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Funded Projects Query Form
20 matches

Program: Institutes for College and University Teachers*
Date range: 2018-2020
Sort order: Award year, descending

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EH-272420-20

Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5200)
Jana Kate Schulman (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Robert F. Berkhofer (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Law and Culture in Medieval England

A four-week institute for 25 higher education faculty on law in medieval England as represented in legal, literary, and historical texts.

This institute focuses on law in medieval England (600-1300), showing how laws were embedded into medieval culture by studying literary works and historical sources. The literary and historical materials will provide contexts for and illustration of medieval thinking about right and wrong, rule and justice, and the negotiation of disputes. By analyzing law codes, literature, and documents, participants will learn how to deploy legal texts in their teaching and research.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$186,927 (approved)
$169,059 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


EH-272453-20

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James R. Akerman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Lia Markey (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Mapping the Early Modern World

A four-week institute for 25 higher education faculty to study early modern cartography. 

The Newberry Library requests $218,363.49 to support a Level I summer institute for higher education faculty titled “Mapping the Early Modern World.” The four-week institute will be co-organized by James Akerman, Director of the Newberry’s Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography, and Lia Markey, director of the Newberry’s Center for Renaissance Studies. The institute’s 25 participants will pursue a program of seminars and workshops, discussion, and research exploring interdisciplinary approaches to the study of maps in connection with the global intellectual, cultural, and geographical transformations of the world between 1400 and 1700. The course of reading and discussion will consider five major “theaters” in which the production, use, and interpretation of maps operated: the world, the city, the land, the sea, and the skies.

Project fields:
Geography; History, General; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$218,363 (approved)
$218,363 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2022


EH-272469-20

University of Houston System (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Rex A. Koontz (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Roberto J. Tejada (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Mari Carmen Ramirez (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Arden Decker (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Engaging Latinx Art: Methodological And Pedagogical Approaches

A two-week institute for 25 college and university faculty to study Latinx art history in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

The University of Houston (UH) in partnership with the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) and its International Center for the Arts of the Americas (ICAA) request funding for a Level 1 NEH Summer Institute for higher education faculty. The institute would provide the intellectual environment for twenty-five university and college teachers to explore the full range of Latinx art history. The two-week institute will be held June 7-21, 2021.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Hispanic American Studies; Latin American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$136,477 (approved)
$136,477 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2022


EH-272497-20

Long Island University (Greenvale, NY 11548-1300)
Deborah Mutnick (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Shannon Carter (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
The New Deal Era's Federal Writers' Project: History, Politics, and Legacy

A four-week institute for 25 college and university faculty to study the history, accomplishments, and cultural legacy of the Federal Writers’ Project.

LIU-Brooklyn proposes a 4-week summer institute for 25 college and university faculty to study the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), part of the federally funded unemployment relief agency known as the Works Projects Administration under FDR during the Great Depression. The institute will focus on the FWP’s history, accomplishments, and literary legacy as our country’s first government-sponsored public history project, particularly with respect to its mission to document underrepresented stories about everyday American life and its impact on American literature. Given the extraordinary impact former FWP writers had on American literature, participants will also study creative works by former FWP writers like Zora Neale Hurston, Dorothy West, Richard Wright, and Meridel Le Seuer, alongside archival materials these same writers generated for the FWP. We invite applicants from diverse backgrounds and will reserve space for at least five non-tenure track or adjunct faculty.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Studies; Public History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$224,235 (approved)
$177,660 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


EH-272526-20

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Jason Robert (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Our SHARED Future: Science, Humanities, Arts, Research Ethics, and Deliberation

A four-week institute for 25 college and university faculty, to introduce humanists to the scientific, ethical, and social dimensions of bioengineering.

With the development of genome editing, tissue engineering, stem cell research, and neural interface design, bioengineering is dramatically influencing, and potentially fundamentally altering, what it means to be human. Humanists must take a leadership role in guiding the development and use of novel technologies by educating their students to engage in critical discussions and societal deliberations about our conceptions of ourselves, the shape of human society, and the nature of our shared future. Over the course of four weeks, participants will deliberate on these topics through the lenses of ethics, history, philosophy, literature, and film, while experiencing first-hand what it’s like to do science, from editing the bacterial genome using a do-it-yourself CRISPR kit to peering into the inner workings of a non-human primate research laboratory.

