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17 matches

Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan*
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Noriko Manabe
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08544-2001)
FO-50237-14
How Music and Musicians Communicate the Antinuclear Protest Message in Post-Fukushima Japan

The Fukushima nuclear crisis has inspired the largest citizens' movement in Japan since the 1960s. Based on fieldwork and musico-textual analyses, my monograph-in-progress examines how musicians are communicating the antinuclear message. Eyerman and Jamison have observed that social movements engage music from the past. I take this observation a step further by proposing a typology of intertextuality—a recurrent feature of Japanese antinuclear songs, which incorporate music from past movements and quote recent announcements. I examine the role of music in different venues—demonstrations, cyberspace, festivals, and recordings—and the evolution of sound demonstrations with the stage of the movement. I consider the range of roles taken by musicians, who see themselves as ordinary citizens rather than representatives of their fans (cf Street). Drawing from ethnography, musical analysis, sound studies, and literary theory, I consider how music communicates messages in contentious politics.

Project fields: Ethnomusicology
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $37,800
Grant period: 1/1/2014 – 9/30/2014

Tomomi Kinukawa
University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA 95211-0110)
FO-50203-13
Health Disparities and Immigration Politics in Cold War Era Japan: The Case of Korean Diaspora Communities

"Health Disparities and Immigration Politics in Cold War Era Japan: The Case of Korean Diaspora Communities" is a pioneering historical and transnational study on the link between health disparities, racial projects, and immigration politics. My book examines: (1) biopolitics (the politics of health) as an ethno-racial project in Cold War era Japan, and (2) the ways in which various groups of Zainichi (resident) Koreans, including medical professionals, medical students, community leaders, and entrepreneurs articulated their critique of U.S.-Japanese neo-imperialism in East Asia by focusing on the issue of health. My study will reconstruct the social, cultural, and political history of Zainichi health movements, based on oral history interviews and original archival research. The Zainichi movements provide an innovative model for reducing health disparities that critiques the standard assumption that assimilation and citizenship is the only and the best measure for improving health.

Project fields: History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $50,400
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 5/31/2014

Louise Conrad Young
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53706-1314)
FO-50204-13
Sociology and "Social Problems" in Prewar Japan, a Monograph on the History of Japanese Social Thought

The early twentieth century was a critical moment in the production of social knowledge in Japan as elsewhere. Scholars, government leaders, activists, and journalists created the core categories, institutional foundations, and circuits of production and exchange that would shape the study of society for decades to come. The rise of sociology closely tracked the emergence of "social problems" as a central political concern. Early concepts of "society" were linked to "social problems," and both became a code for fault lines in Japanese politics and society. My book project, Sociology and "Social Problems" in Prewar Japan, argues that interlinked intellectual and social developments within three sites of knowledge production—the academy, government bureaucracy, and social movements—profoundly shaped ideas about society and their political impact. Based on primary research conducted in Japan during 2010-11, this proposal seeks support for write-up of the book manuscript.

Project fields: East Asian History
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $50,400
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 5/31/2014

Chikako Ozawa-de Silva
Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
FO-50182-12
In the Eyes of Others: Suicide and Meaning in Contemporary Japan

Discourse in Japan on suicide prevention has focused almost exclusively on the state of the Japanese economy and mental illness. Increasing evidence suggests that a lack of positive mental health may be more important than the presence of mental illness in predicting future suicide attempts, and also that treatment of mental illness alone may not address the lack of psychological and social well-being implicated in suicidality. This book project intends to mend the current gap in our understanding of suicide and its prevention by making several contributions: it will provide accounts of subjective experience currently lacking in the study of suicide in Japan; it will provide a culturally-situated account of positive mental health in Japan by employing ethnographic methods alongside survey data; and it will critically assess the potential of traditional Japanese practices to bolster positive mental health and thereby play a role in suicide prevention.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $50,400
Grant period: 1/1/2013 – 12/31/2013

Yukiko Koga
Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-0001)
FO-50146-11
Accounting for Silence: Narration, Nation, and the Politics of Redress in China and Japan

This project is an anthropological, legal, and historical exploration of postwar compensation for Japanese colonial violence and injustice in the first half of the twentieth-century. I examine the politics of redress through the lens of postwar compensation surrounding Chinese forced laborers. While considerable recent studies shed light on the wartime slave labor practice, surprisingly little research exists on what happened to them after the war ended. My fieldwork draws attention to a pervasive and academically under-explored silence that many survivors maintained until the 1990s when they became plaintiffs in lawsuits against the Japanese government and corporations. This study explores how the dramatic disappearance and reappearance of the survivors and their archival traces—in both Japan and China—have produced distinct forms of giving voice to past injustice. This, in turn, allows for an exploration of what it means to account for silence.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $50,400
Grant period: 7/1/2012 – 6/30/2013

Mireya Solis
American University (Washington, DC 20016-8200)
FO-50116-10
Japan's Preferential Trade Agreements: Implications for Domestic Liberalization and Regional Integration in East Asia

