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Funded Projects Query Form
27 matches

Program: Institutes for College and University Teachers*
Date range: 2017-2019
Sort order: Award year, descending

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EH-266984-19

Adelphi University (Garden City, NY 11530-4213)
Laraine Anne Fletcher (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
George L. Scheper (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
Worlds in Collision: Nahua and Spanish Pictorial Histories and Annals in 16th-Century Mexico

A three-week institute for 26 college and university faculty on the visual culture and history of 16th-century Mexico.

Funding is requested for a Summer Institute for 26 higher education Summer Scholars entitled "Worlds in Collision: Pictorial Histories and Annals of Nahua and Spanish in 16th Century Mexico" to be held on the campus of Adelphi University, Garden City, N.Y. Eleven visiting scholars will present research on the “New Conquest History,” exploring the newly accessible archives concerning 16th century Mexico, which include multiple forms (maps, pictorial histories and annals), many by indigenous and mestizo authors. Three weeks of daily seminars, enhanced by frequent roundtable discussions, will explore the ways in which these newly translated and interpreted documents can be integrated into existing and/or new curricula involving the encounter of cultures in 16th century Mexico. We will make a special outreach to seek applicants from community colleges, including adjunct faculty and qualified graduate students.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Latin American History; Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,459 (approved)
$148,109 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


EH-267026-19

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Donna Thompson Ray (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Pennee Bender (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
The Visual Culture of the American Civil War and its Aftermath

A two-week summer institute for 25 higher education faculty on the visual culture of the American Civil War and its Aftermath.

This two-week institute in July 2020 will study the visual culture of the American Civil War and its aftermath. The institute will focus on the era’s array of visual media—including the fine arts, ephemera, photography, cartoons, maps, and monuments— to examine how information and opinion about the war and its impact were recorded and disseminated, and the ways visual media expressed and shaped Americans’ views on both sides of and before and after the conflict. Participants will hear lectures by noted historians, art historians, and archivists and attend hands-on sessions in major museums and archives. A team of three institute faculty that represents the range of work in the field will introduce participants to the rich body of new scholarship that addresses or incorporates Civil War and postwar visual culture, prompt them to do further research, and help them to use visual evidence to enhance their scholarship and teaching about the war and its short- and long-term effects.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$159,999 (approved)
$159,029 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


EH-267110-19

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Mark James Noonan (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
City of Print: New York and the Periodical Press

A two-week summer institute for 25 higher education faculty on the 19th- and 20th-century periodical press in New York City.

Two week summer institute for college faculty offering a comprehensive view of the shifting cultural politics of the city during the 19th and 20th centuries as told through disparate voices of New York's periodical press. Twenty-five participants will be selected to take part in discussions led by cultural historians, archivists and experts in the field of American literature, art and urban history, and periodical studies. They will participate in hands-on sessions in New York Historical Society's periodicals collection and visit sites significant in the rise of New York's periodical press.

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$155,182 (approved)
$155,182 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


EH-267121-19

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Liza Weinstein (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Serena Parekh (Co Project Director: September 2019 to present)
Cameron Blevins (Co Project Director: September 2019 to present)
Engaging Geography in the Humanities

A three-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on geography and the humanities.

The Humanities Center at Northeastern University in Boston requests funds to host a three-week Summer Institute on the theme “Engaging Geography in the Humanities” in the summer of 2020. The three-week summer institute, to be held from July 6 through July 24, 2020, will explore the possibilities and productive tensions at the intersection of geography and the humanities. Through engagement with readings, lectures, discussions, workshops, and field visits, the Institute will introduce university and college faculty from the humanities and related disciplines to concepts and methods from geography, as participants and faculty collectively think through how these approaches can enhance their own research and teaching.

Project fields:
Geography

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$155,666 (approved)
$152,962 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


EH-267165-19

Mangalam Centers (Berkeley, CA 94704-1418)
William Stone Waldron (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Karin L. Meyers (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
The Imagination and Imaginal Worlds in Buddhism

A two-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on the role of imagination in Buddhist traditions and beyond.

