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Program: Seminars for School Teachers*
Date range: 2017-2019
Sort order: Award year, descending

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FV-267042-19

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Peter Gibbon (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
What We Teach and Why: Philosophers of Education from the Enlightenment to the Present

A three-week seminar for 16 K-12 teachers on the philosophical foundations of American education.

This Seminar at Boston University will explore works of major educational thinkers. We will look at John Locke’s theories on education, Thomas Jefferson’s letters, Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s portrait of a young boy’s education, Horace Mann’s reports, William James’ talks, and John Dewey’s essays. We will analyze the debate between Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois on African-American education. We will examine Maria Montessori’s message about early childhood education and Mary Wollstonecraft’s early feminism. We will consider critics of Progressive education, such as Arthur Bestor and William C. Bagley.  The Seminar will conclude with the works of two contemporary educational philosophers, Howard Gardner and E.D. Hirsch. The overarching goals of this exploration will be to introduce teachers to debates among significant philosophers of education, to understand connections among their ideas, and to articulate ways their theories can be made relevant to K-12 education.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$105,000 (approved)
$103,849 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


FV-267054-19

Endicott College (Beverly, MA 01915-2098)
Mark Herlihy (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Elizabeth Matelski (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
The Salem Witch Trials: Their World and Legacy

A three-week summer seminar for 16 middle and high school educators on the history, interpretations, and legacies of the Salem Witch Trials.

A three-week Summer Seminar focusing on the Salem Witch Trials and their legacy. The seminar will allow 16 participants - middle school and high school history, civics, and language arts teachers - to explore the trials in depth and from a variety of perspectives, and to consider parallels between the trials and moments in 20th century United States history that were marked by fear of enemies both real and imagined.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$103,622 (approved)
$103,338 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


FV-267056-19

Gustavus Adolphus College (St. Peter, MN 56082-1498)
Matthew Panciera (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Roman Daily Life in Petronius and Pompeii

A three-week seminar for 16 school teachers on Roman daily life as portrayed in Petronius’s Satyricon and in archaeological and epigraphical evidence in Pompeii.

This summer seminar will provide teachers the opportunity to study Roman Daily Life through Petronius' novel Satyricon and material culture from the city of Pompeii. The novel will be read in Latin, to provide opportunity for translation. Pompeii will be studied through its archaeological history and graffiti. Therefore, the seminar will bring together two of the methods for studying Roman history--which are usually done in isolation. Seminar participants will also have the opportunity to select and focus on a particular people group in relation to rarely studied daily Roman life: women, slaves, or freedmen, for example.

Project fields:
Classical History; Classics

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$90,988 (approved)
$90,878 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


FV-267158-19

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James R. Akerman (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Kathleen A. Brosnan (Co Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Mapping Nature across the Americas

A four-week seminar for 16 K-12 teachers to study mapping as a lens for understanding the history of the Americas.

The Newberry Library’s Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography seeks funding for a four-week summer seminar for sixteen schoolteachers in 2020 that traces the interplay between mapping and environmental knowledge across Pan-American history. Mapping Nature across the Americas, led by James Akerman and Kathleen Brosnan, will emphasize how map study can provide insights into the complicated, contradictory, and contested ways in which humans conceived their place in nature through history. The seminar will be distinctive in its use of maps as the core texts for this exploration, emphasizing the development of teachers’ skills in the use of maps in their classroom teaching as they consider how mapping has represented and transformed human conceptions of nature over time. This seminar builds on our experience leading a summer institute on the same topic for college and university faculty in 2014.

Project fields:
Geography; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$124,989 (approved)
$124,261 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


FV-261361-18

Trustees of Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Austin D. Sarat (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Andrew Poe (Co Project Director: April 2019 to present)
Punishment, Politics, and Culture

A four-week seminar for 16 school teachers to examine crime and punishment in America and their role in politics, law, and culture.

From The Gospel of Matthew to George Bernard Shaw and former Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, many have remarked that how a society punishes reveals its true character. Punishment then tells us who we are. The way a society punishes demonstrates its commitment to standards of judgment and justice, its distinctive views of blame and responsibility, its understandings of mercy and forgiveness, and its particular ways of responding to evil. The Seminar I am proposing, Punishment, Politics, and Culture, will examine the nature and limits of punishment and its place in the “American story.” This Seminar will address questions about punishment that go to the heart of humanistic inquiry.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$99,938 (approved)
$99,938 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FV-261606-18

Trustees of Indiana University (Indianapolis, IN 46202-2915)
Edward E. Curtis (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Muslim American History and Life

A three-week seminar for 16 school teachers on Muslim American history and contemporary life.

The purpose of this three-week seminar for K-12 educators, a version of which was successfully offered in 2015 and 2017 and will be offered again in 2018, is to strengthen teaching about Muslim American history and contemporary life. Focusing on primary sources and supplemented by visits to two mosques in the greater Indianapolis area, the seminar will prepare sixteen participants to teach about a key question of our historical moment: what does it mean to be both Muslim and American? This seminar will emphasize the richness and diversity of Muslim American voices, offering balanced, complex, and informed answers to this question. In addition, participants will research areas of special relevance to their classes and prepare presentations on how to incorporate the seminar’s themes into their teaching. As a result, teachers will return home ready to inspire their students to greater intellectual understanding of America, including its history and its contemporary life.

