NEH banner

Funded Projects Query Form
45 matches

Grant programs:Landmarks of American History and Culture*
Date range: 2019-2022
Sort order: Award year, descending

Query elapsed time: 0.031 sec

1
Page size:
 45 items in 1 pages
 
1
Page size:
 45 items in 1 pages
Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
Ronald V. Morris (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Denise A. Shockley (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

BH-288025-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,000 (approved)
$185,626 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

The Democratization of the Automobile Industry: Construction, Culture, and Preservation

Two place-based workshops for 36 K-12 educators each on the historical, economical, and cultural impact of the automobile industry on the Midwest and broader United States. 

Car culture shapes media and popular culture in America. In this project, educators learn how the automobile illustrates social history of the working class, including the Great Migration, and the accompanying shadow of racism. The workshops also explore industrial preservation and adaptive reuse to examine why place matters in our communities and how participants can help their students to look at old structures in any community across America. Participants create virtual field trips from the sites they visit for their students and students in other places to use as they conduct inquiry. In an inquiry process, they question, use a disciplinary framework, and evaluate sources, before communicating their conclusions and taking action in their community. As educators have learned in the recent pandemic, access to digital resources is crucial for student learning as they conduct their own investigations.

Thomas County Museum of History (Thomasville, GA 31792-4452)
G. Kurt Piehler (Project Director: February 2022 to August 2022)
G. Kurt Piehler (Project Director: August 2022 to present)
Gregory Lamont Mixon (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

BH-288048-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$189,952 (approved)
$186,921 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

The Quest for Freedom, 1865-1954

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 educators on the significance of Thomasville, Georgia, to the long civil rights movement in U.S. history.

Two one-week teacher workshops focusing on the African American community's quest for freedom after the Civil War using Thomasville and surrounding region as a case-study.

Fort Peck Community College (Poplar, MT 59255-7819)
Sierra Rose Atkinson (Project Director: February 2022 to October 2022)
Roxann Smith (Project Director: October 2022 to present)
Christine Rogers Stanton (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

BH-288078-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,000 (approved)
$189,460 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Buffalo Nations: History and Revitalization of the American Bison

Two week-long workshops for 72 K-12 educators to learn the histories, geographies, and contemporary knowledges of the Buffalo Nations.

This project will prepare 72 K-12 educators from across the U.S. to implement curriculum focusing on the sovereign signatories of the landmark InterTribal?Buffalo Treaty. These Buffalo Nations are leading culturally restorative buffalo conservation efforts – especially with bison being culled from Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Teachers will participate in on-site workshops at YNP – with visits to noted landmark sites, followed by virtual learning. The project is led by educators from Fort Peck Community College, Montana State University, and Ecology Project International. Presenters from the Fort Peck Assiniboine & Sioux as well as Crow, Blackfeet and Eastern Shoshone Nations will join the Project Team in sharing knowledge and facilitating lesson development pertaining to historical, ecological, political/economic, and cultural literacies. The program will be rooted in the principles of Recognition, Relationships, Responsibility, Respect, Relevance and Reciprocity.

University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Meghan Howey (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Stephen Michael Trzaskoma (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

BH-288081-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,977 (approved)
$186,717 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

From the Fragments: Places and People in Colonized New England

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 educators on archaeological approaches to studying Indigenous and African American history in the New England region.

During the week, educators will have place-based encounters with global colonialism in sites along the Great Bay Estuary, considering the experiences of a key populations, placing the experiences of Native Americans and African Americans alongside those of what would become the white majority, with a final day for curriculum building. The basis for this program is the Great Bay Archaeological Survey, a community-engaged, interdisciplinary research program, whose interactive website and StoryMap offers an accessible and updatable launching point for direct learning. Our goal is to have educators experience the physical locations that serve as the source for this resource. This sequence of experiential investigations is organized to model the types of experiences teachers may then design for their students during a final day of curriculum development, as they consider how to deepen their students’ understandings of these people and environments through both direct and digital learning.

Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture (Williamsburg, VA 23187-8781)
Catherine Elizabeth Kelly (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Maureen Elgersman Lee (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

BH-288082-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$185,460 (approved)
$185,460 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Hidden Histories of the Founding Era

Two week-long workshops for 72 K-12 educators in Colonial Williamsburg on African American and Indigenous perspectives during the Founding Era.

Hidden Histories of the Founding Era will introduce teachers to four sites that encompass the full complexity of the founding era: William & Mary’s Brafferton building, the Williamsburg Bray School, the historic First Baptist Church, and James Monroe’s Highland plantation. All are crucial sites for exploring Virginia’s multicultural history, and each is also the subject of ongoing research, reinterpretation, and community engagement. Taken together, these sites underscore the importance of grappling with complex, multivalent histories and demonstrate how scholars, archivists, educators, and community historians and members are collaborating to uncover hidden histories. This Landmarks program will be offered as two five-day residential sessions on the campus of William & Mary in Summer 2023 (First Session: June 26–30; Second Session: July 10–14) for 36 teachers per session.

Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff, AZ 86011-0001)
Ricardo Antonio Guthrie (Project Director: February 2022 to October 2022)
Gretchen McAllister (Project Director: October 2022 to present)
Gretchen McAllister (Co Project Director: August 2022 to October 2022)
Ricardo Antonio Guthrie (Co Project Director: October 2022 to present)

BH-288103-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$189,860 (approved)
$189,860 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Racialized Spaces on Route 66

A combined virtual and residential program for 72 K-12 educators on the significance of race, place, and movement to understanding Route 66 within U.S. history and culture.

