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Funded Projects Query Form
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Program: Institutes for School Teachers*
Date range: 2017-2019
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ES-267025-19

National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-0152)
Andrew Mink (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Christian Lentz (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Contested Territory: America’s Involvement in Vietnam, 1945-1975

A two-week summer institute for 36 K-12 teachers on the post-World War II French-Vietnamese conflict and American involvement in the Vietnam War.

Contested Territory: America’s Involvement in Southeast Asia, 1945–1975 is a proposal by the National Humanities Center (NHC) to the NEH Summer Institutes Program that aims to provide thirty-six secondary school humanities educators with a deeper understanding of how and why America became involved in fighting in Vietnam in the 1960s. Although the fiftieth anniversary of the Vietnam War has passed, American classrooms are still grappling with the complexities of that conflict. This institute will combine fresh scholarship, hands-on visualization technology, and best practice humanities pedagogy with a targeted goal of addressing this need.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$156,110 (approved)
$153,781 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267027-19

Plimoth Plantation, Inc. (Plymouth, MA 02362-1620)
Darius Coombs (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Lisa L. Heuvel (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Beyond the Mayflower: New Voices from Early America, 1500-1676

A two-week summer institute for 25 K-12 teachers on the evolution of indigenous-colonial relationships in seventeenth-century New England.

Beyond the Mayflower: New Voices from 17th-Century America is a two-week Summer Institute serving twenty-five K–12 educators. It will be held at Plimoth Plantation July 27–August 9, 2020. In 1620, Mayflower entered a Wampanoag homeland comprising almost seventy communities. The establishment of an English colony set in motion events that irrevocably changed a network of indigenous communities, each with its own traditions, challenges, and aspirations. This historical case study explores how indigenous-colonial relationships evolved through collaboration, conflict, and collapse. These legacies endure. Teachers will engage a diverse set of primary sources whose reinterpretation is rapidly changing the teaching of 17th-century American history—archaeological evidence, cartography, material culture, oral history, and written documents. Scholars and cultural leaders will guide educators as they incorporate new voices and ideas about community, leadership, and civics into their classrooms.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$158,641 (approved)
$152,256 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267034-19

Agnes Scott College (Decatur, GA 30030-3797)
Toby Emert (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Shakespeare and Digital Storytelling

A two-week institute for 25 school teachers on Shakespeare and adaptation, from folk tales to digital storytelling.

Located outside Atlanta, Agnes Scott College (ASC) proposes “Gen Z, Shakespeare, and Digital Storytelling,” a new two-week summer institute for 25 English teachers of grades 9-12. The theme of “translation,” as a means to contextualize Shakespeare’s art and to construct contemporary meaning, underpins ASC’s institute. It will be taught by an interdisciplinary team composed of a Project Director in English Education, a Professor of English and Shakespearean scholar, a Professor of Art, and an Associate Professor of History, supported by a consultant digital curator, an experienced theater educator, and two accomplished K-12 teachers. The institute will guide participants in an in-depth study of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Taming of the Shrew, and Hamlet, exploring the plays’ folk and fairy tales roots as well as 21st-century approaches to teaching Shakespeare, including digital storytelling (DST).

Project fields:
British Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$148,360 (approved)
$147,552 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267039-19

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Joseph Brent Morris (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
America's Reconstruction: The Untold Story

A three-week summer institute for 25 K-12 teachers on the history and legacy of Reconstruction in the South Carolina Lowcountry.

“America’s Reconstruction: The Untold Story” is a three week summer institute for K-12 teachers from July 7-27, 2020. Through seminars led by top scholars, study trips to locations in the SC Lowcountry, and directed archival research, educators will learn more about one of the most neglected and misunderstood periods in US history, the post-Civil War era of Reconstruction, and how that history began in and was influenced by people and events in the Sea Islands. We will closely examine three broad themes over the course of the institute, including: (1) the Old South and wartime “prelude” to Reconstruction (2) the political, social, and economic facets of the Reconstruction era and its aftermath, and (3) American historical memory, the “Second Reconstruction” (modern Civil Rights Movement) and the place of Reconstruction memory in modern America. Each theme will offer unique insight into the most significant issues, events, personalities, and watershed moments of the postwar era.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$184,114 (approved)
$175,787 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267059-19

Center for Documentary Studies (Durham, NC 27705-4854)
Wesley Hogan (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Judy Richardson (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
The Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Perspectives, 1940-1980

A three-week summer institute for 30 middle and high school educators on the grassroots history of the civil rights movement.

The Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Perspectives (1940-1980) Summer Institute will invite 30 teachers (grades 7-12) from across the U.S. for a three-week residency at Duke University in July 2020. The institute is designed by a collaborative team of scholars, Civil Rights Movement veterans, and educators from Duke University, the SNCC Legacy Project, and Teaching for Change. Participants will learn the bottom-up history of the Civil Rights Movement and receive resources and strategies to more deeply engage their students so that they see themselves in this movement to expand democracy for all. Participants will have the unique opportunity to learn from the people who made the history and from leading scholars of the era. This is particularly important since many history teachers received their degrees before the publication of critical recent scholarship on the Civil Rights Movement. The institute was offered for the first time in summer 2018.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$184,786 (approved)
$184,786 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267084-19

Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Susan L. Gabel (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Disability and Identity in History, Literature, and Media

A one-week institute for 30 K-12 educators on disability and identity in history and literature.

Wayne State University College of Education proposes a new week-long summer institute for twenty-eight K-12 teachers. Kindergarten through fifth grade teachers will be given preference. Guest Faculty will teach about identity and disability identity, and engage in deep discussions with participants. Institute Scholars will benefit from discussions with faculty and other Institute Scholars, pursue independent or collaborative projects, use analysis skills with primary sources, and translate their learning into their teaching. Cultural texts, including the texts of the K-12 curriculum, are embedded with frames of references often portraying disability identity as crystallized rather than evolving. With leadership from a team of renowned Guest Faculty, Institute Scholars will explore disability identity as it is represented in the K-12 curriculum.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$108,429 (approved)
$107,301 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267085-19

Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum (New York, NY 10036-1007)
Lynda Kennedy (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
The Cold War through the Collections of the Intrepid Museum

A two-week institute for 25 K-12 educators on the history and technology of the Cold War era.

