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Program: Landmarks of American History*
Date range: 2010-2012
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Apprend Foundation (Durham, NC 27713-2219)
Laurel Sneed
BH-50467-12
Crafting Freedom: Black Artisans, Entrepreneurs, and Abolitionists of the Antebellum Upper South

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American entrepreneurship in the antebellum South, as represented by Thomas Day and Elizabeth Keckly.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American entrepreneurship in the antebellum South, as represented by Thomas Day and Elizabeth Keckly. This workshop uses the lives of two independent artisans to illuminate the African-American experience in antebellum America. Thomas Day, a free black artisan in Milton, North Carolina, was "one of the most prominent furniture makers in the antebellum South." Elizabeth Keckly from Caswell, North Carolina, who purchased her freedom from slavery, became proprietor of a shop in Washington, DC, where she was a dressmaker for and confidante of Mary Todd Lincoln. The lives of Day and Keckly illuminate a "central paradox of American history: how the institution of race-based slavery coexisted with the expansion of political rights and economic opportunities for most Americans in the 19th century" and how the entrepreneurial activities of free artisans, although not typical of the time, advanced independent economic, social, and political life in the Southern black community. The participants visit Union Tavern, the home and shop of Thomas Day; the town of Milton; Burwell School, where Elizabeth Keckly grew up in slavery; and Stagwell Plantation. Among the key topics are the advancement of African-American freedom through business enterprise, management activities on slave plantations, artisanship, and artistic expression. The workshop faculty includes Laurel Sneed (Apprend Foundation), Peter Wood (history, Duke University), William Andrews (English, University of North Carolina), Juanita Holland (independent historian), Michele Ware (English, North Carolina Central University), site staff, and contemporary African-American artisans. Master teachers assist the participants in the development of lesson plans. The participants read Keckly's memoirs and recent writings by scholars, including William Andrews and Peter Wood.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $186,770
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Funding details
Original grant (2012) $174,770
Supplement (2013) $12,000

Florida Humanities Council (St. Petersburg, FL 33701-5005)
Ann S. Schoenacher
BH-50470-12
Jump at the Sun: Zora Neale Hurston and Her Eatonville Roots

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the life and work of Zora Neale Hurston.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the life and work of Zora Neale Hurston. Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), renowned for both her fiction writing and her scholarly research as a collector of African-American folklore, spent much of her childhood in the small town of Eatonville, Florida, which was founded by freed slaves in 1886. During this workshop, participants explore Hurston's Eatonville roots, her folkloric and literary endeavors, her participation in the Harlem Renaissance, and her final years in Fort Pierce, Florida. Historian Julian Chambliss (Rollins College); literary scholars Houston A. Baker (Vanderbilt University), Jill Jones (Rollins College), and Maurice O'Sullivan (Rollins College); preservationist N.Y. Nathiri (Association to Preserve the Eatonville Community); Chautauqua interpreter Phyllis McEwen; and Hurston biographer Valerie Boyd (University of Georgia) join lead scholar Heather Russell (Florida International University) in this consideration of Hurston and her milieu. Participants take walking tours of Eatonville and Fort Pierce, examine Hurston documents at the Rollins College archive, view an exhibit on Hurston and Eatonville at the Maitland Art Center, explore her folklore writings collected on the Library of Congress's American Memory site, work on curriculum projects, and watch a theatrical presentation of songs and stories that the author collected in central Florida. Readings include, among other works and resources, Hurston's masterwork, Their Eyes Were Watching God, and other writings; Valerie Boyd, Wrapped in Rainbows: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston; and Robert Hemenway, Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Biography.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,500
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2014

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38732)
Luther Brown
BH-50472-12
The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus. Two six-day workshops focus on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, described by historian James Cobb as "the most Southern place on earth." Project director Luther Brown leads the first day's seminar on Delta history and the Mississippi River, to include the documentaries LaLee's Kin: the Legacy of Cotton and Fatal Flood, alongside a visit to the site of the levee break in the Great Flood of 1927. During day two, historian Charles Reagan Wilson (University of Mississippi) explores the area's ethnic and religious diversity, including its early Chinese, Russian Jewish, Lebanese, and Italian communities. Music scholar David Evans (University of Memphis) guides the third day on "The Blues: American Roots Music and the Culture That Produced It," featuring a visit to Dockery Farms, the plantation known as the birthplace of the Blues, and a discussion of how life in the Delta influenced the music of early Blues musicians like Charley Patton and Robert Johnson. On day four, Delta State faculty member Henry Outlaw presents the civil rights movement in Mississippi, with the Emmett Till story as a case study in "oppression, revolution, and reconciliation." Participants travel on day five to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, where they also visit other historical landmarks and cultural institutions, including music-related sites. On day six, geographer John Strait (Sam Houston State University) lectures on the diaspora of Delta residents to the cities of the North. Readings include the following, among other works: James Cobb, The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity; John M. Barry, Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927; and Chris Crowe, Getting Away With Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case.

Project fields: U.S. Regional Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $181,984
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Funding details
Original grant (2012) $177,488
Supplement (2013) $4,496

Maritime Museum Association of San Diego (San Diego, CA 92101)
Raymond Ashley
BH-50476-12
Empires of the Wind: Exploration of the United States Pacific West Coast

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the exploration of California and the Pacific in the development of the young nation.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the exploration of California and the Pacific in the development of the young nation. The Maritime Museum of San Diego (MMSD) offers a workshop led by Raymond Ashley on Pacific exploration. Noting the European arrival in San Diego sixty-five years before Jamestown, it underscores the importance of the West Coast in early American history. Participants study European voyages and consider how period maps revealed early understandings of geography, diverse cultures, and the science of navigation. They learn about prehistoric Native American seafaring, the first interactions between Spanish explorers and native peoples, and the rivalries between Spanish, British, French, and Russian colonizers. Lastly, they study how exploration of the wider Pacific region through such ventures as whaling and trade with China yielded complex communication, migration patterns, and political exchanges. Led by project director Raymond Ashley (MMSD), the workshops benefit from the expertise of Stephen Collston (San Diego State University), Stan Rodriguez (Kumeyaay College), Iris Engstrand (University of San Diego), and David Ringrose (University of California, San Diego), among others. In addition to the museum's collection of historic ships, some of which serve as an on-board classroom, participants visit the Cabrillo National Monument, Old Town San Diego State Historic Park, and the San Diego Mission de Alcala. Primary sources include maps, shipping manifests, and customs bills, as well as European and native accounts of exploration and first encounters. Secondary sources include J. C. Beaglehole's The Exploration of the Pacific, William Schurz's The Manila Galleon, Lynn Withey's Voyages of Discovery: Captain Cook and the Exploration of the Pacific, and Richard Johnson's Thence Round Cape Horn. Finally, after a morning on the State's official tallship, California, to immerse participants in aspects of sailing the ship, they share their progress on group teaching projects that are later posted on the MMSD website.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $164,677
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Meredith Davis (project director)
Stephen P. Rice (co-project director)
BH-50481-12
The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that survey the Hudson River in an interdisciplinary study of modernization in nineteenth-century America.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that survey the Hudson River in an interdisciplinary study of modernization in nineteenth-century America. Ramapo College offers a workshop on the Hudson River as a case study of the scope of modernization in nineteenth-century America. The study of art, literature, and architecture, alongside the developments of commerce, industry, and tourism that emerged on the nineteenth-century Hudson, reveal the diverse ways in which Americans navigated the waterway. This approach also brings an interdisciplinary perspective to history and a humanities focus to environmental studies. Each day allows for a specific topic with lectures, readings, and site-based activities tied to a region of the river. The workshop begins by considering the mouth of the Hudson as estuary and economic gateway; participants survey New York Harbor by boat, walk the commercial district of Wall Street, and read Walt Whitman's poetry at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. Farther up river, they discuss short stories by Washington Irving; visit his home, Sunnyside; and compare this modest structure to Lyndhurst, its Gilded-Age neighbor and home of financier Jay Gould. They study the development of the steamboat and Erie Canal for the purpose of industry and commerce, and the Hudson River School paintings of Thomas Cole as romantic depictions of nature. Finally, a morning boat trip-enhanced by readings in period guidebooks-enable participants to interpret the river's dramatic geology, iconic vistas, and environmental change through a nineteenth-century lens. Project directors Stephen P. Rice and Meredith Davis are scholars of American studies and art history, respectively. Their expertise is supplemented by Elizabeth Hutchinson (art history, Columbia University), Roger Panetta (Curator of the Hudson River Collection, Fordham University), Judith Richardson (English, Stanford University), Thomas Wermuth (history, Marist College and Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute), and Stephen Stanne (Hudson River Estuary Program, Cornell University). In addition to place-based writing exercises, a session entitled "Teaching Your Place" assists teachers in the translation of the Hudson River workshop to local sites.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,876
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Kentucky Historical Society (Frankfort, KY 40601)
Tim Talbott
BH-50488-12
Torn Within, Threatened Without: Kentucky and the Border States in the Civil War