Northern Arizona University is requesting funds for a new Landmarks of American History and Culture grant of $189,000 for two, one-week site-based workshops in the summer of 2023 for 5th grade to 12th teachers of History, English, and general content areas (elementary grades) to examine the multiple perspectives along Route 66, an iconic landmark in the United States. This teacher workshop located on Route 66 in Flagstaff examines how landmarks tell the story of the United States, offering a mirror for their curricula as they learn a more inclusive and widened story of the classic, nostalgic Route 66.

Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (Seattle, WA 98104-2948)
Rahul Gupta (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Charlene Mano Shen (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

BH-288131-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$189,410 (approved)
$188,320 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

In our own words: Early Asian Americans and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders in the Pacific Northwest

Two week-long workshops for 72 K-12 educators to learn about the histories of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders in the Pacific Northwest.

The Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (dba Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience) seeks funding to present our popular Landmark workshops, "In our own words: Early Asian Americans and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders in the Pacific Northwest." Building on the success of our 2014, 2016, 2019, and 2021 workshops, we propose two in-person week-long workshops in summer 2023 led by our 2021 team Education staffing partnership with preeminent scholars and veteran K-12 educators. The long history of Asian Americans and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders (AA & NH/PIs) in the Northwest provides a wealth of landmark sites, historical materials, and digital resources on which to base K-12 professional development training about AA & NH/PI immigrant histories and the many cultures that shaped our nation. In 2023 we will build on our existing program to enrich content and deepen teacher learning.

Spring Hill College (Mobile, AL 36608-1791)
Ryan Noble (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Joe'l Lewis Billingsley (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

BH-288140-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$188,629 (approved)
$188,165 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

From Clotilda to Community: The History of Mobile, Alabama’s Africatown

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers to explore the history of the slave ship Clotilda and the Africatown community in Mobile, Alabama, from the Civil War to today.

Spring Hill College (SHC) seeks funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for “From Clotilda to Community: The History of Mobile, Alabama’s Africatown,”a five-day Landmarks of American History and Culture workshop to immerse K-12 educators of all grades in the history of the 110 survivors of the slave ship Clotilda, their descendants, and the post-Civil War community of Mobile, Alabama’s Africatown.

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation (Powell, WY 82435-8723)
Ray Locker (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Eric Sandeen (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

BH-288147-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$189,486 (approved)
$189,413 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Echoes of History: Mistreatment and Incarceration in the American West

Two one-week workshops for 72 educators on Indigenous history and the incarceration of Japanese Americans in Heart Mountain, Wyoming.

Few sounds of history occur for the first time. Instead, they repeat themselves, echoing through new generations and new communities. That is the theme of the proposed Landmarks of American History and Culture workshops by the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation to occur June 18-23 and July 23-28, 2023. Echoes of History: Mistreatment and Incarceration in the American West is a place-based, pedagogically centered exploration of the Japanese American incarceration of World War II that weaves that event into a larger and more complex narrative. It is backed by participant feedback, expanded inquiry and the new resources now available at the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center.

FDR Memorial Legacy Committee (Washington, DC 20006-1631)
Mary E. Dolan (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Arlene King-Berry (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)
Rosalie Boone (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

BH-288162-22
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,000 (approved)
$190,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

A Disability Legacy: The FDR Presidency and Memorial

Two one-week workshops in Washington, D.C. for 72 K-12 educators on the Franklin Roosevelt Memorial and disability rights in U.S. history.

As striking as the FDR Memorial in DC was at its 1997 dedication, it was missing a core element of what made FDR the great leader he was–disability. Now, disability is front and center at the Memorial for all to experience. However, visitors often do not learn that the wheelchair statue was not part of the original design and was added four years after the dedication following an epic six-year campaign by disabled Americans. This fight for representation is an important bellwether in understanding the Disability Rights Movement and its direct linkage to the Civil Rights Movement. This workshop is organized to ensure new generations of Americans learn about FDR’s disability experience and the impact of disability on his leadership, the campaign by disabled Americans to ensure disability representation at the FDR memorial, and the continued impact of that addition to the Memorial. This will address humanities themes of history, education, arts, cultural identity, and public memory.

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Timothy J. Crimmins (Project Director: March 2021 to present)

BH-281173-21
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$189,946 (approved)
$189,946 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Problem of the Color Line: Atlanta Landmarks and Civil Rights History

Two one-week workshops for 72 educators on the civil rights movement and desegregation in Atlanta. 

At the core of the workshop is the weighty issue of race reform in a contested southern past. Atlanta, destroyed in the Civil War, was rebuilt on the ashes of slavery as a “New South” city where memorials to the Old South became symbols of white supremacy that relegated African Americans to legal and economic second-class status. The struggle of resistance follows from W. E. B. Du Bois to Martin Luther King. Atlanta has an ideal nexus of historic sites where teachers can explore these struggles, from the legacy of slavery, the tragedy of war and defeat, the promise of emancipation, the betrayal of Reconstruction, the terror of redemption and race riot, the erection of the color line and resistance to segregation, the civil rights movement, desegregation, integration and resegregation, to a multicultural and pluralistic society. Participants will see how race relations figured into the landscape as Americans who once venerated the civil war dead now memorialize civil rights martyrs.