The Intrepid Museum Foundation is respectfully requesting a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support a two-week Institute for educators, examining the history, experience and legacy of Cold War technology through the use of two historic sites—the former U.S. aircraft carrier Intrepid, a National Historic Landmark, and the former U.S. submarine, Growler, a unique artifact that represents the technology and tensions of the Cold War.   The Institute will immerse teachers in scholarly historical research as well as the history, artifacts and oral histories in the Museum’s collection that embody the Cold War era. Integrating content exploring the historical context of technological innovation, the Institute will serve a national group of 25 high school history and science teachers in order to deepen their understanding and increase confidence in their ability to explore the subject thoroughly, critically and engagingly with their students.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$127,000 (approved)
$126,575 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267106-19

San Jose State University Research Foundation (San Jose, CA 95112-5569)
Susan Shillinglaw (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
William Gilly (Co Project Director: July 2019 to present)
John Steinbeck: Social Critic and Ecologist

A three-week institute for 28 K-12 educators to study the writing of John Steinbeck.

The Summer Institute will examine why John Steinbeck remains relevant as a novelist, social critic, and ecologist, and endures as a voice of twenty-first century American values and ideas. The Institute's target primary audience is middle and high school teachers of a diversity of subjects, including English, History and Science. The project objective is to demonstrate new ways in which Steinbeck can be presented as a central figure in these subjects, and how his work continues to address the complexity of the American populace. An important element will be to consider the impact of ecological thinking on several of Steinbeck's major works, and how historical and contemporary agricultural and fishing industries influenced these works as well as today's society.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$184,624 (approved)
$181,977 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267111-19

San Jose State University Research Foundation (San Jose, CA 95112-5569)
Matthew Spangler (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
The Immigrant Experience in California through Literature and History

A two-week institute for 25 K-12 teachers to explore California’s immigration history through literary and historical texts.

"The Immigrant Experience in California through Literature and History" (San Jose State University, July 12-26, 2020) explores the history of immigration to California through a collection of literary texts: Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior, Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner, Andrew Lam's Perfume Dreams, poetry written by detainees at the Angel Island Immigration Station as collected in Judy Yung's book Island, and Luis Valdez's Valley of the Heart and Zoot Suit. Authors Kingston, Hosseini, Lam, Yung, and Valdez are institute faculty members and will lead sessions on their respective works. Participants will take field trips to sites around the San Francisco Bay Area, including the Spanish Mission in San Juan Bautista, Angel Island, downtown San Francisco, and San Jose's "Little Saigon" and "Japantown." Participants will create classroom lesson plans based on the institute material, or on the immigration literature and history of their home regions of the country.

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$159,898 (approved)
$155,303 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267120-19

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300)
Anthony F. Arrigo (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Hoover Dam and the Shaping of the American West

A two-week institute for 25 K-12 educators to study Hoover Dam and the development of the American West.

Two week institute for 6-12th grade schoolteachers on the history of water in the American West centered on Hoover Dam.

Project fields:
American Studies; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$136,972 (approved)
$134,264 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267130-19

Historical Society of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19107-5699)
Beth A. Twiss-Houting (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Becoming US: The Immigrant Experience through Primary Sources

A one-week institute for 30 K-12 teachers to study U.S. immigration history through archival collections in Philadelphia.

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania seeks a grant of $81,621 to develop and implement a one-week summer institute for 30 educators (grades 6-12) with the goal of introducing them to archival research and providing them with strategies for using primary source materials to build lesson plans within their social studies and civics education curriculum. Titled Becoming U.S., the institute will focus on broad themes of immigration and its complexities throughout American history, placing lessons about the past within historical and contemporary contexts. Pennsylvania was a critical port of entry in the 18th century as the colonies grew into a young nation. The institute will simultaneously engage the teachers with HSP’s renowned archival collections that document the stories of our nation’s past immigrant groups and their experiences while delving into how to use these stories and collections to make social studies curriculum more effective.

Project fields:
Immigration History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$81,621 (approved)
$81,275 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267131-19

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
James David Moran (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
David P. Nord (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
The News Media and the Making of America, 1730-1800

A one-week summer institute for 25 middle and high school educators on the news media in the revolutionary era.

The News Media and the Making of America, 1730–1800 is a one-week Summer Institute for 25 school teachers teaching grades 5–12 offered by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) in the summer of 2020. This Institute is both a colloquium and a hands-on workshop that will explore how news media—in all its various forms—was connected to civic engagement and how media fit into the public and private lives of the American people. The academic fields that inform the Institute include early American history as well as the history of journalism, readers and reading. The colonial period and the era of the American Revolution are part of every K-12 curriculum, and this Institute will provide participants with a unique and relevant way to approach that material. With many states increasing their emphasis on civics and media literacy, studying the founding of the country through the lens of news media will help teachers help their students to see their own media lives in historical perspective.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$92,903 (approved)
$92,391 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267135-19

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Brian Jones (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Ansley T. Erickson (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Harlem’s Education Movements: Changing the Civil Rights Narrative

A two-week summer institute for 25 middle and high school educators on efforts to secure equitable education in twentieth-century Harlem.

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library, in partnership with Teachers College, Columbia University, requests support for a new two-week summer institute titled, “Harlem’s Education Movements: Changing the Civil Rights Narrative.” Through scholarly presentations, dialogue with movement veterans, place-based pedagogy, and guided exploration of the Schomburg Center’s unique archival collections, this two-week institute will provide twenty-five teachers of grades 6-12 with an opportunity to learn about the history of Black people’s efforts to secure access to and equity in schools and other educational institutions in Harlem from the 1930s through the 1970s.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$138,751 (approved)
$131,908 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


ES-267140-19

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Sean Connors (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Lissette Lopez Szwydky Davis (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Remaking Monsters and Heroines: Adapting Classic Literature for Contemporary Audiences

A two-week institute for 30 school teachers on Frankenstein, Cinderella, and adaptations of these classic texts.

This summer Institute will help thirty (30) K-12 educators develop a vocabulary and framework for teaching adaptations alongside a range of canonical texts that they already use (or are considering using) in their classrooms. The Institute will feature hands-on technology workshops (including user-friendly freeware for podcasting, video editing, and digital imaging) to adapt traditional texts for new audiences and to help educators replicate these activities in the classroom. The goals of the adaptation-focused Institute include the following: (1) to demonstrate to interdisciplinary K-12 educators the significance of teaching canonical texts alongside adaptations; (2) to support the examining and understanding of oral storytelling, fairy tales, and folktale traditions in the humanities; and (3) to demonstrate best practices for incorporating a variety of genres and media reflecting diverse storytelling forms.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$160,000 (approved)
$160,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267151-19

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Christian K. Anderson (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Kenneth Winchester Gaines (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Freedom’s Lawmakers: Black Leadership during Reconstruction

A three-week summer institute for 25 K-12 teachers on the impact and legacy of black elected officials during Reconstruction.