Project fields:
Religion, Other

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$103,884 (approved)
$103,884 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FV-261636-18

Bowdoin College (Brunswick, ME 04011-8447)
Natasha Goldman (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Kimberly Page Herrlinger (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Teaching the Holocaust through Visual Culture

A two-week seminar for 16 school teachers on the visual culture of the Holocaust.

The Holocaust left behind an emotionally powerful, aesthetically diverse, and ethically challenging visual landscape. The two-week Summer Seminar, for sixteen teachers from across the US, at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, ME seeks to enrich the middle school and high school curricula by investigating how history and visual culture inform each other when we seek to understand the Holocaust. "Visual culture” is defined as art objects, including photomontage, sculpture, painting, book art, and film, as well as more mundane visual forms, such as posters, flags and uniforms, and magazine illustrations. Led by art historian Natasha Goldman, PhD, and historian Page Herrlinger, PhD, participants will be introduced to teaching and viewing this topic through the visual lens and be encouraged to share their own teaching experiences and how they have confronted the challenges unique to the visual legacy of the Holocaust and genocide.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; History, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$89,889 (approved)
$89,889 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FV-261637-18

Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
Graham Russell Hodges (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Abolitionism and the Underground Railroad

A three-week seminar for 16 school teachers on the history of abolitionism and the Underground Railroad.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$98,395 (approved)
$98,395 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FV-261720-18

Hood College (Frederick, MD 21701-8575)
Trevor Ross Dodman (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Corey Campion (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
World War I in History and Literature

A three-week seminar for 16 school teachers on World War I in history and literature.

“World War I in History and Literature" is a three-week summer seminar for secondary school teachers that examines the meaning and relevance of World War I today and prepares teachers to teach the war from an interdisciplinary perspective. Historical sources and works of literature will be approached as windows into the experiences of soldiers and civilians in a time of total war. Co-directed by Trevor Dodman, Associate Professor of English at Hood College, and Corey Campion, Assistant Professor of History and Global Studies at Hood College, the seminar builds on the co-directors’ work with Maryland secondary school teachers through their institution’s interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Humanities program. The seminar is designed to provide participating teachers with a deeper understanding of World War I and concrete, actionable, and effective strategies and tools to enhance their teaching practices in an interdisciplinary manner.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$100,137 (approved)
$100,137 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FV-261725-18

Carroll College (Helena, MT 59625-0001)
Christopher C. Fuller (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Edward Glowienka (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Re-Enchanting Nature: Humanities Perspectives

A three-week seminar for 16 school teachers on the relationship of humans to the natural world.

Carroll College looks to again host a seminar for school teachers titled "Re-Enchanting Nature: Humanities Perspectives." The seminar draws upon religious, historical, literary, fine arts, and cinematic perspectives to provide an intellectual framework through which to explore the human relationship with nature. Inspired by the NEH's efforts to bring humanities into public discourse, this program demonstrates for participants that a more full and reasoned understanding of the national discourse is supported when the humanities are included as part of the conversation. Carroll College will host the participants for the first two weeks on campus while the final week is hosted at Yellowstone Park. Four interdisciplinary themes will be examined during the seminar: 1) Exploring Origin, 2) Defining Nature, 3) Imagining a Way Forward, and 4) Bringing it all Together in Yellowstone National Park.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$103,898 (approved)
$103,898 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FV-261751-18

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
John O. Jordan (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Marty Russell Gould (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Reimagining the Literary Classic: Teaching Literature through Adaptations

A three-week seminar for 16 school teachers on adaptations of literary works.

This three-week seminar for middle and high school teachers uses two case studies - Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" and Charles Dickens's "Great Expectations" - to show teachers how they can use literary imitations and appropriations to connect the study of literature with the development of their students' skills in critical reading, analytical reasoning, argumentative writing, and creative production. Informed by current and emerging trends in adaptation studies and drawing on scholarship in literary, film, and cultural studies, the seminar examines two frequently taught nineteenth-century texts as reimagined and refracted in imitative texts, plays, and films, including "Rebecca", "Wide Sargasso Sea", "Mr. Pip", and more.

Project fields:
British Literature; Film History and Criticism; Literary Criticism

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$94,143 (approved)
$94,143 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FV-255941-17

Trustees of Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Austin D. Sarat (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Punishment, Politics, and Culture

A four-week seminar for sixteen schoolteachers to examine crime and punishment and their role in politics, law, and culture.

From The Gospel of Matthew to George Bernard Shaw and former Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, many have remarked that how a society punishes reveals its true character. Punishment then tells us who we are. The way a society punishes demonstrates its commitment to standards of judgment and justice, its distinctive views of blame and responsibility, its understandings of mercy and forgiveness, and its particular ways of responding to evil. The Seminar I am proposing, Punishment, Politics, and Culture, will examine the nature and limits of punishment and its place in the “American story.” This Seminar will address questions about punishment that go to the heart of humanistic inquiry.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$97,676 (approved)
$97,676 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


FV-256712-17

Trustees of Indiana University (Indianapolis, IN 46202-2915)
Edward E. Curtis (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Muslim American History and Life

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history and cultures of Muslims in the United States.