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$192,145 (approved)
$183,646 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


EH-272535-20

Reed College (Portland, OR 97202-8199)
Tamara Metz (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Elizabeth Brake (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Philosophical Perspectives on Giving, Receiving, and Conceiving Care

A three-week institute for 22 college and university faculty and three advanced graduate students, on giving and receiving care, and their philosophical implications.

The Summer Institute will introduce recent work on care and caregiving in Anglophone moral and political philosophy and foster development of related pedagogical and research projects. Our investigation will be guided by three goals. The first is to explore the distinct questions which arise when caregiving is taken as central in moral and political philosophy. The second is to build on existing research to address new questions posed by recent economic and technological changes. The third is to nurture teaching and research attentive to different perspectives on care - those of caregivers and care recipients - and sensitive to the complexities of age, disability, race, class, and gender.

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$168,877 (approved)
$168,877 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2022


EH-272538-20

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Ayesha K. Hardison (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Maryemma Graham (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Hurston on the Horizon: Past, Present, and Future

A three-week institute for 25 higher education faculty on the life and works of author Zora Neale Hurston.

This 3-week Institute for Higher Education Professionals focuses on author Zora Neale Hurston's diverse body of work, and its unwaning impact on American literature and culture. A novelist, folklorist, anthropologist, journalist, and precursor to the applied humanities, Hurston is the most prolific African American woman writer of the early 20th century. Her oeuvre, including an autobiography, novels, essays, and folklore collections published at the height of her career, is still expanding, as her previously unpublished work, namely short stories, plays, and ethnography, appear recurringly in print. "Hurston on the Horizon: Past, Present, and Future" is inspired by this as well as the enduring popularity of Hurston's seminal novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. The Institute will enable 25 participants to develop new perspectives and deeper appreciation of Hurston's texts in order to place her in 21st century contexts and foster new directions for teaching and research.

Project fields:
American Literature; Literature, Other

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


EH-272549-20

Bradley University (Peoria, IL 61625-0001)
Jason Zaborowski (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Pieternella A. van Doorn-Harder (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Middle Eastern Christianity: A Historic and Living Tradition

A summer institute for college faculty on the history and culture of Middle Eastern Christians in the Middle East and American society.

*Middle Eastern Christianity: A Historic and Living Tradition* prepares educators to integrate the topic of Middle Eastern Christianity into various courses relevant to Middle Eastern Christians, both in the Middle East, and in their immigrant roles in American society.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Near and Middle Eastern History; Religion, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,661 (approved)
$170,661 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2022


EH-266984-19

Adelphi University (Garden City, NY 11530-4213)
Laraine Anne Fletcher (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
George L. Scheper (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
Worlds in Collision: Nahua and Spanish Pictorial Histories and Annals in 16th-Century Mexico

A three-week institute for 26 college and university faculty on the visual culture and history of 16th-century Mexico.

Funding is requested for a Summer Institute for 26 higher education Summer Scholars entitled "Worlds in Collision: Pictorial Histories and Annals of Nahua and Spanish in 16th Century Mexico" to be held on the campus of Adelphi University, Garden City, N.Y. Eleven visiting scholars will present research on the “New Conquest History,” exploring the newly accessible archives concerning 16th century Mexico, which include multiple forms (maps, pictorial histories and annals), many by indigenous and mestizo authors. Three weeks of daily seminars, enhanced by frequent roundtable discussions, will explore the ways in which these newly translated and interpreted documents can be integrated into existing and/or new curricula involving the encounter of cultures in 16th century Mexico. We will make a special outreach to seek applicants from community colleges, including adjunct faculty and qualified graduate students.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Latin American History; Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,459 (approved)
$148,109 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022


EH-267026-19

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Donna Thompson Ray (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Pennee Bender (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
The Visual Culture of the American Civil War and its Aftermath

A two-week summer institute for 25 higher education faculty on the visual culture of the American Civil War and its Aftermath.

This two-week institute in July 2020 will study the visual culture of the American Civil War and its aftermath. The institute will focus on the era’s array of visual media—including the fine arts, ephemera, photography, cartoons, maps, and monuments— to examine how information and opinion about the war and its impact were recorded and disseminated, and the ways visual media expressed and shaped Americans’ views on both sides of and before and after the conflict. Participants will hear lectures by noted historians, art historians, and archivists and attend hands-on sessions in major museums and archives. A team of three institute faculty that represents the range of work in the field will introduce participants to the rich body of new scholarship that addresses or incorporates Civil War and postwar visual culture, prompt them to do further research, and help them to use visual evidence to enhance their scholarship and teaching about the war and its short- and long-term effects.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$182,659 (approved)
$181,689 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


EH-267110-19

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Mark James Noonan (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
City of Print: New York and the Periodical Press

A two-week summer institute for 25 higher education faculty on the 19th- and 20th-century periodical press in New York City.

