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Program: Seminars for College Teachers*
Date range: 2011-2013
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FS-50339-13

James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA 22807-0001)
Mark Rankin (Project Director: March 2013 to January 2015)
Tudor Books and Readers: 1485-1603

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty on the history of book production and reading in the Tudor era, to be held at three locations: Antwerp, London, and Oxford.

Over the course of five weeks in 2014, this overseas program would investigate the physical construction of books and the nature of reading during the era of the Tudor monarchs (1485-1603). We take an expansive view of this epoch in that we look back to the origins of English printing when William Caxton, the dominant force during the formative period of the Tudor book trade, founded his press at Westminster, just outside London, in 1476. We would give thought to how Tudor book culture gave rise to three vitally important publications during the years following the end of the Tudor dynasty: the King James Bible and the collected works of the best-known Tudor authors, William Shakespeare and Edmund Spenser, the epic poet of Elizabethan England. This proposed seminar would investigate the development of early English print and reading culture, book production technologies during the era of the hand press, and the history of the book and the history of reading as academic disciplines.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,685 (approved)
$161,633 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014


FS-50340-13

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Benjamin Heber Johnson (Project Director: March 2013 to December 2014)
Bridging National Borders in North America

A four-week summer seminar for sixteen college and university faculty, focusing on the history of borderlands in North America.

Proposes a seminar on the history of borderlands in North America, to be held at the Newberry Library from June 2 to June 27, 2014. Borderlands studies have emerged from their conceptual cradle, New Spain's northern frontier, to serve as an analytic concept for illuminating contact zones across the wider North American continent and beyond. The seminar's organizing theme is the process of border-making. We will examine three aspects of this theme: how nation-states claiming exclusive territorial sovereignty re-drew the continent's map; the intersection and sometimes collision of these efforts with other ways of organizing space and people; and the social and political consequences of the enforcement of national territoriality. The seminar's format, readings, and guest scholars have been selected with the goal of bringing together participants with diverse scholarly agendas into a common conversation about these developments.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$140,005 (approved)
$140,005 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014


FS-50342-13

American Academy in Rome (New York, NY 10021-4905)
Maureen C. Miller (Project Director: March 2013 to April 2016)
Reform and Renewal in Medieval Rome

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to investigate social transformation in medieval Rome.

Reform and renewal have been central concepts in the history of Europe as well as of the wider world, and they continue to be powerful elements of our public discourse whether in the political, the religious, or the institutional spheres of life. With its repeated movements for religious and political reform and renewal, the Middle Ages offer a particularly rich historical landscape in which to investigate these processes. The seminar will address questions fundamental to our understanding of society, such as: what is the relationship between the sacred and the secular? how do institutions gain and maintain authority in the midst of change? what is the place of the past in the transformation of the present? Seminar participants will pursue these large questions through a combination of theoretical readings, richly documented case studies, and site visits, with the aim of fostering interdisciplinary research among the participating scholars.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$131,263 (approved)
$131,263 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014


FS-50343-13

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Richard Strier (Project Director: March 2013 to December 2014)
George Herbert and Emily Dickinson

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to study the poetry of George Herbert and Emily Dickinson.

This seminar will provide its participants with the opportunity to study, in detail and in relation to each other, two of the greatest lyric poets in English, George Herbert (1593-1633) and Emily Dickinson (1831-1886); it will allow the participants to investigate a number of literary and spiritual modes as they move from seventeenth-century England to nineteenth-century America.

Project fields:
English

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$108,313 (approved)
$100,125 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014


FS-50351-13

University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80302-7046)
Terry Frederick Kleeman (Project Director: March 2013 to September 2016)
Daoist Literature and History: An Introduction

A three-week seminar at the University of Colorado, Boulder, for sixteen college and university faculty to examine the Daoist religion and its impact on Chinese civilization and society.

This three-week Summer Seminar for College Teachers focuses on the scriptures and other documents of Daoism, China's indigenous organized religion. After a general introduction to Daoism, the history of its study, and bibliographic resources, we will concentrate on the intensive reading of primary sources, providing advanced language instruction and enhancing understanding of a key element of Chinese culture. Sources will be chosen from all periods of Daoist history and from a variety of genres, including liturgies, spirit revelations, ordination documents, inspired poetry, demonologies, hagiographies, epigraphy, and sacred geographies. Our goal is to familiarize seminar participants with the wide variety of Daoist literature, and to give them the basic skills to read and evaluate Daoist documents. It is hoped that this will expand Daoism's presence in the curriculum and foster new studies of Daoism's significance to all aspects of Chinese civilization and society.