Mangalam Research Center (MRC) proposes to host a two-week Summer Institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on "The Imagination and Imaginal Worlds in the Mirror of Buddhism," to be held June 14-26, 2020. The co-directors are William Waldron, PhD and Karin Meyers, PhD. We are requesting a grant of $146,217 from the NEH.

Project fields:
Epistemology; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$146,217 (approved)
$145,732 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


EH-267168-19

Portland State University (Portland, OR 97207-0751)
Angela M. Coventry (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
David Hume in the 21st Century: Perpetuating the Enlightenment

A four-week institute for 30 college and university faculty on the Scottish thinker David Hume.

Hume in the 21st Century: Perpetuating the Enlightenment This Institute is designed to pursue intensive study of multidisciplinary perspectives on the work of eighteenth-century Enlightenment giant David Hume. In his time, Hume was an innovator in his application of the experimental method to many disciplines. This Institute will feature a rotating faculty of eminent scholars. While they will explore Hume’s impact in epistemology, ethics, history, and economics, a notable feature of this Institute is a treatment of the implication of Hume’s thought in non-traditional areas. Faculty will address Hume’s approach in relation to Eastern thought, the status of women (including early modern woman philosophers' responses to Hume), race, the status of animals, and the environment. Participants will come away with an expansive context and diverse resources to facilitate their own teaching and research projects on these themes. The Institute will also offer them a sample of the engagement of a

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$185,975 (approved)
$184,133 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


EH-261665-18

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Barbara Watson Andaya (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Colonial Experiences and Their Legacies in Southeast Asia

A four-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on the complexities of colonialism in Southeast Asia.

"Colonial Experiences and Their Legacies in Southeast Asia" will explore the ways in which Southeast Asian societies respond to colonial presences and how the legacies of these experiences shaped later efforts to forge national identities, envision independent political futures, and imagine new state-citizen relationships. Moving chronologically from the late 19th century to the post-independence period, the institute program will foreground key themes through case studies of specific countries in the region. The program is designed to meet the teaching needs of educators in community colleges, liberal arts colleges and undergraduate serving universities. By offering deep and context-rich engagement with key traditions, practices, and primary texts, the program will help participants to develop curricular materials for humanities courses in history, religion, philosophy, art history and literature, and to engage such themes as globalization and cultural pluralism.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,654 (approved)
$187,654 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261743-18

College of Charleston (Charleston, SC 29424-0001)
Shari Rabin (Project Director: February 2018 to July 2019)
Dale Rosengarten (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Michael Cohen (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Dale Rosengarten (Co Project Director: August 2018 to July 2019)
Jewish History in the American South

A two-week institute for 25 college and university faculty exploring the history of Jews in the American South, to be held at the College of Charleston.

This summer institute aims to revise our understanding of the entwined histories of the American South and its Jewish inhabitants. Our inquiry shifts Jews from the margins of the story to the center, demonstrating the region’s cosmopolitan past and its relationship to both diversity and discrimination.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$143,699 (approved)
$143,699 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261583-18

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Karen Bassi (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Gretchen E. Henderson (Co Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere

A four-week summer institute for 25 college and university teachers to examine museums as sites of cultural meaning, to be held in Washington, DC.

"Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere" is an in-depth exploration of museums and curated cultural collections around Washington, D.C. The four-week Institute approaches museums as sites for interdisciplinary inquiry into advances in humanistic and scientific research, the effects of ongoing international conflicts, the speed of evolving technologies, and ethical debates over privacy and sustainability and cultural heritage. These explorations are guided by weekly lectures and seminars led by six outstanding Visiting Faculty and a renowned Visiting Artist, working together with local museum specialists. Complemented by carefully chosen readings, excellent library resources, and targeted museum visits as case studies, the Institute is guided by the principle that museums offer windows on the educational, ethical, and cultural debates that define the humanities today.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Public History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261605-18

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Liesl Marie Olson (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Making Modernism: Literature and Culture in Chicago, 1893–1955

A four-week institute for 25 college and university teachers to study modernist literary and artistic expression through the collections of the Newberry Library and sites in Chicago.