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on conflicts in Kentucky and other border states during the Civil War.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on conflicts in Kentucky and other border states during the Civil War. In this Landmarks workshop, the Kentucky Historical Society takes teachers beyond the battlefield in an exploration of the Civil War in Kentucky. According to the project director, "the conventional studies focus on places like Perryville and personalities like John Hunt Morgan . . . but recent scholarship reveals a complex network of guerillas, political and economic intrigue, expansive questions of loyalty, and sometimes surprising race and gender roles within a divided society." As a border state between North and South, Kentucky was a microcosm of Civil War divisiveness and played a key role in its outcome. As Lincoln said, "I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky." Among the workshop faculty are historians William C. Harris (North Carolina State University), Alicestyne Turley and J. Blaine Hudson (University of Louisville), Brian McKnight (University of Virginia-Wise), Lindsey Apple and James Klotter (Georgetown College), Aaron Astor (Maryville College), Anne E. Marshall (Mississippi State University), Dwight Pitcaithley (New Mexico State University), and Christopher Phillips (University of Cincinnati), the last of whom discusses Missouri and Maryland as other examples of Civil War border states. Readings include three books by visiting faculty: Harris's Lincoln and the Border States: Preserving the Union; Lindsey Apple's The Family Legacy of Henry Clay: In the Shadow of a Kentucky Patriarch; and Anne E. Marshall's Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Memory in a Border State. In addition to reading secondary works, participants consult primary sources from the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society and conduct research in the Society archives. Teachers visit sites in Lexington, Frankfort, and Louisville, such as the Abraham Lincoln birthplace, the Old State Capitol, the Kentucky Military History Museum, the Perryville Battlefield, the Farmington Historic Plantation, and Camp Nelson, a recruiting and training center for African-American soldiers. Participants discuss classroom applications, keep notebooks, and write responses to site visits. Within a month of the workshop, they submit an essay about a primary source for posting on the workshop blog.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $178,741
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2527)
Jennifer Masengarb
BH-50489-12
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of skyscrapers to urbanization.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of skyscrapers to urbanization. The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) offers a workshop to explore how the rise of the skyscraper stimulated and reflected change in American life. Between 1885 and 1895, rising land prices and technological changes such as the invention of the elevator and the steel frame made a new building type, the skyscraper, both commercially necessary and physically possible. In the heart of Chicago's city center or "Loop," a boom of new tall buildings formed what became known as the "Chicago School" of architecture. Workshop participants examine the interplay of economic, cultural, and aesthetic influences that transformed Chicago's built landscape from the 1880s through the present. Teachers visit several landmark buildings throughout the "Loop," such as the Reliance Building (D. H. Burnham & Co., 1895), the Chicago Tribune Tower (Raymond Hood, 1925), and the Federal Center (Mies van der Rohe, 1964, 1974). Sessions with historian Henry Binford (Northwestern University) and architectural historians Katherine Solomonson (University of Minnesota) and Joanna Merwood-Salisbury (Parsons The New School for Design), as well as with practicing architects, advance exploration of the complexities of the tall building boom. Readings include selections from (among other works) William Cronon, Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; Daniel Bluestone, Constructing Chicago; Louis Sullivan's 1896 essay, "The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered"; and Carl Sandburg's 1916 Chicago Poems. Participants receive CAF's award-winning curriculum guide, Schoolyards to Skylines: Teaching with Chicago's Amazing Architecture.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $172,393
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum
BH-50492-12
Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization. This workshop focuses on Lowell, Massachusetts, the first planned industrial city in the United States, as a means to study changes in work, economics, society, culture, and the environment that occurred between 1820 and 1860. To address the key themes that a study of Lowell invites, Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) places the local textile industry in an international context, Patrick Malone (Brown University) focuses on Lowell's water power system, Jack Larkin (Old Sturbridge Village) discusses the transition from an agrarian to a market-based economy, Gray Fitzsimons (GGF Historical Consultants) focuses on the textile industry's management structure and on the experience of Irish and French Canadian immigrants, Robert Forrant (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) speaks about labor's responses to the new industrial order, Chad Montrie (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) explores the tensions between the traditional and the modern in the literature of the early nineteenth century, and Marie Frank (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) utilizes two selections (by Thomas Cole and Charles Sheeler) from the NEH Picturing America portfolio to explore responses to industrialization and the American landscape. Participants directly examine Lowell's rich historic fabric such as the Suffolk Mill, the Boott Cotton Mill and Boarding House, and other mill sites along the Merrimack and Concord Rivers. Site visits to Old Sturbridge Village and the town of Concord put the industrial developments in a wider context. In addition to readings by workshop scholars, the participants read selections by historians Thomas Dublin, Patrick Malone, and Brian Mitchell; the period literature of Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne; and the writings of young women who worked in the mills. The university provides online support through Blackboard, and teachers develop lesson plans, the best of which are posted on the workshop's website.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $180,861
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Funding details
Original grant (2012) $169,430
Supplement (2013) $11,431

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Cortland (Cortland, NY 13045)
Kevin B. Sheets (project director)
Randi Jill Storch (co-project director)
BH-50495-12
Forever Wild: The Adirondacks in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers using the Adirondacks to understand the interconnections of urban and wilderness environments in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers using the Adirondacks to understand the interconnections of urban and wilderness environments in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America. Directed by historians Kevin Sheets and Randi Storch (State University of New York College of Cortland [SUNY Cortland]), this workshop explores "the social, cultural, political, and economic relevance of the Adirondack wilderness" to the history of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era, which has often been taught with an urban focus. Participants learn on-site at three Adirondack Great Camps (Camp Huntington, which now belongs to SUNY Cortland, and those of the Vanderbilts and J.P. Morgan) and two museums (Adirondack Museum, 1890 House Museum), as well as on contrasting walking tours in urban Cortland and on Adirondack camp trails. Monday's focus on "Innovation, Industrialization and Domestic Life of the Gilded Age" takes Cortland as a case study for understanding life in a nineteenth-century manufacturing town. Participants work with collections at the 1890s House Museum, modeling historians' process of inquiry and interpretation. Discussing Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy, which fictionalizes the 1906 murder of Cortland factory worker Grace Brown, they explore the interpretation of historical events through literature. The focus on Tuesday is the cultural and aesthetic ideal of the wilderness, and how Americans of the era defined "wilderness" and "nature" in contrast with the urban experience. Primary source texts and period photographs in the archive and library at Camp Huntington help illuminate the role of "wilderness" in Gilded Age ideas of masculinity, class, and nation building. Wednesday's theme, "From Enchanted Forest to Lumber Mill," focuses on the economic interdependence of city and wilderness. Adirondack Museum curators guide participants through exhibits on the region's industries and help them engage with the museum's collections and historic structures, ranging from a nineteenth-century one-room log cabin hotel to a luxurious early-twentieth-century Pullman railcar. Thursday's topic turns to "Domesticating the Wild," with study of the Great Camps that industrialists built as "civilized" retreats in the wilderness for their lesiure pursuits. On Friday, "wilderness" is considered as a focus of political conflict, most notably in the 1894 debate over protecting the Adirondack forest preserve as "forever wild" in the revised state constitution. Historian Rebecca Edwards (Vassar College) situates these contentions among industrialists, reformers, and naturalists in their progressive-era political context. Workshop readings include writings by Theodore Roosevelt on "the strenuous life" and selections from Philip Terrie's Forever Wild: A Cultural History of Wilderness in the Adirondacks, William Cronon's Nature's Metropolis, Edwards's New Spirits: Americans in the Gilded Age, Robert Cherny's American Politics in the Gilded Age, and Philip DeLoria's Playing Indian.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,983
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Wright on the Park, Inc. (Mason City, IA 50402-0792)
Patricia Ann Schultz
BH-50497-12
Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School in the Midwest

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School in Mason City, Iowa.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School in Mason City, Iowa. This workshop focuses on Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School of architecture, led by co-directors Paula Mohr (architectural historian, Iowa State Historic Preservation Office) and Pat Schultz (chair,Wright on the Park's Education Committee). The Historic Park Inn Hotel, the world's last remaining hotel designed by Wright, serves as workshop headquarters, for seminars as well as participants' lodging, and is itself the focus of a detailed tour on Monday. Architectural historian Richard Guy Wilson (University of Virginia) offers several sessions in the first few days, discussing the role of architecture in the study of history and culture, the origins of the Prairie School and Wright's early work, and the relationship between the Arts and Crafts movement and the Prairie School. Midweek in the Rock Crest and Rock Glen neighborhoods, participants tour the Stockman House, designed by Wright, alongside three houses by Prairie School architects Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony. Historian Paul Kruty (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) gives presentations on Griffin and Mahony and on the design for the neighborhood. Dennis Domer (American studies, University of Kansas) discusses Prairie School landscape design, and art historian Barbara Mooney (University of Iowa) places the Prairie School's work in the context of other Midwestern architecture of the time. The program's final day includes a Mason City walking tour aimed to "illustrate how the study of any community's architecture can serve as an effective tool for teaching art, history, and culture." A roundtable of participant presentations and concluding sessions on Wright's legacy and pedagogical strategies bring the workshop to a close.

Project fields: Architecture
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,993
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Millsaps College (Jackson, MS 39210-0002)
Suzanne Marrs
BH-50502-12
One Place, One Time: Jackson, Mississippi, 1963

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers focused on the year 1963 in Jackson, Mississippi, with the murder of civil rights leader Medgar Evers and its aftermath.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers focused on the year 1963 in Jackson, Mississippi, with the murder of civil rights leader Medgar Evers and its aftermath. After midnight on June 12, 1963, civil rights leader Medgar Evers was shot in his driveway in Jackson, Mississippi, just hours after President Kennedy had pledged his support for sweeping civil rights legislation in a televised address to the nation. By working "both backwards and forwards" from this focal point, this new workshop helps teachers to "understand the complex intersections of race and power, cultural change and resistance, institutions and individuals and to make these intersections vivid for their students." This project is led by Millsaps faculty members Suzanne Marrs and Stephanie Rolph, a historian of the civil rights era in the South. Myrlie Evers-Williams, Evers's widow, gives a keynote address on Sunday evening. Monday begins with an introductory lecture by Rolph, after which Mississippi civil rights movement veteran Leslie McLemore (political science, Jackson State University) leads a tour of civil rights sites, including the Medgar Evers House. The tour concludes at the Margaret Walker Alexander Center, where director Robert Luckett (history, Jackson State University) examines archival holdings with participants. The next day, biographer Michael Vinson Williams (history and African-American studies, Mississippi State University) discusses Evers's life, and staff at the Department of Archives and History introduce their Evers Papers and holdings from the Sovereignty Commission, a de facto intelligence organization. Reverend Edwin King, himself spied upon by the Sovereignty Commission, discusses his response to the opening of these papers, and on Wednesday details the roles of Tougaloo College (where he was chaplain in 1963) and Millsaps College (from which he graduated) in the "Jackson Movement." Participants explore works by Eudora Welty (including a story in the voice of the then-unidentified assassin) and learn about Welty's civil rights involvement in touring the Welty House. On Thursday, former NEH councilmember Peggy Prenshaw discusses autobiographical writings by Myrlie Evers, Anne Moody, and Willie Morris, as well as other responses to the assassination (Margaret Walker Alexander's poems; Bob Dylan's song "Only a Pawn in Their Game"). The role of journalism "then and now" is taken up on Friday: Rolph leads participants in analyzing the press response to Evers's killing, and investigative reporter Jerry Mitchell discusses his 1993-1994 Jackson Clarion-Ledger articles looking back at the assassination, which spurred the reopening of the murder case against Byron de la Beckwith, convicted in 1994. Rolph then gives a concluding session on the legacy of 1963 Jackson, and participants share their research and curricular work from the week.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,530
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Montana Historical Society (Helena, MT 59601-4514)
Kirby Lambert (project director)
Paula E. Petrik (co-project director)
BH-50510-12
The Richest Hills: Mining in the Far West, 1862-1920

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that connect the study of mines and mining in Montana to broad patterns in U. S. history.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that connect the study of mines and mining in Montana to broad patterns in U. S. history. This workshop addresses the contribution of western mining to the social and economic history of the United States through the study of the different types of mining in four Montana towns. Lectures and discussions address such topics as the technological processes of mining; capital and labor in the mining industry; the architecture and commercial life of Bannack, Virginia City, Helena, and Butte; African-American, Jewish, and Chinese communities; and relations with Native Americans in the region. Project co-directors Kirby Lambert (Montana Historical Society [MHS]) and Paula Petrik (history, George Mason University) are joined by Robert Swartout (history, Carroll College), Ken Egan (literature, Humanities Montana), Fredric Quivik (industrial heritage and archaeology, Michigan Technological University), Ray Breuninger (geology, University of Montana), Mary Murphy (history, Montana State University), Nicholas Vrooman (Native American history, University of Montana), independent filmmaker Pamela Roberts, and other local experts. Readings include selections from Montana: A History of Two Centuries (Michael Malone et al.) and Montana: Stories of the Land (Krys Holmes), as well as scholarly chapters and articles, several by workshop faculty Petrik, Murphy, and Vrooman. The participants also use primary sources from MHS, including documents, maps, and photographs, as they develop teaching units.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $191,910
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Funding details
Original grant (2012) $179,910
Supplement (2013) $12,000

University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95616-5270)
Ari Kelman (project director)
Eric Rauchway (co-project director)
BH-50512-12
The Transcontinental Railroad: Transforming California and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the transcontinental railroad and its impact on nineteenth-century America.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the transcontinental railroad and its impact on nineteenth-century America. This workshop explores the impact of the transcontinental railroad on the politics, society, economy, and environment of California and the nation. Daily topics include technology and labor, geography and the environment, the social and economic impact of the railroad, and the West in the American imagination. Based in Sacramento, the western terminus of the railroad, the project includes visits to the California State Railroad Museum, Old Sacramento State Historic Park, the Sacramento History Museum, the Crocker Art Museum, and the mansion of railroad baron Leland Stanford. Farther afield, participants take day trips to Stanford University's Bill Lane Center for the West, the Chinese Historical Society of America, and the treacherous Donner Pass, an example of the difficult terrain faced by railroad workers. In addition to co-directors Ari Kelman and Eric Rauchway of University of California, Davis, the faculty includes historians Richard White (Stanford University) and Richard J. Orsi (California State University, East Bay), as well as museum curators and staff. White discusses selected chapters from his prize-winning book Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America. Other readings are drawn from Amy Richter's Home on the Rails: Women, the Railroad, and the Rise of Public Domesticity; Alexander Saxton's The Indispensable Enemy: Labor and the Anti-Chinese Movement in California; Wolfgang Schivelbusch's The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the 19th Century; Andrew C. Isenberg's The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1850-1920; and The West as America: Reinterpreting Images of the Frontier, 1820-1920, edited by William Truettner. During the workshop, participants develop a resource list, annotated bibliography, and lesson or unit plans for posting on the project's website.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $180,000
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

California State University, Monterey Bay (Seaside, CA 93955)
Ruben G. Mendoza
BH-50515-12
The Fourteenth Colony: Native Californians, Missions, Presidios, and Colonists on the Spanish Frontier, 1769-1848

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers to explore the architectural, archaeological, cultural, and historical record of Spanish colonial missions in California.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers to explore the architectural, archaeological, cultural, and historical record of Spanish colonial missions in California. This workshop, sponsored by the Institute for Archaeology of the California State University, Monterey Bay, unfolds around visits to Spanish colonial missions. Inquiry centers on such key questions as: What motives sent the joint Spanish military and religious expedition into "Alta California"? How do primary documents and the missions themselves help us understand the Spanish colonial heritage and its impact? Training in how to "read" a mission provides the interpretative framework of the workshops. In field trips, consideration is given to period artifacts, materials, construction methods, the social implications of built space, and the special features and distinctive functions of each site. The program begins on Sunday with a formal dinner and keynote address on Father Junípero Serra by historians Robert Senkewicz (Santa Clara University) in week one, and by Douglas Monroy (Colorado College) in week two. The focus of the first full day is the Mission San Juan Bautista, with buildings and features dating to 1797, including a soldiers barracks, nunnery, and livery stable. The Alameda (now Third Street) boasts a number of later eighteenth-century Spanish and early nineteenth-century Mexican-Indian adobes, and numerous examples of later architectural styles. On Tuesday, a morning visit to San Miguel Arcangel supports study of the artistic and musical traditions that pervaded daily life; arts curator Carol Kenyon introduces the brilliant fresco murals painted by the Salinan Indian peoples; and Spanish colonial music expert John Warren treats the participants to a demonstration performance by the New World Baroque Orchestra. At San Antonio de Padua in the afternoon, anthropologist Robert Hoover discusses its intact aqueduct system and water-driven mill, distinctive features of this "best preserved and most pristine" of missions in the Monterey Bay. On Thursday, the final field trip is to Mission San Carlos Borromeo and the Royal Presidio of Monterey, where guest scholars guide discussion on a range of topics, with emphasis on indigenous acculturation and change. Wednesday and Friday sessions are organized around "focus" group interactions, resource development using such collections as the Huntington Library's California population database, review of content in relation to classroom teaching, and presentation of curricular projects. On Saturday, historian Douglas Monroy guides concluding discussions in week one, and anthropologist Maria De Fátima Wade (University of Texas, Austin) in week two. The workshop is directed by archaeologist Ruben Mendoza, whose California Missions Source Book serves as a basic text. Other readings, primarily drawn from books and articles by visiting scholars, represent a cross-section of fields, including anthropology, archaeology, history, art history, and music.

