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Program: Institutes for School Teachers*
Date range: 2014-2016
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ES-250628-16

Moravian College (Bethlehem, PA 18018-6650)
Hilde Binford (Project Director: 02/15/2016 to present)

Johann Sebastian Bach and the Music of the Reformation Churches

A four-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers on the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and of the Reformation churches, within the context of the Baroque and Enlightenment eras.

Moravian College’s proposed 2017 four-week Summer Institute, Johann Sebastian Bach and the Music of the Reformation Churches, is for K-12 teachers, taking place in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The goal of the institute is to provide teachers with methods and tools to integrate the music of Bach and the world of the Enlightenment into elementary, secondary and high school classrooms. The institute will demonstrate how to use Bach as a vehicle for teaching the social, cultural, intellectual and religious changes taking place in Europe from the 17th to 18th centuries. By situating the Institute in Bethlehem, participants will be immersed in the original Moravian settlement (1741) and have access to nearby historical sites and communities of other Pietist and Anabaptist sects known to Bach. Internationally-known scholars will present lectures and workshops describing the relationship of Bach’s life and music to the world around him, spanning the late Baroque era to the Age of Enlightenment.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$167,668 (approved)
$167,668 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


ES-250803-16

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center (Cortez, CO 81321-9408)
Sharon Milholland (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

From Mesa Verde to Santa Fe: Pueblo Identity in the Southwest

A three-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers on the history, migration, and present-day world of the southwestern Pueblo peoples.

World-altering challenges confronted the Pueblo Indians of U. S. Southwest starting in AD 1300. They departed their ancestral homelands, migrated into the northern Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico, redefined themselves in the context of other Pueblo communities, only to be confronted by Spanish conquistadors, missionaries, and colonists intent on acquiring wealth, saving souls, and generally replacing the indigenous populations of New Mexico. This little-known history is the subject of a three-week institute for 25 school teachers that evaluates why and how ancestral Pueblo people left their Mesa Verde homeland, what happened when they arrived and settled in the northern Rio Grande Valley, and how the arrival of Spaniards affected their options and shaped their adaptations. The institute integrates archaeological data, ethnohistorical documents, and traditional narratives to provide a richer interpretive context than available through any single line of evidence.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$187,349 (approved)
$187,349 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250805-16

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Shawn Alexander (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Teaching the "Long Hot Summer" of 1967 and Beyond: Racial Disturbances in Recent US History

A three-week summer institute for thirty schoolteachers on the urban riots of 1967, placed in a broad historical context.

The Langston Hughes Center proposes a three-week institute in June 2017 for thirty secondary teachers to study race, urban communities, and civil disturbances in historical context. It will feature a broad humanities outlook to place events in 1967 in perspective, utilizing an interdisciplinary faculty with differing viewpoints and diverse racial and gender identities, making connections between prior incidents and today. The institute will encourage teachers to think about the events and issues affecting their students from multiple viewpoints, becoming familiar with primary and secondary texts as well as innovative humanities-based strategies for engaging critical subject matter about race and conflict. Under the guidance of institute scholars, participants will develop web-based portfolios that include lesson plans suitable for their home institutions.

Project fields:
African American History; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$180,247 (approved)
$180,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250806-16

University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)
Rodrigo Rodriguez (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Tales from the Chihuahuan Desert: Borderlands Narratives

A two-week institute for twenty-five secondary schoolteachers, to be held at University of Texas-El Paso, that would examine historical and literary narratives of the Chihuahuan Desert people.

The 2017 NEH Summer Seminar for Teachers will provide 16 secondary school teachers in grades 6–12 with two weeks of intense, guided exploration of borderland narratives from the Chihuahuan Desert—a culturally and politically significant region for instructional consideration and critical research encompassing 139,000 square miles across several Mexican states and parts of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Building on the ethnohistorical work and narratology, we argue that the Chihuahuan Desert’s wide geographic space serves as a useful metaphor in conceptualizing the historical and cultural evolution of border identities, which are the product of space adaptations and bi-national influences. To that end, the Seminar will largely, but not exclusively, focus on the El Paso–Cd Juárez metroplex. The Seminar will provide teachers with a focused understanding of the dynamic nature and literacies of border people’s narratives and of their social, cultural, and political adaptations across time.

