and of the species of wit still known as “epigram.” Less known, but equally important, are epigram’s exploration of death and memorialization, and its intense and complex engagement with material culture: epigram began as inscribed poetry, and it continues to reflect on objects even as its own genre becomes exclusively textual. Finally, The Greek Anthology provides an opportunity unique in antiquity to trace minutely the evolution of a genre over a thousand years. An up-to-date edition and accessible translation will be invaluable to scholars and the general reader.

Project fields:
Classical Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-232808-16

Trysh Travis
University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)

Reading Matter: Books, Bookmen, and the Creation of Mid-Century American Liberalism, 1930-1980

A book-length history of American trade book publishing in the mid-20th century.

Reading Matters is a cultural and literary history of American trade book publishing, which unfolds on three levels. At its most basic, it is an institutional history, examining the publishing industry's efforts to modernize its rather Victorian business practices and align them with the new media and policy landscape taking shape at mid-century. Against this backdrop, it explores the professional identity of the publishers who liked to call themselves "bookmen," and charts their struggles for cultural authority in an increasingly technocratic world. One way in which they bid for that authority was to cast themselves as stewards of democracy, using books and reading to safeguard the nation against the sinister illiberalisms of the period-- fascism, communism, and "the mass mind." This explication of the way publishers and publishing contributed to the distinctive liberal culture (and institutions) of the post-war US is the book's third and largest contribution.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-232827-16

Willard Sunderland
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH 45220-2872)

Russia and the World in the Age of Peter the Great

The completion of a book on the Eurasian dimensions of the Russian Empire during the reign of Peter the Great from 1696 to 1725.

Westernization is one of the supposedly settled questions of Russian history. According to the standard interpretation, old Muscovy was isolated and backward until Peter the Great (r.1696-1725) changed everything by turning the country towards Europe, leading in time to a dramatic reordering of Russian society, culture, and governance. My study offers an original reinterpretation of this critical moment of the Russian past. Rather than the turn to Europe, I argue that the great development of Peter's time was a new and wide-ranging engagement with the world, specifically with the societies of Eurasia and the Northern Pacific, all of which was profoundly influenced by the country's complexity as a sprawling, multiethnic empire. My contention is that it was this worldly transformation rather than westernization proper that ultimately had the greatest impact on Russia's modern experience.

Project fields:
History, General; Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232828-16

Ellen Muehlberger
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)

The Moment of Reckoning: Imagined Death in Early Christianity

A book-length history of changes in the understanding of death in 4th-century Christianity and its impact on the roots of religious violence.

A history of how in late antiquity Christians began to think of death as a terrifying, difficult experience followed by judgment and punishment, this book argues that the cultural changes that defined death as a moment of reckoning also facilitated the late ancient adoption of violence against others for ideological purposes.

Project fields:
Ancient History; History of Religion

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 4/30/2017


FA-232836-16

Paige Anne McGinley
Washington University (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)

Rehearsing Civil Rights: Practicing the Law, 1938-1965

A book-length study of the relationship of theater, performance, and the law during the civil rights movement.

Rehearsing Civil Rights explores performances of the law that were ubiquitous in the middle decades of the twentieth century. During this period, activists strategically tested de jure and de facto segregation at sit-ins; black lawyers performed both legal authority and legal subjectivity as they argued cases in the highest courts of the land; and artists such as James Baldwin wrote plays that explored nonviolent resistance and the category of the legal subject. This book brings the work of these activists, lawyers, and artists together under a common umbrella to explore the relationship between performance and the law from the dawn of the Popular Front (1934) to the close of the classical phase of the civil rights movement (1965). In its consideration of performances both on and off stage, this book emphasizes the contestation of legal segregation as a fundamentally embodied act as well as the significance of the law as it was lived, rather than as it was written.

Project fields:
African American History; American Studies; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-232860-16

Michael Rescorla
University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)

Bayesian Modeling of the Mind: Conceptual and Explanatory Foundations

Four articles on cognitive science and Bayesian modeling of the mind.

Illuminating how the mind works has been a central concern of humanistic research stretching back to Plato. I seek to advance this enterprise by analyzing Bayesian cognitive science, a scientific research program that models the mind using probabilities. My analysis hinges upon the mind’s capacity to represent the world. I will argue that Bayesian cognitive science assigns a central explanatory role to mental representation. Bayesian modeling reveals that core mental activities such as perception, action, and decision-making all crucially involve representational aspects of mentality. My analysis should advance our understanding of the mind by establishing that mental representation is an indispensable theoretical notion. As an illustrative case study, I will discuss Bayesian modeling of autism. My discussion of this case study should clarify some important points of similarity and difference between typically developing individuals and individuals with autism.

Project fields:
Philosophy of Science

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FA-232866-16

Yaron Ayalon
Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)

Autonomous and Integrated: Jewish Life in the Ottoman Empire

A book-length social history of the Ottoman Empire from the 16th through the 19th century, based on a study of Ottoman Jewish communities.

I am seeking NEH support in writing my second book. It will be a social history of the Ottoman Empire from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century explored through the prism of its Jewish communities and focusing on such issues such as leadership, taxation, literacy, charity, and inter-communal relations. The book will consider key and misunderstood questions in Ottoman Jewish historiography; further our understanding of Jewish-Muslim relations; and explore everyday life in the Ottoman Empire from new angles. It will be based mostly on primary sources from the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem and the Ottoman archives in Istanbul. I have already carried out most of the research and published some preliminary findings. I will complete a first draft of the entire manuscript during the fellowship year. The book will serve historians and students of the Middle East, Ottoman Empire, and Jewish-Muslim relations.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232872-16

Deborah Cosier Solomon
Auburn University at Montgomery (Montgomery, AL 36117-7088)

The Poem and the Garden: Rival Media in Early Modern England

A book-length study of the relationships between poetic craft and garden design in 16th- and 17th-century England.
 