The U of SC Center for Innovation in Higher Education in partnership with the U of SC School of Law, the historic Penn Center and the South Carolina Supreme Court Historical Society proposes a three week summer institute in July of 2020 for 25 K-12 teachers to study and learn about a seminal moment in American political history when large numbers of Black Americans who, though but one generation removed from slavery, were selected by their peers and party affiliates to take on the responsibilities of governance on the local, state, and national levels. The goal of the institute is to bring these individuals into focus and examine their lives, who they were, what they wanted, what they did, and their role in the Reconstruction experiment. This institute will expand the teaching of Reconstruction into a wider use for teaching and research in the humanities.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Political History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$176,440 (approved)
$173,012 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267164-19

New Bedford Whaling Museum (New Bedford, MA 02740-6398)
Timothy W. Marr (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Wyn Kelley (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Moby-Dick and the World of Whaling in the Digital Age

A two-week institute for K-12 educators on Herman Melville’s classic, Moby-Dick.

The New Bedford Whaling Museum (NBWM) and the Melville Society Cultural Project (MSCP) will offer a two-week Summer Institute from June 19 to July 2, 2020 titled “Moby-Dick and the World of Whaling in the Digital Age.” This Institute will build on the success of the 2018 Summer Institute of the same format and theme, which hosted teachers of grades 9-12 in New Bedford, MA to investigate the art and contexts of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. Through this institute, participants will encounter the rich worlds of Moby-Dick to better understand and appreciate Melville’s literary power and interpret the book's wonders for their students. This Institute will extend the sharing of our communal resources to twenty-five educators from around the nation, to empower them to journey with their students ever more boldly into Moby-Dick, and to dramatize the imperative value of the humanities as an essential antidote to the diminished discourse of tweet and sound byte.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$157,321 (approved)
$156,986 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267170-19

New-York Historical Society (New York, NY 10024-5152)
Leslie Hayes (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Nicholas A. Juravich (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
American Women, American Citizens: 1920-1948

A two-week institute for 30 teachers on women's history in the United States between 1920 and 1948.

This project comprises a two-week professional development institute for 30 school teachers and 13 scholars in the field of women's history in July 2020. This conference will empower teachers to incorporate the voices of a diverse range of women into their instruction on early-to-mid 20th century United States history through interactive pedagogy workshops, lesson writing support, and dialogue with leading scholars in the field. Participants will deepen their content knowledge of US history in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s, with an emphasis on women; practice incorporating primary sources and secondary texts into their instruction; and reflect on how women’s history can and should be woven into the broader history curriculum for middle and high school students. Participants will have full access to N-YHS's library and museum collections, as well as to the expertise of our education staff.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$146,096 (approved)
$144,607 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267180-19

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Margaret H. O'Brien (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Shakespeare and the Making of America

A three-week institute for 25 school teachers on Shakespeare and early American history.

The Folger Shakespeare Library—in partnership with the College of William & Mary, the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Historic Jamestowne, and Colonial Williamsburg—will immerse 25 middle and high school teachers in this three-week institute focused on exploring the flow and clash of Shakespeare and Renaissance culture in the early days of the American experiment through a rigorous study of The Tempest and The Merchant of Venice. Teacher participants, resident faculty, and staff will live on-campus at W&M, attend lectures and other classes in the Wren Building, and undertake research at Historic Jamestowne and Colonial Williamsburg. As always, rigorous study of the plays will be distinguished by attention to their scholarly, performative, and pedagogical elements. For the first time, however, we include significant focus on elements of the Early Modern and Early American worlds in which these plays are deeply embedded, particularly in the state of Virginia. This area of inquiry is close to undeveloped in the scholarly world, and nearly unknown to middle and high school teachers. Teaching Shakespeare: Shakespeare and the Making of America, therefore, draws schoolteachers into exciting research and scholarship “as it happens.”

Project fields:
Literature, Other

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$185,000 (approved)
$185,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-267191-19

American Civil War Museum Foundation (Richmond, VA 23219-4328)
Stephanie Arduini (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Nicole Annette Moore (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Kristin Gallas (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Emancipation and Evolving American Identity

A two-week summer institute for 36 K-12 teachers on the process of emancipation in Civil War-era America.

The American Civil War Museum’s (ACWM) new two-week NEH Summer Institute Emancipation and Evolving American Identity will bring three dozen K-12 teachers to a deeper understanding of the history of emancipation and its impact on Americans past and present. Civil War-era scholars will contextualize the policy and process of emancipation through lectures, discussions, and visits to historic sites. Additionally, public history professionals and experienced K-12 educators will provide primary sources and model best practices for teaching an often complex, sensitive, and misunderstood topic. Ultimately, participants will create a plan to lead a professional development session for their school or district that models the content, techniques, and resources learned at the Institute.

Project fields:
African American History; Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$159,551 (approved)
$158,588 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ES-261599-18

Theatre for a New Audience (New York, NY 10014-2840)
Kathleen Dorman (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Teaching Shakespeare’s Plays through Scholarship and Performance

A two-week summer institute for 25 school teachers on the text and performance of Shakespeare’s plays.

Theatre for a New Audience (TFANA) proposes a two-week Summer Institute on Scholarship and Performance: Teaching Shakespeare's Plays, to be held July 15-26, 2019, at TFANA's Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn, New York. Offered to a national group of 25 middle and high school teachers, the Institute introduces a carefully integrated approach for exploring text-based scholarship, contextual and original source material, language, and performance in three Shakespeare plays. This year's participants will study ROMEO AND JULIET, ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL, and RICHARD III under the guidance of leading Shakespeare scholars Julie Crawford (Columbia University) and Mario DiGangi (Lehman College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York), and master teaching artists and theatre practitioners Krista Apple and Claudia Zelevansky.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$153,877 (approved)
$153,877 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261625-18

Rendell Center for Civics and Civic Engagement (Philadelphi, PA 19104-3806)
Bruce Allen Murphy (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Sally Flaherty (Co Project Director: September 2018 to present)
The First Amendment and Twenty-first-Century America

A one-week seminar for 30 school teachers on the First Amendment.

One week intensive institute for k-12 teachers on the United States Constitution and the First Amendment, focusing on the delicate balance between the rights of individuals and the need to govern society and keep it safe. The institute will begin with an historical review and a conceptual discussion of the founding of the United States with an emphasis on important founding documents. The Institute will then move to a study of the issues raised by the incorporation of the First Amendment into the Fourteenth Amendment Due Process Clause. And finally, it will examine specific issues that emerge out of the First Amendment as seen in major Supreme Court Decisions. The institute will not only explore substantive matters, but also promote the development of critical thinking and the disposition to question. Participants will then discuss how to apply the strong content in their own classrooms.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$94,734 (approved)
$94,554 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261627-18

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Stephanie G. Wood (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Discovering Native Histories along the Lewis and Clark Trail

A three-week institute for 25 school teachers to explore the history of native and non-native peoples along the Lewis and Clark trail in Montana and North Dakota.

The three-week National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute, “Discovering Native Histories along the Lewis and Clark Trail,” will invite 25 U.S. K–12 school teachers to engage in a historiographical investigation along part of the Trail—from Missoula, MT, to Bismarck, ND. The institute will involve an educational journey of discovery to visit landmarks and meet with Native educators, national and state park interpreters, university professors familiar with that episode in our shared history, and be guided by a National Archives expert in indigenous historical records. We will study written and painted primary and secondary sources for what we can learn of Native histories, hear oral traditions from tribal elders across the region, read journals from the Corps of Discovery, examine Native and non-Native original manuscripts in the North Dakota Historical Society archives, view archaeological remains, and study three dimensional objects in museums.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$179,247 (approved)
$175,229 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 11/30/2020


ES-261629-18

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc. (Cortez, CO 81321-9408)
Sharon K. Milholland (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Kathleen Stemmler (Co Project Director: September 2018 to present)
Continuity and Change in the Pueblo World from Mesa Verde to Santa Fe

A three-week institute for 25 school teachers to explore the migration of Pueblo peoples from their homeland in Colorado’s Mesa Verde region to New Mexico’s Rio Grande Valley.

World-altering challenges confronted the Pueblo Indians of the U. S. Southwest starting in A.D. 1280. They departed their ancestral homelands, migrated into the northern Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico, redefined themselves in the context of other Pueblo communities, only to be confronted by Spanish conquistadors, missionaries, and colonists intent on acquiring wealth, saving souls, and replacing the indigenous populations of New Mexico. The institute examines this history from the perspectives of two cultures (Euroamerican and Pueblo) and three academic disciplines (archaeology, ethnohistory, and oral history. We highlight a fascinating history and show how distinct academic disciplines and cultural core values interact to produce different data, epistemologies, and ultimately different reconstructions of the past. The complexities produced by the mix of academic disciplines and cultural perspectives offer opportunities to develop projects for all classroom subjects and grades.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$184,844 (approved)
$184,844 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261642-18

Five Colleges, Inc. (Amherst, MA 01002-2324)
Alice Nash (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Linda Coombs (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Teaching Native American Histories

A three-week institute for 25 school teachers on the history of Native Americans in New England.

This summer institute examines five key concepts in Native American Studies through a rigorous, interdisciplinary humanities program that includes primary source analysis, museum and Native community visits, and conversations with Native and non-Native guest presenters. For three weeks, participants will live and work together in the Wampanoag homelands of southeastern Massachusetts to explore Native histories and contemporary issues through the framework of grounded history, identities, land, historical trauma and re-evaluating classroom resources. This topic is timely because a wealth of exciting scholarship has appeared since the turn of the 21st century but these new understandings have not been widely incorporated into K-12 or even post-secondary teaching. The Institute is particularly well suited for History and Social Studies teachers because questions about sources and interpretation are integrated throughout and approached from several directions.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$178,564 (approved)
$178,564 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261653-18

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Howard Rambsy (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Frederick Douglass and Literary Crossroads

A one-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on Frederick Douglass and African American literary studies.

The proposed Institute, “Frederick Douglass and Literary Crossroads,” exposes secondary school teachers to new developments in African American literary studies, an array of print-based, audio, and visual texts, and digital resources all in an effort to enliven and strengthen pedagogical engagements with The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845). The African American literature program at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville proposes a one-week institute that will give language arts educators opportunities to expand their views of how Douglass’s work resides at the crossroads of autobiography, literary art, and scholarly discourse. The proposed Institute will involve participants in knowledge and skill building workshops, technology activities, and collaborative projects designed to fortify interpretive capabilities and pedagogical expertise.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$106,009 (approved)
$106,002 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261664-18

University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)
Ignacio Martinez (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
R. Joseph Rodriguez (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Tales from the Chihuahuan Desert: Borderlands Narratives about Identity and Binationalism

A two-week institute for 25 school teachers to study the history, literature, and culture of the Chihuahuan Desert region.

The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and in collaboration with the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies (CIBS) and the Institute of Oral History (IOH), non-profit research and education centers at UTEP, propose a Summer Institute for School Teachers from July 14th to July 28th, 2019. Building on the successful participation of 24 Summer Scholars in the 2017 Summer Institute for School Teachers titled “Tales from the Chihuahuan Desert: Borderlands Narratives about Identity and Binationalism,” the 2019 Summer Institute will provide 25 secondary school teachers (NEH Summer Scholars) in grades 6–12 with two weeks of intense, guided exploration of borderland narratives from the Chihuahuan Desert—a culturally and politically significant region for instructional consideration and critical research encompassing 139,000 square miles across several Mexican states and parts of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona.

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$131,542 (approved)
$131,542 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261677-18

Interfaith Center of New York (New York, NY 10115-0253)
Henry Goldschmidt (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Religious Worlds of New York: Teaching the Everyday Life of American Religious Diversity

A three-week institute for 25 school teachers on religious diversity in New York City.

This three week institute will offer K-12 teachers an advanced introduction to the religious diversity of the United States, through a rigorous engagement with both religious studies scholarship and the religious life of New York City. Participants will explore six major religious traditions. They will discuss the constitutional and pedagogic issues surrounding the study of religion in public and private schools. They will meet with diverse religious leaders, visit local houses of worship, and conduct field research to trace the presence of religion in a New York neighborhood. In addition to these community-based pedagogies, they will also explore a range of classroom strategies for teaching about religious life, including the use of literature, film, and the arts. The institute will thus give participants the pedagogic tools they need to teach their students about the everyday lives of their fellow Americans from diverse faith traditions.

Project fields:
American Studies; Comparative Religion; Urban Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$173,038 (approved)
$173,038 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261681-18

Alabama Humanities Foundation (Birmingham, AL 35205-7011)
Martha V. Bouyer (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
"Stony the Road We Trod . . . ": Exploring Alabama's Civil Rights Legacy

A three-week institute for 30 school teachers on the history and legacy of the civil rights movement in Alabama.

"Stony the Road We Trod...": Exploring Alabama's Civil Rights Legacy offers educators a rare opportunity to explore America’s Second Revolution for Civil and Human Rights in an interactive, intensive institute. Often referred to as, the “Heart of Dixie,” the “Cradle of the Confederacy," and the “Birthplace of the Modern Civil Rights Movement,” Alabama's story is one of great magnitude and depth that must be explored in thought and discussion as much as through text and research in order to understand and appreciate the significance of the role it played in shifting the strategy and outcomes of the national and global struggles for civil rights. Through lectures and discussions with noted scholars; interactions with foot soldiers of the Movement; trips to key sites of memory; and primary source research, participants will better understand how events in Alabama impacted the struggle for civil rights around the world. This inspiring, three-week institute will be offered July 7-27, 2019.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$178,871 (approved)
$178,870 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/1/2019


ES-261717-18

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Lisa Reilly (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Thomas Jefferson: The Public and Private Worlds of Monticello and the University of Virginia

A two-week institute for 30 school teachers on Thomas Jefferson and community life at Monticello and the University of Virginia.

“Thomas Jefferson: The Public and Private Worlds of Monticello and the University of Virginia” seeks to bring K-12 schoolteachers together with some of the foremost scholars on Thomas Jefferson in a two-week institute during the summer of 2019. This institute will provide teachers with an on-site introduction to Thomas Jefferson's writings, architecture, and other evidence of material culture, with the goal of establishing a full and complex narrative of not only Jefferson’s life, but of those who inhabited the Monticello and University communities. By reading for themselves the evidence that can inform our understanding of Jefferson and his private and public realms, participants will be better equipped to teach the process of reading and understanding primary sources, both textual and material, and to evaluate them within a larger historical context.

Project fields:
Architecture; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$158,907 (approved)
$158,907 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


ES-261739-18

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-5591)
Jacqueline Simmons (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Slavery in the Colonial North

A one-week institute for 25 school teachers on slavery in the colonial North.

Slavery in the Colonial North will offer K-12 teachers the opportunity to look deeply into northern colonial enslavement and gain a better understanding of when northern enslavement developed, how it was maintained, where it was contested, what was unique about enslavement in the North, and why it remains relevant. Teachers will examine the legal and economic systems in colonial America and how these systems justified and relied on the existence of slavery. By the end of the institute, participants will understand that, for economic and social reasons, slavery was as entrenched in the North as in the South. Educators will learn that, by including enslavement as part of the story of colonial America, their students will see how the past is connected to their lives in the present day and how they might consider their futures.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$109,490 (approved)
$109,490 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261741-18

New-York Historical Society (New York, NY 10024-5152)
Mia Nagawiecki (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Carol Berkin (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
American Women in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars

A three-week summer institute for 30 school teachers on the role of women in the American Revolutionary War and the U.S. Civil War.

American Women at War will convene 30 schoolteachers, 15 renowned scholars, the vast treasures of the New-York Historical Society’s (N-YHS) collections, and the resources of our Center for Women’s History for a three-week summer Institute in 2019. Building on N-YHS’s successful 2017 NEH Institute of the same name, American Women at War will engage schoolteachers in primary source analysis, dialogue with leaders in the field, and meaningful curriculum projects to examine two critical wars in American history through the lens of women’s experiences and actions. As a result of the Institute, K-12 teachers will deepen their historical content knowledge; have the tools to incorporate primary sources into instructional practice, particularly as they relate to women’s history; broaden their understanding of how to present history fully and equitably, representing multiple perspectives; and develop their own library of primary and secondary source materials to enhance teaching.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$173,056 (approved)
$173,056 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-261753-18

Loyola University, Chicago (Chicago, IL 60611-2147)
Charles Tocci (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Rethinking the Gilded Age and Progressive Era: Race, Capitalism, and Democracy (1877–1920)

A four-week institute for 30 school teachers to explore the history of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era.

The Loyola University Chicago (LUC) in partnership with the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) propose to convene for a fifth summer its institute titled "Rethinking the Gilded Age and Progressivisms: Race, Capitalism, Democracy, 1877 to 1920." From June 30 through July 26, 2019, thirty school teachers will deepen their knowledge and understanding of this crucial period through readings, discussions, lectures, inquiries into primary sources, and exploration of landmark historical issues.

Project fields:
History, General; Labor History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-256815-17

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Chara Haeussler Bohan (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
H. Robert Baker (Co Project Director: October 2018 to present)
Courting Liberty: Slavery and Equality Under the Constitution, 1770-1870

A two-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on slavery and equality as central constitutional issues in early United States history.

"Courting Liberty: Slavery and Equality Under the Constitution, 1770-1880" is a proposed NEH Summer Scholars two-week institute which will address the central constitutional dispute of the antebellum era - the question of whether the Constitution was a document that embraced ideas of liberty and equality, or whether it protected slavery. Expert faculty in fields including: African American Studies, History, Education, and Law and our institutional partner the Atlanta History Center, will facilitate rich academic experiences for 25 schoolteacher participants. In addition to field trips to museums, plantations, and historic landmarks, NEH Summer Scholars will engage in dynamic discussions with content experts, critically read landmark primary source documents, and participate in sessions to promote interactive strategies for teaching complex court cases and constitutional questions.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$141,073 (approved)
$141,073 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256823-17

James Agee Film Project (Charlottesville, VA 22902-4657)
Jamie Simpson Ross (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Daniel S. Pierce (Co Project Director: August 2017 to September 2018)
The Power of Place: Land and Peoples in Appalachia

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers on the role of landscape in shaping southern Appalachian history and culture.

The Power of Place: Land and Peoples in Appalachia, a two-week institute on the environmental history of the southern Appalachians, will be held at the University of North Carolina Asheville from July 8 to July 22, 2017. The institute will host thirty K-12 educators from across the country and will be sponsored by the James Agee Film Project, producers of APPALACHIA: A History of Mountains and People, an award winning PBS series made with support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Power of Place will use insights from the field of environmental history to explore the role of landscape in shaping human culture and, in turn, the way humans have shaped the land, with the southern Appalachians as a case study.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$145,003 (approved)
$145,003 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


ES-256830-17

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Joseph Brent Morris (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
America's Reconstruction: The Untold Story

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the post-Civil War era of Reconstruction in the South Carolina and Georgia low country.

America’s Reconstruction: The Untold Story” is a three week summer institute for K-12 teachers from July 8-28, 2018. Through seminars led by top scholars, study trips to locations in the SC and GA Lowcountry, and directed archival research, educators will learn more about one of the most neglected and misunderstood periods in US history, the post-Civil War era of Reconstruction, and how that history began in and was influenced by people and events in the Sea Islands. We will closely examine three broad themes over the course of the institute, including: (1) the Old South and wartime “prelude” to Reconstruction (2) the political, social, and economic facets of the Reconstruction era and its aftermath, and (3) American historical memory, the “Second Reconstruction” (modern Civil Rights Movement) and the place of Reconstruction memory in modern America. Each theme will offer unique insight into the most significant issues, events, personalities, and watershed moments of the postwar era.

