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31 matches

Program: Landmarks of American History*
Date range: 2017-2019
Sort order: Award year, descending

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BH-267146-19

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2235)
Diane Louise Mutti Burke (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Wide-Open Town: Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 teachers using Kansas City as a case study for examining the changes in American society in the 1920s and 1930s.

Wide-Open Town: Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression is a NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop for K-12 Teachers that explores historical landmarks and cultural resources in light of recent scholarship in order to better understand these pivotal decades in United States history. The 1920s and 30s were particularly vibrant years in Kansas City, sometimes described as the city's "Golden Age." City boosters claimed a new position of economic dynamism and culture flourished, most notably resulting in Kansas City becoming a key site in the development of American jazz. Yet, all of these events were intertwined in a political, social, and economic landscape fraught with notorious machines politics, vice, and long histories of people fighting for their rights and freedoms. Much of what played out in Kansas City are a reflection of the larger cultural and historic forces that shaped this era in US history.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,987 (approved)
$163,861 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267160-19

State Historical Society of Colorado (Denver, CO 80203-2109)
Eric Carpio (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Borderlands of Southern Colorado

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 school teachers on Colorado’s southern borderlands in the nineteenth century.

Borderlands of Southern Colorado is a place-based workshop in Colorado's San Luis Valley illuminating the complex history of the American southwest through the intersection of geo-political, geographic, cultural, ethnic, and religious landscapes. Through two, one-week workshops in summer 2020, educators will learn from a diverse and highly qualified team of scholars, mentors, and community members to examine how shifting historic borders and borderlands in the region have impacted individual and community identity, power and government, ecosystems and the economy, land and water, and religion and spirituality; and how these borderlands issues continue to resonate today. Borderlands of Southern Colorado is proposed to NEH as an opportunity to critically examine our nation's complex history, engage in critical dialogue, and share diverse viewpoints across the K-12 humanities curricula.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; Latino History; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$168,167 (approved)
$166,265 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267161-19

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Adam Rubin (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Jenni G. Mushynski (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the development of the skyscraper and its impact on the city of Chicago and on urbanization throughout the world.

The Chicago Architecture Center will offer the workshop The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation to supplement and enhance the humanities lessons of teachers from across the nation. Buildings are primary sources that reflect who we are as a society at a moment in time. As such, architecture stands as one of the strongest tools for sharing the way we live our lives. The skyscraper is perhaps the strongest architectural legacy of America, and Chicago, as the home of one of the first skyscrapers, provides a powerful lens through which we can examine our culture, economy, history, and society. Through the context of skyscraper development in Chicago from the late 19th through mid-20th centuries, teachers participating in this workshop will use Chicago’s landmark buildings to explore the many forces that shaped Chicago into a center of architecture, how these developments impacted society and vice versa, and how this history continues to impact urbanization to this day.

Project fields:
Architecture; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267048-19

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc. (Cortez, CO 81321-9408)
Sean Gantt (Project Director: February 2019 to September 2019)
Susan Ryan (Project Director: September 2019 to present)
Mesa Verde National Park and Pueblo Indian History

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers to study Pueblo history and culture through the archaeology of Mesa Verde.

Mesa Verde National Park and Pueblo Indian History is a one-week residence-based workshop that will be offered twice during the summer of 2020, each time for 36 K–12 educators. The Workshop focuses on three fundamental questions: 1) How do we come to know and appreciate the time depth, people, and activities that comprise the past and shaped our contemporary world? 2) Who creates America’s history and culture? 3) How do contemporary Pueblo people (and all Americans not of European descent) balance their cultural identity and continuity with Euro American ideals of assimilation and the melting pot? These questions touch the lives of all Americans today, and the Workshop offers historic and multicultural perspectives using Mesa Verde National Park and the surrounding Mesa Verde Region—home to humans for over 10,000 years and containing some of the world’s greatest archaeological treasures.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,984 (approved)
$165,551 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267057-19

Eastern Washington University (Cheney, WA 99004-1619)
Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
David Allen Pietz (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Grand Coulee Dam: The Intersection of Modernity and Indigenous Cultures

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the construction and impact of the Grand Coulee Dam.