This project explores how the major aesthetic conventions of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century poetry take shape through garden imagery. To place poetry in the garden and the garden in poetry was not just a reiteration of old metaphors; it represented a kind of decorum, a means of matching work to site in a way that could offer readers a rich array of multi-media allusions and varied (sometimes paradoxically varied) points of view. In order to demonstrate this aesthetic interchange between garden and lyric, the present study ranges through a number of generic spaces, from sixteenth-century plays and sonnet sequences to seventeenth-century pastoral modes. Drawing attention to the distinctively trans-media manifestations of garden and lyric art introduces new perspectives on the cultural value of form and its involvement in matters of genre, print technology, environment, and self-fashioning.

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232894-16

Victor M. Caston
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)

The Stoics on Mental Representation and Content

A book-length study on the Stoic philosophy of mind.

The early Stoics (late 4th–1st century BCE) developed an extensive theory of mental representation and content, which are the ultimate source of our contemporary discussions of propositional attitudes and mental representations. In this monograph, I show how their theory evolved from a response to Plato's theory of Forms into a systematic account of the mental states of animals and humans, based on close readings of the primary sources in the original language.

Project fields:
Classical Languages; History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232898-16

Gabriel P. Solis
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61820-5711)

Music, Race, and Indigeneity in Australia and Papua, New Guinea

Preparation of a book-length study of musical and cultural exchanges between African diasporic and indigenous musicians in Australia and Papua New Guinea, 19th century to the present.

The Black Pacific investigates the ongoing history of musical alliances and affiliations between Indigenous artists and activists in Australia and Papua New Guinea and their counterparts in the African Diaspora. From the Australasian tour of the Fisk Jubilee Singers in the 1890s to Snoop Dogg's visit to Brisbane in 2014, music has provided a hidden transcript of modernity in the region. Never previously seen as a unified history, in this project the musical lives of such communities as the multi-ethnic crews in pearl fishing fleets in the Coral Sea in the 1900s, Aborigines extending Marcus Garvey's Pan-African philosophy in the 1930s, and Melanesians calling for West Papuan independence today resonate through linkages across time and space. Using the register of singing voices and dancing bodies, this book charts the critical ways these Indigenous–Diasporic musical intersections have contributed to the trajectory of race and Indigeneity for more than a century.

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232901-16

Lorraine Smith Pangle
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)

Wisdom and Character: The Moral Foundations of Aristotelian Political Philosophy

A book-length study of the moral foundations of Aristotle's political philosophy.

I propose to complete a book on the relation between moral and intellectual virtue in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (NE). This study will make several important contributions to contemporary debates about Aristotle’s ethical thought and moral responsibility. First, it will show the unappreciated indebtedness of Aristotle’s moral theory to the Socratic thesis that virtue is knowledge; second, it will distinguish Aristotle’s theoretical and practical intentions and show how puzzles in the Nicomachean Ethics can be understood in light of his dual audience and complex purposes; third, it will bring his treatment of intellectual virtue (NE 6) to bear on his treatments of responsibility for character and action (NE 3 and 7) in a way that has not been done; and finally, it will draw on recent work across the fields of philosophy, classics, and political science to bring relevant contributions into fruitful dialogue with each other.

Project fields:
Classics; Ethics; Political Theory

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232928-16

Jennifer Louise Burns
Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)

An Intellectual Biography of American Economist Milton Friedman (1912-2006)

A biography of the economist Milton Friedman (1912-2006).

Project fields:
American Government; Intellectual History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 3/31/2018


FA-232931-16

Nicola Frances Denzey Lewis
Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-0001)

Against the Cult of the Saints: The Early Modern Invention of Late Antique Rome

A book-length history of the development of saint worship in early Christian Rome.

This grant application is to complete a book which challenges the common understanding of late antique Christianity as dominated by the Cult of the Saints. Popularized by historian Peter Brown, the Cult of the Saints presupposes that a "corporeal turn" in the 4th century CE initiated a new sense of the body (even the corpse or the bone) as holy. Against the Cult of the Saints: The Early Modern Invention of Late Antique Rome argues that although present elsewhere in the late Roman Empire, no such “corporeal turn” happened in Rome until the early modern period. The prevailing assumption that it did – fostered by the apologetic concerns of early modern Catholic scholars – has led us to gloss over important evidence to the contrary. This book delves deeper into the world of Roman late antique Christianity to explore how it differed from the set of practices and beliefs we have come to think flourished in this crucial age of Christianization.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Religion, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FA-232937-16

Gina Ann Herrmann
University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)

Voices of the Vanquished: Spanish Women of the Left between Franco and Hitler

Archival research for a book-length study of Spanish Republican women who resisted European fascism from the 1930s through the 1960s. 
 

Voices of the Vanquished is a book about Spanish and Catalan women’s oral histories that recount and grapple with their participation in anti-fascist movements in Spain during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), their fight against the dictatorship of Francisco Franco (1939-1975), their involvement in the French Resistance during World War II (1940-45), and for some, their survival of Nazism. The first three chapters of the book are written. NEH support would allow me to complete the last two chapters, comprising a section which brings the story of these women to their work in the French Resistance, and finally to Germany, at Ravensbrück. My project contributes to four areas of inquiry: the history of anti-totalitarian women’s movements in Europe; gendered violence against women political prisoners; oral history; and studies of identity as developed in response to intensely lived ideological affiliations.

Project fields:
European History; Gender Studies; Spanish Literature

Program: