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51 matches

Program: Institutes for College and University Teachers*
Date range: 2014-2016
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EH-250625-16

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter Hershock (Project Director: 02/12/2016 to present)

Islam in Asia: Traditions and Transformations

A four-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants, examining the history of Islam in Asia and its place in contemporary South and Southeast Asia, to be held on the adjacent campuses of the University of Hawaii and the East-West Center.

"Islam in Asia: Traditions and Transformations" will enable undergraduate educators to develop curricular content on Islam, including its origins in the Middle East, the history of its spread throughout South and Southeast Asia, and its place in contemporary Asia. Balancing the dual needs for breadth and depth in teaching and learning about traditions that are culturally and historically distant, this multidisciplinary four-week summer institute program will offer participants the context-rich engagement with key traditions, practices, and primary texts (in translation) needed to develop curricular materials applicable across a wide range of humanities disciplines, including religion, philosophy, history, art history and literature.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion; South Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$184,668 (approved)
$184,668 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250627-16

Community College Humanities Association (Baltimore, MD 21237-3899)
Laraine Fletcher (Project Director: 02/13/2016 to present)
George Scheper (Co Project Director: 08/09/2016 to present)

On Native Grounds: Studies of Native American Histories and the Land

A three-week institute for college and university teachers on Native American history, to be held at the Library of Congress.

Funding is requested for a Summer Institute for 22 higher education Summer Scholars, in residence at the Library of Congress, co-hosted by the Kluge Center, from June 12 - June 30, 2017. Ten Visiting Faculty will present their paradigm-shifting archival research on Native American ethnohistory, with focus on three crucial interaction regions: the Great Lakes, the Greater Southwest, and the Pacific Northwest. Work that has been in the forefront of scholarship in Native American Studies and that has been central as well to the transformation of scholarship in anthropology, American history, legal history, American Studies, and other humanities disciplines. This Institute also provides ample time for participants' individual research in the Library's rich and voluminous holdings in Native American history and culture. We will make a special outreach to seek applicants from tribal colleges, community colleges, small liberal arts colleges, and from contingent and adjunct faculty.

Project fields:
History, General; Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$156,054 (approved)
$156,054 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250784-16

Macalester College (St. Paul, MN 55105-1899)
James Laine (Project Director: 02/23/2016 to present)

Teaching the Religions of the World

A four-week college and university institute for thirty participants, exploring the difficulties of teaching about the religions of the world, to be held at Macalester College.

I am proposing a Summer Institute that concentrates on a tension in the comparative study of the religions. Students and teachers assume that such study should provide a certain basic literacy about the major traditions, from Buddhism and Hinduism to Islam and Christianity. Critical scholarship shows, however, that these traditions are not comparable species within the broader genus “religion.” Scholars have raised fundamental questions about how we use the word religion, and what we should emphasize in studying a variety of traditions. Reflection on this tension between “teaching the basics” and raising important theoretical critiques will be the heart of the Institute, and we will build a website to archive useful strategies for teachers across the nation to use in the future.

Project fields:
History of Religion

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$163,427 (approved)
$163,427 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250787-16

Kent State University Main Campus (Kent, OH 44242-0001)
Francoise Massardier Kenney (Project Director: 02/23/2016 to present)

What is Gained in Translation: Learning How to Read Translated Texts

A three-week institute for thirty faculty on literature in translation as a means of enhancing cross-cultural understanding.

The three-week summer institute, What is Gained in Translation: Learning How to Read Translated Texts, is dedicated to the study of literature in translation as a way to develop cross-cultural literacy. It focuses on features of translated literary texts that distinguish them from texts that are written and read in the same language in order to explore the complexities involved in cross-cultural communication. Informed by discussions of contemporary translation scholarship, participants will consider translated texts not as mere copies of an original, but as versions that provide points of access to the source culture as it is shaped both by the translator’s voice and the receiving culture’s beliefs and practices. The Institute’s mission is to provide participants with the resources necessary to engage with the unique issues posed by translated texts and to enable them to use translated texts more knowledgeably in their classrooms and their research.

Project fields:
Comparative Languages

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$174,711 (approved)
$174,711 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250795-16

Oregon State University (Corvallis, OR 97331-8565)
Joseph Krause (Project Director: 02/23/2016 to present)

Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia: The Voices of Women in Literature, Cinema, and Other Arts since Independence

A three-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants, exploring the significance of the contributions made by women artists in Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia since these countries achieved independence, to be held at Oregon State University.

The purpose of this institute is to offer college and university teachers a three-week forum to explore the significance of some of the major women writers, artists, and film makers who have contributed to the formative periods that have marked Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia since decolonization.

Project fields:
Arabic Language; Comparative Literature; French Language

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$182,138 (approved)
$182,138 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250809-16

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Richard Talbert (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Migration and Empire: The Roman Experience From Marcus Aurelius to Muhammad

A four-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants, on migration and the Roman Empire, to be held at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

This Institute for college teachers examines two interlocking phenomena against the background of todays headlines: the experience of migration, a subject of concern to historians and experts in many other disciplines, and the Roman Empire in the period during which it shrank from its greatest extent on three continents to becoming no more than a regional power in the eastern Mediterranean.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Area Studies; Medieval History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$170,971 (approved)
$170,971 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250814-16

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47401-3654)
Ibrahim Sahin (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Beyond East and West: the Early Modern World, 1400-1800

A three-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants, examining the history of the early modern world, to be held at Indiana University.

This summer institute focuses on the history of the globe between 1400 and 1800 CE. Our goal is to stimulate interest in this critical period, help college teachers integrate global history into their teaching and research, and thus contribute to a diversity of content in the classroom. We are now increasingly aware of living in a global environment through the circulation of global cultural artifacts (ethnic food, modern art, music, literature, movies) as well as our exposure to global problems (the deterioration of nature, refugee crises, global market volatility). In order to better understand the implications of these developments, it is crucial to rethink their origins in the so-called early modern period. The institute will revisit the 1400-1800 period through the lens of cultural exchange, human interaction, and the movement of people and objects. It will do so by bringing together the experiences of European as well as non-European societies.

Project fields:
History, General; International Studies; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$164,355 (approved)
$164,355 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250819-16

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Liesl Olson (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Making Modernism: Literature and Culture in Twentieth-Century Chicago, 1893-1955

A four-week institute for college and university teachers to study modernist literary and artistic expression through the collections of the Newberry Library and various sites in Chicago.

The Newberry proposes a 4-week NEH summer institute that will explore Chicago’s contribution to the modernist movement, with particular attention given to literature. The institute will begin with the persistent cultural resonances of the 1893 World’s Fair and will end with mid-century representations of African-American experiences in literature and the visual arts. The institute aims for an inclusive and expansive history of modernist literature and art in Chicago across racial lines. Four themes will be emphasized: the geographic uniqueness of Chicago as both a Midwestern and international hub; the historically overlooked women in Chicago who built the city’s literary and cultural infrastructure; the connections between the “literary renaissance” of the 1910s and early 1920s and the Chicago Black Renaissance; and modernism’s distinctive production and reception history in Chicago. Participants will engage the Newberry’s vast collections and the experience of the city itself.

Project fields:
American Literature; Art History and Criticism; Urban Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$196,839 (approved)
$196,839 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250823-16

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Donald Lopez (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Rethinking Area Studies Through the Modern Asian Novel

A four-week college and university institute for thirty participants, on understanding Asia through the reading of Asian novels, to be held at the University of Michigan.

The institute will trace the history of the Humanities’ role in Asian Studies in the past and offer new perspectives for the critical and comparative study of Asia in the future. What role can the Humanities play in advancing new models for understanding Asia? What critical resources can the Humanities of the new millennium marshal toward this endeavor, beyond those offered by philology and the social sciences? The participants of the institute will consider these questions and seek answers to them through a critical reexamination of the history of Asian Studies in the American academy over the twentieth century, through its evolution from Oriental Studies to Area Studies to Cultural Studies. It will anchor that reexamination in the history of interpretation and pedagogy surrounding the modern Asian novel.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Literature; South Asian Literature

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$207,688 (approved)
$196,470 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2018


EH-250825-16

Community College Humanities Association (Baltimore, MD 21237-3899)
Sandra Petrulionis (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Transcendentalism and Reform in the Age of Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller

A two-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to study the major figures of Transcendentalism: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Thoreau, and Margaret Fuller.

The Community College Humanities Association requests funds for an NEH Summer Institute on “Transcendentalism and Reform in the Age of Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller” for 25 college, university, and community college faculty. Directed by Sandra Harbert Petrulionis (Penn State University, Altoona), the Institute will be held in Concord, Massachusetts, from June 18 through July 1, 2017, and features ten eminent scholars, including two recent recipients of the Pulitzer Prize for Biography: Phyllis Cole, Robert Gross, Megan Marshall, John Matteson Joel Myerson, Wesley T. Mott, Lance Newman, Melissa Pennell, Sandra Harbert Petrulionis, and Laura Dassow Walls. Housed at the historic Concord Colonial Inn, NEH Summer Scholars will have extensive research opportunities at the Concord Free Public Library, the Concord Museum, the Henley Library at the Thoreau Institute, and the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston.

Project fields:
American Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$129,838 (approved)
$129,838 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250827-16

University of Washington (Seattle, WA 98105-6613)
Thaisa Way (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)
Richard Watts (Co Project Director: 09/01/2016 to present)

City/Nature: Urban Environmental Humanities

A three-week institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on urban environmental humanities.

This three-week NEH Summer Institute will explore the manifold consequences of the two historical trajectories – the duality of city and nature and the rise of what has become called urban nature – in the context of the urban environmental humanities. Intended for college and university faculty, the Institute will explore the emerging landscape of the urban environmental humanities as it informs both scholarship and teaching. In support of the NEH Common Good initiative, the study of this urbanized world around us should also inform how humanists address the challenges and opportunities of the 21st Century.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Literature, Other; Urban History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$179,256 (approved)
$179,256 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250874-16

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3846)
Henry Gates (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

What Happened to the Civil Rights Movement?

A four-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university faculty members on the civil rights movement in the United States.

"What Happened to the Civil Rights Movement?" is organized around new and recent scholarship on the history of the African American-based struggles for citizenship and justice. The program aims to work with college teachers in identifying major themes, questions, and approaches to the history of the Civil Rights Movement as well as the broader struggles that moved to the forefront in the late 1960s – around urban conditions, poverty criminal justice, access to housing, and school segregation – consequences of segregation and racial discrimination beyond the Jim Crow South. A major goal of the institute is to work collaboratively in developing curriculum and teaching strategies for incorporating this history into American history courses and related areas of instruction.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$196,559 (approved)
$196,559 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250879-16

Elon University (Elon, NC 27244-9423)
Ann Cahill (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Diverse Philosophical Approaches to Sexual Violence

A two-week institute for twenty-five college and university teachers to explore the issues in philosophy relating to sexual violence.

This summer seminar will gather emerging and established scholars to consider the philosophical questions surrounding the persistent social problem of sexual violence. Participants will explore the different meanings of sexual violence in distinct social contexts, diverse ways of framing the harms that sexual violence imposes, the relation (or lack of same) between sexual violence and other sexual acts, the value of various forms of individual and collective resistance, the role of the state in responses to sexual violence, and other questions. Conversations will be grounded in cutting-edge philosophical scholarship and will address some of the most pressing themes in the humanities as a whole, including difference, embodiment, vulnerability, and justice. Informed by a wide spectrum of philosophical approaches, this seminar aims not only to prompt deep, wide, and meaningful discourse in the moment, but to build the knowledge base and analytical approaches of the future.

Project fields:
Philosophy, Other

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$111,906 (approved)
$111,906 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


EH-250912-16

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5000)
Timothy Cresswell (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to 09/28/2016)
Elizabeth Dillon (Project Director: 09/28/2016 to present)
Timothy Cresswell (Co Project Director: 09/28/2016 to present)

Space, Place, and the Humanities

A three-week institute for college and university teachers on the subject of space, place, and the humanities.

The Humanities Center at Northeastern University proposes a three-week summer institute in summer of 2017 for 25 college teachers focused on the theme of space, place, and the humanities. The goal is to provide a firm basis for further research and teaching in the geohumanities. The institute will be led by prominent scholars of humanistic geography, literary studies, and the digital humanities and will include leading figures from across the humanities with substantive interests in space and place. Participants will study significant texts in study of space and place from the full range of humanities disciplines. The place of Boston will become a laboratory for our explorations. There will be field visits in the Boston area to galleries and archives as well as guided walks. Participants will be given ample opportunity to interact with the faculty and with each other and will leave the institute with both a syllabus and a developed research plan for a paper or grant proposal.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$205,597 (approved)
$201,867 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250933-16

Jackson State University (Jackson, MS 39217-0001)
Rico Chapman (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to 10/17/2017)
Mario Azevedo (Project Director: 10/17/2017 to present)

Mississippi in the National Civil Rights Narrative

A three-week institute for college and university teachers on the civil rights movement in Mississippi and its relationship to national developments.

This summer institute seeks a marriage between the local and national narratives by bringing the Mississippi and the national stories together. Specifically, we will explore in great depth the struggle for freedom in Mississippi while comparing it to significant events in other parts of the American South, allowing participants to address the power of the older national narrative and the newer one based on community struggle. By the end of the institute, the participants and the faculty leaders will have placed the local within the national narrative, providing new analytical tools for understanding the transformative global impact of the Civil Rights Movement. National leaders inside government or on the streets of Birmingham helped shape and create change. At the same time, unlettered and largely unknown people, by the hundreds and thousands struggled for dignity and power on plantations and in small towns and cities of the Mississippi Delta.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$216,585 (approved)
$216,585 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250944-16

Georgia Historical Society (Savannah, GA 31401-4889)
Stan Deaton (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Recognizing an Imperfect Past: History, Memory and the American Public

A two-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to study how events in United States history are publicly memorialized, remembered, and recognized.

This two-week program will engage scholars—college and university professors—in an exploration of how we as a country recognize, remember, and memorialize controversial people and events in the American past as viewed with a presentist lens, and what role scholars can play in the classroom and the public arena in shaping and leading this national discussion going forward.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$154,921 (approved)
$154,921 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-250960-16

Bard Graduate Center (New York, NY 10024-3602)
David Jaffee (Project Director: 02/26/2016 to 02/13/2017)
Catherine Whalen (Project Director: 02/13/2017 to 03/31/2017)
Katherine Grier (Co Project Director: 02/13/2017 to 03/31/2018)
Catherine Whalen (Project Director: 05/23/2017 to present)

American Material Culture: Nineteenth-Century New York

A four-week institute for college and university faculty to study American material culture in nineteenth-century New York City.

Bard Graduate Center (BGC) proposes a four-week Summer Institute in July of 2017 for 18 college teachers to study American Material Culture: Nineteenth-Century New York with the goal of bringing this important field into wider use for teaching and research in the humanities. This program will build on our three successful Summer Institutes (2011, 2013, and 2015) where we held an extremely fruitful series of lectures,seminars, sites visits,hands-on tool demonstrations and workshops, independent research, and participant presentations. The 2017 Institute will focus on nineteenth-century artifactual materials with an emphasis on New York City as a national center for fashioning cultural commodities and promoting consumer tastes. Leading practitioners in this interdisciplinary field of study will serve as faculty. Participants will study significant texts in the field of material culture, as well as pursue hands-on work with artifacts in local and regional collections.

Project fields:
American Studies; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$203,564 (approved)
$203,564 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-230940-15

Community College Humanities Association (Baltimore, MD 21237-3899)
George Scheper (Project Director: 02/17/2015 to present)
Laraine Fletcher (Co Project Director: 08/28/2015 to present)

On Native Grounds: Studies of Native American Histories and the Land

A four-week institute for twenty college and university faculty at the Library of Congress on Native Americans in U.S. history.

Funding is requested for a Summer Institute for 20 higher education Summer Scholars, in residence at the Library of Congress, hosted by the Kluge Center. from June 19-July 16, 2016, on the topic of “On Native Grounds: Studies on Native American Histories and the Land.” Eight Visiting Faculty will present their paradigm-shifting archival research on issues of land, sovereignty, treaties, and Native American culture, work that has been in the forefront of scholarship in Native American Studies, and that has been central to the transformation of scholarship in anthropology and archaeology, political and legal history, comparative religion, art history and American Studies. The Institute also provides time for participants’ individual research in the library’s rich and voluminous holdings on Native Americans. In publicizing the project we will make a special outreach to tribal colleges, community colleges, and small liberal arts colleges.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$162,000 (approved)
$140,220 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231028-15

Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI 49546-4388)
Karin Maag (Project Director: 02/20/2015 to present)

Teaching the Reformation after Five Hundred Years

A three-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on the Reformation.

From its inception nearly 500 years ago, the Reformation shook up western society by challenging the status-quo and offering diverse perspectives on the relations between political and religious powers, the role of authority, and the place and price of uniformity versus toleration. This three-week institute for college and university teachers is designed to foster high-quality instruction on the Reformation by equipping participants with the content-based knowledge, teaching resources, and points of connection between key Reformation-era debates and issues of the common good still at stake today. Topics covered include the pre-Reformation context, the Lutheran, Anabaptist/Radical, Calvinist/Reformed, Catholic, and English and Scottish Reformations alongside cross-confessional issues that continue to resonate today: the impact of women and gender, repercussions on political authority and the right of resistance, and the place of toleration in a context of competing truth claims.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$134,930 (approved)
$134,930 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231029-15

Grand Valley State University (Allendale, MI 49401-9403)
Phyllis Vandenberg (Project Director: 02/20/2015 to present)

Moral Psychology and Education: Putting the Humanities to Work

A four-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants, examining moral psychology and moral philosophy.

This four-week Institute at Grand Valley State University in June 2016 extends discussion beyond the public function of the humanities to an examination of their effect on the moral psychology of individuals and their role within moral education.Moral psychology is a new interdisciplinary field focused on the capacities of the human mind necessary for moral action and behavior and the social and environmental influences that affect moral development. We have pulled together the expertise of seventeen faculty from a variety of disciplines to offer an intensive examination of the moral psychology behind effective moral education. Guided by renowned scholars and rising stars, participants will study primary texts, explore new areas of interdisciplinary research, examine connections between key concepts and bodies of literature across philosophical areas and historical periods, and develop teaching and research projects.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Literature, General; Psychology

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$155,747 (approved)
$152,151 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231087-15

Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5200)
Jana Schulman (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Teaching Beowulf in the Context of Old Norse-Icelandic Literature

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to study the cultural and historical contexts of Beowulf in connection with Old Norse-Icelandic literary texts in translation.

This institute will engage participants with detailed information about the culture, religions, and history of Anglo-Saxon England and medieval Iceland, using the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf and various Icelandic sagas as starting points for discussion. These discussions, together with hands on translation exercises, will provide participants with a greater and synergetic awareness of and appreciation for the literature of Anglo-Saxon England and medieval Iceland.

Project fields:
Literature, Other; Medieval Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$180,420 (approved)
$150,837 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231102-15

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Nicholas Silins (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Presuppositions and Perception: Reasoning, Ethics, Politics, and Aesthetics

A four-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants, exploring the ways in which people’s presuppositions affect their perceptions.

Perception and Reasoning To philosophers, one of the most important divisions in the human mind is between perception and reasoning. We reason from information that we take ourselves to have already, and often our reasoning is unconscious. In contrast, perception is a means of taking in new information, and it is typically a mode of conscious experience. These two aspects of the mind become deeply intertwined when beliefs, fears, or desires influence what we see, hear, taste, or smell. Such influences are called top-down effects on perception. We propose a four-week Summer Institute to explore the diverse issues raised by top-down effects, covering four major themes: varieties of top-down effects on perception, the epistemology of top-down effects, moral and political perception, and perception in aesthetics. Readings include selections from classical Greek philosophy, contemporary analytic philosophy, psychology, literary studies, and art history.

Project fields:
Epistemology; Ethics; Philosophy, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$192,461 (approved)
$152,871 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231105-15

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Donna Thompson Ray (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

The Visual Culture of the American Civil War and Its Aftermath

A two-week institute for thirty college and university faculty members on the visual culture of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

This two-week institute in July 2016 will study the visual culture of the American Civil War and its aftermath. The institute will focus on the era’s array of visual media—including the fine arts, ephemera, photography, cartoons, maps, and monuments— to examine how information and opinion about the war and its impact were recorded and disseminated, and the ways visual media expressed and shaped Americans’ views on both sides of and before and after the conflict. Participants will hear lectures by noted historians, art historians, and archivists and attend hands-on sessions in major museums and archives. A team of four institute faculty that represents the range of work in the field will introduce participants to the rich body of new scholarship that addresses or incorporates Civil War and postwar visual culture, prompt them to do further research, and help them to use visual evidence to enhance their scholarship and teaching about the war and its short- and long-term effects.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$188,668 (approved)
$186,847 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 6/30/2017


EH-231183-15

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47401-3654)
Eileen Julien (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)
James Ogude (Co Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Arts of Survival: Recasting Lives in African Cities

A three-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on arts and culture in Nairobi, New Orleans, Port-au-Prince, Lagos, and Accra.

Our summer institute, "Arts of Survival: Recasting Lives in African Cities", explores contemporary urban culture and arts in African and African diaspora cities--Accra, Lagos, Nairobi, New Orleans and Port-au-Prince. These cities share African "roots," but are distinctive because of the unique "routes" that subsequently shaped them: landscapes, and histories; multiple languages; waves of immigrants who brought and continue to bring their labor, culture and creativity; and the sometimes tragic events, both "natural" (hurricanes and earthquakes) and man-made (political violence and legacies of colonialism and slavery), that these cities have undergone. Our goal is to examine how art engages the political and social hierarchies embedded in these cities and often recasts marginal or precarious lives into lives endowed with beauty, elegance, and an intrinsic value that exceed their constraining structures.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$191,592 (approved)
$188,692 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231190-15

Mystic Seaport Museum (Mystic, CT 06355-1946)
Glenn Gordinier (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

The American Maritime Commons

A five-week institute for twenty college and university faculty on America’s maritime history.

Mystic Seaport's Frank C. Munson Institute of American Maritime Studies seeks NEH funding to host a five-week summer 2016 institute for college/university faculty titled "The American Maritime Commons." The Institute builds on the Museum's successful record of five previous NEH institutes. Aligning with the new NEH "Common Good" initiative, seeking to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life, "The American Maritime Commons" will employ interdisciplinary perspectives on American maritime studies, with an emphasis on recent social, cultural, and ecological approaches and current research. The Institute will consist of a series of seminars led by 12 visiting scholars and co-directors Dr. Glenn Gordinier and Dr. Eric Roorda. Participants will enhance their course offerings through intensive studies, dialogue, and reflection on the influence of maritime activities on U.S. history and culture.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$168,134 (approved)
$168,134 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2017


EH-231204-15

Florida International University Board of Trustees (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Steven Heine (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Tokyo: High City and Low City

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on traditional and modern Tokyo.

This NEH Summer Institute to be held at Florida International University (FIU) for four weeks in June 2016 will lead participants in an in-depth humanistic exploration of the literary, religious and philosophical movements that have visibly—and invisibly—contributed to the construction of modern Japan. It investigates the markers of tradition and modernity in Tokyo, in order to infuse college teachers with critical knowledge of Japanese identity. The megalopolis of Tokyo has for over four hundred years occupied a position of unique significance. This makes for a remarkable story of a historically significant yet continuously developing global cityscape that represents an inventive resource for exploring diverse aspects of Japan vis-à-vis East Asia and the world. The Institute will draw on resources for in South Florida, including the Japan Consulate General Office and the prestigious Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in addition to an impressive Japanese art collection at FIU.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Literature; East Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$141,123 (approved)
$141,051 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231218-15

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Bruce Caldwell (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

The History of Political Economy

A three-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants on the history of economic thought.

The proposal seeks funding for a three week summer institute to be held at Duke University in May-June 2016. The institute will explore various episodes in the development of the history of economic thought. It will build on the successes of earlier institutes held in 2010 and 2013, while attempting to improve in those areas in which we received criticism. The intended audience is faculty in economics and the humanities who desire to explore economic knowledge in a historically informed fashion in their teaching but do not have the background to do so. Revealing the roots of economic knowledge in humanistic understandings of social life has been a central theme for historians of economics. The host for the summer institute, the Center for the History of Political Economy, was established in fall 2008 with a mission of promoting and supporting research in, and the teaching of, the history of political economy.

Project fields:
Economics

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$164,026 (approved)
$155,546 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231226-15

University of Louisiana, Lafayette (Lafayette, LA 70503-2014)
Matthew Teutsch (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to 09/22/2015)
Sheryl Curry (Co Project Director: 09/22/2015 to present)
Matthew Teutsch (Co Project Director: 09/22/2015 to present)
Cheylon Woods (Project Director: 09/22/2015 to present)

Ernest J. Gaines and the Southern Experience

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on the works of Ernest Gaines in their literary contexts.

The Ernest J. Gaines Center at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (UL Lafayette) proposes a four-week summer institute for 25 participants, 3 of which will be graduate students, to study the works of noted African American author Ernest J. Gaines, his influences, and his contemporaries. The institute will be held from May 31-June 24, 2016 on the UL Lafayette campus, and it will expand upon the previous 2 institutes that the center conducted for area high school teachers in 2014 and 2015. The 2016 institutes will focus on bringing the work of Ernest J. Gaines into the broader conversations of American, Southern, and African American literature. Participants will have the opportunity to hear from leading scholars on Gaines in the field. Participants will read all of Gaines' works and will be able to take full advantage of the Ernest J. Gaines Center's archives, which house all of his manuscripts, correspondence, reviews, and other materials.

Project fields:
African American History; African Studies; American Literature

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$196,232 (approved)
$150,316 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231245-15

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Kurtis Schaeffer (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Problems of the Study of Religion

A three-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants on the historical, analytic, and conceptual tools that can be used to study religion.

Our goals for the Institute are simple: we wish to introduce scholars both within and outside the field of religious studies to the enormously productive re-thinking of the idea of "religion" that has occurred in recent years, in order to strengthen their teaching and research. Such an introduction will assist them in developing a richer and more nuanced understanding of the opportunities and pitfalls that come with using the category of "religion" to think and teach about highly diverse manifestations of human discourse, institutions, practices, and communities. The primary activity of the Institute will be close reading and discussion of important contemporary scholarship on the study of religion, complemented both by conversations with noted experts and by pedagogy workshops driven largely by our participants’ research and teaching aims.

Project fields:
Religion, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$135,374 (approved)
$120,859 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231261-15

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter Hershock (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Confucian Asia: Traditions and Transformations

A five-week institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on Confucianism in Asia.

"Confucian Asia: Traditions and Transformations, an NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers" is proposed as a five-week program for college and university teachers that explores the origins and influence of Confucianism as an evolving system of thought and practice, including its impacts on social dynamics, the arts and politics. Offering deep and context-rich engagement with key traditions and primary texts (in translation), the multidisciplinary program will enable participants to appreciate how common Confucian values were given different practical and institutional expression as they were carried from China to Korea, Japan and Vietnam, and as East Asia embraced the global ideals of modernization and industrialization. The program will introduce participants to current scholarship on Confucianism and enable them to develop new curricular materials for use in a wide range of humanities and social science courses.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion; South Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$187,850 (approved)
$187,001 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231264-15

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
James Dubinsky (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Veterans in American Society

A three-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on the history and experiences of military veterans in the United States.

The Center for the Study of Rhetoric in Society (CSRS)at Virginia Tech and the Virginia Tech Libraries proposal a three-week summer institute in July 2016 for 16 college faculty members to study issues concerning veterans in society. Our combined energies and resources will enable us to provide an interdisciplinary experience with a central focus on the meaning and implications of the deceptively simple category, veteran, not only as it is used in today's discussions of U.S. military personnel returned from war but also in light of selected work about and by veterans across historical eras, national boundaries, and creative and interpretive genres. Through examining ambiguities in the representation of veterans, participants will take home new tools for understanding and representing the diverse potentials and needs of veterans in their own classrooms and communities, and perhaps their own families.

Project fields:
American Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$152,250 (approved)
$146,857 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231267-15

American Center for Mongolian Studies (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305)
David Dettmann (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Modern Mongolia: Heritage and Tradition Amid Changing Realities

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on modern Mongolian history, culture, and geography.

The American Center for Mongolian Studies (ACMS) at University of Pennsylvania seeks funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a 4-week Summer Institute on Modern Mongolia. The proposed institute would be held on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, from June 6 to July 1, 2016, and would be run by co-directors David Dettmann and Academic Lead Morris Rossabi. The goals of the proposed Institute are to provide undergraduate educators with resources needed to be able to expand curricular offerings in East, Inner, or Central Asian Studies, with a focus on familiarity with the unique case study of a quickly changing Mongolia. The Institute will be organized to engage educators with stimulating presentations, materials, and discussions, and to provide them with necessary tools to build draft course modules tailored to their institutional and individual teaching circumstances.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$147,153 (approved)
$140,329 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-231269-15

University of Oklahoma, Norman (Norman, OK 73019-3003)
Kevin Butterfield (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)
Paul Gilje (Co Project Director: 08/31/2015 to present)

Westward Expansion and the Constitution in the Early American Republic

A two-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on the U.S. Constitution and American westward expansion in the early Republic.

The Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage (IACH), an interdisciplinary center for the study of American constitutionalism at the University of Oklahoma, in conjunction with the Department of History proposes to host a two-week Summer Institute for College and University Teachers in June 2016. We offered a successful NEH Institute on this topic in the summer of 2014 and plan to follow the same basic program in 2016 with some minor adjustments. This Institute will explore the social, cultural, and political dimensions of American westward expansion through the lens of the U.S. Constitution and the struggles over its interpretation between the American Revolution and the conclusion of the Mexican-American War in 1848. In this Summer Institute, we hope to bring current and future college faculty together to study the history of the American West, race, Indian removal, and the early history of the federal Constitution and the republic it created.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$138,570 (approved)
$119,402 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


EH-231272-15

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Joan McGregor (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Extending the Land Ethic: Sustainability and the Humanities

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to explore sustainability through the lens of the humanities, the sciences, and contemporary concerns.

“Extending the Land Ethic” builds on two earlier NEH institutes sponsored by the Institute for Humanities Research at Arizona State University. In 2009, “A Fierce Green Fire at 100” commemorated the centennial of Aldo Leopold’s 1909 arrival in Arizona by highlighting the humanistic qualities of his A Sand County Almanac, a founding document of environmental ethics. That project led in 2011 to “Reframing the Land Ethic,” which extended Leopold’s ideas to sustainability studies, a critical issue for the common good that is grounded in ethics and philosophy. This 2016 institute extends the previous work, featuring new humanities research that illuminates the core values which define the human-nature accord. Held in Flagstaff in partnership with NAU, the institute builds on Leopold’s “land ethic,” arguing that sustainability is at root a humanistic concept. The institute does not advocate; rather, it provides cultural contexts to help scholars design curricula and conduct research.