The Newberry Library proposes a summer institute for college and university faculty that will explore Chicago’s contribution to the modernist movement. The institute will begin by considering the cultural resonances of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition and will end with an exploration of work by artists and writers of the Chicago Black Renaissance. It will be led by renowned scholars in the fields of literature, history, art history, print culture, and African-American studies. Four themes will be emphasized: 1) the geographic centrality of Chicago both locally and internationally; 2) modernism’s distinctive reception history in Chicago; 3) the women in Chicago who served as key cultural arbiters; 4) and the connections between the Chicago Renaissance and the Chicago Black Renaissance. Making Modernism will provide summer scholars with a special opportunity to explore Chicago through both the Newberry’s vast collections on this topic and the experience of the city itself.

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$197,738 (approved)
$197,738 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261649-18

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Lisa Marie Adeli (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Understanding Middle Eastern Millennials through Literature, Culture, and Media

A one-week institute for 28 college and university faculty on Middle Eastern millennials.

The University of Arizona Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES) is proposing a one-week National Endowment for the Humanities summer institute. The program will serve twenty-eight post-secondary educators, mostly professors at community colleges and small, undergraduate-serving liberal arts colleges, many of them minority-serving institutions. Held at the University of Arizona in Tucson during the first week of August 2019, the institute will explore the theme of "Middle Eastern Millennials through Literature, Culture, and Media." Led by Dr. Maha Nassar, a cultural and intellectual historian of the Arab world, participants will engage in a cross-disciplinary study of Middle East diversity and change through a focus on youth. Co-Director Dr. Lisa Adeli, CMES Director of Educational Outreach, will help with curriculum development and ensure a wide dissemination of the materials created.

Project fields:
Area Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$89,887 (approved)
$89,887 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261656-18

University of Tampa (Tampa, FL 33606-1490)
James Joseph Lopez (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Denis Alberto Rey (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
José Martí and the Immigrant Communities of Florida in Cuban Independence and the Dawn of the American Century

A four-week institute for 30 college and university faculty on José Martí and the immigrant communities of Florida.

The proposed 4-week Summer Institute seeks to heighten awareness of how American immigrant communities have helped usher in political transformations both at home and abroad, and to accentuate the rich and complex cultural world established by the Cuban, Sicilian and Spanish immigrants around the cigar industry in turn-of-the-century Florida. An important and often overlooked aspect of that community was its political activism both domestically, in the struggle for labor and immigrant rights, and internationally, as a crucial component of the organization and funding of the War for Cuban Independence under the leadership of Jose Marti, and the U.S. intervention in that war, an event that would transform both countries. The immigrant communities of Tampa, Ybor City and Key West, and the role they played in this history, constitute an extraordinary chrysalis in which to observe and understand the geopolitical evolution of the U.S. in the early 20th century.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; Immigration History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,238 (approved)
$190,238 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-256937-17

University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
David Z. Saltz (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Digital Technologies in Theatre and Performance Studies

A two-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on the impact of digital technologies on performance and on theatre history.

This institute introduces college and university teachers to ways digital culture is transforming theatre and performance studies. The first week focuses on the impact of digital technologies on performance scholarship, and the second, on digital performance practices. Both weeks balance lectures, seminars, and hands-on workshops. The project directors, David Saltz (UGA) and Sarah Bay-Cheng (Bowdoin College), are leading scholars in digital performance and historiography. They are joined by a visiting faculty consisting of twelve of the world?s foremost scholars and practitioners in digital humanities and performance, such as Philip Auslander (GA Tech), Peter Eckersall (CUNY), Derek Miller (Harvard), Kiri Miller (Brown), Ashley Ferro-Murray (Rensselaer) and Mark Coniglio and Dawn Stoppiello (Troika Ranch). HowlRound, a Boston-based online theatre commons, will livestream video and provide a platform for people around the world to engage with the institute?s faculty and participants.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$131,290 (approved)
$131,290 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


EH-256769-17

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Donna Thompson Ray (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
The Visual Culture of the American Civil War and its Aftermath

A two-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to examine the visual record of the American Civil War and its aftermath.