“Grand Coulee Dam — The Intersection of Modernity and Indigenous Cultures” These workshops, serving teachers in grades K-12, will explore how different social groups experience history – actual historical events and the memory of those events. More specifically, the project will unpack the history of Grand Coulee Dam as a landmark of contested narratives. One narrative celebrated the social, economic and cultural power of modernity. The other focused on the loss of indigenous cultural identities and practices. Participants will explore these historical dynamics in discussion with experts, site visits, and engagement with primary historical material including oral histories, art, song and photographs. The project’s goal is to equip teachers with unique and meaningful analytical frameworks to engage their humanities and social science students in conversations centered on how social groups experience and interpret transformative changes of the landscape.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; Social Sciences, General; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


BH-267062-19

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Kathryn Miller Haines (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Suzi Bloom (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
The Homestead Steel Strike and the Growth of America as an Industrial Power

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the Homestead Steel Strike.

The Homestead Steel Strike and the Growth of America as an Industrial Power is a one week workshop (offered twice) that will provide teachers with a full accounting of the circumstances that led to the Battle of Homestead and what its lasting impact has been in the United States. This program will provide a framework for participants to immerse themselves in the battle from both sides by examining primary sources, listening to lectures by leading historians and scholars, and visiting historic sites including the Original Homestead Works Pump House, the Bost Building, which served as headquarters for the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers, and The Carrie Furnace, which produced iron for the Homestead Works from 1907 to 1978.

Project fields:
Labor History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,803 (approved)
$165,481 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267064-19

Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
David Powell (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
On Hallowed Ground: Gettysburg in History and Memory

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the Battle of Gettysburg and its legacy.

Gettysburg College intends to engage secondary educators in a workshop focused on the relationship between history and memory through the lens of the Civil War. We seek to offer a revised version of this highly successful 2014 workshop in which participants are immersed in the 'hallowed ground' of Gettysburg and the events that transpired in July 1863, and also expose teachers to the emerging scholarship in the field of memory studies. Participants will engage in historic site visits paired with seminar sessions that will inform the creation of teaching projects that will ultimately land on the program website. Having walked the hallowed ground at Gettysburg, we believe participants will return home with a renewed sense of the significance of what happened here, and with a strengthened understanding of how to teach about Gettysburg.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,256 (approved)
$168,850 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267081-19

Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association (Deerfield, MA 01342-5004)
Lynne Manring (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Living on the Edge of Empire: Alliance, Conflict and Captivity in Colonial New England

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on cross-cultural contact and conflict in colonial New England, focused on the 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts.   

The Deerfield Teachers’ Center of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, a nationally recognized professional development provider, seeks $169,998 to fund two Landmarks Workshops for K-12 Teachers July 12 – 17, 2020 and July 26 – 31, 2020. Living on the Edge of Empire: Alliance, Conflict and Captivity in Colonial New England will take place in the beautiful Old Deerfield Village Historic Landmark District and surrounding historic sites. This workshop will bring together a full range of resources—landscape, architecture, artifacts, documents, oral histories—which, combined with secondary interpretations, illuminate competing perspectives on the colonial period. It will offer K-12 educators tools to engage students in learning topics related to the history of colonial America, including cultural interaction on the frontier, colonization, and the European imperial struggle for control of North America which ultimately set the stage for the American Revolution.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,998 (approved)
$169,747 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267091-19

East Carolina University (Greenville, NC 27858-5235)
Anne Swenson Ticknor (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Saipan's Land and Sea: Battle Scars and Sites of Resilience

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the history of military conflicts in Saipan.

The newly proposed Landmarks of American History and Culture program, Saipan’s Land and Sea: Battle Scars & Sites of Resilience, provides 72 teachers an incomparable opportunity to interact with a continuous, intact, and largely undisturbed record of conflict history outside of museum walls on the island of Saipan, a US commonwealth in the western Pacific Ocean. The one-week program will be held twice at Kagman High School by a mostly indigenous project team comprised of educators, historians, archaeologists, authors, and cultural guides. Hosting the institute on Saipan provides a unique opportunity for often under-represented teachers to participate in NEH Landmark programming and for US mainland teachers to interact with a largely undisturbed record of conflict history that is virtually untold in history textbooks and unknown to K-12 students.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,997 (approved)
$167,529 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267097-19

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Labor and Landscape: Lowell as 19th-Century Crucible

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 school teachers on the environmental history of Lowell, MA.

The Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of UMass Lowell's College of Education and Lowell National Historical Park, proposes to build educators’ content knowledge and pedagogical skills through a study of Lowell as an environmental "crucible." Through talks, tours, and discussions, educators consider nineteenth-century textile manufacturing as a moment when multiple ways of using nature collided. We look at ways of labor and meaning of landscape for the Merrimack River Valley’s Native Americans, for enslaved people in the Deep South, and for “Yankee” farm families on New England’s rural homesteads. We study the industrial transformation of raw cotton into finished cloth by a changing array of wage laborers in Lowell. We also locate the origins of American environmental concern, social protest, and regulatory policy in the reaction to widespread environmental disruption and ever-worsening pollution associated with textile and other factories.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$166,974 (approved)
$163,773 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267105-19

Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Yonghee Suh (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Brian J. Daugherity (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
The Long Road from Brown: School Desegregation in Virginia

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on school desegregation in Virginia.

This project offers two one week long workshops on the topic of school desegregation in Virginia. Participants include 72 Grade 6-12 social studies/history teachers as a total. In these workshops, participants will visit significant historic sites associated with the topic, learn how to use primary sources in the archives and created their own curriculum on the topic. The first workshop will take place from July 12th through July 17th, 2020 and the second from July 26th through July 31st, 2020.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$169,390 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267113-19

Kent State University (Kent, OH 44242-0001)
Todd Hawley (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Laura L. Davis (Co Project Director: September 2019 to present)
Making Meaning of May 4th: The 1970 Kent State Shootings in US History

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the 1970 Kent State Shootings.

The Kent State Shootings, occurring May 4, 1970 when the Ohio National Guard shot and killed four students and wounded nine others during a student protest against the Vietnam War, is considered to be a turning point in American history. Its implications for First Amendment rights, excessive use of government force, and the importance of younger generations seeking to make a difference, all continue to have a relevant echo today, with their lessons more important now than ever. As the event reaches the fifty-year mark in 2020, teachers will convene at this National Historic Landmark site where they will engage with scholars and eyewitnesses, explore the May 4 Visitors Center, Walking Tour, and the extensive May 4 Collection to develop a deeper understanding of this historical event. Teachers will develop transformative lessons to engage their students in deep study of May 4 and transcendent historical themes including freedom of speech, student activism, and peaceful protest.

Project fields:
American Government; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267114-19

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation (Powell, WY 82435-8723)
Ray Locker (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Heart Mountain, Wyoming, and the Japanese American Incarceration

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the incarceration of Japanese-Americans in Heart Mountain, Wyoming.

"Heart Mountain, Wyoming, and the Japanese American Incarceration" is a six-day workshop that will bring K-12 teachers from around the country to Heart Mountain, one of the 10 concentration camps that held Japanese Americans who were forced to evacuate the West Coast during World War II. Workshop participants will learn about the Japanese American experience in the United States, the conditions that made it possible and the evacuation and incarceration itself. The workshop will examine the incarceration’s long-term effect on the Japanese American community and federal policies ranging from the formal apology approved by Congress in 1988 to immigration.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; History, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$164,447 (approved)
$164,447 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267175-19

Southern Utah University (Cedar City, UT 84720-2470)
Samantha Kirkley (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Jeanne M. Moe (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Voices of the Ancients: Archaeology and Oral Tradition in the American Southwest

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 educators on the ancient Fremont culture of the American Southwest.

This project will model archaeological inquiry for teachers and students. Participants will have multiple opportunities to work collaboratively in small groups to ask and answer important questions about the past. Workshop participants will explore the universal human need for shelter. Educators will be able to help students connect to past cultures and value the many underrepresented communities presently residing within the United States. Participants will examine authentic content including artifacts, site maps, oral histories, and historic documents with guidance from instructors. Through this project, participants will return to their own classrooms armed with the materials and experience necessary to conduct archaeological inquiry with their students.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,445 (approved)
$169,445 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267178-19

Vermont Archaeological Society, Inc. (Burlington, VT 05402-0663)
Angela Marie Labrador (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Jason Barney (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Freedom and Unity: The Struggle for Independence on the Vermont Frontier

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for 72 K-12 school teachers on the American Revolution in Vermont.

The Vermont Archaeological Society, in partnership with two museums and the Vermont State Historic Sites Program, proposes to offer a new Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop entitled, “Freedom and Unity: The Struggle for Independence on the Vermont Frontier.” The workshop will feature a program of place-based and participatory learning activities related to the events of the American Revolution at seven historic sites in Vermont’s Champlain Valley, including sessions held on Lake Champlain in a replica of the 1776 USS Philadelphia. The workshop will target educators who teach history and social studies at the 6-12 grade levels, as well as those who co-teach with social studies colleagues or wish to incorporate historic place-based education to engage students in their subject matter in new ways. In sum, the workshop will demonstrate methods of how to teach students about history and how to teach with historic sites to meet learning outcomes across the curriculum.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$139,638 (approved)
$138,562 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-267123-19

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, Inc. (Boston, MA 02116-2813)
Michelle LeBlanc (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Elisabeth Nevins (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Mapping a New World: Places of Conflict and Colonization in 17th-Century New England

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on cultural interactions and conflict in seventeenth-century New England.

The Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library proposes a 2020 Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop for teachers focused on the early colonial period in New England (1600-1700), with an emphasis on the role of geography and place. This workshop is designed to immerse 3rd–12th grade teachers in the history and landscape of 1600s New England. This workshop was previously funded in 2017. Participants will engage deeply with the region by visiting and learning at major historical landmarks such as the site of the Plymouth colony, the city of Boston and museums and libraries that together house collections and exhibitions that bring to life this complex story of land, power, identity and community. Teachers will be learning from scholars and with primary source materials, such as period maps, letters, land deeds and narratives that are grounded in their geographic location.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$167,626 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


BH-261604-18

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Timothy J. Crimmins (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
The Problem of the Color Line: Atlanta Landmarks and Civil Rights History

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on southern segregation and the civil rights movement in Atlanta.

Atlanta is a fitting locale to consider the weighty issues of race reform in American history. Politicians and businessmen supported by the majority white population erected the color line in cities, while African Americans resisted the imposition of Jim Crow laws and practices. Within this national context, our workshop will use historic landmarks to focus on the creation and maintenance of a color line in Atlanta in the decades after emancipation as well as the resistance by African Americans that led to the dismantling of Jim Crow laws in the aftermath of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Atlanta’s National Historic Landmarks are perfect teaching tools for interpreting the history of race in America using public spaces.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,908 (approved)
$169,903 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


BH-261607-18

University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9055)
Robert A. Goldberg (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Paul Reeve (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Manifest Destiny Reconsidered: The Utah Experience

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on migration to and settlement of Utah.