Project fields:
American Literature; Ethnic Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$132,262 (approved)
$132,262 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250816-16

Shepherd University (Shepherdstown, WV 25443-5000)
Sylvia Shurbutt (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Voices from the Misty Mountains

To support a three-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers that would explore Appalachian culture and history through literature, music, and theater.

Shepherd University proposes its third three-week seminar for public school teachers that will delve into the subject of Appalachian literature and culture. A literature of unexpected cultural diversity, the Appalachian literary works and topics that we have selected for the seminar will provide a deeper understanding of the complexity and cultural range of a region that encompasses the twelve states following the ridge of mountains stretching from New York to Georgia. The quality and depth of the Appalachian writers that will be explored in the seminar will allow participants the opportunity to listen to the variety of voices from this region. Participants will also take part in an Appalachian storytelling workshop led by an award-winning storyteller and listen to lectures about playwriting and dramatic storytelling. They will explore Appalachian music and tour the Appalachian heartland.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Cultural History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$152,310 (approved)
$152,310 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017

Funding details:
Original grant (2016) $147,543
Supplement (2017) $4,767


ES-250824-16

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Joseph Morris (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

America's Reconstruction: The Untold Story

A three-week institute for thirty schoolteachers on the history of Reconstruction and its aftermath in South Carolina and Georgia’s Sea Islands.

“America’s Reconstruction: The Untold Story” is a three week summer institute for K-12 teachers from July 9-29, 2017. Through seminars led by top scholars, study trips to locations in the SC and GA Lowcountry, and directed archival research, educators will learn more about one of the most neglected and misunderstood periods in US history, the post-Civil War era of Reconstruction, and how that history began in and was influenced by people and events in the Sea Islands. We will closely examine three broad themes over the course of the institute, including: (1) the Old South and wartime “prelude” to Reconstruction (2) the political, social, and economic facets of the Reconstruction era and its aftermath, and (3) American historical memory, the “Second Reconstruction” (modern Civil Rights Movement) and the place of Reconstruction memory in modern America. Each theme will offer unique insight into the most significant issues, events, personalities, and watershed moments of the postwar era.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$199,140 (approved)
$199,140 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250835-16

Primary Source (Watertown, MA 02472-4052)
Ann Marie Gleeson (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Foreign Exchanges: The U.S. and the Wider World in the Twentieth Century

A three-week institute for thirty-six schoolteachers exploring new perspectives for the study of U.S. identities and foreign interactions across the twentieth century.

The three-week summer institute we propose, "Foreign Exchanges: The U.S. and the Wider World in the Twentieth century," offers K-12 educators new perspectives for the study of U.S. identities and foreign interactions across the twentieth century - a century that forged the interconnected world our students inhabit today. Our course of study both complements and challenges traditional diplomatic history to bolster teachers' abilities to present a more thorough and nuanced account of American foreign relations, with a particular focus on the regions of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. Teachers in the institute will look at the various levels, modes, and structures through which the ideas of the "foreign" were constructed and consumed by Americans in the twentieth century, and the consequences of those ideas. Teachers will gain fluency with the richly creative literature of twentieth-century transnational U.S. history and learn from some of the field's leading scholars.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Diplomatic History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$172,270 (approved)
$172,270 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250836-16

Interfaith Center of New York (New York, NY 10115-0253)
Henry Goldschmidt (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Religious Worlds of New York: Teaching the Everyday Life of American Religious Diversity

A three-week summer institute for twenty-five schoolteachers on religious diversity in New York City neighborhoods, exemplified by six religious traditions.  

This three week institute will offer school teachers an advanced introduction to the religious diversity of the United States, through a rigorous engagement with both religious studies scholarship and the religious life of New York City. Participants will explore six major religious traditions. They will discuss the constitutional and pedagogic issues surrounding the study of religion in public and private schools. They will meet with diverse religious leaders, visit local houses of worship, and conduct field research to trace the presence of “religion” in a New York neighborhood. In addition to these community-based pedagogies, they will also explore a range of classroom strategies for teaching about religious life, including the use of literature and film. The institute will thus give participants the pedagogic tools they need to teach their students about the everyday religious lives of their fellow Americans from diverse faith traditions.

Project fields:
American Studies; Comparative Religion; Urban Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$169,169 (approved)
$169,169 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250856-16

Chicago Historical Society (Chicago, IL 60614-6038)
Lisa Oppenheim (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to 10/04/2016)
Rachel Allmen (Project Director: 10/04/2016 to present)

Rethinking the Gilded Age and Progressivisms: Race, Capitalism, and Democracy, 1877-1920

A four-week institute for thirty school teachers to explore the history of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era.

The Chicago Metro History Education Center (CMHEC), in partnership with the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)and Loyola University Chicago (LUC), proposes a Summer Institute entitled "Rethinking the Gilded Age and Progressivisms: Race, Capitalism, and Democracy, 1877-1920." From June 25 to July 21, 2017, thirty school teachers will deepen their knowledge and understanding of this crucial period in the US through readings, discussions, lectures, inquiries into primary sources, and explorations of historical and cultural sites in Chicago. The institute responds to the NEH initiative, "The Common Good" by creating an intellectual space for teachers to contemplate and debate how diverse individuals and groups with radically different perspectives defined, reformed and contributed to a vision of American democracy, opportunity, and culture. The civic discourse and actions then resonate in our world today.

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$207,405 (approved)
$207,405 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250891-16

San Jose State University Research Foundation (San Jose, CA 95112-5569)
Matthew Spangler (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

The Immigrant Experience in California through Literature and Theater

A two-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers on immigration to California as revealed through literature and theater.

In July 2014, the Departments of Communication Studies and Radio, TV, Film, and Theatre Arts at San Jose State University (SJSU) hosted a Summer Institute for School Teachers titled The Immigrant Experience in California through Literature and Theatre. The institute was a great success and we will be hosting it again in July 2016. We propose to host the institute a third time from June 25 to July 9, 2017. New to the 2017 institute will be faculty presentations by Khaled Hosseini (author The Kite Runner), Luis Alfaro (playwright, professor, and MacArthur Fellow), and Erika Lee (Director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota).

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$171,323 (approved)
$171,323 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250898-16

Center for Civic Education (Calabasas, CA 91302-1441)
William Harris (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Political and Constitutional Theory for Citizens

A three-week summer institute for twenty-five schoolteachers on the principles of American constitutionalism.

The Center for Civic Education proposes to conduct a Summer Institute on "Political and Constitutional Theory for Citizens: The National Academy for Civics and Government" for 25 participants in the summer of 2017. This Summer Institute, like its predecessors, is based on the perspective that all citizens of the United States, under the Constitution, can and must acquire a capacity to think theoretically about the nature of democracy and constitutionalism. William F. Harris, II of the University of Pennsylvania, who was the founding director of the Center for the Constitution at James Madison's Montpelier, will lead the institute. He has served as the academic director of the last 15 of the Center for Civic Education's Summer Institutes. Three eminent scholars of constitutional theory will serve as faculty as well. In addition, three master teachers will provide instruction in educational applications, with assistance from the staff of the Center.

Project fields:
Political Theory

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$194,702 (approved)
$194,702 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250900-16

New-York Historical Society (New York, NY 10024-5152)
Mia Nagawiecki (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)
Carol Berkin (Co Project Director: 09/14/2016 to present)

American Women at War

A three-week institute for thirty schoolteachers on the experiences of American women in the American Revolution, the Civil War, and World War II.

American Women at War will convene 30 schoolteachers, 24 renowned scholars, the vast treasures of the New-York Historical Society’s collections, and the resources of our Center for the Study of Women’s History for a three-week summer institute in 2017. The Institute will engage schoolteachers in deep primary source research, dialogue with leaders in the field, and meaningful curriculum projects to examine three critical wars in American history through the lens of women. As a result of the Institute, teachers will deepen their historical content knowledge; have the tools to incorporate primary sources into instructional practice, particularly as they relate to women’s history; broaden their understanding of how to present history fully and equitably, representing multiple perspectives; and develop their own library of primary and secondary source materials to enhance and enrich their classroom strategies.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$186,941 (approved)
$186,941 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250902-16

Theatre for a New Audience (New York, NY 10014-2840)
Katie Beganics (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Scholarship and Performance: Teaching Shakespeare's Plays

A two-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers focusing on the representations of family life in William Shakespeare’s plays Twelfth Night, Hamlet, and The Winter’s Tale

Theatre for a New Audience (TFANA) proposes a two-week Summer Institute for school teachers on Scholarship and Performance: A Combined Approach to Teaching Shakespeare’s Plays, to be held July 12 – 28, 2017, at TFANA’s Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn, New York. Offered to a national group of 25 middle and high school teachers, the Institute uses a carefully integrated approach to exploring text-based scholarship, contextual and original source material, language, and performance in three Shakespeare plays. This year’s participants will study TWELFTH NIGHT, HAMLET and THE WINTER'S TALE under the guidance of leading Shakespeare scholars and master teaching artists. The Institute will focus on Shakespeare’s representations of family life, with an emphasis on new approaches to issues of gender, authority, marriage, service, and friendship in the plays; recent scholarship on Shakespeare; and research in other fields.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$146,826 (approved)
$146,826 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250905-16

Five Colleges, Inc. (Amherst, MA 01002-2324)
Alice Nash (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Teaching Native American Histories

A two-week summer institute for twenty-five schoolteachers to examine themes of Native American history through the lens of one tribe, the Wampanoags, of southwestern Massachusetts.

This summer institute examines 5 key concepts in Native American Studies through a rigorous interdisciplinary humanities program that includes primary source analysis, museum and Native community visits, and discussions with Native and non-Native presenters. Scholars will live and work together in the Wampanoag homelands of southeastern Massachusetts exploring Native histories and their relationship to contemporary issues through the frameworks of 1)grounded history, 2)identities, 3)land, 4)historical trauma and 5)re-evaluating classroom resources for teaching Native American histories. This subject is timely because a wealth of exciting scholarship has appeared in the last decade, but these new understandings have not been widely incorporated into K-12 or even post-secondary teaching. The Institute is particularly well suited for History and Social Studies teachers because questions about sources and interpretation are integrated throughout and approached from several directions.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$137,497 (approved)
$137,497 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250946-16

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-1203)
Jacqueline Simmons (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Slavery in the Colonial North

A one-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers on slavery in the colonial North.

"Slavery in the Colonial North: Institutions and Individuals" will offer teachers the opportunity to look deeply into northern colonial enslavement and gain a better understanding of when northern enslavement developed, how it was maintained, where it was contested, what was unique about enslavement in the North, and why it remains relevant. Teachers will examine the legal and economic systems in colonial America and how these systems justified and relied on the existence of slavery. By the end of the seminar, participants will understand that, for economic and social reasons, slavery was as entrenched in the North as in the South. Educators will learn that by including enslavement as part of the story of colonial America, their students will see how the past is connected to their lives in the present day and how they might consider their futures.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$83,443 (approved)
$83,443 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-250955-16

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Laura Nash (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

From Harlem to Hip-hop: African-American History, Literature, and Song

A three-week institute for thirty schoolteachers to study African-American culture, from the Harlem Renaissance through hip hop, through history, literature, and music.

Fairfield University proposes a three-week summer Institute for school teachers. The scholars will present a range of perspectives on an interdisciplinary topic titled "From Harlem to Hip-hop: African-American History, Literature, and Song." The Institute includes training in the implementation of digital humanities as a means for conveying Institute content to students.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$175,323 (approved)
$175,323 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


ES-231004-15

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Scott Levi (Project Director: 02/19/2015 to present)

Central Asia in World History

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the role of Central Asia in world history from antiquity to the present day.  

3-week Summer Institute for 25 K-12 teachers to be held at Ohio State University July 10-29, 2016. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of how Central Asia has functioned as a crossroads of intercultural exchange and major events and trends within Central Asia. The Institute will be led by Dr. Scott Levi of Ohio State, and will consist of daily workshop sessions led by Dr. Levi and visiting faculty. Teachers will also have time to develop curricular modules as well as a product of the Institute.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$186,630 (approved)
$170,485 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231019-15

San Jose State University Research Foundation (San Jose, CA 95112-5569)
Matthew Spangler (Project Director: 02/19/2015 to present)

The Immigrant Experience in California through Literature and Theater

A two-week summer institute for twenty-five school teachers that would explore the immigrant experience in California through literary works and theatrical adaptations.

The Departments of Communication Studies, History, and Radio, TV, Film & Theatre Arts at San Jose State University (SJSU) propose to host a Summer Institute for 25 school teachers from July 17-31, 2016, titled: "The Immigrant Experience in California through Literature and Theatre." The institute seeks to deepen participants' knowledge about literary texts and theatre productions that document the immigrant experience and the legacy of immigration in California.

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$168,632 (approved)
$161,518 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231043-15

Theatre for a New Audience (New York, NY 10014-2840)
Katie Beganics (Project Director: 02/20/2015 to present)

Scholarship and Performance: Teaching Shakespeare's Plays

A two-week institute for twenty-five school teachers focusing on themes of justice and equity in William Shakespeare’s plays A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, and Othello.

Theatre for a New Audience requests a grant of $138,609 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support a two-week Summer Institute for school teachers in the summer of 2016 on Scholarship and Performance: A Combined Approach to Teaching Shakespeare's Plays. The Institute will be offered to 25 middle and high school teachers from around the country and will take place at Theatre for a New Audience's new home, Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn, New York. Focusing on the themes of justice and equity in A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, and OTHELLO, the Institute uses a carefully integrated approach to exploring text-based scholarship, contextual and original source material, language, and performance.

Project fields:
Classical Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$138,609 (approved)
$138,609 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/18/2016 – 12/31/2016


ES-231045-15

San Jose State University Research Foundation (San Jose, CA 95112-5569)
Susan Shillinglaw (Project Director: 02/20/2015 to present)

John Steinbeck: Social Critic and Ecologist

A three-week institute for twenty-seven school teachers on John Steinbeck as a novelist, social critic, and ecologist.

The Summer Institute will examine why John Steinbeck remains relevant as a novelist, social critic, and ecologist, and endures as a voice of twenty-first century American values and ideas. The Institute's target primary audience is middle and high school teachers of a diversity of subjects, including English, History and Science (elementary teachers also welcome). The project objective is to demonstrate new ways in which Steinbeck can be presented as a central figure in these subjects, and how his work continues to address the complexity of the American populace. An important element will be to consider the impact of ecological thinking on several of Steinbeck's major works, and how historical and contemporary agricultural and fishing industries influenced these works as well as today's society.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$184,471 (approved)
$158,579 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231107-15

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Chara Bohan (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Courting Liberty: Slavery and Equality Under the Constitution

A two-week school teacher institute for twenty-five participants on slavery and equality as constitutional issues in early United States history.

"Courting Liberty: Slavery and Equality Under the Constitution, 1770-1880" is a proposed NEH Summer Scholars two-week institute which will address the central constitutional dispute of the antebellum era - the question of whether the Constitution was a document that embraced ideas of liberty and equality, or whether it protected slavery. Expert faculty in fields including: African American Studies, History, Education, and Law and our institutional partner the Atlanta History Center, will facilitate rich academic experiences for 25 schoolteacher participants. In addition to field trips to museums, plantations, and historic landmarks, NEH Summer Scholars will engage in dynamic discussions with content experts, critically read landmark primary source documents, and participate in sessions to promote interactive strategies for teaching complex court cases and constitutional questions.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$132,588 (approved)
$127,993 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231108-15

Interfaith Center of New York (New York, NY 10115-0253)
Henry Goldschmidt (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Religious Worlds of New York: Teaching the Everyday Life of American Religious Diversity

A three-week summer institute for twenty-five school teachers on religious diversity in America, exemplified by six religious traditions.

This three week institute will offer school teachers an advanced introduction to the religious diversity of the United States, through a rigorous engagement with religious studies scholarship, and with the religious life of New York City. Participants will explore six major religious traditions. They will discuss the constitutional and pedagogic issues surrounding the study of religion in public and private schools. They will meet with diverse religious leaders, visit local houses of worship, and conduct field research to trace the presence of “religion” in a New York neighborhood. In addition to these community-based pedagogies, they will also explore a number of classroom strategies for teaching about religious life, including the use of literature and film. The institute will thus give participants the pedagogic tools they need to teach their students about lived religion – that is, about the everyday lives of their fellow Americans from diverse religious traditions.

Project fields:
American Studies; Comparative Religion; Urban Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$167,959 (approved)
$166,880 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231140-15

Immaculata University (Immaculata, PA 19345-9903)
William Watson (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Duffy's Cut: Immigration, Industrialization, and Illness in Nineteenth Century America

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on Irish immigration, public health, and nativism in the first half of the nineteenth century.

The proposed summer institute for middle and high school teachers will be held on July 11 – July 29, 2016, at Immaculata University in suburban Philadelphia. The three week Institute will examine the tragic events that occurred at Duffy’s Cut in 1832 in which fifty-seven Irish immigrant railroad workers lost their lives as a result of violence and disease. This historical event encompasses several enduring themes, including immigration and nativism, industrialization, and epidemic disease. Participants will examine these timely issues not only as they apply to the events of Duffy’s Cut but also as they relate to today’s changing demographics and the cultural, economic, and political divide that exists between immigrants and natives in the 21st century. The Institute will investigate the importance of the humanities in understanding contemporary issues in America and will serve as a model for teachers on how to incorporate the arts and sciences into the teaching of history.

Project fields:
Immigration History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$158,201 (approved)
$151,224 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231160-15

Museum of Chinese in America (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Joy Liu (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to 07/18/2016)
Lauren Nechamkin (Project Director: 07/18/2016 to present)

The Chinese Exclusion Act and Immigration in America

A two-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and its legacy.

On June 18th, 2012 Congress passed a resolution expressing “regret” for its 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, the first such statement in the 130 years since the Act’s passing. Such Congressional action prompted three humanities projects that address Chinese Exclusion and its legacy: a major NEH-supported traveling exhibition of the New-York Historical Society on view from September 2014 – April 2015, the NEH-supported historical documentary by Ric Burns that will air nationally in fall 2015, and the proposed NEH Summer Institute for Teachers at the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) scheduled for July 10-23, 2016. The Summer Institute will enable 25 K-12 teachers to learn from leading scholars and work with primary materials and artifacts. Participants will also develop pedagogical approaches for integrating these unique objects and original documents into their local school curricula and explore new perspectives on the history of immigration, citizenship, and what it means to be American.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Immigration History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$141,963 (approved)
$141,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 2/28/2017


ES-231176-15

Chicago Historical Society (Chicago, IL 60614-6038)
Robert Johnston (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to 10/14/2015)
Rachel Allmen (Project Director: 10/14/2015 to present)

Rethinking the Gilded Age and Progressivisms: Race, Capitalism, and Democracy, 1877-1920

A four-week institute for thirty school teachers to explore the history of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era.

The Chicago Metro History Education Center (CMHEC), in partnership with the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and Loyola University Chicago (LUC), proposes a Summer Institute entitled “Rethinking the Gilded Age and Progressive Era: Capitalism, Democracy, and Progressivisms, 1877 to 1920.” From Jun 27 to Jul 22, 2016, thirty K-12 teachers will deepen their knowledge and understanding of this important time period through readings, discussions, lectures, inquiries into primary sources, and exploration of historical and cultural resources in Chicago. The institute responds to the National Endowment for the Humanities’ “The Common Good” initiative by creating an intellectual space where teachers can contemplate and debate how individuals and groups defined, reformed, and contributed to a vision for American democracy, opportunity, and culture during a period when radically different perspectives often dominated the political and cultural discourse.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$198,275 (approved)
$198,275 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 6/30/2017


ES-231209-15

James Agee Film Project (Charlottesville, VA 22902-4657)
Jamie Ross (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

The Power of Place: Land and People in Appalachia

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers on southern Appalachian history and culture.

The Power of Place: Land and Peoples in Appalachia, a two-week institute, will be held at the University of North Carolina Asheville in 2016 from July 10 to July 22 and will host thirty K-12 educators from across the country. The institute is sponsored by the James Agee Film Project, an award winning educational media non-profit in East Tennessee, and producers of the NEH funded PBS series APPALACHIA: A History of Mountains and People. Using the Southern Appalachians as a case study, The Power of Place will use insights from environmental history to examine the role of landscape in the shaping of culture and history. The Power of Place will address these major humanities themes: 1) how the Appalachian mountains have shaped the people of the region and in turn how humans have shaped the mountains 2) how the story of Appalachia--including its land, peoples, and resources--relates to the larger American story and 3) the role cultural and biological diversity have played in the region

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$138,832 (approved)
$138,832 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231238-15

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Margaret O'Brien (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Teaching Shakespeare

A four-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on William Shakespeare’s Othello, The Tempest, and The Merchant of Venice.