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0073)
Jeffrey M. Banister (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Jennifer Lei Jenkins (Co Project Director: August 2021 to present)

BH-281213-21
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,000 (approved)
$189,882 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Arizona-Sonora Borderlands, Palimpsest of Cultures

Two one-week workshops for 72 educators on the history, ecology, and cultures of the Arizona-Sonora borderland region. 

This new project will bring K-12 educators to the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands for one week in summer 2022 to study the history, arts, environments, and plural cultures of the region in the context of past habitation and present conditions of tri-national (U.S., Mexico, Native Nations) coexistence. We pose the framing question: how do place, space, and identity intermingle in this region’s millennia of layered written, oral, aural, and visual histories to construct its futures? Given current conversations about the nature of the US-Mexico border and global migration more generally, the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands present a compelling and real-time learning-lab in layered histories, cultures, arts, ecologies, and current events of the region.

CSUB Auxilliary for Sponsored Programs Administration (Bakersfield, CA 93311-1022)
Adam Sawyer (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Oliver Arthur Rosales (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

BH-281239-21
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$204,525 (approved)
$201,825 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2024

California Dreamin': Migration, Work, and Settlement in the "Other" California

Two one-week workshops for 72 educators about migration and agricultural labor history in rural California.

From the exhausted hope of the Joads to the tenacity of Cesar Chavez; from the austere Garveyian self- reliance of Allensworth to the lyricism of the Bakersfield Sound, very few locales have captured the promise, struggles, artistry, and multi-ethnic tapestry of Rural America more than California’s San Joaquin Valley. This place-based workshop features four historical rural landmarks related to multiracial agricultural settlement since the late nineteenth century through the era of the farm worker movement in the 1960s. Participant field trips will include cultural heritage interpreters, visiting scholars, and companion digital archival material related to Allensworth State Park, Sunset Labor Camp, National Chavez Center, and various historical landmarks located in Delano, California. Hosted by CSU Bakersfield, participants will draw linkages to K-12 curriculum with a focus on teaching the rich and diverse history of migration and agricultural labor in the United States.

Nobis Project, Inc. (Savannah, GA 31412-9304)
Christen Clougherty (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Walter Isaac (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Amir Jamal Toure (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Josiah Watts (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

BH-281283-21
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$191,908 (approved)
$191,908 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

The Legacy of Early African-Americans and the Gullah-Geechee People

Two one-week workshops exploring Gullah-Geechee history and culture in the Lowcountry of Georgia and South Carolina.

This workshop focuses on the history and cultural legacy of Gullah-Geechee people of South Carolina and Georgia, descendants of enslaved people from the West Coast of Africa, who contributed to making America “A More Perfect Union,” even as they were excluded from its benefits. The Gullah-Geechee preserved more of their African traditions than other groups of early enslaved Africans in the U.S. As a result, the Gullah-Geechee people’s history, stories, beliefs, and traditions are central to the establishment of African American cultural institutions and practices, and therefore critical to understanding American society in general. The institution of slavery and the contributions of the enslaved and their descendants is foundational to the formation of the U.S. and has long been undertaught and over-simplified in K-12 curriculum. This place-based workshop grounds teachers with a scholarly understanding of (1) how African Americans, free and enslaved, have strived to realize the nation’s ideal that “all men are created equal” in possession of liberty and certain rights, and (2) how the Gullah-Geechee people, who worked over four centuries to preserve their culture, contributed to this democratic ideal.

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation (Powell, WY 82435-8723)
Ray Locker (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Tyson Emborg (Co Project Director: September 2021 to present)

BH-281290-21
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$187,804 (approved)
$187,803 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Heart Mountain, Wyoming, and the Japanese American Incarceration

Two one-week workshops for 72 educators on the incarceration of Japanese Americans in Heart Mountain, Wyoming.

We will conduct two six-day workshops for 5-12 educators for the Landmarks of American History and Culture program to instruct them on the details of the Japanese American incarceration during World War II.

Washington DC Office of the National JACL (Washington, DC 20006-1602)
Phillip Ozaki (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Matthew Weisbly (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

BH-281301-21
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$177,735 (approved)
$177,735 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Civil Liberties in Times of Crisis: The Japanese American Incarceration

Two one-week workshops for 72 teachers to examine the history and long-term impacts of Japanese American internment/incarceration during World War II in California.

Following its 2016 award of the same title, Civil Liberties in Times of Crisis: The Japanese American Incarceration, the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) seeks funding through the NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture grants program for seventy-two primarily social studies and history teachers at the middle and high school levels to explore the historical significance and enduring legacy of the World War II Japanese American incarceration experience. Two six-day sessions of are planned for June 19 to 24, and July 10 to 15, 2022, in the historic Little Tokyo neighborhood in Los Angeles at host institution, the Japanese American National Museum (JANM), with day trips to Santa Anita Park (a previous temporary “assembly center”) and Manzanar National Historic Site (one of the ten permanent WWII “internment” camps). This will be one of the last times that JACL isable to host a workshop with living camp survivors as the WWII generation passes the torch to future ones.