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$135,815 (approved)
$122,707 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 3/31/2016


FS-50353-13

Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)
Mustafa Aksakal (Project Director: March 2013 to May 2015)
World War I in the Middle East

A four-week college and university faculty summer seminar for sixteen participants to study World War I in the Middle East.

Famine, disease, and mass murder swept across the Middle East like a tidal wave during the First World War. While Ottoman soldiers shared the horrors of trench warfare that French, Germans, and British faced on the Western Front, Middle Eastern civilians suffered catastrophe on a scale reached in Europe only during the Second World War. Mortality rates of the common soldier were almost double those of his German allies. Yet, the suffering in the Middle East has found little mention in the numerous histories of World War I. And only now have specialists in the Middle East found access to archives to begin filling in this story, crucial to understanding both the history of the Great War as a whole, and the history of the Middle East in the 20th century. We propose to bring disparate scholars together and to acquaint them with the latest research in an enhanced reprise of our highly praised 2012 seminar.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$127,422 (approved)
$113,430 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014


FS-50357-13

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
David W. Foster (Project Director: March 2013 to December 2014)
Jewish Buenos Aires

A three-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty on Argentine Jewish literature and culture, to be held in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The seminar will focus on major texts in twentieth-century Jewish culture as it has played out in the contest of immigration and assimilation in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the major center of Jewish culture in Latin America. Through a detailed examination of these works as literary texts that interpret the Jewish experience in Buenos Aires, the seminar will provide participants with an important grounding in this important dimension of ethnic culture in Argentina and, by implication, in other Latin American societies. Participants will be college and university professors of Latin American studies plus up to two advanced doctoral students, some of whom may have some familiarity with Argentina; all will have a working command of Spanish. Latin American Jewish Studies is a relatively recent area of interest to Latin Americanists, and the seminar will contribute toward addressing the critical lack of trained scholars in the field.

Project fields:
Latin American Languages

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$106,657 (approved)
$97,382 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014


FS-50358-13

Kenyon College (Gambier, OH 43022-5020)
Sarah Blick (Project Director: March 2013 to November 2014)
Laura D. Gelfand (Co Project Director: August 2013 to November 2014)
Arts, Architecture, and Devotional Interaction in England, 1200-1600

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to explore the relationship between art and devotional practices in medieval England.

This four-week NEH Summer Seminar for College Teachers held in York, England, will provide participants with an extraordinary opportunity to explore how and why artwork and architecture produced between 1200-1600 engaged devotees and others in dramatic new forms of physical and emotional interaction. In the past decade scholars working across diverse disciplines in the humanities have been examining the role performativity, sensual engagement, and dynamic kinetic action played in medieval devotions. Emotion and imagination were fundamental to the success or failure of devotional materials and the flurry of recent scholarship on the topic have given us a new understanding of the Middle Ages and Renaissance that is tremendously appealing to faculty and students in university classrooms across the country. The seminar, visiting historic sites and museums, often in the company of renowned experts, will make this topic come alive for participants, enhancing their scholarship.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$132,908 (approved)
$132,908 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014


FS-50369-13

George Washington University (Washington, DC 20052-0001)
Dina R. Khoury (Project Director: March 2013 to May 2016)
The Late Ottoman and Russian Empires: Citizenship, Belonging, and Difference

A three-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers to explore comparative dimensions of citizenship and related issues in the late Ottoman and Russian empires.

Three-week scholarly and cross-disciplinary summer seminar investigating the common understandings of citizenship, communal belonging and political activism, within the Ottoman and Russian historiographies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,185 (approved)
$100,184 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2015


FS-50306-12

Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)
John F. Heil (Project Director: March 2012 to September 2014)
Metaphysics and Mind

A five-week seminar for sixteen higher education faculty to engage with topics in metaphysics and philosophy of mind.

Despite impressive advances in the neurosciences, fundamental questions in the philosophy of mind remain as elusive as ever. This is due in part to metaphysical baggage we carry with us when we set out to understand mind-body interaction, for instance, or the qualitative nature of consciousness. Unacknowledged metaphysical presuppositions constrain the space of possible answers in ways that make the hard questions even harder. The seminar I am proposing would encourage a fresh look at the territory by starting with a discussion of basic metaphysical issues, and working up to a consideration of the place of minds in the world as revealed by the sciences. The aim is to provide participants with an opportunity to think more critically about their own tacit metaphysical assumptions and the bearing of these on their conceptions of the mind and its place in the natural world.

Project fields:
Metaphysics

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$125,552 (approved)
$82,626 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013


FS-50307-12

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
David W. Foster (Project Director: March 2012 to November 2014)
Brazilian Literature: Twentieth-Century Urban Fiction

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty, in São Paolo to study literature that reflects Brazil's dynamic and increasingly urban culture.