Project fields: U.S. Regional Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $188,695
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Funding details
Original grant (2012) $176,698
Supplement (2013) $11,997

Siena College (Loudonville, NY 12211-1462)
Jennifer Dorsey
BH-50520-12
Heaven on Earth: Shakers, Religious Revival, and Social Reform in America

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the nineteenth-century Shaker movement and the communitarian society it produced.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the nineteenth-century Shaker movement and the communitarian society it produced. This workshop is anchored in the observation that "[t]he impulse toward utopia has played a vital role in the evolution of American culture from the seventeenth century to the present." Given the opportunity to engage in close study of Shaker history and material culture, teachers gain a deeper understanding of the importance of the utopian experiment in American history. The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing (Shakers) came to America under the direction of Mother Ann Lee (1736-1784), who evangelized on the basic tenets of their faith, including celibacy, gender equality, and a communal life. The growth of the Shaker movement took place against the backdrop of industrial and commercial transformation that was particularly intense in New York, with its aggressive investment in transportation; by the 1830s approximately 6,000 Shakers lived in nineteen communities from Kentucky to Maine. Assigned readings include works by visiting scholars Stephen Stein (The Shaker Experience in America) and Glendyne Wergland (One Shaker Life: Isaac Newton Youngs, 1793-1865, and Sisters in the Faith: Shaker Women and Equality of the Sexes), as well as readings drawn from nineteenth-century Shaker writings and testimonials. Participants visit Hancock Shaker Village in Hancock, Massachusetts, as part of a general introduction to the time in which the Shakers lived and how their community life responded to it, as explained by project director Jennifer Dorsey. Glendyne Wergland leads sessions on two days, covering a wide range of topics--health, diet, celibacy, gender roles, education, children--and accompanying the group on field trips to the Shaker Museum and Library at Mount Lebanon and to the New York State Library in Albany, which houses a collection of documents relating to Shaker educational practices. On the fourth day, Stephen Stein joins the group to discuss Shaker spirituality in the context of the Great Awakening; in the visit to the Shaker Heritage Society in Watervliet, New York, director Starlyn D'Angelo discusses Shaker architecture, music, and dance. On the last day, Professor Stein focuses on the post-Civil War decline of the Shaker movement, the mythology or romanticism about Shakers that subsequently emerged, and the Shakers' efforts in the early twentieth century to preserve their own material culture, culminating in a visit to the New York State Museum's Shaker Collection. The teachers are expected to develop curricula that incorporate material culture or use primary source documents.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $175,767
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT 06269-9000)
Robert W. Stephens (project director)
Mary Ellen Junda (co-project director)
BH-50522-12
Gullah Voices: Traditions and Transformations

Two one-week workshops for eighty schoolteachers to explore the history and cultural memory of the Gullah people through the arts.

Two one-week workshops for eighty schoolteachers to explore the history and cultural memory of the Gullah people through the arts. In collaboration with The Penn Center in St. Helena, South Carolina, two music department faculty from the University of Connecticut, Robert Stephens and Mary Ellen Junda, engage teachers in a study of the history and rich artistic heritage of the Gullah people. They observe that the Gullah, also known as Geechee in Georgia, have shaped a distinctive culture within a history of oppression followed by isolation and more recent struggles to preserve their way of life in the face of twentieth-century development. The Gullah people, descended from rice plantation slaves, preserved many common elements of their home culture in Sierra Leone, chief among them music, dance, and oral traditions. Before coming to the workshop, teachers are asked to view the video Family Across the Sea; review materials on Yale University's Gullah website; and listen to examples of Gullah music collected in the 1930s (materials are available on the project website). They are also asked to read God, Dr. Buzzard, and the Bolito Man by Cornelia Bailey and Black Culture and Black Consciousness by Lawrence Levine. Following a reception on Sunday night featuring a live performance by the Gullah Geechee Ring Shouters, the week begins with historian Cynthia Schmidt discussing West African and American Gullah connections reflected in songs and stories in common, as depicted in the documentary, The Language You Cry In. Historian Erskine Clark (Columbia Theological Seminary) expands upon these comparisons in the domain of religion and religious practices. Mid-week, co-directors Stephens and Junda discuss the historical and cultural contexts of Gullah music and explain Gullah musical styles. Wednesday afternoon at the Georgia Historical Society, teachers examine artifacts, documents, photographs, and other records with a view toward selecting a primary source to feature in the development of their group projects. In addition to the scholarly and archival experts, teachers have opportunities to work with Gullah community members: artist Leroy Campbell; Gullah historians Emory Campbell and Cornelia Bailey; and Mary Moran and her son Wilson, descendants of Amelia Dawley whose recorded song made it possible for scholars to identify precisely the Gullah's African origins. For the day trip to remote Sapelo Island, teachers are accompanied by author and community "griot" Cornelia Bailey, one of the last generation born and educated there. The tour of African-American historical sites in Savannah on Wednesday evening is led by Karen Wortham, who produced the documentary, Journey by Faith: A Story of First African Baptist Church. On the last day, teachers discuss group projects (arranged by grade levels and academic backgrounds) and explore ways to integrate the content of the Landmarks project into their teaching.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $191,873
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2014

Funding details
Original grant (2012) $179,915
Supplement (2013) $11,958

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2356)
Timothy D. Walker
BH-50524-12
Sailing to Freedom: New Bedford and the Underground Railroad

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on abolitionism in its maritime context in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on abolitionism in its maritime context in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The program examines New Bedford as a locus for abolitionism and the Underground Railroad, treating the city as a lens through which to view great challenges facing nineteenth-century America. During this period, New Bedford became one of America's most cosmopolitan cities, as well as a preeminent whaling port. While its maritime trade drew diverse populations of immigrants, it also transported to freedom fugitive African Americans in ship cargo holds. With its significant Quaker population, New Bedford emerged as a hub of both reform society and abolitionist activity. As Kathryn Grover captures in her book, The Fugitive's Gibraltar: Escaping Slaves and Abolitionism in New Bedford, Massachusetts, New Bedford was "not so much a stop along the Underground Railroad, but rather a terminus--a community where ex-slaves knew they could settle and prosper." Project director Timothy Walker (University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth), a maritime and slave trade historian, has assembled a diverse faculty, including historians Grover, John Stauffer (Harvard University), and Jeffrey Bolster (University of New Hampshire), and local poet laureate Everett Hoagland. Each day, experts connect lectures and discussions with close studies of original documents, objects, and architecture. For example, after lectures on New Bedford's early history and the maritime trade, teachers examine rare maritime guides, captains' logs, and mariners' scrimshaw sculpture. On another day, Len Travers (University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth) trains participants to work with primary documents and material objects as historical evidence. Primary readings include census data, fugitive slave narratives, and the speeches and letters of Frederick Douglass; secondary readings include works by several of the visiting scholars, such as Jeffrey Bolster's Black Jacks: African American Seamen in the Age of Sail.

Project fields: Arts, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,986
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

U.S.S. Constitution Museum (Boston, MA 02129-0215)
Sarah Watkins
BH-50529-12
The USS Constitution and the War of 1812

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the naval War of 1812 and its most important and complex artifact, the United States frigate Constitution, anchored in Boston.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the naval War of 1812 and its most important and complex artifact, the United States frigate Constitution, anchored in Boston. In connection with the War of 1812 bicentennial, the USS Constitution Museum organizes a new workshop around an "underrepresented" war, using the frigate Constitution to tell the story, not just of "technology and tactics," but also the broader significance of the war in its time and in the national collective memory. Although the Constitution served in other conflicts, the ship achieved iconic status for her role in three inspiring victories against the Royal Navy in the War of 1812. Participants read Donald Hickey's The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict; Stephen Budiansky's Perilous Fight: America's Intrepid War with Great Britain on the High Seas; A Sailor's Life (forthcoming) by Sarah Watkins and Matthew Brenckle; J. C. A. Stagg's Mr. Madison's War: Politics, Diplomacy, and Warfare in the Early American Republic; Madison's declaration of war; and the 1814 Treaty of Ghent. Other readings are provided in a workshop notebook; the teachers also use the Museum's web-based curriculum guide, All Hands on Deck. Joining lead scholar Donald Hickey is Robert Allison, who has written on Stephen Decatur; Margherita Desy of the Naval History and Heritage Command Detachment in Boston; Bill Fowler, author of Silas Talbot: Captain of Old Ironsides; Sidney Hart, curator at the National Portrait Gallery; and Gene Smith, who is currently writing about African-American combatants in the War of 1812. The daily progression of topics begins with the debates that led to the start of the war, then turns to the major naval battles. Wednesday and Thursday's program features stories of "Ordinary People in Extraordinary Times," and the week concludes with "memory and meaning" themes to deepen participants' understanding of the impact of the War of 1812. With the Constitution's rich trove of artifacts-some 10,000 in all-the ship serves as the major landmark of the workshop, and teachers have opportunities to explore spaces usually "off limits" to the public, including the captain's cabin, surgeon's cockpit, and the magazine. The teachers also visit Boston sites, including the Museum of Fine Arts, the Black Heritage Trail, and the Federal-style Harrison Gray Otis House.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,548
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Niagara County Community College (Sanborn, NY 14132-9487)
Pierson Bell
BH-50533-12
Clinton's Ditch: The Erie Canal in Western New York

Two one-week workshops on the construction of the Erie Canal and its economic, social, and cultural impact.

Two one-week workshops on the construction of the Erie Canal and its economic, social, and cultural impact. This workshop guides teachers through an in-depth exploration of the construction of the Erie Canal and the "larger themes of how advancements in transportation, communication, and engineering change not only the economy but the political climate, social interactions, and the culture of a people." The development of a commercial waterway in upstate New York that eventually spanned 363 miles began in controversy concerning funding, engineering, and labor challenges, but this did not deter Governor DeWitt Clinton, who realized the enormous economic advantage of constructing what was derided as "Clinton's Ditch." This background is covered by author Gerard Koeppel and historian Tamara Plankins Thornton (University of Buffalo), supported by readings from David Walker Howe's What God Hath Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 and Koeppel's Bond of Union: Building the Erie Canal and the American Empire. An Erie Canal trip originating in Lockport, NY, allows participants to experience first-hand the engineering challenges posed by elevation changes between Buffalo and Albany, and the technical innovations they inspired. Director Pierson Bell, a veteran teacher in the Niagara County School District, next teams up with Roger Hecht (literature, State University of New York, Oneonta) to examine the cultural impact of the canal through landscape painting, prints and drawings, and selections of writings by Twain, Hawthorne, and Harriet Beecher Stowe drawn from Hecht's The Erie Canal Reader, 1790-1950. Wednesday is devoted to group tours of the Erie Canal Museum, housed in the old "weighlock" building that provided a system for determining toll charges, and trips to Camillus Erie Canal Park and the Mile Creek Aqueduct. On Thursday, historian F. Daniel Larkin (SUNY Oneonta) addresses the rapid growth the canal brought to cities like Buffalo, expanding upon Ronald Shaw's Erie Water West: a History of the Erie Canal, 1792-1854. Professor Larkin stays the following day to share insights about various primary sources-maps, drawings, blueprints, and photographs-as teachers, working in small groups, develop their document projects and virtual archives. On Saturday, the teachers report on their projects and then gather for a late afternoon trip to Niagara Falls State Park.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $175,122
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association (Deerfield, MA 01342)
Barbara A. Mathews
BH-50536-12
Living on the Edge of Empire: Alliance, Conflict, and Captivity in Colonial New England

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on cross-cultural contact and conflict, set in colonial Deerfield, Massachusetts.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on cross-cultural contact and conflict, set in colonial Deerfield, Massachusetts. This workshop uses the 1704 Raid on Deerfield as an entry point for studying encounters between Native Americans, African-American slaves, and European settlers in the early colonial period. During the raid-part of a war between England and France over the Spanish crown-French and Native American forces set fire to Deerfield and slew more than fifty villagers. Workshop topics include Native American nations and alliances, European religious and political conflicts, daily life in colonial and tribal settlements, slavery, and captivity narratives. Based at the Old Deerfield Village Historic Landmark District, the project involves visits to several collections of eighteenth century artifacts, the colonial Wells-Thorn House, and the Pocumtuck children's museum, as well as the Pocumtuck Fort, where an archaeologist introduces participants to an active dig site. As part of a session on the legacy of the raid in history and memory, participants view and discuss two films, Ononko's Vow (1910) and Captive: The Story of Esther (2005). Among the readings are Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney's Captors and Captives: The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield, William Cronon's Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England; and Joanne Melish's essay "Slavery and the Slave Trade in Colonial New England." Participants also read The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America by Yale historian John Demos, who gives a talk on his research. Other visiting historians include Joanne Melish (University of Kentucky) and Kevin Sweeney (Amherst College). Margaret Bruchac, a Wobanaki Indian and anthropologist at University of Connecticut, lectures on local Indian history and lead a tour of former tribal lands. Participants spend part of each day developing lesson plans and other curricular materials under the guidance of staff historians and master teachers.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,294
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (Birmingham, AL 35203-1911)
Martha V. Bouyer
BH-50538-12
But for Birmingham: The Rise of the Magic City and the Evolution of the Civil Rights Movement

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on labor history and the civil rights struggle in Birmingham, Alabama.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on labor history and the civil rights struggle in Birmingham, Alabama. The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (BCRI) offers a workshop on Birmingham, tracing its history as an industrial center and its role in the civil rights movement. The workshop begins with an examination of post-Civil War labor relations and the rise of Birmingham as an industrial center before turning to discussion of the role of labor in the civil rights movement. Participants then turn to an in-depth examination of civil rights activism in Birmingham, which includes a panel discussion with veterans of the movement. They visit a variety of sites around the city: Sloss Furnace; Red Mountain Park, where the remnants of several mines are located; Bethel Baptist Church; the Smithfield neighborhood, where residential segregation was challenged in the 1950s; and the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. In addition to the project director, presenters include Glenn Eskew (Georgia State University), Calvin Woods (Southern Christian Leadership Conference), Robert Corley (University of Alabama, Birmingham), Horace Huntley (University of Alabama, Birmingham), and G. Douglas Jones (former U.S. attorney), as well as site curatorial staff. Readings are drawn from Eskew's But for Birmingham, Charles Connerly's The Most Segregated City in America, Douglas Blackmon's Slavery by Another Name, and Andrew Manis's biography of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, as well as collections of oral history interviews and primary sources from the BCRI's archives. Participants also view two documentaries: The Barber of Birmingham and NEH-funded Slavery by Another Name.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $177,881
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Caroline Pryor
BH-50415-11
Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois.

"Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois. The program investigates four central themes of Abraham Lincoln's public life: nationalism, power, freedom, and race. The project considers such subjects as nationalism and politics in the Civil War era; Lincoln, slavery, and race; Lincoln and the Constitution; Lincoln, the radicals, and Emancipation; Walt Whitman and Lincoln; visual art on Lincoln and the war, using images from the NEH's Picturing America portfolio; African-American women's experiences as an example of racial issues; and Lincoln's legacy. Participants visit the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, the Lincoln Home, Lincoln's Law Office in Springfield, Illinois, and the historical reconstruction of New Salem Village, where Lincoln began his career. Teachers also explore the exhibit "Lincoln and the Constitution," on display at the Lovejoy Library. Participants read writings by Lincoln, including the Lincoln-Douglas debates, the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address, the Second Inaugural Address, and selected letters; writings by African-American women; and secondary works by Eric Foner, David Donald, John Stauffer, James McPherson, Philip Shaw Paludan, David Potter, Barry Schwartz, Garry Wills, and Lerone Bennett, Jr. The staff includes project director Caroline Pryor (education, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville [SIUE]); historians Stephen Hansen (SIUE), Iver Bernstein (Washington University), Leslie Brown (Williams College), Jason Stacey (SIUE), and Laura Milsk-Fowler (SIUE); art historian Ivy Cooper (SIUE); and site and museum personnel.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,518
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30303)
Timothy J. Crimmins
BH-50416-11
The Problem of the Color Line: Atlanta Landmarks and Civil Rights History

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on southern segregation and the civil rights movement in Atlanta.

"The Problem of the Color Line: Atlanta Landmarks and Civil Rights History" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on southern segregation and the Civil Rights movement in Atlanta. The project is anchored in an observation made by W. E. B. Du Bois in The Souls of Black Folk (1903): "The Problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." In addition to Atlanta University's Stone Hall, where Du Bois penned this famous reflection, the project uses other Atlanta sites as touchstones for examining the history of the "color line," race relations, and the Civil Rights movement in twentieth-century America. Sites include Piedmont Park, the site of Booker T. Washington's 1895 "Atlanta Compromise" speech; the residence of Alonzo Herndon, a former slave who became Atlanta's first black millionaire; the Fox Theatre, which still bears the marks of the segregation era; the State Capitol, which retains monuments to both Jim Crow and the triumph over the color line; and the Auburn Avenue National Landmark District (the site of Ebenezer Baptist Church) and the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site. Georgia State University faculty members Timothy J. Crimmins, Glenn Eskew, Clifford Kuhn, and Akinyele Umoja address such topics as the South before the color line, the debate between W. E. B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington, the Atlanta Race Riot of 1906, and race relations in Atlanta from the 1930s to the 1990s. In addition, Dana White (Emory University), Beverly Guy Sheftall (Spelman College), and Vickie Crawford (Morehouse College) lecture about patterns of segregation in Atlanta during the Jim Crow era and women in the Civil Rights movement. Readings are drawn from varied primary sources (such as Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk, Ray Baker's Following the Color Line, and autobiographies by Walter White and John Lewis), secondary works (such as William Chafe's Remembering Jim Crow and Aldon Morris's Origins of the Civil Rights Movement), and literary texts (from such writers as Margaret Mitchell, Joel Chandler Harris ["Uncle Remus"], Flannery O'Connor, Alice Walker, and Tom Wolfe).

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,997
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 3/31/2013

Massachusetts Historical Society (Boston, MA 02215-3631)
Jayne K. Gordon
BH-50417-11
At the Crossroads of Revolution: Lexington and Concord in 1775

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War on April 19, 1775.

"At the Crossroads of Revolution: Lexington and Concord in 1775" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War on April 19, 1775. Utilizing Minute Man National Historical Park (including the North Bridge and the preserved "Battle Road"), Freedom Trail in Boston, and sites in Concord itself, the project focuses on the battles of Lexington and Concord to illuminate the following topics: New England life and society on the eve of the Revolution; the developing conflict between Britain and its colonies; the battles themselves; the impact of the events on ordinary farmers, women, and African Americans; the local environment and landscape in relation to the history of the time; and the legacies of the Revolution, particularly in the writings of nineteenth-century Concord authors such as Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau. The project faculty includes co-directors Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker (Massachusetts Historical Society [MHS]), Robert Gross (history, University of Connecticut), William Fowler (history, Northeastern University), Brian Donahue (environmental studies, Brandeis University), and Mary Fuhrer and Joanne Meyers (independent historians).

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $170,937
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Apprend Foundation (Durham, NC 27713-2219)
Laurel Sneed
BH-50419-11
Crafting Freedom: Black Artisans, Entrepreneurs and Abolitionists of the Antebellum Upper South

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American artisans during the antebellum period, using sites in North Carolina.

"Crafting Freedom: Black Artisans, Entrepreneurs and Abolitionists of the Antebellum Upper South" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on African-American artisans during the antebellum period, at sites in North Carolina. The workshop uses the careers of free African-American artisans Thomas Day, a cabinetmaker, and Elizabeth Keckly, a dressmaker, to illuminate the relationship between race-based slavery and African-American enterprise in the antebellum American South. The project utilizes a number of North Carolina sites, including Day's home and shop, his church, Burwell School (where Keckly was enslaved), and the Stagville tobacco plantation. The faculty includes project director Laurel Sneed (Apprend Foundation), John Michael Vlach (American studies, George Washington University), Juanita Holland (independent historian), Peter Wood (history, Duke University), and Michele Ware (English, North Carolina Central University); the program also includes presentations by African-American artisans.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $172,022
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38732)
Luther Brown
BH-50420-11
The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta's rich history, diverse peoples, and impact on the American imagination.

"The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta region, its rich history, its diverse peoples, and its impact on the American imagination. Project director Luther Brown leads the first day's seminar on Delta history and the Mississippi River, including the documentaries LaLee's Kin: The Legacy of Cotton and Fatal Flood alongside a visit to the site of the levee break in the Great Flood of 1927. During day two, historian Charles Reagan Wilson (University of Mississippi) explores the area's ethnic and religious diversity, including its early Chinese, Russian Jewish, Lebanese, and Italian communities. Music scholar David Evans (University of Memphis) guides the third day on "The Blues: American Roots Music and the Culture that Produced It," featuring a visit to Dockery Farms, the plantation viewed as the birthplace of the Blues. On day four, Delta State faculty member Henry Outlaw presents the Civil Rights movement in Mississippi, with the Emmett Till story as a case study in "oppression, revolution, and reconciliation." Participants travel on day five to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, where they also visit other historical landmarks and cultural institutions (including music-related sites). On day six, geographer John Strait (Sam Houston State University) talks about the diaspora of Delta residents to the cities of the North. Readings include The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity (James Cobb), Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 (John M. Barry), and Getting Away With Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case (Chris Crowe), among other works.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. Regional Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $178,872
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Mark Twain House (Hartford, CT 06105-6400)
Craig Hotchkiss
BH-50423-11
Huck, Jim and Jim Crow: a Workshop for Teachers

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, and race in post-Reconstruction America.

"Huck, Jim, and Jim Crow" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, and race in post-Reconstruction America. The workshops explore Mark Twain and his writings in their social, political, and historical contexts. Project director Craig Hotchkiss heads a team of scholars and educators who prepare participants to teach their students about Huckleberry Finn, the important issues it addresses, and the controversies it has engendered. The program opens with a tour of the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Connecticut, where Twain lived from 1871 to 1891. The tour is led by Hotchkiss and chief curator Patricia Philippon, who introduces the museum's library, archives, and collections. Scholarly presentations begin on the first day with Kerry Driscoll (St. Joseph College) on "The Origins of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." Other literary scholars include John Bird (Winthrop University) on the novel's use of dialect; Robert Hirst (General Editor of the Mark Twain Project, University of California at Berkeley) exploring "Mark Twain on Racism" through the author's own notes and drafts of the novel; Stephen Railton (University of Virginia) on Twain's relationship with George Washington Cable and their "Twins of Genius Tour"; Ann Ryan (Le Moyne College) on the era's representations of black men; and Bruce Michelson (University of Illinois) on the novel's ending. Further framing is provided by Wilbert Jenkins (Temple University) on African Americans during Reconstruction and the advent of Jim Crow, and Eric Lott (University of Virginia) on the blackface minstrel tradition. Curator David Pilgrim (Ferris State University) also guides teachers through the exhibition "Hateful Things," on loan from the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia.

[Grant products]
Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $145,873
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Maritime Museum Association of San Diego (San Diego, CA 92101)
Raymond Ashley
BH-50424-11
Empires of the Wind: Exploration of the United States Pacific West Coast

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Pacific exploration and the colonization of the American west coast, held at sites in San Diego, California.

"Empires of the Wind: Exploration of the United States Pacific West Coast" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Pacific exploration and the colonization of the American west coast, held at sites in San Diego, California. The program uses resources at the San Diego Maritime Museum, the Cabrillo National Monument, Old Town San Diego State Historic Park, and San Diego Mission de Alcala. Sessions consider early European voyages and mapping; Spanish interactions with Native Americans in Mexico and the southwest; the role of scientific discoveries in exploration; Spanish, British, and Russian imperial rivalries; the Spanish in California; and Americans in the Pacific from the beginnings of the China trade to the Civil War. Primary sources include maps, European accounts of exploration, and native responses; secondary sources mentioned include works by J.C. Beaglehole, William Schurtz, Lynn Withey, and Richard Johnson. In addition to project director Raymond Ashley (Maritime Museum of San Diego), visiting scholar presenters include Stephen Collston (San Diego State University), Jim Cassidy (U.S. Navy Southwest Cultural Resources Program Manager), Stan Rodriguez (Kumeyaay College), Iris Engstrand (University of San Diego), David Ringrose (University of California, San Diego), and Bruce Linder (independent scholar); Maritime Museum of San Diego staff, site specialists, and curriculum experts are also on hand to assist participants.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $168,369
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2527)
Jennifer Masengarb
BH-50430-11
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the origins of the skyscraper in Chicago and its relationship to urbanization.

