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27 matches

Program: Seminars for School Teachers*
Date range: 2014-2016
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FV-250085-16

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Austin Sarat (Project Director: 01/12/2016 to present)

Punishment, Politics, and Culture

A four-week summer seminar for sixteen schoolteachers to examine crime and punishment and their role in politics, law, and culture.

From The Gospel of Matthew to George Bernard Shaw and former Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, many have remarked that how a society punishes reveals its true character. Punishment then tells us who we are. The way a society punishes demonstrates its commitment to standards of judgment and justice, its distinctive views of blame and responsibility, its understandings of mercy and forgiveness, and its particular ways of responding to evil. The Seminar I am proposing, Punishment, Politics, and Culture, will examine the nature and limits of punishment and its place in the “American story.” This Seminar will address questions about punishment that go to the heart of humanistic inquiry.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$101,265 (approved)
$101,265 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FV-250749-16

San Diego State University Research Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-0001)
Kathleen Jones (Project Director: 02/17/2016 to present)

The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt: A Public Intellectual in the Public Square

A four-week summer seminar for sixteen schoolteachers to examine the works of the political theorist, Hannah Arendt.

This four week seminar will study intensively two key works by the political theorist, Hannah Arendt. The proposed seminar fits well the new NEH initiative, "The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square." As a public intellectual, Arendt brought humanities' perspectives to bear on central 20th century questions, issues remaining salient in the present. Among topics explored will be Arendt's investigation of the problem of evil and terror in the contemporary age, her philosophical perspective on violence in politics, her examination of how dramatic advances in science and technology changed relationships between humans and the natural world, and her reflections on the conditions of democratic rule and the scope and significance of global human rights.

Project fields:
Gender Studies

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$130,161 (approved)
$130,161 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FV-250759-16

Mount Holyoke College (South Hadley, MA 01075-1461)
Thomas Wartenberg (Project Director: 02/18/2016 to present)

Existentialism

A three-week seminar for sixteen schoolteachers on Existentialism.

Existentialism, an important philosophical movement in the twentieth century, remains influential to this day. This seminar will acquaint participants with the basic philosophical ideas of Existentialism by introducing them to the writings of such thinkers as Søren Kierkegaard, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and Franz Fanon. In addition to philosophical treatises, readings will be drawn from novels and plays, and films will be shown each week. The Existentialists are known for their emphasis on the actual lived experience of human beings and outlining more authentic possibilities for living than those people ordinarily choose. The seminar will explore how the Existentialists argue for this view of life and it will assess Existentialism’s validity both historically and for our contemporary society.

Project fields:
Phenomenology Existentialism; Philosophy, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$88,449 (approved)
$88,449 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FV-250761-16

Trustees of Indiana University (Indianapolis, IN 46202-2915)
Edward Curtis (Project Director: 02/19/2016 to present)

Muslim American Identities, Past and Present

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history and cultures of Muslims in the United States.

The purpose of this three-week seminar for K-12 educators is to strengthen teaching about Muslim American history and contemporary life. Seminar participants will examine the diverse facets of Muslim American identity, both as grounded in the past and as experienced in the present. Focusing on primary sources and supplemented by visits to two mosques in the greater Indianapolis area, the seminar will prepare sixteen participants to teach about a key question of our historical moment: what does it mean to be both Muslim and American? The seminar will emphasize the richness and diversity of Muslim American voices, offering balanced, complex, and informed answers to this question. By inspiring teachers to engage students in these discussions, this seminar will also demonstrate the essential role that the humanities play in nurturing our national life and the common good.

Project fields:
Religion, Other

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$108,969 (approved)
$108,969 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FV-250785-16

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Peter Gibbon (Project Director: 02/23/2016 to present)

Philosophers of Education: Major Thinkers from the Enlightenment to the Present

A three-week seminar for sixteen schoolteachers on philosophers of education from the Enlightenment to the present day.

This Seminar at Boston University will explore the works of major educational thinkers. We will look at John Locke’s theories on education, Thomas Jefferson’s letters, Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s portrait of a young boy’s education, Horace Mann’s reports, William James’ lectures, and John Dewey’s essays. We will study the debate between Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois over African-American education and analyze Maria Montessori’s message about early childhood education. We will consider critics of Progressive education, such as Arthur Bestor and William C. Bagley. The Seminar will conclude with the works of two contemporary educational philosophers, Howard Gardner and E. D. Hirsch. The overarching goals of this exploration will be to introduce the teachers to debates among significant philosophers of education, to understand connections among their ideas, and to articulate ways their theories can be made accessible and relevant to K-12 educators today.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$110,603 (approved)
$110,603 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FV-250792-16

Library Company of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19107-5679)
Lori Ginzberg (Project Director: 02/23/2016 to present)

What Did Independence Mean For Women, 1776-1876?

A three week summer seminar for sixteen K-12 teachers on the meanings of independence for women from the writing of the Declaration of Independence to its centennial.

The Library Company of Philadelphia and Prof. Lori Ginzberg of Penn State University seek a grant of $81,907 to fund a three-week Summer Seminar for School Teachers. This seminar will bring together sixteen K-12 teachers for a close study of primary documents, scholarly readings, and historic sites to address the question "What Did Independence Mean for Women?" The seminar will explore the different meanings of independence, and how women’s experiences in the first century of the nation’s founding were shaped by their racial, legal, and class identities and statuses. Through readings, discussion, field trips, and lectures, participants will address white and black women’s experiences, think critically about the concept of independence, and consider sources that would be appropriate to their own classroom discussions of United States History. The Library Company has a successful track record of running seminars for K-12 educators and serves as an ideal place for studying these concepts.

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$81,907 (approved)
$81,907 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FV-250892-16

Carroll College (Helena, MT 59625-0001)
Chris Fuller (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Re-enchanting Nature: Humanities Perspectives

A three-week seminar for sixteen schoolteachers exploring the human relationship with nature  through religion, philosophy, literature, the fine arts, and cinema.

Carroll College has designed a seminar for school teachers titled “Re-Enchanting Creation: How the Humanities Help Us Understand Our Relationship with Nature.” Set against a backdrop of contemporary environmental issues, our seminar explores the human relationship with nature through religious, philosophical, literary, fine arts, and cinematic perspectives. Our curriculum responds to the current NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, by demonstrating for participants that a more full and reasoned understanding of the national discourse regarding the environment is supported when the humanities are integrated with the scientific conversation. Our seminar is an interdisciplinary survey organized around four themes: 1) exploring origins; 2) nature and commerce; 3) defining wilderness; and 4) modern tensions. The first two weeks are hosted on the Carroll College campus and the final week is hosted at Yellowstone National Park.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$90,707 (approved)
$90,707 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FV-230832-15

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Austin Sarat (Project Director: 01/15/2015 to present)

Punishment, Politics, and Culture

A five-week seminar for sixteen school teachers to examine crime and punishment and their role in politics, law, and culture.

From The Gospel of Matthew to George Bernard Shaw and former Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, many have remarked that how a society punishes reveals its true character. Punishment then tells us who we are. The way a society punishes demonstrates its commitment to standards of judgment and justice, its distinctive views of blame and responsibility, its understandings of mercy and forgiveness, and its particular ways of responding to evil. The Seminar I am proposing, Punishment, Politics, and Culture, will examine the nature and limits of punishment and its place in the ???American story.??? This Seminar will address questions about punishment that go to the heart of humanistic inquiry.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$116,455 (approved)
$99,169 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FV-230885-15

Mount Holyoke College (South Hadley, MA 01075-1461)
Thomas Wartenberg (Project Director: 01/29/2015 to present)

Existentialism

A five-week seminar for sixteen school teachers to study philosophical treatises and other works relating to existentialism.

Existentialism, an important philosophical movement in the twentieth century, remains influential to this day. This seminar will acquaint participants with the basic philosophical ideas of Existentialism by introducing them to the writings of such thinkers as S??ren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and Franz Fanon. In addition to philosophical treatises, readings will be drawn from novels and plays, and films will be shown each week. The Existentialists are known for their emphasis on the actual lived experience of human beings and outlining more authentic possibilities for living than those people ordinarily choose. The seminar will explore how the Existentialists argue for this view of life and it will assess Existentialism???s validity both historically and for our contemporary society.

Project fields:
Phenomenology Existentialism

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$117,601 (approved)
$111,210 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FV-230920-15

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Harvey Klehr (Project Director: 02/13/2015 to present)

Communism and American Life

A five-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the Communist movement in America from the 1930s through the Cold War.

This is a five week Summer Seminar for School Teachers on "Communism and American Life." The participants will confront the historial choices, moral dilemmas and intellectual problems that communism posed.

Project fields:
American Government

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$118,571 (approved)
$118,015 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


FV-231034-15

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Peter Gibbon (Project Director: 02/20/2015 to present)

Philosophers of Education: Major Thinkers from the Enlightenment to the Present

A three-week school teacher seminar for sixteen participants to study influential philosophers of education from the eighteenth century to the present.

This Seminar will study works of major educational thinkers. Starting with the Enlightenment, it will explore John Locke’s "Some Thoughts Concerning Education", Thomas Jefferson’s letters, and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s "Emile"; move on to Horace Mann’s "Reports on Education", William James’ "Talks to Teachers on Psychology", and John Dewey’s "The School and Society"; study the debate between Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois over African-American education; and analyze Maria Montessori’s "The Montessori Method". We will also consider critics of Progressive education. The Seminar will conclude with works by contemporary philosophers: Howard Gardner’s "The Disciplined Mind" and E. D. Hirsch’s "The Schools We Need". The overarching goals will be to introduce participants to debates among significant philosophers of education, to understand the connections among their ideas, and to articulate ways their theories are relevant to K-12 educators today.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$110,006 (approved)
$96,565 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FV-231035-15

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300)
Gerard Koot (Project Director: 02/20/2015 to present)

The Dutch Republic and Britain: The Making of a European World Economy and Modern Society

A five-week seminar for sixteen school teachers comparing the development of modern economic systems in the Dutch Republic and Great Britain in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

The purpose of this five-week NEH Summer Seminar for School Teachers at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, is to investigate how a region of Northwestern Europe on the North Sea emerged as a liberal market society, became the first region in the world to develop a modern economy of sustained economic growth that spawned the first industrial revolution, and constructed a European led world economy. We will study how the national economy of the Dutch Republic rose to pre-eminence in the new European world-economy of the seventeenth century, how Britain acquired this supremacy in the eighteenth century, and how it transformed itself to become the first industrial nation. We will discuss contemporary accounts, historical documents and seminal historical interpretations of this world-historical transformation. In order to broaden our perspective and appreciate the interdisciplinary nature of humanistic studies, we will also study many visual images from the period. Common Good Init.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$131,235 (approved)
$119,516 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


FV-231037-15

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
John Jordan (Project Director: 02/20/2015 to present)

Charles Dickens: Hard Times and A Tale of Two Cities

A four-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on Charles Dickens’s novels Hard Times and A Tale of Two Cities

The "Dickens: Then and Now" seminar is a four-week exploration of multiple methods for using literature to engage critical thinking and active literacy while promoting cultural awareness and historical understanding. Designed for middle and high school teachers, the seminar critically explores two of the most frequently taught of Dickens's novels: Hard Times and A Tale of Two Cities. These two texts are ideal sites for investigation, as both are deeply engaged with political and social issues that are as relevant today as they were for Dickens and his contemporaries.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$119,417 (approved)
$116,860 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


FV-231051-15

Shepherd University (Shepherdstown, WV 25443-5000)
Sylvia Shurbutt (Project Director: 02/21/2015 to present)

Voices from the Misty Mountains: Appalachian Writers and Mountain Culture

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on Appalachia's literary and cultural heritage.

Shepherd University proposes its second three-week seminar for public school teachers that will delve into the subject of Appalachian literature and culture. A literature of unexpected cultural diversity, the Appalachian literary works and topics that we have selected for the seminar will provide a deeper understanding of the complexity and cultural range of a region that encompasses the twelve states following the ridge of mountains stretching from New York to Georgia. The quality and depth of the Appalachian writers that will be explored in the seminar will allow participants the opportunity to listen to the variety of voices from this region. Participants will also take part in an Appalachian storytelling workshop led by an award-winning storyteller and listen to lectures about playwriting and dramatic storytelling. They will explore Appalachian music and tour the Appalachian heartland.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Cultural History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$118,868 (approved)
$109,633 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FV-231118-15

Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
Graham Hodges (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Abolitionism and the Underground Railroad

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history of abolitionism and the Underground Railroad.

A three-week Summer Seminar for teachers on Abolitionism and the Underground Railroad in America from the colonial days until the Civil War to be held at Colgate University, Hamilton, New York, from July 10-July 29, 2016. The proposed seminar will provide to sixteen middle and high school teachers: lectures, discussions by some of the foremost scholars in the field, ample secondary readings and primary texts, films and field trips to sites relevant to the institute’s purpose. Graham Russell Hodges, the George Dorland Langdon,Jr. Professor of History and Africana & Latin American Studies at Colgate will organize and direct the institute.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$133,105 (approved)
$123,258 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FV-231181-15

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Matthew Heaton (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Race and Mental Health in History and Literature

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the political, social, and scientific relationship between race and mental health in the United States and Africa as seen through the humanities and other disciplines.   

This seminar will examine the question of how the political, social, and scientific relationship between race and mental health has been articulated in its historical, literary, and medical contexts in both the United States and Africa since the late nineteenth century, emphasizing connections and comparisons across space, time, and disciplinary perspectives.The seminar will provide teachers with an opportunity to read classic texts that explore the relationship between race and mental health in the United States and Africa as well as studies on the subject by historians, anthropologists, literary theorists, psychologists, and psychiatrists. Participants will also pursue research topics of their own choosing, using primary sources that range from literary works to scientific studies to old case files of psychiatric patients.

Project fields:
African American Studies; African Studies; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$89,424 (approved)
$80,365 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FV-231200-15

San Diego State University Research Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-0001)
Kathleen Jones (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt: The Problem of Evil and the Origins of Totalitarianism

A five-week school teacher seminar for sixteen participants to study major works by Hannah Arendt.

During this 5 week seminar we will study several key works by the political theorist Hannah Arendt. These works shed light on the problem of evil and the use of violence to settle political conflicts about the conditions of democracy and about the scope and importance of human rights. The proposed seminar fits the new NEH initiative The Common Good-The Humanities in the Public Square. As a public intellectual Arendts writing brought humanities perspectives to bear on central 20th century questions. She investigated the problem of evil and terror in the contemporary age provided a philosophical perspective on violence in politics explored how dramatic advances in science and technology changed relationships between humans and the natural world and examined the conditions of democratic rule and the scope and significance of global human rights.

Project fields:
Gender Studies

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$147,819 (approved)
$137,882 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FV-231298-15

Gustavus Adolphus College (St. Peter, MN 56082-1498)
Matthew Panciera (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Roman Daily Life in Petronius and Pompeii

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on Roman daily life as portrayed in Petronius’s Satyricon and in archaeological and epigraphical evidence in Pompeii.

This summer seminar will provide teachers with an opportunity to read in Latin Petronius' Satyricon and examine the archaeological and epigraphical evidence in Pompeii. We will do this with an eye to understanding more clearly the daily lived experience of people living during the Roman Empire.

Project fields:
Classical Languages

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$92,550 (approved)
$92,285 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2005 – 9/10/2016


FV-50387-14

Brigham Young University, Provo (Provo, UT 84602)
Ray Clifford (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Authors in the Prado

A five-week seminar for sixteen school teachers of Spanish to study the relationship between literary works and works of art in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Spanish Literature

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$149,813 (approved)
$145,865 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 10/31/2015


FV-50388-14

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Austin Sarat (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Punishment, Politics, and Culture

A five-week seminar for sixteen school teachers, examining crime and punishment and their role in American politics, law, and culture.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$118,344 (approved)
$99,134 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


FV-50389-14

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300)
Gerard Koot (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The Dutch Republic and Britain: The Making of Modern Society and a European World Economy

A five-week seminar for sixteen school teachers comparing the development of modern economic systems in the Dutch Republic and Great Britain in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$164,550 (approved)
$147,099 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


FV-50390-14

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Deborah Parker (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Dante's Inferno: Influence, Adaptation, and Appropriation

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on Dante's Inferno and its literary, visual, and cultural legacy.

Project fields:
Italian Literature

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$98,362 (approved)
$98,286 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2016


FV-50392-14

University of Vermont (Burlington, VT 05405-0160)
William Stephany (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Dante's Commedia

A five-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on Dante's "Commedia."

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$164,538 (approved)
$160,852 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


FV-50393-14

Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-3288)
Edward Curtis (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Muslim American Identities, Past and Present

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history and cultures of Muslims in the United States.

Project fields:
American Studies; Religion, Other

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$114,438 (approved)
$105,083 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


FV-50395-14

Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
Graham Hodges (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Abolitionism and the Underground Railroad

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers to study the history of the Underground Railroad and abolitionism.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$119,988 (approved)
$110,151 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


FV-50398-14

CUNY Research Foundation, Hunter College (New York, NY 10065-5024)
Jennifer Hayashida (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Asian Americans in New York City: Literature and Film

A two-week seminar for sixteen school teachers to study Asian-American cultures in New York City through film and literature.

Project fields:
American Literature; Asian American Studies; Film History and Criticism

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$104,525 (approved)
$102,874 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


FV-50404-14

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Thomas Ewing (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The Spanish Influenza of 1918

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history and impact of the 1918 Spanish Flu epidemic.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$101,917 (approved)
$92,345 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 8/31/2015