Two week summer institute for college faculty offering a comprehensive view of the shifting cultural politics of the city during the 19th and 20th centuries as told through disparate voices of New York's periodical press. Twenty-five participants will be selected to take part in discussions led by cultural historians, archivists and experts in the field of American literature, art and urban history, and periodical studies. They will participate in hands-on sessions in New York Historical Society's periodicals collection and visit sites significant in the rise of New York's periodical press.

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$162,750 (approved)
$162,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


EH-267121-19

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Liza Weinstein (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Serena Parekh (Co Project Director: September 2019 to present)
Cameron Blevins (Co Project Director: September 2019 to present)
Engaging Geography in the Humanities

A three-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on geography and the humanities.

The Humanities Center at Northeastern University in Boston requests funds to host a three-week Summer Institute on the theme “Engaging Geography in the Humanities” in the summer of 2020. The three-week summer institute, to be held from July 6 through July 24, 2020, will explore the possibilities and productive tensions at the intersection of geography and the humanities. Through engagement with readings, lectures, discussions, workshops, and field visits, the Institute will introduce university and college faculty from the humanities and related disciplines to concepts and methods from geography, as participants and faculty collectively think through how these approaches can enhance their own research and teaching.

Project fields:
Geography

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$155,666 (approved)
$152,962 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022


EH-267165-19

Mangalam Centers (Berkeley, CA 94704-1418)
William Stone Waldron (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Karin L. Meyers (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
The Imagination and Imaginal Worlds in Buddhism

A two-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on the role of imagination in Buddhist traditions and beyond.

Mangalam Research Center (MRC) proposes to host a two-week Summer Institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on "The Imagination and Imaginal Worlds in the Mirror of Buddhism," to be held June 14-26, 2020. The co-directors are William Waldron, PhD and Karin Meyers, PhD. We are requesting a grant of $146,217 from the NEH.

Project fields:
Epistemology; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$146,217 (approved)
$145,732 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022


EH-267168-19

Portland State University (Portland, OR 97207-0751)
Angela M. Coventry (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
David Hume in the 21st Century: Perpetuating the Enlightenment

A four-week institute for 30 college and university faculty on the Scottish thinker David Hume.

Hume in the 21st Century: Perpetuating the Enlightenment This Institute is designed to pursue intensive study of multidisciplinary perspectives on the work of eighteenth-century Enlightenment giant David Hume. In his time, Hume was an innovator in his application of the experimental method to many disciplines. This Institute will feature a rotating faculty of eminent scholars. While they will explore Hume’s impact in epistemology, ethics, history, and economics, a notable feature of this Institute is a treatment of the implication of Hume’s thought in non-traditional areas. Faculty will address Hume’s approach in relation to Eastern thought, the status of women (including early modern woman philosophers' responses to Hume), race, the status of animals, and the environment. Participants will come away with an expansive context and diverse resources to facilitate their own teaching and research projects on these themes. The Institute will also offer them a sample of the engagement of a

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$185,975 (approved)
$184,133 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022


EH-261583-18

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Karen Bassi (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Gretchen E. Henderson (Co Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere

A four-week summer institute for 25 college and university teachers to examine museums as sites of cultural meaning, to be held in Washington, DC.

"Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere" is an in-depth exploration of museums and curated cultural collections around Washington, D.C. The four-week Institute approaches museums as sites for interdisciplinary inquiry into advances in humanistic and scientific research, the effects of ongoing international conflicts, the speed of evolving technologies, and ethical debates over privacy and sustainability and cultural heritage. These explorations are guided by weekly lectures and seminars led by six outstanding Visiting Faculty and a renowned Visiting Artist, working together with local museum specialists. Complemented by carefully chosen readings, excellent library resources, and targeted museum visits as case studies, the Institute is guided by the principle that museums offer windows on the educational, ethical, and cultural debates that define the humanities today.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Public History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261605-18

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Liesl Marie Olson (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Making Modernism: Literature and Culture in Chicago, 1893–1955

A four-week institute for 25 college and university teachers to study modernist literary and artistic expression through the collections of the Newberry Library and sites in Chicago.