"The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of such buildings to urbanization. Between 1885 and 1895, as technological innovations (elevators, the steel frame, and fireproof building materials, among others) made tall buildings both physically possible and commercially feasible, Chicago experienced a skyscraper boom. This workshop hosted by the Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) focuses on the central question: How does the rise of the skyscraper stimulate and reflect change in American life? Participants examine the city's geographical features, as well as the interplay of cultural, philosophical, and aesthetic influences that marked the evolution of Chicago's built landscape from the 1880s through the present. Teachers visit several landmark buildings and architectural firms throughout Chicago's "Loop." Lecture/discussion sessions with historian Henry Binford (Northwestern University) and architectural historians Katherine Solomonson (University of Minnesota) and Joanna Merwood-Salisbury (Parsons The New School for Design), as well as with practicing architects, advance exploration of the complexities of the tall building boom. Readings include selections from (among other works) William Cronan, Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; Donald Miller, City of the Century: The Epic of Chicago and the Making of America; Daniel Bluestone, Constructing Chicago; and Carl Sandburg, Chicago Poems. Participants receive CAF's Schoolyards to Skylines: Teaching with Chicago's Amazing Architecture.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $177,523
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2446)
Diane Mutti-Burke
BH-50432-11
Crossroads of Conflict:Contested Visions of Freedom and the Missouri-Kansas Border Wars

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and impact of the Missouri-Kansas border wars during the era of the American Civil War.

"Crossroads of Conflict: Contested Visions of Freedom and the Missouri-Kansas Border Wars" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the history and impact of the Missouri-Kansas border wars during the era of the American Civil War. The workshops explore issues and events that precipitated hostilities between settlers in Kansas and Missouri from the Missouri Compromise of 1820 through the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 and on through the Civil War era. Participants examine the struggles between the Kansas Jayhawkers and Missouri Bushwackers. Central to the discussion are two concepts of liberty-freedom to hold slaves versus freedom from slavery. The project utilizes a variety of landmark sites illuminating settlement, economic development, and pro- and anti-slavery activity in the area: Lecompton and Lawrence, Kansas, the John Wornall House, the Watkins Woolen Mill, the Steamboat Arabia Museum, the site of the battle of Westport, and the Jesse James farm. The staff includes project director Diane Mutti Burke (history, University of Missouri-Kansas City [UMKC]), program director Edeen Martin, and faculty members Nicole Etcheson (history, Ball State Univerity), LeeAnn Whites (history, University of Missouri-Columbia), Jonathan Earle (history, University of Kansas), Ann Rabb (archaeology, University of Kansas), Ethan Rafuse (military history, US Army Command and General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth), and other faculty and staff from UMKC. Readings include collections of primary documents and scholarly writings by Etcheson, Mutti Burke, Earle, Michael Fellman, and T. J. Stiles.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,882
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Rebecca Maria Sanchez
BH-50434-11
Contested Homelands: Knowledge, History and Culture of Historic Santa Fe

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the history of interactions between Native Americans and Spanish and Anglo settlers in Santa Fe.

"Contested Homelands: Knowledge, History and Culture of Historic Santa Fe" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty schoolteachers on the history of interactions between Native Americans and European settlers in Santa Fe. The program considers the ways in which Native Americans, Spanish and Mexican colonists, and settlers have interacted in Santa Fe and the surrounding communities over the past 400 years. The workshops begin with a discussion of the framing concept of "homelands," examining the processes of colonization and resistance that characterized the Santa Fe region. They then turn to the ways that religion, artistic production, history, and memory shape the relationship of peoples to their homelands and consider how historic sites reflect contested claims to, and conflicting perceptions of, homelands. Sites under examination include Pecos National Park, where participants learn about the pre-colonial Pueblo system; vestiges of El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the road linking Santa Fe to Mexico City; the Palace of the Governors, built in the early seventeenth century as Santa Fe's administrative center and the site of many workshop sessions; the Governor Bent house, home of the territorial governor who was killed by a group of Indians and Mexicans in protest against American rule; and Taos Pueblo, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Participants also visit the New Mexico Museum of Art and the Wheelwright Museum of the Native American and work with primary sources from the New Mexico State Archives and Library. In addition to project director Rebecca Sánchez, an expert in social studies education, workshop faculty members include historians Estevan Rael-Gálvez (New Mexico State Historian), Joseph Sánchez (Spanish Colonial Research Center, University of New Mexico), and Thomas Chávez (independent scholar and director emeritus, Palace of the Governors); anthropologist Frances Levine (Palace of the Governors); and education professors Quincy Spurlin (University of New Mexico) and Glenabah Martinez (University of New Mexico), as well as artists, archivists, and curatorial staff.

[Grant products]
Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $153,097
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2497)
Rebecca Trivison
BH-50444-11
The War of 1812 in the Great Lakes and Western Territories

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to study the national implications of the War of 1812's northwestern frontier.

"The War of 1812 in the Great Lakes and Western Territories" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the causes, conduct, and consequences of the War of 1812 in the Midwestern United States. Hosted by the Ohio Historical Society [OHS], the workshop investigates the War of 1812 by considering several major topics: the war's causes; the complicated interactions of Euro-Americans, British, Canadians, and Native Americans during the conflict; and the war's short- and long-term effects. The project utilizes important military sites, including River Raisin Battlefield, Fort Meigs, and Perry's Victory and International Peace Monument. The project staff includes co-directors Brian Schoen (history, Ohio University) and Rebecca Trivison (OHS) and visiting faculty members Alan Taylor (history, University of California, Davis), Andrew Cayton (history, Miami University, Ohio), Gregory Dowd (history, University of Michigan), Susan Sleeper-Smith (history, Michigan State University), Gerard Altoff (National Park Service), Ralph Naveaux (Monroe County Historical Museum), and David Skaggs (history, Bowling Green State University). The program includes lectures, discussions, site visits, primary-source sessions, and work on teaching projects. The participants read secondary works by members of the visiting faculty and other scholars. Primary sources include an Indian captivity narrative, missionary letters, correspondence by William Henry Harrison, President James Madison's war message, and the full text of "The Star-Spangled Banner"; participants also receive a primary-source database from the OHS archives for use in creating lesson plans.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $170,258
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum
BH-50445-11
Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

"Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers. The program is offered by the Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and the Lowell National Historical Park, and focuses on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization. During the workshops, historians and other scholars lead lecture/discussions on key themes in Lowell's history. Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) places the local textile industry in an international context; Patrick Malone (Brown University) focuses on Lowell's water power system; Jack Larkin (Old Sturbridge Village) talks about the transition from an agrarian to a market-based economy; Gray Fitzsimons (formerly National Park Service) focuses on the textile industry's management structure and on the experience of Irish and French-Canadian immigrants; Robert Forrant (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) speaks about labor's responses to the new industrial order; and Chad Montrie (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) explores the tensions between the traditional and the modern in the literature of the early nineteenth century. Participants visit historic sites around Lowell and Concord such as Walden Pond and Minute Man National Historical Park; they also visit Old Sturbridge Village. Marie Frank (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) utilizes two selections (by Thomas Cole and Charles Sheeler) from the NEH Picturing America portfolio to explore responses to industrialization and the American landscape. The participants read selections by historians including Thomas Dublin, Merritt Roe Smith, Jack Larkin, Patrick Malone, Chad Montrie and Brian Mitchell, and writings by Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and young women who worked in the mills.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $172,880
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 6/30/2013

Friends of Peralta Hacienda Historical Park (Oakland, CA 94601-0172)
Holly L. Alonso (project director)
Alex M. Saragoza (co-project director)
BH-50461-11
Spanish, Mexican, and American California: Reframing U.S. History at Peralta Hacienda

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on California in the Spanish, Mexican, and American periods, using the Peralta family of northern California as a case study.

"Spanish, Mexican, and American California: Reframing U.S. History at Peralta Hacienda" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on California in the Spanish, Mexican, and American periods, using the Peralta family of northern California as a case study. This program gives teachers the opportunity to examine the connections between United States history and that of Mexico through Luis Peralta, a soldier and colonist, and his family. The Peraltas were among the original californios, descendants of Spanish-speaking settlers who arrived with the Anza expedition to the San Francisco Bay area in 1776. Topics under examination include encounters between Spanish colonists and Native Americans, independence from Spain, the Mexican-American war, repercussions of the Mexican revolution, and the bracero program, a twentieth-century work program that brought temporary laborers from Mexico to the United States. These broad topics are grounded by primary sources, as well as secondary scholarship by Ramón Gutiérrez, Douglas Monroy, and William Deverell, among others. Most workshop sessions take place at Peralta Hacienda Historical Park in Oakland, which features a nineteenth-century Peralta family home and the remains of two earlier adobe houses. In addition to studying the buildings and archaeological record at Peralta Hacienda, participants visit the San Francisco Presidio, Ceja Vineyard, Sonoma Mission, and Oakland's Fruitvale neighborhood. Along with co-directors Alex Saragoza (ethnic studies, University of California, Berkeley) and Holly Alonso (Friends of Peralta Hacienda Historical Park), project faculty members include Charles C. Mann (independent scholar), Ramón Gutiérrez (University of Chicago), Albert Hurtado (University of Oklahoma), Douglas Monroy (Colorado College), Mary Jo Wainwright (Diablo College), Tey Diana Rebolledo (University of New Mexico), Myrna Santiago (St. Mary's College), Rick Tejada-Flores (filmmaker), and David Gutierrez (University of California, San Diego). Participants also meet with former braceros Pablo and Juana Ceja.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $173,302
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Kenneth T. Jackson
BH-50462-11
Empire City: New York from 1877-2001

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate local and national history since 1877.