Auburn University (Auburn, AL 36849-0001)
Elijah Gaddis (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Keith Hebert (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

BH-281304-21
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,888 (approved)
$190,888 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2024

Bloody Sunday, Selma, and the Long Civil Rights Movement

Two one-week workshops for 72 educators on the significance of Selma, Alabama, within the long civil rights movement.

This workshop will invite educators from across the country to an immersive, week-long exploration of one of the most important landscapes of the American civil rights movement. Using the events of the infamous “Bloody Sunday” protests in Selma, Alabama, workshop participants will spend a week exploring the understudied ordinary people and places of this freedom struggle. A range of experts will lead these educators in thinking about how we remember (and forget) civil rights struggles and the places they stemmed from. Through workshops and readings, teachers will be exposed to place based learning techniques and an unparalleled archive of images assembled for the workshop. Participants will leave the workshop better equipped to identify and educate about the intersections between race, place, and freedom struggles in their own classrooms and communities.

National Council for History Education, Inc. (University Heights, OH 44118-3204)
Matt Missias (Project Director: March 2021 to December 2021)
Kathleen Barker (Project Director: December 2021 to present)

BH-281309-21
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$190,000 (approved)
$190,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

The Space Age on the Space Coast

Two one-week workshops for 72 educators on the space race, technology, and civil rights during the twentieth century. 

The National Council for History Education (NCHE) proposes partnering with the Astronauts Memorial Foundation (AMF) at Kennedy Space Center on a National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of History and Culture Grant, entitled The Space Age on the Space Coast. The workshops funded by this grant, which will take place from July 11th-15 and July 25th-29th of 2022, will be focused on the unique history and culture of Florida’s Space Coast. This project will allow K-12 educators of multiple disciplines from around the country to explore the ways in which politics, science, and culture collided in a unique geographical location in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, and where they continue to intersect today.

Reinhardt University (Waleska, GA 30183-2981)
William Jeff Bishop (Project Director: February 2020 to present)

BH-272357-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$189,004 (approved)
$189,004 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2023

The Trail of Tears: Context and Perspectives

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers about the history and culture of the Cherokee people.

The Funk Heritage Center of Reinhardt University, located in the town of Waleska in northwestern Georgia, proposes a new National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture workshop for K-12 teachers, especially grades 3 through 12, titled The Trail of Tears: Context and Perspectives. The goals of the workshop are to (1) heighten awareness of 19th-century Cherokee removal from the Southeastern U.S.; (2) give K-12 teachers the tools they need to teach this portion of their social studies and/or history curricula effectively; and (3) highlight voices and perspectives from the period – particularly Cherokee voices – to tell the story. Participants will visit several key Cherokee landmarks and engage with a wide range of museum artifacts, Native American art, claims for damages filed by the Cherokees, newspapers from the time period, recorded eyewitness testimony, Cherokee myths and stories, and other resources.

Regents of the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Rebecca Maria Sanchez (Project Director: February 2020 to present)

BH-272362-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,000 (approved)
$185,183 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2022

Contested Homelands: Knowledge, History, and Culture of Historic Santa Fe, New Mexico

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 educators on the interaction between Native Americans and European settlers in Santa Fe.

The University of New Mexico is seeking a grant award to provide teacher workshops during the summer of 2021. Santa Fe, a city boasting a 400+ year history as the recognized capital will be the site of this workshop. The extensive history of the continuously occupied historic sites offers a rich opportunity for teachers from around the U.S. to study the history and culture of the area by investigating the historic sites of Santa Fe and area Pueblos. The workshops will be structured around the concept of homelands and include the study of historic sites, artifacts and stories in Santa Fe, NM and surrounding communities. The Camino Real de Tierra Adentro and the Palace of the Governors will be interpreted, studied and contrasted with the Pueblo history of the region, including Taos Pueblo, to understand the complexity of historical homelands. Structures, museums, centers and libraries in Santa Fe housing artifact and document collections will be utilized to foster deeper understandings.

University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Timothy Paul Grady (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Rebecca Mueller (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)

BH-272365-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$190,866 (approved)
$187,277 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2023

Fabric of the Past: Weaving the Twentieth Century at the Beaumont Mill and Village in South Carolina

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers exploring the textile industry of upstate South Carolina as a case study for 19th- and 20th-century cultural, economic, and technological change.

Through its examination of 20th Century American history, Fabric of the Past touches on multiple topics and themes highlighted in middle and high school classrooms nationwide and stressed in national teaching guidelines and standards. USC Upstate will offer two one-week sessions of the workshop in July 2021, serving up to 36 teachers each time. The workshop will explore the following key themes from the National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: culture (mill and Southern cultures); time, continuity, and change (history of the Beaumont Mill); production, consumption, and distribution (economic changes across time); and science and technology (industrial and technological changes in the mills). Workshop content is designed to be integrated at multiple points in the U.S. History curriculum, including Reconstruction, the Industrial Age, and World War II.

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Rolando Herts (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Lee Aylward (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)

BH-272368-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$210,257 (approved)
$210,257 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2024

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers about history, music, food, and racial diversity in the Mississippi Delta.

“The Most Southern Place on Earth” is a seven-day workshop that will bring together K-12 teachers from around the country to learn about the important role that the Mississippi Delta has played in American History. Workshop participants will learn about the interconnectedness of culture, place, and history in the Delta, including the racial and ethnic diversity that influenced, and was influenced by, music, food, and labor. Using scholarship, films, oral history, and museum visits, “Most Southern Place” offers participants a rich and immersive experience that highlights interdisciplinary teaching and learning.

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300)
Anthony F. Arrigo (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Timothy D. Walker (Co Project Director: July 2020 to present)

BH-272369-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$189,702 (approved)
$189,702 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2022

Sailing to Freedom: New Bedford and the Underground Railroad

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers to explore abolitionism and the Underground Railroad in the port city of New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Examines New Bedford, Massachusetts as a destination for escaped slaves in the Underground Railroad and the maritime links to the anti-slavery movement.

Regents of the University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95618-6153)
Stacey Greer (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Robyn M. Rodriguez (Co Project Director: September 2020 to present)

BH-272380-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$189,883 (approved)
$189,883 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2023

Building Community in California: The Chinese American Experience

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the Chinese American experience in California.

The University of California, Davis seeks $189,883 to fund Building Community in California: The Chinese American Experience, a Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop for School Teachers to be held June 27 to July 2 and July 11 to 16, 2021.This program for K-12 teachers, hosted on the UC Davis campus, will highlight the significance of historic sites in Sacramento, Donner Summit, the town of Locke, and San Francisco, California. These spaces frame educators’ understanding of Chinese immigration and Chinese immigrants’ contributions from the Gold Rush era through the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, which have a lasting impact. These two events in American history bookend our study. The Chinese American experience provides an important frame to understand the significance of immigration policy, and the contributions and experiences of those who came to and built community in Northern California.

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-3629)
Sheila Kirschbaum (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Kristin Gallas (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)

BH-272381-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$196,677 (approved)
$191,890 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2022

Social Movements and Reform in Industrializing America: The Lowell Experience

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the history of reform movements in Lowell, MA.

The Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of UMass Lowell's College of Education and Lowell National Historical Park, proposes to engage educators in investigating Lowell’s textile industry as a case study of early 19th-century industrialization and reform. We use the resources of the Park and other cultural/historical sites to examine changes in work, society, and culture between 1820 and 1860, changes that led Lowellians, imbued with the ideals of the natural rights tradition, to engage in labor reform, women’s rights, and antislavery movements. We also look at nativism in this time period as a reactionary reform movement. An industrial city that formed the template for later industrial cities in the U.S., Lowell provides an ideal setting for historical inquiry. Through lectures, discussion, hands-on and field investigations, drama, and close study of primary, secondary, and literary sources, educators gain both useful content knowledge and new pedagogical approaches.

Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (Seattle, WA 98104-2948)
Rahul Gupta (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Charlene Mano Shen (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)

BH-272383-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$190,564 (approved)
$189,654 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2022

From Immigrants to Citizens: Asian Pacific Americans in the Northwest

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers about the history and culture of Asian Pacific American immigrants in the Pacific Northwest.

The Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (dba Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience) seeks funding to present our popular Landmark workshops, "From Immigrants to Citizens: Asian Pacific Americans in the Northwest". Building on the success of our 2014, 2016, and 2019 workshops, we propose 2 week-long sessions in summer 2021 led by our 2019 team of Education staff in partnership with preeminent scholars and veteran K-12 educators. The long history of Asian Pacific Americans (APAs) in the Northwest provides a wealth of landmark sites and historical materials on which to base K-12 professional development training about APA immigrant histories and the many cultures that shaped our nation. The need for training is clear based on the continued lack of published curriculum and persistent under-resourcing of materials and training for K-12 teachers on APA history. In 2021, we will build on our existing program to include newly available sites/materials.

Spring Hill College (Mobile, AL 36608-1791)
Ryan Noble (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Joe'l Lewis Billingsley (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)

BH-272385-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$264,224 (approved)
$264,224 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2022

From Clotilda to Community: The History of Mobile, Alabama's Africatown

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers exploring the history of the slave ship Clotilda and the Africatown community in Mobile, Alabama, from the Civil War to today.

Spring Hill College (SHC) seeks funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for “The Past is Present: From Africa to Africatown,” a new five-day Landmarks of American History and Culture workshop to immerse K-12 educators of all grades in the history of the slave ship Clotilda and the post-Civil War community of Mobile, Alabama’s Africatown.

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-5591)
Elizabeth L. Bradley (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Margaret Hughes (Co Project Director: July 2020 to December 2021)

BH-272387-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[White paper]

Totals:
$189,384 (approved)
$189,384 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2022

Slavery in the Colonial North

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 educators on the history of slavery in the colonial north.

In recent years, public humanities practitioners have focused on re-evaluating how slavery in America is presented at historic sites, incorporating the point of view of enslaved individuals, and recognizing the longevity of slavery’s existence in America. Still, the narrative of slavery is rooted in the antebellum South, omitting its connection to the legal, economic, and political development of colonial America and the New Nation period. For over 20 years, Historic Hudson Valley has told the story of slavery in colonial America, on site at our historic site Philipsburg Manor and, in 2019, with the interactive documentary People Not Property: Stories of Slavery in the Colonial North. In 2017 and 2019, HHV hosted NEH summer Institutes to explore this topic with K-12 teachers. Now HHV seeks a Landmarks grant for summer 2021. The workshop would be grounded at Philipsburg Manor and extended to nearby historic sites to consider how these locations expand our knowledge of American slavery.