Project fields:
African American History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$199,803 (approved)
$199,803 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256831-17

Theatre for a New Audience (New York, NY 10014-2840)
Katie Beganics (Project Director: February 2017 to November 2017)
Victoria Barclay (Project Director: November 2017 to present)
Scholarship and Performance: Teaching Shakespeare’s Plays

A two-week institute for twenty-five school teachers focusing on the themes of community and national identity in William Shakespeare’s plays The Merry Wives of Windsor, Macbeth, and King Lear.

Theatre for a New Audience (TFANA) proposes a two-week Summer Institute on Scholarship and Performance: Teaching Shakespeare’s Plays, to be held July 16-27, 2018, at TFANA’s Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn, New York. Offered to a national group of 25 middle and high school teachers, the Institute introduces a carefully integrated approach for exploring text-based scholarship, contextual and original source material, language, and performance in three Shakespeare plays. This year’s participants will study THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, MACBETH, and KING LEAR under the guidance of leading Shakespeare scholars Julie Crawford (Columbia University) and Mario DiGangi (Lehman College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York), and master teaching artists and theatre practitioners Krista Apple and Claudia Zelevansky.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$148,976 (approved)
$148,976 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256833-17

Area Cooperative Educational Services (ACES) (North Haven, CT 06473-3108)
Jennifer Kelly Murrihy (Project Director: February 2017 to August 2017)
Leslie Abbatiello (Project Director: August 2017 to present)
The Long Civil Rights Movement

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers on the “long civil rights movement” from the Civil War to today.

Area Cooperative Educational Services (ACES) and Yale University propose a two-week institute for school teachers entitled “The Long Civil Rights Movement: Unfinished Business and Enduring Legacies.” The program will be held at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in July 2018. This institute is designed for K-12 teachers interested in looking broadening their current understanding of the Civil Rights Movement, enhancing their teaching of this period in American history, and applying the lessons learned from the Civil Rights Movement to the issues pervading national life today.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$154,991 (approved)
$154,991 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256843-17

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Rolando Herts (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week institutes for seventy-two school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta was presented as a Landmarks in American History workshop with NEH support in June and July of 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016. This 2018 institute will inform participants of the important role that the Mississippi Delta has played in American history, a role that is very often ignored or overlooked. Since the Delta is a place of “mean poverty and garnish opulence” (according to Will Campbell), intellectual exploration of its heritage requires building a community of civility. Our approach is highly experiential and tells heritage stories at the places where they happened.

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$189,387 (approved)
$189,387 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256846-17

University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)
Claire Clark (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Addiction in American History

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on the history and literature of addiction in twentieth-century America.

The NEH Summer Institutes provide professional development opportunities for secondary schoolteachers. The institutes offer models of exemplary teaching and scholarship on a variety of topics related to the humanities. This institute on Addiction in American History will support the College of Medicine's educational and community outreach goals. It will draw on the Program Director’s teaching experience with secondary education and medical humanities, the subject area expertise of visiting and onsite program faculty, and the unique historical assets of Lexington, Kentucky- home to the nation’s central federal addiction treatment facility from the 1930s until the 1970s- to equip educators to address this timely yet enduring topic using the established humanistic techniques of historical analysis and close reading.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$146,611 (approved)
$146,611 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256853-17

Interfaith Center of New York (New York, NY 10115-0253)
Henry Goldschmidt (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Religious Worlds of New York: Teaching the Everyday Life of American Religious Diversity

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on religious diversity in New York City neighborhoods.

This three week institute will offer school teachers an advanced introduction to the religious diversity of the United States, through a rigorous engagement with both religious studies scholarship and the religious life of New York City. Participants will explore six major religious traditions. They will discuss the constitutional and pedagogic issues surrounding the study of religion in public and private schools. They will meet with diverse religious leaders, visit local houses of worship, and conduct field research to trace the presence of religion in a New York neighborhood. In addition to these community-based pedagogies, they will also explore a range of classroom strategies for teaching about religious life, including the use of literature and film. The institute will thus give participants the pedagogic tools they need to teach their students about the everyday lives of their fellow Americans from diverse faith traditions.

Project fields:
American Studies; Comparative Religion; Urban Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,550 (approved)
$170,550 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256856-17

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Carol Bakhos (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Religious Landscapes of Los Angeles

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers on religious diversity in America, using Los Angeles as a case study.

Our summer two-week institute (July 16-27, 2018) seeks to provide the tools K-12 educators need to teach about religious diversity in a manner that draws attention not only to differences that distinguish religious traditions from one another, but also commonalities that give us a deeper appreciation for shared ethical norms and values. In order to foster a diverse and inclusive environment, it is important to understand the ways in which humans express themselves religiously. We hope to bring 30 teachers from across America to Los Angeles, where they will work closely with scholars of religion, meet with local religious leaders, visit houses of worship, explore the life of the city, and engage in service learning with the purpose of developing their own curriculum projects.

Project fields:
Comparative Religion

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$143,136 (approved)
$143,136 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


ES-256857-17

Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum (New York, NY 10036-1007)
Lynda Kennedy (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
The Cold War through the Collections of the Intrepid Museum

A two week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the history, experience, and legacy of the Cold War through its technology.

The Intrepid Museum Foundation seeks a $126,283 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities toward a two-week Institute for educators, examining the history, experience and legacy of Cold War technology through the use of two historic sites—the former U.S. aircraft carrier Intrepid, a National Historic Landmark, and the former U.S. submarine, Growler, a unique artifact that represents the technology and tensions of the Cold War. The Cold War through the Collections of the Intrepid Museum will immerse teachers in scholarly historical research as well as the history, artifacts and oral histories in the Museum’s collection that embody the Cold War era. Integrating content exploring the historical context of technological innovation, the Institute will serve a national group of 25 high school history and science teachers in order to deepen their understanding and increase confidence in their ability to explore the subject thoroughly, critically and engagingly with their students

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$126,283 (approved)
$126,283 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256862-17

Alabama Humanities Foundation (Birmingham, AL 35205-7011)
Martha V. Bouyer (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
"Stony the Road We Trod...": Exploring Alabama's Civil Rights Legacy

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on the history and legacy of the civil rights movement in Alabama.