The seminar focuses on five major works of Brazilian urban fiction. Through a detailed examination of these works as literary texts that interpret the urban experience in Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Curitiba, and Porto Alegre, the seminar provides participants with an important grounding in Brazilian literature. Participants will be college and university professors; some may have familiarity with Brazil. The latter will deepen their knowledge of Brazilian literature, while other participants will receive a solid introduction to Brazilian culture. Portuguese remains a critical language in the U.S., and the seminar proper will contribute to addressing the critical lack of trained scholars in the field. This project falls within the purview of the Bridging Cultures initiative because of the continuity of cultural institutions throughout the Americas, and because of the presence of Brazilian immigrant communities in major U.S. states like Massachusetts, New York, Florida, and California.

Project fields:
Latin American Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$137,110 (approved)
$126,155 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013


FS-50308-12

Calvin University (Grand Rapids, MI 49546-4388)
Karin Yvonne Maag (Project Director: March 2012 to May 2017)
Persecution, Toleration, Co-Existence: Early Modern Responses to Religious Pluralism

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty on the varied responses to religious pluralism in the early modern era.

This four-week seminar for college and university teachers (July 15-August 9, 2013) assesses how early modern Europeans dealt with competing truth claims upheld by rival believers, whether Catholics, Lutherans, Reformed, Anabaptists, Jews, or Muslims. Seminar participants will begin with an overview of religious pluralism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. They will then consider three possible reactions: persecution, in which believers from one group tried to suppress other views; toleration, which allowed for limited legal recognition of religious minorities under restricted conditions; and co-existence, which often took root informally within communities where no single faith group was predominant. By the end of the seminar, through reading and discussing key texts and researching the issues, participants will be better equipped to address the history of responses to religious pluralism and bring this training to bear in their classrooms, scholarship and public discourse.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$107,838 (approved)
$105,892 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013


FS-50310-12

Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Stephen C. Behrendt (Project Director: March 2012 to March 2015)
Reassessing British Romanticism

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to study British Romanticism in light of evolving scholarship.

This 5-week Summer Seminar for College Teachers combines a common set of readings and directed discussion with individual research projects to help participants reassess the historical influences upon modern conceptions of "British Romanticism" of extra-literary factors involving political, economic, scientific, moral, gender and class considerations, especially as affected by recent revisionist scholarship in those areas and in traditional literary and cultural studies. Members will participate in comparative study of selected primary literary works and contemporary reviews of them in light of both recent interdisciplinary literary, cultural and theoretical scholarship and the diverse ongoing recovery projects that are expanding and reconfiguring the literary landscape of Romantic-era Britain. The seminar revisits - aiming to reconceptualize and redefine - issues of literary judgment, canonical status and varieties of audience response involved in British Romantic literary production.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$117,198 (approved)
$110,298 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013


FS-50312-12

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Clare Lois Carroll (Project Director: March 2012 to November 2014)
Researching Early Modern Manuscripts and Printed Books

A four-week seminar for sixteen higher education faculty to study the history of manuscript production and bookmaking during the early modern period.

"Researching Early Modern Manuscripts and Printed Books" will teach codicology, paleography, analytical bibliography, textual editing, and the study of book catalogues for the early modern period in order to give the participants the skills that they need to do research in early modern studies. We will be studying how such techniques can actually change the research questions, and in turn change not only the interpretation of individual texts but also of long held interpretations of major authors, intellectual traditions, and historical movements of the early modern period. The participants will do research in some of the greatest collections of early modern manuscripts and books in America with guidance from expert curators and literary scholars and historians who will demonstrate how the techniques of book history have shaped their research. This experience should lead to continued research and collaboration between academics and curators and librarians for years to come.

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$157,807 (approved)
$141,665 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013


FS-50321-12

American Academy in Rome (New York, NY 10021-4905)
John A. Davis (Project Director: March 2012 to September 2014)
Italy in the Age of the Risorgimento: New Perspectives on Unification

A five-week seminar for college and university faculty on the Risorgimento, the nineteenth-century quest to form a unified nation-state in Italy.

The city of Rome and the American Academy in Rome provide ideal settings for an intensive five week seminar for college teachers and researchers on the Italian Risorgimento. A version of this seminar first ran in 2003, since then the construction of the 19th-century Italian nation-state has become as major focal point for students of modern nationalist movements. The new seminar program has been revised to take account of this remarkable body of new studies and draws on the experience of the previous seminar and the constructive comments of the 2003 participants. Making extensive use of the city of Rome as a historical site and benefiting from the facilities of the AAR, the seminar offers college teachers a unique opportunity to study the ways in which new perspectives in humanities scholarship are reshaping understanding of Italy's unification, its place in the history of modern Italy and of modern nationalist movements.