"Manifest Destiny Reconsidered, The Utah Experience" complicates the standing narrative of western expansion through study of Utah migration and settlement from 1847 to 1869. It also will investigate how the emerging nation tried to define what it meant to be American, with particular focus on immigration, religion, race, gender, and class and how such issues continue to shape the political and social debates of our nation. The workshops will be held at the THC and historic sites in the Salt Lake City area on June 16 to 21 and July 14 to 19, 2019.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,999 (approved)
$169,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261609-18

University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95618-6153)
Louis S. Warren (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Stacey Greer (Co Project Director: October 2018 to present)
The Transcontinental Railroad: Transforming California and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the history of the transcontinental railroad.

The History Project at University of California, Davis, in partnership with California State Parks (the California State Railroad Museum, Old Sacramento State Historic Park and the Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park), the Historic Old Sacramento Foundation, Crocker Art Museum, and Stanford University seeks $170,000 to fund two Landmarks of American History workshops for teachers in 2019. The 150th Anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad: Transforming California and the Nation will be held at historic sites in Sacramento on June 23 through 28 and July 7 through 12, 2019, with day trips to Donner Pass and the San Francisco Bay Area with visits to Stanford University and landmarks in San Francisco. The goal of the workshop is to assist K-12 educators in acquiring new content knowledge, experiences that will translate to classroom instruction, resources for lesson planning, and tools for using the railroad as a lens for examining the Gilded Age.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261615-18

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Rolando Herts (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Lee Aylward (Co Project Director: September 2018 to present)
The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

This 2019 Landmarks workshop will inform participants of the important role that the Mississippi Delta has played in American history. Designated a National Heritage Area by U.S. Congress and a National Treasure of the National Trust for Historic Places, the Mississippi Delta is recognized as “the land where the blues was born, where the Civil Rights movement took root, and where increasingly mechanized farming sparked the Great Migration,” making it the “’cradle of American culture’ for its role in shaping our nation’s character” (National Trust, 2012). Our approach is highly experiential and tells these nationally significant heritage stories at the places where they happened.

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


BH-261620-18

Edison Institute, The (Dearborn, MI 48124-5029)
Lucie Howell (Project Director: February 2018 to July 2019)
Philip Grumm (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
America's Industrial Revolution at The Henry Ford

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the Industrial Revolution in America at The Henry Ford.

The Henry Ford, a National Historic Landmark, seeks funding to host another year of teacher workshops on America's Industrial Revolution. Five themes will be explored: 1) The early 19th century transformation of home and craft production; 2) The mechanization of agriculture; 3) The impact of steam on transportation; 4) The increasing impact of science and invention; and 5) The assembly line method of mass production. Teachers will have discussions with six renowned scholars, visit the Ford Rouge Center's Dearborn Truck Plant, visit historic buildings in Greenfield Village, study primary documents and artifacts and create innovative lesson plans. The workshop is designed to ignite teachers' curiosity and deepen their knowledge of the human dimensions of industrial change in order to encourage student enthusiasm and professional growth.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$164,744 (approved)
$164,744 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261645-18

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Cortland (Cortland, NY 13045-0900)
Kevin B. Sheets (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Randi Jill Storch (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Forever Wild: The Adirondacks in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers using the Adirondacks to explore the interconnections of urban and wilderness environments in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America.

Forever Wild: The Adirondacks in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era is a collaborative effort providing an unparalleled opportunity for teachers to investigate the late 19th century and early 20th century period from the unique perspective of the wilderness.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$165,198 (approved)
$165,198 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261659-18

Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association (Deerfield, MA 01342-5004)
Lynne Manring (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
African Americans in the Making of Early New England

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on slavery and African American life in colonial New England.