Japanese American National Museum (Los Angeles, CA 90012-3911)
Lynn Yamasaki (Project Director: February 2020 to present)

BH-272394-20
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$172,445 (approved)
$162,969 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2023

Little Tokyo: How History Shapes a Community Across Generations

Two one-week workshops for 72 schoolteachers about the history and culture of Japanese American immigrants and their place in U.S. history.

“Little Tokyo: How History Shapes a Community Across Generations” is a new initiative that will invite educators from across the country to Los Angeles to examine the neighborhood of Little Tokyo, including the Little Tokyo Historic District.

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc. (Cortez, CO 81321-9408)
Sean Gantt (Project Director: February 2019 to September 2019)
Susan C Ryan (Project Director: September 2019 to October 2022)

BH-267048-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$180,175 (approved)
$175,742 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Mesa Verde National Park and Pueblo Indian History

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers to study Pueblo history and culture through the archaeology of Mesa Verde.

Mesa Verde National Park and Pueblo Indian History is a one-week residence-based workshop that will be offered twice during the summer of 2020, each time for 36 K–12 educators. The Workshop focuses on three fundamental questions: 1) How do we come to know and appreciate the time depth, people, and activities that comprise the past and shaped our contemporary world? 2) Who creates America’s history and culture? 3) How do contemporary Pueblo people (and all Americans not of European descent) balance their cultural identity and continuity with Euro American ideals of assimilation and the melting pot? These questions touch the lives of all Americans today, and the Workshop offers historic and multicultural perspectives using Mesa Verde National Park and the surrounding Mesa Verde Region—home to humans for over 10,000 years and containing some of the world’s greatest archaeological treasures.

Eastern Washington University (Cheney, WA 99004-1619)
Dorothy Zeisler-Vralsted (Project Director: February 2019 to November 2020)
David Allen Pietz (Co Project Director: August 2019 to November 2020)

BH-267057-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$24,866 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Grand Coulee Dam: The Intersection of Modernity and Indigenous Cultures

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the construction and impact of the Grand Coulee Dam.

“Grand Coulee Dam — The Intersection of Modernity and Indigenous Cultures” These workshops, serving teachers in grades K-12, will explore how different social groups experience history – actual historical events and the memory of those events. More specifically, the project will unpack the history of Grand Coulee Dam as a landmark of contested narratives. One narrative celebrated the social, economic and cultural power of modernity. The other focused on the loss of indigenous cultural identities and practices. Participants will explore these historical dynamics in discussion with experts, site visits, and engagement with primary historical material including oral histories, art, song and photographs. The project’s goal is to equip teachers with unique and meaningful analytical frameworks to engage their humanities and social science students in conversations centered on how social groups experience and interpret transformative changes of the landscape.

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Kathryn Miller Haines (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Suzi Bloom (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

BH-267062-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$177,003 (approved)
$172,681 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 7/31/2022

The Homestead Steel Strike and the Growth of America as an Industrial Power

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the Homestead Steel Strike.

The Homestead Steel Strike and the Growth of America as an Industrial Power is a one week workshop (offered twice) that will provide teachers with a full accounting of the circumstances that led to the Battle of Homestead and what its lasting impact has been in the United States. This program will provide a framework for participants to immerse themselves in the battle from both sides by examining primary sources, listening to lectures by leading historians and scholars, and visiting historic sites including the Original Homestead Works Pump House, the Bost Building, which served as headquarters for the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers, and The Carrie Furnace, which produced iron for the Homestead Works from 1907 to 1978.

Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
David Powell (Project Director: February 2019 to present)

BH-267064-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$178,547 (approved)
$178,141 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

On Hallowed Ground: Gettysburg in History and Memory

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the Battle of Gettysburg and its legacy.

Gettysburg College intends to engage secondary educators in a workshop focused on the relationship between history and memory through the lens of the Civil War. We seek to offer a revised version of this highly successful 2014 workshop in which participants are immersed in the 'hallowed ground' of Gettysburg and the events that transpired in July 1863, and also expose teachers to the emerging scholarship in the field of memory studies. Participants will engage in historic site visits paired with seminar sessions that will inform the creation of teaching projects that will ultimately land on the program website. Having walked the hallowed ground at Gettysburg, we believe participants will return home with a renewed sense of the significance of what happened here, and with a strengthened understanding of how to teach about Gettysburg.

Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association (Deerfield, MA 01342-5004)
Lynne Manring (Project Director: February 2019 to present)

BH-267081-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$194,406 (approved)
$194,155 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 6/30/2023

Living on the Edge of Empire: Alliance, Conflict and Captivity in Colonial New England

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on cross-cultural contact and conflict in colonial New England, focused on the 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts.   

The Deerfield Teachers’ Center of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, a nationally recognized professional development provider, seeks $169,998 to fund two Landmarks Workshops for K-12 Teachers July 12 – 17, 2020 and July 26 – 31, 2020. Living on the Edge of Empire: Alliance, Conflict and Captivity in Colonial New England will take place in the beautiful Old Deerfield Village Historic Landmark District and surrounding historic sites. This workshop will bring together a full range of resources—landscape, architecture, artifacts, documents, oral histories—which, combined with secondary interpretations, illuminate competing perspectives on the colonial period. It will offer K-12 educators tools to engage students in learning topics related to the history of colonial America, including cultural interaction on the frontier, colonization, and the European imperial struggle for control of North America which ultimately set the stage for the American Revolution.