The Folger Shakespeare Library proposes Teaching Shakespeare 2016, a four-week institute for secondary school teachers. A group of 25 participants will undertake an intensive study of the intellectual, pedagogical, and theatrical challenges of three Shakespeare plays, OTHELLO, THE TEMPEST, and THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, with an emphasis on what these plays have meant in American history. Working with a faculty of scholars, theater professionals, and mentor teachers, the participants will explore successful strategies for teaching these plays, while creating new materials to use in their own classrooms and share with other teachers around the country. Participants and institute faculty will approach these works via primary resources in order to reconstruct historical and cultural contexts; study production history; engage in theatrical practice; and explore digital collections in order to bring the plays across to a new generation of high school students.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$200,109 (approved)
$200,109 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231262-15

Ferris State University (Big Rapids, MI 49307-2295)
Christian Peterson (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

War, Revolution, and Empire: U.S.-Russian/Soviet Relations, 1776-Present

A four-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the political relationships between the United States and the Soviet Union/Russia, from 1776 through the present.

This proposed four-week institute for teachers will explore the complexities of U.S. -Russian/Soviet relations since 1776 through the prism of “War, Revolution, and Empire.” By reading a number of fundamental works and participating in cultural activities, the participants will develop a much deeper understanding of Russian/Soviet history and the evolution of U.S. foreign policy. As this institute unfolds, the participants will use their knowledge to address the question of why U.S.-Russian/Soviet relations have often become strained and competitive. Do geographical, historical, ideological, and cultural differences make conflict inevitable? If not, what steps can Americans and Russians take to improve the relationship between their nations in the coming years and break down the barriers that separate them?

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; Russian History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$178,724 (approved)
$155,037 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231291-15

Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040)
Cornelius Bynum (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

From Plessy to Brown: The African-American Freedom Struggle in the Twentieth Century

A four-week school teacher institute for twenty-five participants on the background and history of the African-American freedom struggle in the twentieth century.

“From Plessy to Brown: The African American Freedom Struggle in the Twentieth Century,” an National Endowment Summer Institute, is a four-week institute designed to help school teachers incorporate African American history and culture into their classrooms. It is organized around the specific goal of blending African American history and literature,geospatial information systems (GIS), and digital humanities into substantive classroom teaching methodologies and resources for history, social studies, and English instruction.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$199,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231299-15

City Lore: NY Center for Urban Folk Culture (New York, NY 10003-9345)
Amanda Dargan (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

A Reverence for Words: Understanding Muslim Cultures through the Arts

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers on Islamic poetry and related arts.

City Lore, in collaboration with Poets House, Teachers & Writers Collaborative and the Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University request funding for a second two-week NEH Summer Institute for School Teachers. Based on the success of the 2014 Institute and the persistent need for increased American understanding of Muslim cultures, this program remains vital and timely for educators and their students.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$186,170 (approved)
$186,170 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231305-15

Brooklyn Historical Society (Brooklyn, NY 11201-2711)
Emily Potter Ndiaye (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Freedom for One, Freedom for All? Abolition and Woman Suffrage, 1830s – 1920s

A two-week school teacher institute for thirty participants on the relationship between the abolition and women’s suffrage movements in the United States.

The two-week Summer Institute Freedom for One, Freedom for All?, a partnership between Brooklyn Historical Society (BHS) and the Museum of the City of New York (City Museum), will bring 30 middle and high school teachers to New York City to explore the intertwined histories of the abolitionist and woman suffrage movements in the United States from the 1830s through the 1920s. Using a rich array of primary sources and historical scholarship on view at both institutions, teachers will learn new narratives about these seminal movements in United States history and the connections between them. In light of upcoming important anniversaries for both the abolition and suffrage movements, educators will also learn ways to connect past with present using the lenses of race, gender, and class to unpack inequities and injustices that continue to challenge our nation.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$184,138 (approved)
$184,138 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-50550-14