"Empire City: New York from 1877-2001" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate major themes in local and national history since 1877. The workshops use lectures, discussions, and site visits to situate New York City within broader urban history and American history. Co-directors are Kenneth Jackson (Columbia University) and Karen Markoe (State University of New York, Maritime College). The program opens with consideration of Manhattan's rise to national dominance after the Civil War, followed by a walking tour of Central Park and visit to the New-York Historical Society, where Sandra Trenholm (Gilder Lehrman Collection) guides participants in working with primary documents. Day two's focus on Gilded Age New York includes prizewinning biographer David Nasaw (Graduate Center of City University of New York) on "Andrew Carnegie and His Gospel of Wealth," and a visit to magnate Henry Clay Frick's mansion. To explore immigration, participants read Jacob Riis's How the Other Half Lives and E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime, then experience immigrant neighborhoods including Five Points, Little Italy, and Chinatown. The program also addresses the "Black Metropolis," including visits to Harlem and the Bronx as well as readings from Langston Hughes and Ralph Ellison. On the final day of the workshop, Joshua Freeman (Queens College) covers the transition from industrial to service and residential use, as seen in the Meat Packing District. Concluding the site visit at Ground Zero, project director Kenneth Jackson discusses the local and national effects of 9/11.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $158,969
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Chicago Metro History Education Center (Chicago, IL 60610-3305)
Lisa Oppenheim
BH-50464-11
Renaissance in the Black Metropolis: Chicago, 1930s-1950s

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Chicago Black Renaissance of the 1930s to 1950s.

"Renaissance in the Black Metropolis: Chicago, 1930s-1950s" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the Chicago Black Renaissance of the 1930s to 1950s. The workshops explore the cultural, social, economic, and political experience of Chicago's "Black Metropolis" and are led by Chicago Metro History Education Center's Lisa Oppenheim. NEH Summer Scholars learn about Great Depression Chicago and significant figures such as Margaret Burroughs, Charles White, Langston Hughes, John Johnson, Claude Barnett, Vivian Harsh, and St. Clair Drake. Historian Darlene Clark Hine (Northwestern University) leads off the scholarly program by setting out the context for and significance of the Chicago Black Renaissance. In a session at the Chicago Bee's former offices, Adam Green (University of Chicago) discusses the role of black journalism in the community. The South Side Community Art Center provides both site and subject for a lecture by Andrea Barnwell Brownlee (Spelman College Museum of Fine Art), followed by a visit to the DuSable Museum. Co-director Erik Gellman (Roosevelt University) and Lionel Kimble (Chicago State University) address labor and politics, with sites including the former United Packinghouse Workers union office and the Pullman Porters Museum, where participants learn about the predominantly African-American Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. The end of the week features Jacqueline Goldsby (New York University) on literature, including writers Richard Wright, Lorraine Hansberry, and Gwendolyn Brooks; Davarian Baldwin (Trinity College) on the meaning of Chicago's music; and an extended afternoon of archival work at the Harsh Collection for AfroAmerican History and Culture.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $176,592
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Caroline Pryor
BH-50362-10
Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $157,564
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Montana Historical Society (Helena, MT 59601-4514)
Paula E. Petrik (project director)
Kirby Lambert (co-project director)
BH-50363-10
The Richest Hills: Mining in the Far West, 1865-1920

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on gold, silver, and copper mining in the American West, with visits to Virginia City, Helena, and Butte, Montana.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,998
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

California State University, Northridge (Northridge, CA 91330-0001)
Josh Sides
BH-50366-10
The Spanish and Mexican Influences on California, 1769-1884

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Spanish and Mexican influence in California, using sites in the Los Angeles area.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $157,005
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Florida Humanities Council (St. Petersburg, FL 33701-5005)
Ann S. Schoenacher
BH-50367-10
Jump at the Sun: Zora Neale Hurston & Her Eatonville Roots

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American folklorist and author Zora Neale Hurston and her formative years in Eatonville, Florida.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,745
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2012

Niagara University (Niagara Falls, NY 14305-1500)
Thomas A. Chambers
BH-50371-10
Crossroads of Empire: Old Fort Niagara

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers that focus on the interaction and mutual influence of Iroquois, European, and North American colonists at Old Fort Niagara.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $178,746
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Laura R. Nash
BH-50372-10
Duke Ellington and the Development of American Popular Culture

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington.

Project fields: Music History and Criticism
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $177,096
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

National Constitution Center (Philadelphia, PA 19106)
Kerry Sautner (project director)
Kerry Sautner (co-project director)
BH-50375-10
A Revolution in Government: Philadelphia and the Creation of the American Republic

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the historic formation and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U. S. Constitution.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $167,360
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Fort Ticonderoga (Ticonderoga, NY 12883-0390)
Richard Strum
BH-50379-10
The American Revolution on the Northern Frontier: Fort Ticonderoga and the Road to Saratoga

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers focused on the role of Fort Ticonderoga and the northern frontier as a critical outpost in the early years of the Revolution.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $159,518
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2356)
Timothy D. Walker
BH-50386-10
Sailing to Freedom: New Bedford and the Underground Railroad

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to explore New Bedford, Massachusetts as a historical landmark for abolitionism and the Underground Railroad.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $177,781
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
William F. Harris
BH-50387-10
James Madison and Constitutional Citizenship

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for school teachers on James Madison's role in the creation and implementation of the U. S. Constitution, held at Montpelier.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $160,217
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

California State University, Dominguez Hills Foundation (Carson, CA 90747)
Laura Talamante (project director)
Alison Bruesehoff (co-project director)
BH-50390-10
American History through the Eyes of a California Family, 1780s - 1920s

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers using the history of the Dominguez family and related sites to illuminate California's history from colonial days to the 1920s.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $171,788
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Henry Ford, The (Dearborn, MI 48121-1970)
Paula Gangopadhyay
BH-50392-10
America's Industrial Revolution at The Henry Ford

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on America's Industrial Revolution as interpreted through the historic buildings and archival collections at Henry Ford's Greenfield Village and the Ford Rouge factory.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $179,964
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

National-Louis University (Chicago, IL 60657)
Mark A. Newman (project director)
Costas Spirou (co-project director)
BH-50394-10
The Chicago Lakefront as Public Space

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Chicago lakefront and public space.

Project fields: Architecture
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $149,175
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Stephen P. Rice (project director)
Meredith Davis (co-project director)
BH-50395-10
The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty teachers that will use the Hudson River as a focus for the study of nineteenth-century intersections of art, culture, commerce, and nature.

Project fields: American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $175,114
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Funding details
Original grant (2010) $167,282
Supplement (2011) $7,832

Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Richard S. Newman (project director)
Jose Torre (co-project director)
BH-50399-10
Abolitionism, Women’s Rights, and Religious Revivalism on the Rochester Reform Trail

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to examine Rochester's central role in American reform history through its iconic landmark geography.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $156,981
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 6/30/2013

Pennsylvania State University, Main Campus (University Park, PA 16802)
George W. Boudreau
BH-50400-10
A Rising People: Benjamin Franklin and the Americans

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to explore Benjamin Franklin's influence on the American people through the sites and environs of eighteenth-century Philadelphia.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $180,000
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 6/30/2012

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum
BH-50402-10
Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $170,051
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 6/30/2012

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Linda Heywood
BH-50406-10
African Americans in Massachusetts: From Slavery to Today

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the African-American community in Massachusetts and the role of New England in African-American history.

Project fields: African American Studies
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $180,382
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Apprend Foundation (Durham, NC 27713-2219)
Laurel Sneed
BH-50409-10
Crafting Freedom: Black Artisans, Entrepreneurs, and Abolitionists in the Antebellum Upper South

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on African-American artisans during the antebellum period, using sites in North Carolina.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $172,823
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann
BH-50411-10
Pearl Harbor: History and Memory Across Asia and the Pacific

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, its global context, and its place in cultural memory.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $180,000
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002)
Cynthia Dickinson
BH-50412-10
Emily Dickinson: Person, Poetry, and Place

Two five-day Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the poet Emily Dickinson.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Landmarks of American History
Division: Education Programs
Total amount awarded: $167,917
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

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