The Deerfield Teachers’ Center of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, a nationally recognized professional development provider, seeks $169,961 for two Landmarks Workshops for K-12 teachers July 7-12 & July 21-26, 2019. "African Americans in the Making of Early New England" will take place in the Old Deerfield Village Historic Landmark District and focuses on its 23 African American historic sites, the Royall House & Slave Quarters in Medford, MA, Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, NH, and sites along the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire. This workshop brings a wide range of primary sources along with secondary interpretations and lectures by specialists providing tools for K-12 educators to engage their students in learning about African Americans’ life experiences in early New England. Knowing this history is an important tool for building cross-racial and cross-cultural understanding in the classroom.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$174,761 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261682-18

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Social Movements and Reform in Industrializing America: The Lowell Experience

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on nineteenth-century Lowell, MA, as a site of the Industrial Revolution.

The Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of UMass Lowell's College of Education and Lowell National Historical Park, proposes to engage educators in a study of Lowell's textile industry as a case study of early 19th-century industrialization and reform. We use the resources of the Park and other cultural/historical sites to address changes in work, society, culture, and the environment between 1820 and 1860, as well as subsequent reform activity related to labor, women's rights, and slavery. Lowell, the first planned industrial city in the U.S., formed the template for later industrial cities and provides an ideal setting for historical inquiry. Educators investigate history where it happened and learn how to teach with primary sources, artifacts, and historic sites in their own communities. The workshops combine lectures, discussion, hands-on and field investigations, dramatic presentations, and close examination of primary, secondary, and literary sources.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$164,666 (approved)
$164,666 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261684-18

Collaborative for Educational Services (Northampton, MA 01060-3947)
Richard D.W. Cairn (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
The Springfield Armory and the Genesis of American Industry

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers focusing on the early economic development of the Connecticut River Valley, the Industrial Revolution, and its legacy.

Participants will investigate how changes wrought by the Springfield Armory and its large networks of metalworking shops transformed the very nature of manufacturing and the economy and thereby played a central role in propelling the United States from agricultural dependent of Britain to global industrial superpower. Investigation of this compelling national story of 19th century innovation offers a powerful model to help teachers and students analyze and understand the economic and social challenges and opportunities of today’s tumultuous age.

Project fields:
Economic History; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$172,904 (approved)
$164,740 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261703-18

Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (Seattle, WA 98104-2948)
Charlene Mano Shen (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Rahul Gupta (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
From Immigrants to Citizens: Asian Pacific Americans in the Northwest

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers to explore the histories and cultures of Asian immigrants in the Pacific Northwest and their significance to the nation.

The Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (dba Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience) seeks funding to present our popular Landmark workshops, "From Immigrants to Citizens: Asian Pacific Americans in the Northwest". Building on the success of our 2014 and 2016 workshops, we propose 2 week-long sessions in July 2019 led by the 2016 team of our Education staff in partnership with preeminent scholars and veteran K-12 educators. The long history of Asian Pacific Americans in the Northwest provides a wealth of landmark sites and historical materials on which to base K-12 professional development training to engage students in learning about APA immigrant histories and the many cultures that shaped our nation. The need for training is clear based on the continued lack of published curriculum and persistent under-resourcing of materials and training for K-12 teachers on APA history. In 2019, we will build on our existing program to include newly available sites/materials.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Immigration History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$168,532 (approved)
$167,192 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261704-18

Montana State University, Billings (Billings, MT 59101-0245)
John M. Keener (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Thomas C. Rust (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
The Battle of the Little Bighorn and the Great Sioux War (1876)

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers to explore the Great Sioux War and the Battle of Little Bighorn from diverse perspectives.

The Battle of the Little Bighorn is a rich topic of scholarship and popular media that provides great opportunity for deep study in the humanities. A wealth of historic, cultural and primary sources, produced over time with many perspectives, provides the secondary teacher a great platform for instruction. Through a rich understanding of the battle, the teacher understands this clash of cultures and the competition for valuable resource and opportunity. Through the study of the battle, students will distinguish key concepts in literature such as the explicit and inference in text, compare and contrast between points of view, distinguish between focus and firsthand and secondhand information, and interpret information in many formats. The strength of the topic provides the teacher the perfect format to engage in the common core standards for literacy, across reading, writing, speaking and listening in an interesting and motivating topic.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261712-18

University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT 06269-9000)
Robert W. Stephens (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Gullah Voices: Traditions and Transformations

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on Gullah history, culture, and artistic expression.