East Carolina University (Greenville, NC 27858-5235)
Anne Swenson Ticknor (Project Director: February 2019 to present)

BH-267091-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$186,250 (approved)
$186,250 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2023

Saipan's Land and Sea: Battle Scars and Sites of Resilience

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the history of military conflicts in Saipan.

The newly proposed Landmarks of American History and Culture program, Saipan’s Land and Sea: Battle Scars & Sites of Resilience, provides 72 teachers an incomparable opportunity to interact with a continuous, intact, and largely undisturbed record of conflict history outside of museum walls on the island of Saipan, a US commonwealth in the western Pacific Ocean. The one-week program will be held twice at Kagman High School by a mostly indigenous project team comprised of educators, historians, archaeologists, authors, and cultural guides. Hosting the institute on Saipan provides a unique opportunity for often under-represented teachers to participate in NEH Landmark programming and for US mainland teachers to interact with a largely undisturbed record of conflict history that is virtually untold in history textbooks and unknown to K-12 students.

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-3629)
Sheila Kirschbaum (Project Director: February 2019 to October 2022)

BH-267097-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$202,257 (approved)
$188,445 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Labor and Landscape: Lowell as 19th-Century Crucible

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 school teachers on the environmental history of Lowell, MA.

The Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of UMass Lowell's College of Education and Lowell National Historical Park, proposes to build educators’ content knowledge and pedagogical skills through a study of Lowell as an environmental "crucible." Through talks, tours, and discussions, educators consider nineteenth-century textile manufacturing as a moment when multiple ways of using nature collided. We look at ways of labor and meaning of landscape for the Merrimack River Valley’s Native Americans, for enslaved people in the Deep South, and for “Yankee” farm families on New England’s rural homesteads. We study the industrial transformation of raw cotton into finished cloth by a changing array of wage laborers in Lowell. We also locate the origins of American environmental concern, social protest, and regulatory policy in the reaction to widespread environmental disruption and ever-worsening pollution associated with textile and other factories.

Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Yonghee Suh (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Brian J. Daugherity (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)

BH-267105-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$204,729 (approved)
$204,119 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

The Long Road from Brown: School Desegregation in Virginia

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on school desegregation in Virginia.

This project offers two one week long workshops on the topic of school desegregation in Virginia. Participants include 72 Grade 6-12 social studies/history teachers as a total. In these workshops, participants will visit significant historic sites associated with the topic, learn how to use primary sources in the archives and created their own curriculum on the topic. The first workshop will take place from July 12th through July 17th, 2020 and the second from July 26th through July 31st, 2020.

Kent State University (Kent, OH 44242-0001)
Todd Hawley (Project Director: February 2019 to May 2022)
Laura L. Davis (Co Project Director: September 2019 to May 2022)

BH-267113-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$187,393 (approved)
$185,328 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Making Meaning of May 4th: The 1970 Kent State Shootings in US History

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the 1970 Kent State Shootings.

The Kent State Shootings, occurring May 4, 1970 when the Ohio National Guard shot and killed four students and wounded nine others during a student protest against the Vietnam War, is considered to be a turning point in American history. Its implications for First Amendment rights, excessive use of government force, and the importance of younger generations seeking to make a difference, all continue to have a relevant echo today, with their lessons more important now than ever. As the event reaches the fifty-year mark in 2020, teachers will convene at this National Historic Landmark site where they will engage with scholars and eyewitnesses, explore the May 4 Visitors Center, Walking Tour, and the extensive May 4 Collection to develop a deeper understanding of this historical event. Teachers will develop transformative lessons to engage their students in deep study of May 4 and transcendent historical themes including freedom of speech, student activism, and peaceful protest.

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation (Powell, WY 82435-8723)
Ray Locker (Project Director: February 2019 to October 2022)

BH-267114-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$165,172 (approved)
$165,172 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Heart Mountain, Wyoming, and the Japanese American Incarceration

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the incarceration of Japanese-Americans in Heart Mountain, Wyoming.

"Heart Mountain, Wyoming, and the Japanese American Incarceration" is a six-day workshop that will bring K-12 teachers from around the country to Heart Mountain, one of the 10 concentration camps that held Japanese Americans who were forced to evacuate the West Coast during World War II. Workshop participants will learn about the Japanese American experience in the United States, the conditions that made it possible and the evacuation and incarceration itself. The workshop will examine the incarceration’s long-term effect on the Japanese American community and federal policies ranging from the formal apology approved by Congress in 1988 to immigration.

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, Inc. (Boston, MA 02116-2813)
Michelle LeBlanc (Project Director: February 2019 to May 2022)
Elisabeth Nevins (Co Project Director: August 2019 to May 2022)

BH-267123-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$184,719 (approved)
$182,345 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Mapping a New World: Places of Conflict and Colonization in 17th-Century New England

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on cultural interactions and conflict in seventeenth-century New England.

The Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library proposes a 2020 Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop for teachers focused on the early colonial period in New England (1600-1700), with an emphasis on the role of geography and place. This workshop is designed to immerse 3rd–12th grade teachers in the history and landscape of 1600s New England. This workshop was previously funded in 2017. Participants will engage deeply with the region by visiting and learning at major historical landmarks such as the site of the Plymouth colony, the city of Boston and museums and libraries that together house collections and exhibitions that bring to life this complex story of land, power, identity and community. Teachers will be learning from scholars and with primary source materials, such as period maps, letters, land deeds and narratives that are grounded in their geographic location.