The Newberry Library proposes a summer institute for college and university faculty that will explore Chicago’s contribution to the modernist movement. The institute will begin by considering the cultural resonances of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition and will end with an exploration of work by artists and writers of the Chicago Black Renaissance. It will be led by renowned scholars in the fields of literature, history, art history, print culture, and African-American studies. Four themes will be emphasized: 1) the geographic centrality of Chicago both locally and internationally; 2) modernism’s distinctive reception history in Chicago; 3) the women in Chicago who served as key cultural arbiters; 4) and the connections between the Chicago Renaissance and the Chicago Black Renaissance. Making Modernism will provide summer scholars with a special opportunity to explore Chicago through both the Newberry’s vast collections on this topic and the experience of the city itself.

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$197,738 (approved)
$197,738 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261649-18

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Lisa Marie Adeli (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Understanding Middle Eastern Millennials through Literature, Culture, and Media

A one-week institute for 28 college and university faculty on Middle Eastern millennials.

The University of Arizona Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES) is proposing a one-week National Endowment for the Humanities summer institute. The program will serve twenty-eight post-secondary educators, mostly professors at community colleges and small, undergraduate-serving liberal arts colleges, many of them minority-serving institutions. Held at the University of Arizona in Tucson during the first week of August 2019, the institute will explore the theme of "Middle Eastern Millennials through Literature, Culture, and Media." Led by Dr. Maha Nassar, a cultural and intellectual historian of the Arab world, participants will engage in a cross-disciplinary study of Middle East diversity and change through a focus on youth. Co-Director Dr. Lisa Adeli, CMES Director of Educational Outreach, will help with curriculum development and ensure a wide dissemination of the materials created.

Project fields:
Area Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$89,887 (approved)
$89,887 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261656-18

University of Tampa (Tampa, FL 33606-1490)
James Joseph Lopez (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Denis Alberto Rey (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
José Martí and the Immigrant Communities of Florida in Cuban Independence and the Dawn of the American Century

A four-week institute for 30 college and university faculty on José Martí and the immigrant communities of Florida.

The proposed 4-week Summer Institute seeks to heighten awareness of how American immigrant communities have helped usher in political transformations both at home and abroad, and to accentuate the rich and complex cultural world established by the Cuban, Sicilian and Spanish immigrants around the cigar industry in turn-of-the-century Florida. An important and often overlooked aspect of that community was its political activism both domestically, in the struggle for labor and immigrant rights, and internationally, as a crucial component of the organization and funding of the War for Cuban Independence under the leadership of Jose Marti, and the U.S. intervention in that war, an event that would transform both countries. The immigrant communities of Tampa, Ybor City and Key West, and the role they played in this history, constitute an extraordinary chrysalis in which to observe and understand the geopolitical evolution of the U.S. in the early 20th century.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; Immigration History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,238 (approved)
$190,238 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261665-18

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Barbara Watson Andaya (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Colonial Experiences and Their Legacies in Southeast Asia

A four-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on the complexities of colonialism in Southeast Asia.

"Colonial Experiences and Their Legacies in Southeast Asia" will explore the ways in which Southeast Asian societies respond to colonial presences and how the legacies of these experiences shaped later efforts to forge national identities, envision independent political futures, and imagine new state-citizen relationships. Moving chronologically from the late 19th century to the post-independence period, the institute program will foreground key themes through case studies of specific countries in the region. The program is designed to meet the teaching needs of educators in community colleges, liberal arts colleges and undergraduate serving universities. By offering deep and context-rich engagement with key traditions, practices, and primary texts, the program will help participants to develop curricular materials for humanities courses in history, religion, philosophy, art history and literature, and to engage such themes as globalization and cultural pluralism.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,654 (approved)
$187,654 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-261743-18

College of Charleston (Charleston, SC 29424-0001)
Shari Rabin (Project Director: February 2018 to July 2019)
Dale Rosengarten (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Michael Cohen (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Dale Rosengarten (Co Project Director: August 2018 to July 2019)
Jewish History in the American South

A two-week institute for 25 college and university faculty exploring the history of Jews in the American South, to be held at the College of Charleston.

This summer institute aims to revise our understanding of the entwined histories of the American South and its Jewish inhabitants. Our inquiry shifts Jews from the margins of the story to the center, demonstrating the region’s cosmopolitan past and its relationship to both diversity and discrimination.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$143,699 (approved)
$143,699 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019