This two-week institute in July 2018 will study the visual culture of the American Civil War and its aftermath. The institute will focus on the era’s array of visual media—including the fine arts, ephemera, photography, cartoons, maps, and monuments— to examine how information and opinion about the war and its impact were recorded and disseminated, and the ways visual media expressed and shaped Americans’ views on both sides of and before and after the conflict. Participants will hear lectures by noted historians, art historians, and archivists and attend hands-on sessions in major museums and archives. A team of three institute faculty that represents the range of work in the field will introduce participants to the rich body of new scholarship that addresses or incorporates Civil War and postwar visual culture, prompt them to do further research, and help them to use visual evidence to enhance their scholarship and teaching about the war and its short- and long-term effects.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$165,118 (approved)
$165,051 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


EH-256790-17

St. John's University, Collegeville (Collegeville, MN 56321-2000)
Kiril Petkov (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Thresholds of Change: Modernity and Transformation in the Mediterranean, 1400-1700

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on the history of the late medieval and early modern Mediterranean world.

This project requests funding for a Summer Institute, which will enable college and university faculty to develop Mediterranean Studies courses and/or infuse Mediterranean Studies content in undergraduate surveys and upper level courses in Western and World History. The project is inspired by the latest evolution of Mediterranean Studies into a key field of historical inquiry. The Institute will focus on the most dynamic period of Mediterranean history, 1400-1700, and the impact of the twin pressures of modernization and globalization. The Institute will acquaint participants with the major themes, approaches, and accomplishments of recent research; familiarize them with the primary and secondary material necessary for creating courses and modules in the field; network them with leading scholars; and provide them with an opportunity to work in one of the widest-ranging repertoires of reproduced Mediterranean primary sources, the collections of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library.

Project fields:
History, General; Renaissance History; Western Civilization

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$162,330 (approved)
$162,330 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256793-17

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Buddhist East Asia: Religion, the Arts, and Politics

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty examining how Buddhism has shaped East Asia, to be held on the adjacent campuses of the University of Hawaii and the East-West Center.

"Buddhist East Asia: The Interplay of Religion, the Arts and Politics" is proposed as a four-week summer institute that will enable educators from community colleges, liberal arts colleges and universities to develop curricular content reflecting how Buddhism has both shaped and been shaped by cultures and societies in East Asia for nearly two thousand years. The program will enable participants to understand how Buddhism offered East Asians a new "total care system" that addressed both personal and social needs in ways that were inseparable from the dynamics of cultural interaction, artistic production, trade and politics, and will build on lessons learned from the very successful 2015 institute on "Buddhist Asia: Traditions, Transmissions and Transformations."

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,257 (approved)
$187,257 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256812-17

Whitman College (Walla Walla, WA 99362-2083)
Christopher William Leise (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
The Native American West: A Case Study of the Columbia Plateau

A two-week institute for thirty college and university faculty to explore the history of the Columbia Plateau as a case study of indigenous peoples in the American West.

“The Native American West: A Case Study of the Columbia Plateau” explores diverse perspectives on the Indigenous West, the Columbia Plateau, and U.S. history. Just as Plateau peoples’ religion, subsistence practices, politics, and aesthetics were intertwined, this program will employ the interdisciplinary approach required to comprehend Indigenous experiences and perspectives on American history. Framed by scholarly historical works about Native Americans, land, religion, conflict, and ongoing tribal and personal self-determination, the Institute seeks to expand and complicate accepted U.S. history narratives about the West. To offer nuanced interpretations of the Columbia Plateau, we will draw upon both published and oral accounts by members of local Native American communities. This content will reveal spiritual and cultural practices in the eras prior to American and European immigration, and it will contextualize Indigenous and American responses to each encountering the “other.”