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2235)
Diane Louise Mutti Burke (Project Director: February 2019 to May 2022)

BH-267146-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

Totals:
$191,891 (approved)
$184,936 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Wide-Open Town: Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 teachers using Kansas City as a case study for examining the changes in American society in the 1920s and 1930s.

Wide-Open Town: Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression is a NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop for K-12 Teachers that explores historical landmarks and cultural resources in light of recent scholarship in order to better understand these pivotal decades in United States history. The 1920s and 30s were particularly vibrant years in Kansas City, sometimes described as the city's "Golden Age." City boosters claimed a new position of economic dynamism and culture flourished, most notably resulting in Kansas City becoming a key site in the development of American jazz. Yet, all of these events were intertwined in a political, social, and economic landscape fraught with notorious machines politics, vice, and long histories of people fighting for their rights and freedoms. Much of what played out in Kansas City are a reflection of the larger cultural and historic forces that shaped this era in US history.

Colorado History Museum; History Colorado (Denver, CO 80203-2109)
Eric Carpio (Project Director: February 2019 to October 2022)

BH-267160-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$172,054 (approved)
$121,950 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Borderlands of Southern Colorado

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 school teachers on Colorado’s southern borderlands in the nineteenth century.

Borderlands of Southern Colorado is a place-based workshop in Colorado's San Luis Valley illuminating the complex history of the American southwest through the intersection of geo-political, geographic, cultural, ethnic, and religious landscapes. Through two, one-week workshops in summer 2020, educators will learn from a diverse and highly qualified team of scholars, mentors, and community members to examine how shifting historic borders and borderlands in the region have impacted individual and community identity, power and government, ecosystems and the economy, land and water, and religion and spirituality; and how these borderlands issues continue to resonate today. Borderlands of Southern Colorado is proposed to NEH as an opportunity to critically examine our nation's complex history, engage in critical dialogue, and share diverse viewpoints across the K-12 humanities curricula.

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Adam Rubin (Project Director: February 2019 to June 2022)
Jenni G. Mushynski (Co Project Director: October 2019 to October 2020)
Nicole Kowrach (Co Project Director: October 2020 to June 2022)

BH-267161-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$181,662 (approved)
$175,526 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the development of the skyscraper and its impact on the city of Chicago and on urbanization throughout the world.

The Chicago Architecture Center will offer the workshop The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation to supplement and enhance the humanities lessons of teachers from across the nation. Buildings are primary sources that reflect who we are as a society at a moment in time. As such, architecture stands as one of the strongest tools for sharing the way we live our lives. The skyscraper is perhaps the strongest architectural legacy of America, and Chicago, as the home of one of the first skyscrapers, provides a powerful lens through which we can examine our culture, economy, history, and society. Through the context of skyscraper development in Chicago from the late 19th through mid-20th centuries, teachers participating in this workshop will use Chicago’s landmark buildings to explore the many forces that shaped Chicago into a center of architecture, how these developments impacted society and vice versa, and how this history continues to impact urbanization to this day.

Southern Utah University (Cedar City, UT 84720-2415)
Samantha Kirkley (Project Director: February 2019 to October 2022)
Jeanne M. Moe (Co Project Director: August 2019 to October 2022)

BH-267175-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$197,122 (approved)
$194,232 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Voices of the Ancients: Archaeology and Oral Tradition in the American Southwest

Two one-week workshops for 72 K-12 educators on the ancient Fremont culture of the American Southwest.

This project will model archaeological inquiry for teachers and students. Participants will have multiple opportunities to work collaboratively in small groups to ask and answer important questions about the past. Workshop participants will explore the universal human need for shelter. Educators will be able to help students connect to past cultures and value the many underrepresented communities presently residing within the United States. Participants will examine authentic content including artifacts, site maps, oral histories, and historic documents with guidance from instructors. Through this project, participants will return to their own classrooms armed with the materials and experience necessary to conduct archaeological inquiry with their students.

Vermont Archaeological Society, Inc. (Burlington, VT 05402-0663)
Angela Marie Labrador (Project Director: February 2019 to October 2022)
Jason Barney (Co Project Director: August 2019 to October 2022)

BH-267178-19
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$149,829 (approved)
$147,373 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Freedom and Unity: The Struggle for Independence on the Vermont Frontier

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for 72 K-12 school teachers on the American Revolution in Vermont.

The Vermont Archaeological Society, in partnership with two museums and the Vermont State Historic Sites Program, proposes to offer a new Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop entitled, “Freedom and Unity: The Struggle for Independence on the Vermont Frontier.” The workshop will feature a program of place-based and participatory learning activities related to the events of the American Revolution at seven historic sites in Vermont’s Champlain Valley, including sessions held on Lake Champlain in a replica of the 1776 USS Philadelphia. The workshop will target educators who teach history and social studies at the 6-12 grade levels, as well as those who co-teach with social studies colleagues or wish to incorporate historic place-based education to engage students in their subject matter in new ways. In sum, the workshop will demonstrate methods of how to teach students about history and how to teach with historic sites to meet learning outcomes across the curriculum.