Japan's ever-growing free trade agreements (FTAs) pose fundamental questions: Will these trade deals finally open the Japanese market? Can Japan deliver cohesive trade integration in East Asia? To assess the domestic determinants of Japanese FTA quality (dependent variable), I employ two independent variables: 1) lobbying incentives for societal actors in preferential trading, 2) centralization of government trade policy. I make a contribution to existing literature by highlighting the ways in which FTAs create a set of distinctive challenges and opportunities that do not arise in MFN multilateral liberalization; and by elucidating the impact of centralized trade policy institutions for the prospects of market opening. I also offer new insights to the political economy of Japan by analyzing the shifting balance of power between Executive and Legislative, and changing lobbying patterns with the fragmentation of powerful umbrella associations.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Political Science, General
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $50,400
Grant period: 9/1/2010 – 8/31/2011

Christopher Bondy
International Christian University (Tokyo, Japan)
FO-50118-10
Beyond the Buraku: The Negotiation of Burakumin Identity in Contemporary Japan

The burakumin, an "invisible" Japanese minority, present a paradox about Japanese identity, with implications for the study of stigmatized identities more generally. My longitudinal project examines how youth learn of their buraku background, and explores the negotiation of identity from youth to adulthood. The first completed stage, based on interviews with 40 youth, examined the role of school and community in shaping a buraku identity. In the second stage of research, I will resume interviews with the 40 informants (now in their early 20s) and pay particular attention to issues surrounding marriage and employment, where previous research suggests discrimination is at its most severe. I will use the remaining time to complete the book manuscript. Providing a study of how minorities manage a stigmatized identity over time broadens the audience of the work beyond Japanese studies to a wider social science audience.

Project fields: Sociology
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $29,400
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 3/31/2012

Steven Kent Vogel
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
FO-50098-09
Designing the Market: Institutions and Reform in Japan and Other Advanced Industrial Countries

This book project will examine market institutions and market reform in Japan and other advanced industrial countries. It builds upon two previous book projects ("Freer Markets, More Rules" and "Japan Remodeled") yet it seeks to present a broader and bolder argument designed to incite scholars to reconsider how they study political economy and to prompt government officials to re-evaluate the way they assess policy options. The book will focus on two primary country cases, the United States and Japan, with additional comparisons with Western Europe. It will develop two broad issue cases (financial markets and competition regimes), with supplementary cases on intellectual property rights and creating new markets. It will address both government regulation and the private governance of markets, and the interaction between the two.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Political Science, General
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $29,400
Grant period: 1/1/2009 – 7/31/2009

Saori N. Katada
University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
FO-50102-09
Fragmented Regionalism: Japan's Approach to East Asian Economic Institutions

Has Japan's dream of taking regional leadership ended with its economic downturn and the rise of China? After more than a century of mixed results, it may appear that Japan has given up and retreated. I argue that this is not the case. To the contrary, the Japanese government is more interested than ever in engaging in East Asia, especially in the form of building regional economic institutions. My book, "Fragmented Regionalism," will be the first to examine in depth Japan's emerging strategy to influence the "regional economic architectures" of East Asia. These regional architectures include free trade agreements, and funding and currency cooperation, which are crucial to securing East Asia's continued stability and prosperity. By focusing on Japan's initiatives in building institutions in these areas, my book examines the sources of Japan's policy priorities, the implications of those priorities on the regional economy, and the future of Japan's leadership in the region.

Project fields: International Relations
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $46,200
Grant period: 8/1/2009 – 6/30/2010

Kiyoteru Tsutsui
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
FO-50061-08
Global Human Rights and the Transformation of Minority Politics in Contemporary Japan

This book project examines how the rise of global human rights in the last few decades has transformed minority politics, giving rise to political activism by disadvantaged ethnic minorities in many corners of the world. Focusing on three minority social movements in Japan, Ainu people, Korean residents and the Burakumin, the project illustrates how the global human rights regime has provided new venues for contestation for minorities, growing flows of mobilizational resources for disadvantaged groups, and new vocabularies for framing their claims. These processes led to greater activism by all three minority groups in Japan, although the influence varied according to their historical backgrounds. Further, the movements all contribute back to the global political arena and elevated global human rights standards, demonstrating a feedback loop to the global regime. The book presents detailed accounts of these processes, using archival documents and interviews as main data sources.