The purpose of this three-week seminar for K-12 educators, a version of which was successfully offered in 2015 and will be offered again in 2017, is to strengthen teaching about Muslim American history and contemporary life. Focusing on primary sources and supplemented by visits to two mosques in the greater Indianapolis area, the seminar will prepare sixteen participants to teach about a key question of our historical moment: what does it mean to be both Muslim and American? This seminar will emphasize the richness and diversity of Muslim American voices, offering balanced, complex, and informed answers to this question. In addition, participants will research areas of special relevance to their classes and prepare presentations on how to incorporate the seminar’s themes into their teaching. As a result, teachers will return home ready to inspire their students to greater intellectual understanding of America, including its history and its contemporary life.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Religion, Other

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$108,800 (approved)
$108,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


FV-256791-17

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Harvey E. Klehr (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Communism and American Life

A four-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history of and issues surrounding the Communist movement in America from the 1930s through the Cold War.

This four- week seminar for school teachers will examine the controversy over the role of the Communist movement in American history and politics, focusing on the 1930s, the period in which the Communist Party of the United States achieved its most important success, and the 1940s and early 1950s, during which anti-communism became a powerful force in American life, culminating in the controversy over McCarthyism. We will consider such questions as why people were attracted to an extremist ideology, why it gained traction, and why it ultimately failed. The seminar will approach these issues by reading several iconic novels and plays and autobiographies about the Communist issue. In addition, we will watch several movies and documentaries about the issue and use primary source documents from recently opened American and Russian archives to examine controversies about the extent of Soviet espionage in America during this period.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$113,535 (approved)
$113,535 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


FV-256820-17

Gustavus Adolphus College (St. Peter, MN 56082-1498)
Matthew Panciera (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Roman Daily Life in Petronius and Pompeii

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on Roman daily life as portrayed in Petronious’s Satyricon and in archaeological and epigraphical evidence in Pompeii.

This summer seminar will provide teachers the opportunity to study Roman Daily Life through Petronius' novel Satyricon and the city of Pompeii. The Petronius novel will be read in Latin, to provide opportunity for translation. Pompeii will be studied through its archaeological history. Therefore, this seminar will bring together two of the methods for studying Roman history--but are usually done in isolation. The seminar will also include excursions and group activities to provide a lens into daily life through food, drink, literature, and artifacts.

Project fields:
Classical History; Classics

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$93,503 (approved)
$93,503 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


FV-256827-17

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James R. Akerman (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Peter Nekola (Co Project Director: October 2017 to present)
Reading Material Maps in the Digital Age

A four-week summer seminar for sixteen school teachers on learning to interpret historical and contemporary maps.

The Newberry Library's Smith Center for the History of Cartography seeks NEH support for a four-week summer seminar for school teachers in 2018 that will consider how maps not only reproduced geographical facts and understandings, but also reflected and shaped their social and cultural contexts. The seminar will be especially mindful of how map literacy, and more specifically, the reading and use of historic map documents in the classroom and in scholarship has been affected by the challenges and opportunities posed by the digital revolution. Co-directed by James Akerman and Peter Nekola, “Reading Material Maps in the Digital Age,” will provide sixteen K-12 educators with the opportunity to develop critical map reading skills in the presence of a great archive of five centuries of material cartography. The four-week program of seminar sessions, workshops, field trips, and personal research elements is designed to help teachers read and use maps and digital resources effectively.

Project fields:
Geography; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$134,826 (approved)
$134,826 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


FV-256881-17

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in U.S. and World History

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history and impact of the 1918 Spanish influenza epidemic, held in Blacksburg, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.

Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in US and World History will provide teachers with an opportunity to read and discuss the most recent scholarship by historians, epidemiologists, demographers, and public health scholars. In addition, participants will pursue their own research topics, using online newspaper databases, archived oral histories, and documentation from public health authorities. Seminar participants will acquire a broader understanding of the role of disease and health in American and world history, an awareness of how historical precedents inform current plans for dealing with global pandemics, and an appreciation of a complicated topic that engages scholarly as well as broad general interest.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; History, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$92,494 (approved)
$92,494 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


FV-256925-17

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
John O. Jordan (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Janice Carlisle (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Why Literature Matters: Voices from Nineteenth-Century Britain and America

A four-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on nineteenth-century American and British literature.

Linked to both the NEH initiative on "The Common Good" and the annual conference of the Dickens Project, this four-week seminar (July 8 to August 3, 2018) will bring sixteen school teachers to the UCSC campus to study classic American and British literature of the nineteenth century. Texts will include both canonical literary works and recent theoretical perspectives on the nature of reading, with the goal of encouraging participants to generate new conceptions of the value of literary study and new pedagogical methods capable of meeting the diverse challenges currently facing those who teach the humanities.

Project fields:
British Literature; Literature, Other

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$124,241 (approved)
$124,241 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018