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Other; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$138,662 (approved)
$138,662 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256849-17

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Liesl Marie Olson (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Art and Public Culture in Chicago

A three-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to explore the role of the arts in urban life, using Chicago as a case study.

The Newberry Library proposes a 3-week summer 2018 institute for college and university faculty that will explore the role of the arts in the civic life of Chicago. Art and Public Culture in Chicago will look closely at the arts, their reception, and their civic import in Chicago from the 1893 World’s Fair through the present moment. We are particularly interested in artistic communities, small-scale venues, and vernacular expressions that developed against or alongside Chicago’s mainstream cultural institutions. We seek to understand how audiences are created out of cultural activity, and what kinds of civic participation the arts call into being. The institute will be led by experts in art history, literature, American studies, African American studies, and creative arts, and will include site visits to Chicago neighborhoods, arts organizations, museums, and archives. Participants will also engage with a rich array of primary sources in the Newberry’s collection.

Project fields:
American Studies; Arts, General; Urban Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$168,768 (approved)
$168,768 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256855-17

Carthage College (Kenosha, WI 53140-1994)
Stephanie Mitchell (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Women's Suffrage in the Americas

A two-week summer institute for thirty college and university faculty on women’s suffrage in the Americas from a transnational perspective.

A 2018 NEH Two-week Summer Institute proposal for teachers in higher education to be held at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin, from July 23 - August 3, 2017.

Project fields:
History, Other; Women's History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$124,749 (approved)
$124,749 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256863-17

Mystic Seaport Museum (Mystic, CT 06355-1946)
Glenn Gordinier (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Eric Paul Roorda (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)
The American Maritime Commons

A four-week institute for twenty college and university faculty to study the social, cultural, and environmental history of American maritime regions.

Mystic Seaport's Frank C. Munson Institute of American Maritime Studies seeks NEH funding to host a four-week summer 2018 institute for college/university faculty titled "The American Maritime Commons." The Institute builds on the Museum's successful record of six previous NEH institutes. Aligning with the new NEH "Common Good" initiative, seeking to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life, "The American Maritime Commons" will employ interdisciplinary perspectives on American maritime studies, with an emphasis on recent social, cultural, and ecological approaches and current research. The Institute will consist of a series of seminars led by 14 visiting scholars and co-directors Dr. Glenn Gordinier and Dr. Eric Roorda. Participants will enhance their course offerings through intensive studies, dialogue, and reflection on the influence of maritime activities on U.S. history and culture.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$154,811 (approved)
$154,811 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256884-17

Loyola University Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21210-2601)
Sara Scalenghe (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Global Histories of Disability

A four-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to study how different societies have understood, experienced, and responded to disability.

This proposal seeks funding for a four-week NEH Summer Institute for twenty-five college and university teachers. Entitled “Global Histories of Disability,” the Institute would be directed by Dr. Sara Scalenghe of Loyola University Maryland and would be held on the campus of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. from June 18 to July 13, 2018.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$212,967 (approved)
$212,967 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018

Funding details:
Original grant (2017) $210,912
Supplement (2019) $2,055


EH-256886-17

College of Charleston (Charleston, SC 29424-0001)
Christian Coseru (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Evan Thompson (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Jay L. Garfield (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Self-Knowledge in Eastern and Western Philosophies

A two-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty exploring the different ways in which self-knowledge is understood in Indian philosophical traditions and modern Western philosophy.