The University of Connecticut, in collaboration with Penn Center, the Georgia Historical Society and other sites in the Coastal Lowlands, will present two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops in Savannah, GA on July 8-12 and July 15-19, 2019. The sessions will examine the artistic expressions of the Gullah, direct descendants of slaves who worked the rice plantations on the coastal islands off the shores of South Carolina and Georgia. Their history, stories, beliefs, and creative expressions are critical antecedents to African-American culture and the broader American mosaic, as we know it today. The workshop format will follow the African tradition, where the arts are studied as interrelated living experiences rather than as separate entities. Immersion experiences will take place at Penn Center, St. Helena Island, SC; Sapelo Island, McIntosh County, GA; the Georgia Historical Society and Pin Point Heritage Museum, Savannah, GA.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,833 (approved)
$169,833 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261730-18

Concord Antiquarian Society (Concord, MA 01742-3701)
Jayne K. Gordon (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
The Concord Landscapes and Legacy of Henry Thoreau

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the legacy of Henry David Thoreau.

The Concord Museum seeks $169,831 to conduct workshops for school teachers on the weeks of July 14-19 and July 21-26, 2019. "Living and Writing Deliberately: The Concord Landscapes and Legacy of Henry Thoreau" will immerse participants in the historic surroundings of Thoreau’s home town: natural sites that served him as both laboratory and sanctuary, places where he encountered folks whose lives would provide him with examples of both dignity and desperation, and locations of institutions that figured so prominently and provocatively in his essays. The primary focus will be how Thoreau’s ideas were shaped by his experiences, observations, reflections, and discoveries in this community a century and a half ago. Participants will visit the spots where those experiences took place, examine the process of writing employed by Thoreau, and explore the deliberate choices he made to live ethically and responsibly as part of both human society and the natural environment.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,831 (approved)
$169,831 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-261744-18

Tulane University (New Orleans, LA 70118-5698)
Rebecca Snedeker (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Sonya Robinson (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Bruce Barnes (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
New Orleans: Music, Culture, and Civil Rights

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the civil rights history and musical cultures of New Orleans.

The “New Orleans: Music, Culture, and Civil Rights” teacher workshop project aims to implement two immersive 5-day experiences at Tulane University and several locations throughout New Orleans in Summer 2019. Each week-long workshop will introduce participants to the evolution of New Orleans music and culture, from the city's earliest beginnings to present day. All along the way, this development will be situated within historical contexts and in relation to the evolution of human and civil rights. Built on an inquiry-driven practice and drawing from cutting-edge scholars, luminous performers, local civil rights leaders and the workshop co-directors' well of knowledge and spirit, these experiences promise to nourish, challenge, and inspire teachers, and in turn enrich their classrooms.

Project fields:
African American History; Ethnomusicology; Urban Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$160,371 (approved)
$160,371 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


BH-261754-18

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Rachel B. Reinhard (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Movement, Mobilization, and Militarization: The Bay Area Home Front in World War ll

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the social, economic, and cultural impact of World War II in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The History-Social Science Project at the University of California, Berkeley (UCBHSSP), in partnership with the University of California, Berkeley History Department, the National Park Service, The Fred T. Korematsu Institute and the Oakland Museum of California, seeks to fund two, one week-long Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for Teachers to be held June 24-28 and July 8-12, 2019. The workshop focuses on three themes: the movement of diverse groups of people to California, altering the cultural landscape of the state and nation; how mobilization for war was made possible through New Deal Era infrastructure and the marshalling of the nation’s industrial capacity; and the role of UC Berkeley and the American West as a center for militarization.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$165,641 (approved)
$163,311 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019