"Stony the Road We Trod...": Exploring Alabama's Civil Rights Legacy offers educators a rare opportunity to explore America’s Second Revolution for Civil and Human Rights in an interactive, intensive institute. Often referred to as, the “Heart of Dixie,” the “Cradle of the Confederacy," and the “Birthplace of the Modern Civil Rights Movement,” Alabama's story is one of great magnitude and depth that must be explored in thought and discussion as much as through text and research in order to understand and appreciate the significance of the role it played in shifting the strategy and outcomes of the national and global struggles for civil rights. Through lectures and discussions with noted scholars; interactions with foot soldiers of the Movement; trips to key sites of memory; and primary source research, participants will better understand how events in Alabama impacted the struggle for civil rights around the world. This inspiring, three-week institute will be offered July 8-28, 2018.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$185,907 (approved)
$185,907 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/1/2018


ES-256868-17

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Robert Korstad (Project Director: March 2017 to February 2020)
Robert Blaine (Co Project Director: August 2017 to September 2017)
Judy Richardson (Co Project Director: September 2017 to February 2020)
The Civil Rights Movement: Grass Roots Perspectives

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on the history of the civil rights movement at the grassroots level.

The "Challenging the Master Narrative of the Civil Rights Movement" Summer Institute will invite thirty teachers from across the U.S. for a three-week residency at Duke University in July of 2018. The institute is designed by a collaborative team of scholars, veterans, and educators from Duke, the SNCC Legacy Project, Tougaloo College, and Teaching for Change. Participants will learn the bottom-up history of the Civil Rights Movement and receive resources and strategies to bring it home to their students. They will have the unique opportunity to learn from the people who made the civil rights movement happen and from the leading scholars of the era. This is particularly important since many history teachers received their degrees before the publication of recent scholarship on the history of the civil rights movement from the bottom up.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$188,974 (approved)
$188,974 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


ES-256873-17

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Margaret H. O'Brien (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Folger Shakespeare Library's Teaching Shakespeare Institute

A four-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers on William Shakespeare’s Henry VI Part 1, Macbeth, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, to be held at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

The Folger Shakespeare Library proposes Teaching Shakespeare 2018, a four-week institute for secondary school teachers. A group of 25 participants will undertake an intensive study of the intellectual, pedagogical, and theatrical challenges of three Shakespeare plays, I HENRY VI, MACBETH, and A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM, with an emphasis on the making of history. Working with a faculty of scholars, theater professionals, and mentor teachers, the participants will explore successful strategies for teaching these plays, while creating new materials to use in their own classrooms and share with other teachers around the country. Participants and institute faculty will approach these works via primary resources in order to reconstruct historical and cultural contexts; study production history; engage in theatrical practice; and explore digital collections in order to bring the plays across to a new generation of high school students.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$214,325 (approved)
$214,325 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256882-17

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Social Movements and Reform in Industrializing America: The Lowell Experience

Two one-week institutes for seventy-two school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early 19th-century industrialization and reform.

The Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of UMass Lowell's Graduate School of Education and Lowell National Historical Park, proposes to engage educators in a study of Lowell's textile industry as a case study of early 19th-century industrialization and reform. We use the resources of the Park and other cultural/historical sites to address changes in work, society, culture, and the environment between 1820 and 1860, as well as subsequent reform activity related to labor, women's rights, and slavery. Lowell, the first planned industrial city in the U.S., formed the template for later industrial cities and provides an ideal setting for historical inquiry. Educators investigate history where it happened and learn how to teach with primary sources, artifacts, and historic sites in their own communities. The institute combines lectures, discussion, hands-on and field investigations, dramatic presentations, and close examination of primary, secondary, and literary sources.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$166,748 (approved)
$166,748 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256895-17

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Cortland (Cortland, NY 13045-0900)
Kevin B. Sheets (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Randi Jill Storch (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Common Ground: Americans and Their Land During The Gilded Age and Progressive Era

A two-week workshop for twenty-five school teachers using the Adirondacks to explore the interconnection of urban and wilderness environments in America from the late-nineteenth through early-twentieth-century.

"Common Ground" is a two-week NEH Summer Institute for twenty-five K-12 teachers focused on the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (GAPE), from roughly the end of the Civil War to World War I.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$195,406 (approved)
$195,406 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256907-17

National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-0152)
Andrew Mink (Project Director: March 2017 to February 2020)
Morgan Pitelka (Co Project Director: August 2017 to February 2020)
Contested Territory of Vietnam

A two-week institute for thirty-six school teachers on the post-World War II French-Vietnamese conflict and American involvement in the Vietnam War. 

Contested Territory: America’s Involvement in Southeast Asia, 1945-1975 is a proposal by the National Humanities Center to the NEH Summer Institutes Program that aims to provide thirty-six secondary school humanities educators with a deeper understanding of how and why America became involved in fighting in Vietnam in the 1960s. With the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War approaching, American classrooms will soon be grappling with the complexities of that conflict without a strong sense of the connection with the post-World War II French-Vietnamese conflicts. This Institute will combine fresh, emerging scholarship, hands-on visualization technology, and best practice humanities pedagogy with a targeted goal of addressing this need.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$158,283 (approved)
$158,283 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256913-17

San Jose State University Research Foundation (San Jose, CA 95112-5569)
Susan Shillinglaw (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
John Steinbeck: Social Critic and Ecologist

A three-week institute for twenty-seven school teachers on John Steinbeck as a novelist, social critic, and ecologist.

The Summer Institute will examine why John Steinbeck remains relevant as a novelist, social critic, and ecologist, and endures as a voice of twenty-first century American values and ideas. The Institute's target primary audience is middle and high school teachers of a diversity of subjects, including English, History and Science (elementary teachers also welcome). The project objective is to demonstrate new ways in which Steinbeck can be presented as a central figure in these subjects, and how his work continues to address the complexity of the American populace. An important element will be to consider the impact of ecological thinking on several of Steinbeck's major works, and how historical and contemporary agricultural and fishing industries influenced these works as well as today's society.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$192,571 (approved)
$192,571 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256923-17

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Lisa Reilly (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Thomas Jefferson: The Public and Private Worlds of Monticello and the University of Virginia

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers on Thomas Jefferson and community life at Monticello and the University of Virginia.

This project seeks to bring K-12 schoolteachers together with some of the foremost scholars on Thomas Jefferson in a two week-long institute during the summer of 2018. This Institute will provide teachers with an onsite introduction to Thomas Jefferson's writings, architecture, and other evidence of material culture with the goal of establishing a fuller and more complex narrative of the life of not only Jefferson, but of those who inhabited the Monticello and University communities. By reading for themselves the evidence that can inform our understanding of Jefferson and his private and public realms, participants will be better equipped to teach the process of reading and understanding primary sources, both textual and material, and how to evaluate them within a larger historical context.