Self-knowledge raises difficult questions concerning the object of self-knowledge, the importance of self-knowledge to moral agency, responsibility, and decision-making, and the impact of various forms of moral and mental cultivation on self-knowledge. These questions arise in a variety of the world’s great intellectual traditions, including the many philosophical traditions of India, in particular Buddhism, and of Western cognitive science and its allied philosophy of mind. The best approach to these problems is therefore interdisciplinary and cross-cultural, and this Institute proposes to provide such a multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural forum. The aim of this project is to help university teachers developing curricula to incorporate the insights that emerge from addressing these questions in diverse traditions and settings.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Non Western Philosophy; Philosophy, Other

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$164,585 (approved)
$164,585 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


EH-256889-17

Brookhaven College (Farmers Branch, TX 75244-4997)
Paul F. Benson (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Paul Finkelman (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Slavery and the Constitution

A two-week institute based in Washington, D.C. for twenty-five college and university faculty to explore the relationship between slavery and the Constitution.

Slavery is of over-riding importance in understanding United States history and the moral and constitutional issues raised by slavery are profound. SLAVERY AND THE CONSTITUTION is a proposed NEH Summer Institute to examine the relationship between slavery and the Constitution and will enable 25 faculty members from two- and four-year colleges and universities to study the relationship between slavery and the United States Constitution and will be held in Washington, DC from July 8-21, 2018. Seven eminent scholars will offer seminars, lead scholarly discussions, and provide research assistance on the topic of slavery and the Constitution. The Institute’s scholars will also guide the participants through primary documents and the continuing scholarly debate over the relationship between slavery and the Constitution from its writing to the Civil War.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$120,505 (approved)
$120,505 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256890-17

Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)
Stephen C. Angle (Project Director: March 2017 to June 2019)
Reviving Philosophy as a Way of Life

A two-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty examining six ancient and modern philosophical approaches to living a good life.

A two-week NEH Summer Institute for college and university faculty focusing on the idea of "Philosophy as a Way of Life" is to be held at Wesleyan University in July of 2018. This Institute will gather together philosophers who have taught "way of life" classes and allow them to share their insights, experiences, and pedagogical strategies with other professors looking to adopt this model in their classrooms, and will also include sessions led by experts on specific “way of life” approaches.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; Philosophy, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$137,045 (approved)
$137,045 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256893-17

University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)
Skyler Arndt-Briggs (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Barton Byg (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Culture in the Cold War: East German Art, Music and Film

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to explore concepts of artistic freedom under a modern socialist regime the film, music, and visual arts of East Germany.  

This NEH Institute for college and university teachers seeks to break new ground in the study of culture during the Cold War through a sustained interdisciplinary examination into the role of arts and artists in society. For historical and methodological reasons, the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) provides an ideal case study for this topic. The Institute explores new scholarship to provide a sustained, interdisciplinary examination into the role of the arts--specifically film, music, and the visual arts--under socialism; this work is re-appropriating the field by addressing contemporary interests and research questions and has started yielding insights that highlight commonalities and differences between socialist and capitalist modernity. The Institute establishes the relevance of this period of recent history by offering college teachers a wide selection of materials to present a dynamic historical perspective on issues being raised in classrooms today.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Film History and Criticism; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$216,849 (approved)
$216,849 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256894-17

Salt Lake Community College (Salt Lake City, UT 84130-0808)
Melissa Helquist (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
The Book: Material Histories and Digital Futures

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on the history and technologies of the book.

The proposal seeks funding for a four-week summer institute for college and university faculty to be held at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC) from June 18 to July 13, 2018. The Institute will consider the history of the book from material and embodied perspectives, studying how new and old forms of book technology and circulation impact the creation of and access to humanities scholarship and knowledge. Institute participants will gain both a scholarly and pragmatic understanding of the book as a technology and its impact on knowledge-making in the humanities.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$189,043 (approved)
$189,043 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-256910-17

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300)
Anthony F. Arrigo (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Hoover Dam and the Shaping of the American West

A two-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty that explores how Hoover Dam shaped the American West.

Explores the legacy of the Hoover Dam through examination of its technologies, and impacts on the environment and proximate human communities.

Project fields:
U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies; Urban History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$133,432 (approved)
$133,432 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018