Project fields: Sociology
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $50,400
Grant period: 9/1/2008 – 8/31/2009

Philip C. Brown
Ohio State University, Main Campus (Columbus, OH 43210-1307)
FO-50063-08
The Impact of Floods, Landslides, and Other Natural Disasters on the Modernization of Japan, 19th-20th Centuries

I explore how Japan's transition from a decentralized to an increasingly centralized government altered technical and social responses to widespread flood risk. I examine how local, prefecture and national organizations used old and new technologies along with policy to ameliorate natural hazard risks emphasizing the case of Niigata Prefecture. I explore 1) conditions of successful technology transfer and domestic diffusion (e.g., technological adaptations to accommodate new socio-cultural/political contexts), 2) how users select/modify the technologies they employ and 3) how social policy, e.g., zoning, complements technological solutions in the 19th and 20th centuries. Japan's experience offers insights into social and environmental opportunities/risks faced by developing societies today as they become more integrated and are governed by more powerful governments that undertake riparian projects for social benefit, international prestige, and to enhance their self-image as "modern."

Project fields: East Asian History
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $50,400
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 6/30/2010

Jennifer Ellen Robertson
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
FO-50039-07
Robotics, Technology, and the Japanese Family

The emerging field of humanoid robotics is nowhere more actively pursued than in Japan. Japan accounts for nearly 52% of the world’s share of operational robots and leads the postindustrial world in the development of humanoid robots designed specifically to enhance and augment human society. The five-year Humanoid Robotics Project was launched in 1998 with the mandate to develop a robot that could use human tools and work in human environments, including the domestic household. Innovations in robot technology are linked not only to new markets in information technology, but also to new conceptualizations about human life, the structure and formation of Japanese families and kinship systems, and the meaning of citizenship.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $24,000
Grant period: 5/1/2008 – 11/30/2008

Sarah Thal
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53706-1314)
FO-50053-07
The Roles of the Aristocracy in the Creation of Modern Japan, 1869-1900

“Aristocratic Connections: Creating Imperial Japan, 1869-1900” examines the newly expanded aristocracy of the Meiji period as a key player in the creation of modern Japan. By focusing on the aristocracy as a political tool of the Meiji oligarchs, as a contested symbol of imperial identity, and as a mediating structure between regional elites and metropolitan leaders, this project addresses the key issues of political centralization, social restructuring, and increased identification with the emperor in the Meiji era. Drawing upon qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis, the project will produce an historical monograph and a relational database of Meiji-era people and organizations that will be made available to other scholars.

Project fields: East Asian History
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $40,000
Grant period: 8/1/2007 – 7/31/2008

Yoshikuni Igarashi,
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
FO-50017-06
Postwar Japan and Visions of Mass Consumer Society

This project focuses on the radical economic, social, and cultural transformation of Japanese society in the late 1960s and the early 1970s and analyzes the ways in which members of Japanese society responded to this paradigmatic shift.

Project fields: Asian Studies
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $40,000
Grant period: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006

Karen Esther Wigen
Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305)
FO-50026-06
Geopolitics and Geopieties in 20th-Century Nagano

This project maps the shifting shape of the Nagano highlands across Japan’s twentieth century, in the national as well as the local imagination. Focusing on the core genres through which knowledge of Japanese regions has been transmitted—maps, museums, textbooks, and tourist literature—the study highlights three tensions in this archive: between the insider’s idiom of native place (kyodo) and the outsider’s trope of landscape (fukei); between the competing ways in which Nagano has been located in the nation, Asia, and the world over time; and between the anti-political quality of most regional rhetoric and the ideological work that this genre has historically performed.

[Grant products] [Media coverage]
Project fields: Geography
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $40,000
Grant period: 9/1/2006 – 5/31/2007

John C. Campbell
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
FO-50004-05
Japan Confronts the Aging Society

I propose to study old-age policy making, and policy, in Japan. The project will include an account of major policy changes from 1990 until now, concentrating on the initiation and implementation of the public, mandatory long-term-care insurance (LTCI) system that started in 2000; and an analysis of at least two reform processes that will be underway while I am in Japan. These are comprehensive pension reform, perhaps even including integration (already getting underway), and the scheduled 5th-year LTCI review (to be drafted in 2005 for implementation in 2006). The product will be a book that explains what the Japanese government has done about the aging-society problem, and how and why it did it. The first part of the book, perhaps 80-100 pages, will be an account of old-age policy from the mid-1950s until 1990, as summarized from my book of several years ago. This will be followed by four or five chapters based on the research proposed here. The book is intended for readers interested in Japanese politics, comparative welfare states, or policy for the elderly.

Project fields: Political Science, General
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $40,000
Grant period: 5/1/2005 – 1/31/2006

Gary R. Saxonhouse
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
FO-50014-05
The Evolution of Labor Standards in Japan: Human Rights, Scientific Management, and International Economic Conflict

This project seeks to understand how Japanese labor standards came to be transformed between the mid-1880s and the mid-1930s, and the extent to which these changes actually improved the welfare of working Japanese. Japan's experience, in particular, can be a laboratory within which competing claims about the relative efficacy of ILO (International Labor Organization) dialogue versus international trade sanctions can be explored.

Project fields: Economics
Program: Fellowships for Advanced Research on Japan
Division: Research Programs
Total amount awarded: $40,000
Grant period: 7/1/2005 – 6/30/2006

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