Project fields:
Architecture; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$157,956 (approved)
$157,956 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


ES-256930-17

Shepherd University (Shepherdstown, WV 25443-5000)
Sylvia Shurbutt (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Voices from the Misty Mountains and the Power of Storytelling: Appalachian Culture and History

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers that would explore Appalachian culture and history through literature, music, and theater.

Shepherd University proposes its second three-week Summer Institute for Teachers, building upon a successful previous year's Institute and the success of two previous Seminars. The proposed Institute explores Appalachian literature and culture, emphasizing conflict, resolution and Appalachian politics in the 2018 proposed program. Literary works, humanities topics and in-depth exploration of theater are woven throughout the proposed program, with lectures and workshops featuring prominent scholars and contributors in the field.

Project fields:
American Literature; Theater History and Criticism; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$145,905 (approved)
$145,862 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


ES-256935-17

American Center for Mongolian Studies (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305)
David William Dettmann (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Enduring Legacies of the Global Mongol Empire

A four-week summer institute for twenty-five school teachers on the history of the Mongol empire and its influence in Europe and Asia.

The American Center for Mongolian Studies (ACMS) at the University of Pennsylvania seeks funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a 4-week Summer Institute on the Mongol Empire and global History Mongolia. The proposed Institute would be held on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, from July 16 to August 10, 2018, and would invite twenty-five K-12 teachers from across the country to explore the global history of the Mongol Empire with leading experts in history, anthropology, and the arts.

Project fields:
East Asian History; Medieval History; Russian History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$146,356 (approved)
$146,356 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256936-17

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Lissette Lopez Szwydky Davis (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Sean P. Conners (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Remaking Monsters and Heroines: Adapting Classic Literature for Contemporary Audiences

A two-week institute for thirty-six school teachers on Frankenstein, Cinderella, and the adaptations of these classic texts.

“Remaking Monsters and Heroines: Adapting Classic Literature for Contemporary Audiences” is the title of the proposed two-week NEH Summer Institute for School Teachers to be held at the University of Arkansas in June 2018. The topic is literary adaptation and its role in recirculating and popularizing the literary canon. In particular, the Institute co-directors are interested in helping practicing K-12 teachers develop a vocabulary and framework for teaching adaptations alongside a range of canonical texts that they already use (or are considering using) in their classrooms. The Institute will also feature hands-on workshops focused on reimagining and remaking traditional texts for new audiences. The goal is to demonstrate to individual and/or interdisciplinary teams of K-12 teachers the significance of knowing and teaching canonical texts alongside adaptations, of understanding the oral and fairy tale traditions in the humanities, and of incorporating a variety of genres and media.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Literature, General; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$173,087 (approved)
$173,087 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256938-17

Brooklyn Historical Society (Brooklyn, NY 11201-2711)
Emily Potter-Ndiaye (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Franny Kent (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Freedom for One, Freedom for All? Abolition and Women's Suffrage, 1830s – 1920s

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers that would explore the interconnected histories of the abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements in the United States.    

The two-week Summer Institute Freedom for One, Freedom for All, a partnership between Brooklyn Historical Society (BHS) and the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY), will bring thirty middle and high school teachers to New York City to explore the intertwined histories of the abolitionist and woman suffrage movements in the United States from the 1830s through the 1920s. Using a rich array of primary sources and historical scholarship on view at both institutions, teachers will learn new narratives about these seminal movements in United States history and the connections between them. In light of upcoming important anniversaries for the suffrage movement, educators will also learn ways to connect past with present using the lenses of race, gender, and class to unpack inequities and injustices that continue to challenge our nation.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$148,755 (approved)
$148,755 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256939-17

City Lore, Inc. (New York, NY 10003-9345)
Amanda Dargan (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
A Reverence for Words: Understanding Muslim Cultures through the Arts

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers on Islamic poetry and related arts.

Based on the overwhelming success of its 2014 and 2016 Institutes, City Lore respectfully requests funding for a third two-week NEH Summer Institute for School Teachers, to be held in 2018. Just as American movies and popular culture have created pathways to understanding the United States for those abroad, poetry’s centrality in many Muslim cultures makes it a powerful vehicle for exploring and understanding those cultures. In a period of growing need for increased American understanding of Muslim cultures, A Reverence for Words: Understanding Muslim Cultures Through the Arts will give teachers windows onto the history and social and political fabric of a variety of Muslim societies through an examination of their poetry, music, and book arts.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern Literature

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$188,000 (approved)
$188,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256942-17

New Bedford Whaling Museum (New Bedford, MA 02740-6398)
Timothy W. Marr (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Moby-Dick and the World of Whaling in the Digital Age

A two-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on Moby-Dick, its artistic and historical contexts, and classroom approaches to the text.

The Melville Society Cultural Project and the New Bedford Whaling Museum will present "Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick and the World of Whaling in the Digital Age,” a two-week Summer Institute for Teachers — from June 17 to June 30, 2018 in New Bedford, Massachusetts—that will empower participants to encounter the rich worlds of Moby-Dick so that they can better interpret its wonders for their students in the 21st century. Through in-depth discussions of the novel, participatory seminars, and experiential encounters, the scholars from the Melville Society Cultural Project who would serve as lead faculty will guide participants through interdisciplinary inquiry into literary, historical, and aesthetic contexts that have enabled Melville’s Whale to thrive as a powerful meaning-making enterprise. New Bedford and its Whaling Museum provide a unique vantage point from which to explore the world of 19th-century whaling out of which the novel emerged.

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$136,342 (approved)
$136,342 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


ES-256944-17

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey (Piscataway, NJ 08854-3925)
Andrew Theodore Urban (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
The Company Town at Seabrook Farms, N.J.: Internment, Migration, and Resettlement in the WWII Era

A two-week institute for thirty school teachers on the role of Seabrook Farms as a work camp for Japanese-American detainees during and after World War II.

Seabrook Farms: Layered Histories of Displacement, Migration, and Resettlement? will be coordinated and hosted by Professor Urban and the American Studies Department, in partnership with the Rutgers University Libraries and Rutgers Digital Humanities Initiative. The institute will use Seabrook Farms as a case study that offers a window into the different histories of relocation in the World War II era, and how Japanese American internees, migrants, and refugees were recruited and sponsored by the company as laborers. At the institute, which is scheduled for July 16--27, 2018, a class of thirty high school teachers will engage secondary readings through faculty-led discussions and activities. They will also be introduced to primary source material that they can incorporate into their own classrooms.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$139,855 (approved)
$139,855 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018