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Stephanie Wood (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Mesoamerican Cultures and Their Histories: Focus on Oaxaca

A four-week institute for thirty school teachers on Mesoamerican history and culture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$199,629 (approved)
$199,628 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


ES-50551-14

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center (Cortez, CO 81321-9408)
Marjorie Connolly (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

From Mesa Verde to Santa Fe: Pueblo Identity in the Southwest

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the migration of Pueblo peoples of the American Southwest.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$196,058 (approved)
$179,540 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50553-14

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Deane Root (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Voices Across Time: Teaching American History Through Song

A five-week institute for twenty-five school teachers linking American popular songs to significant periods and events in American history.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$199,258 (approved)
$199,258 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50554-14

University of California, San Diego (La Jolla, CA 92093-0013)
Matthew Herbst (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Istanbul Between East and West: Crossroads to History

A three-week institute in Istanbul for twenty-five middle and high school teachers, exploring the history of the Byzantine Empire, the Ottoman Empire, and modern Turkey.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$190,934 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50557-14

University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)
Ronald Weber (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The Monuments of Rome in English Culture

A four-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the influence of Cicero and ancient Rome on law, government, and culture in Enlightenment-era Britain.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classical History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$191,143 (approved)
$191,143 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


ES-50562-14

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
James Moran (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The News Media and the Making of America, 1730-1865

A two-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the role of news media and communication in early America.

Project fields:
Journalism; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$126,733 (approved)
$126,624 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50571-14

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Brent Morris (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

America's Reconstruction: The Untold Story

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on the history of Reconstruction and its aftermath in South Carolina, Georgia, and the Sea Islands.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$203,897 (approved)
$196,213 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50574-14

College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, MA 01610-2395)
Todd Lewis (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Literatures, Religions, and Arts of the Himalayan Region

A four-week institute for twenty-five school teachers, examining the religions and cultures of Nepal, Kashmir, and Tibet.

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$199,380 (approved)
$159,824 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 3/31/2016


ES-50575-14

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Nwando Achebe (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Africa in World History

A four-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on central themes in African history.

Project fields:
African History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$199,040 (approved)
$190,943 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50578-14

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Peter Mandaville (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to 04/01/2015)
Susan Douglass (Project Director: 04/01/2015 to 06/08/2015)
Andrea Stanton (Co Project Director: 04/01/2015 to present)
Maria Dakake (Project Director: 06/08/2015 to present)

Teaching Connected Histories of the Mediterranean

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on the Mediterranean region in a world-historical context.

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$169,349 (approved)
$159,363 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50582-14

Theatre for a New Audience (New York, NY 10014-2840)
Katie Beganics (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Scholarship and Performance: A Combined Approach to Teaching Shakespeare's Plays

A two-week summer institute for twenty-five school teachers focusing on the theme "Politics and Persuasion" in William Shakespeare's plays As You Like It, Julius Caesar, and Macbeth.

Project fields:
Classical Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$136,071 (approved)
$136,071 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50583-14

Chicago Metro History Education Center (Chicago, IL 60610-3305)
Robert Johnston (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)
Rachel Allmen (Co Project Director: 03/30/2016 to present)

Rethinking the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

A four-week institute for thirty school teachers to explore new perspectives on the Gilded Age and Progressive Era in the context of Chicago history.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$197,943 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50586-14

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Deirdre Hollman (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Immigration, Migration, and the Transformation of the African-American Community in the 20th and 21st Centuries

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on black migration and immigration in twentieth- and twenty-first-century North America.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$177,047 (approved)
$157,128 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50587-14

Center for Civic Education (Calabasas, CA 91302-1441)
William Harris (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Political and Constitutional Theory for Citizens

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the principles of American constitutionalism.

Project fields:
American Government; Political Theory

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$191,806 (approved)
$191,806 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


ES-50588-14

University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)
Kathryn Shanley (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Literatures of Indigenous Peoples

A four-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the literatures of indigenous peoples in North America and Europe.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$190,119 (approved)
$189,123 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 3/31/2016


ES-50590-14

Five Colleges, Inc. (Amherst, MA 01002-2324)
Alice Nash (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Native Americans of New England: A Historical Overview

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the history of Native Americans in New England.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$180,922 (approved)
$144,603 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015