Project fields:
Ethics; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$196,485 (approved)
$179,660 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-50414-14

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter Hershock (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Buddhist Asia: Traditions, Transmissions, and Transformations

A five-week summer institute for twenty-five college faculty on Buddhism in Southeast Asian  societies.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion; South Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$199,835 (approved)
$194,522 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50415-14

University of Colorado Museum (Boulder, CO 80303-1058)
Robert Pasnau (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Between Medieval and Modern: Philosophy from 1300 to 1700

A four-week institute for twenty college and university teachers on how medieval scholastic philosophy gradually gave way to the mechanistic philosophy of the seventeenth century.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$166,296 (approved)
$165,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2016

Funding details:
Original grant (2014) $163,341
Supplement (2016) $2,955


EH-50416-14

Community College Humanities Association (Baltimore, MD 21237-3899)
George Scheper (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

On Native Grounds: Studies of Native American Histories and the Land

A three-week college and university summer institute for twenty participants on Native American history.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$148,970 (approved)
$142,512 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50422-14

Kent State University Main Campus (Kent, OH 44242-0001)
Francoise Massardier Kenney (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

What is Gained in Translation?

A three-week institute for thirty college and university faculty on literature in translation as a means of enhancing cross-cultural understanding.

Project fields:
Comparative Languages

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$166,000 (approved)
$157,989 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50423-14

Community College Humanities Association (Baltimore, MD 21237-3899)
P. Warden (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The Legacy of Ancient Italy: The Etruscans and Early Rome

A three-week institute for twenty-four college and university faculty on recent discoveries and new understandings of ancient Etruscan culture.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$173,332 (approved)
$163,409 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50424-14

Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA 19104-2875)
David Raizman (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Teaching the History of Modern Design: The Canon and Beyond

A four-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on teaching the history of modern design.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, Other

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$192,914 (approved)
$192,914 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50428-14

Bard Graduate Center (New York, NY 10024-3602)
David Jaffee (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

American Material Culture: Nineteenth-Century New York

A four-week institute for eighteen college and university teachers to study nineteenth-century American material culture in New York City.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$192,303 (approved)
$187,169 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


EH-50429-14

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Sharon Kinoshita (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Negotiating Identities in the Christian-Jewish-Muslim Mediterranean

A four-week institute for twenty-four college and university faculty on the interconnections among the Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the medieval Mediterranean.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Medieval Studies; Western Civilization

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$191,000 (approved)
$188,140 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


EH-50437-14

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Mark Noonan (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

City of Print: New York and the Periodical Press

A two-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on the evolution of New York's periodical press.

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$163,893 (approved)
$152,137 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50438-14

George Washington University (Washington, DC 20052-0001)
Irene Oh Koukios (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

American Muslims: History, Culture, and Politics

A three-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on the history and cultural expression of American Muslims.

Project fields:
American Studies; Comparative Religion; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$189,088 (approved)
$172,337 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


EH-50442-14

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61801-3620)
D. Fairchild Ruggles (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The Alhambra and Spain's Islamic Past

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to examine changing views of Spain's Islamic past through architectural, visual, and literary representations of the Alhambra.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Architecture; European History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$197,604 (approved)
$172,933 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50443-14

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Frederick Gifford (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Development Ethics and Global Justice: Gender, Economics and Environment

A four-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university teachers to consider new directions in the field of development ethics.

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$208,897 (approved)
$208,897 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 1/31/2017


EH-50444-14

Community College Humanities Association (Baltimore, MD 21237-3899)
Sandra Petrulionis (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Transcendentalism and Reform in the Age of Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller

A two-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants on Transcendentalism and social reform.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$135,671 (approved)
$132,782 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50446-14

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Maryemma Graham (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Black Poetry after the Black Arts Movement

A two-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants on African-American poetry from 1960 to the present.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$156,554 (approved)
$156,394 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 2/29/2016


EH-50448-14

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Molly Uline Olmstead (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)
Thomas Morgan (Co Project Director: 11/25/2014 to present)

Paul Laurence Dunbar and American Literary History

A three-week college and university summer institute for twenty-five participants on the career and influence of African-American writer Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906).

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$136,248 (approved)
$136,248 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50449-14

Community College Humanities Association (Baltimore, MD 21237-3899)
Paul Benson (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Slavery in the American Republic: From Constitution to Civil War

A two-week college and university summer institute for twenty-five participants on the issue of slavery in the early American Republic.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$125,741 (approved)
$121,773 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50452-14

Rhode Island Historical Society (Providence, RI 02906-1012)
Elyssa Tardif (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Early American Women's History: Teaching from the Archives

A two-week college and university institute for thirty participants on early American women's history based on archival sources.

Project fields:
American Literature; Women's History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$150,138 (approved)
$130,362 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 8/31/2015