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$131,407 (approved)
$112,930 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013


FS-50333-12

Mangalam Centers (Berkeley, CA 94704-1418)
Luis Gomez (Project Director: March 2012 to June 2016)
Understanding Buddhism Through its Classic Texts

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to study classical Buddhist texts in the context of their translation and transmission.

Inspired by the NEH "Bridging Cultures" initiative, the proposed 4-week seminar "Understanding Buddhism Through its Classic Texts" will introduce participants to a variety of texts in order to examine how Buddhist literary traditions were transmitted in the past, how they relate to the interests of the contemporary world, and how issues of translation impact the teaching of traditions that developed in isolation from our own. The seminar has two fundamental goals: (1) to introduce participants to the critical study and use of complex, multivalent texts and terms in the context of the Buddhist tradition, and (2) to increase understanding of the special challenges of speaking, thinking, and teaching cross-culturally, bringing indigenous technical terms and discussions into dialogue with the critical tools of a Western academic approach through a close reading of selected passages or complete texts.

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$109,909 (approved)
$107,455 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013

Funding details:
Original grant (2012) $93,409
Supplement (2013) $14,046


FS-50335-12

Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Daniel Karpowitz (Project Director: April 2012 to April 2016)
Faculty Seminar Program, Bard Prison Initiative

A yearlong seminar, meeting twice monthly, for Bard faculty on the role of the humanities in the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI).

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 6/30/2013


FS-50275-11

James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA 22807-0001)
Mark Rankin (Project Director: March 2011 to April 2016)
John N. King (Co Project Director: March 2011 to April 2016)
Tudor Books and Readers, 1485-1603

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to study book construction and print culture in the Tudor era, held in Antwerp, London, and Oxford.

Over the course of five weeks in 2012, this overseas program would investigate the physical construction of books and the nature of reading during the era of the Tudor monarchs (1485-1603). We take an expansive view of this epoch in that we look back to the origins of English printing when William Caxton, the dominant force during the formative period of the Tudor book trade, founded his press at Westminster, just outside London, in 1476. So also, we would give thought to how Tudor book culture gave rise to three vitally important publications during the years following the end of the Tudor dynasty: the King James Bible and the collected works of the best-known Tudor authors, William Shakespeare and Edmund Spenser, the epic poet of Elizabethan England.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$179,392 (approved)
$179,392 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 6/30/2013


FS-50279-11

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Joseph E. Bristow (Project Director: March 2011 to April 2016)
Oscar Wilde and His Circle

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to explore the life, work, and cultural milieu of Oscar Wilde.

"Oscar Wilde and His Circle" is a five-week summer seminar that allows participants to explore the life and work of Oscar Wilde in relation to the largest archive devoted to this legendary Irish writer in the world. The archive, which is also titled "Oscar Wilde and His Circle", is housed at UCLA's William Andrews Clark Memorial Library. The seminar aims to provide participants with an in-depth understanding of the development of Wilde's often lively career from his time as a gifted undergraduate at Oxford to his post-prison exile in France and Italy. Particular attention will be paid to manuscript and archival sources that throw unique light not only on his literary writings but also such events as his widely publicized year-long lecture tour of Canada and the United States in 1882. Especially significant is the experience participants will acquire in using the resources of a major rare book library when conducting advanced research in the humanities.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$136,856 (approved)
$136,502 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2012


FS-50280-11

Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)
Christopher Heath Wellman (Project Director: March 2011 to September 2014)
Andrew Altman (Co Project Director: March 2011 to September 2014)
Liberty, Equality, and Justice: Philosophical Problems in Domestic and Global Contexts

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members examining the meanings of liberty, equality, and justice, and the applications of these concepts within and between nations.

Liberal democracies such as the United States aspire to treat their members as free and equal citizens. Determining precisely what this means in today's world, however, is a difficult matter. Even if one agrees that political regimes must organize themselves in a liberal democratic fashion (and not everyone does, of course), it remains controversial as to when someone is free, what equality requires, and how conflicts among these two core values should be adjudicated. What is more, as interesting and important as these issues are, some of the most pressing and difficult questions in today's geo-political context concern not how liberal democracies should treat their own citizens, but how they should interact with foreigners and their states. The chief purpose of this seminar is to enable its participants to understand and contribute to the current debates on these questions and to bring their understanding of these debates to their teaching, research and public service.

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$129,472 (approved)
$126,172 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2012


FS-50281-11

American University (Washington, DC 20016-8200)
Mustafa Aksakal (Project Director: March 2011 to September 2013)
Elizabeth Florence Thompson (Co Project Director: August 2011 to September 2013)
World War I in the Middle East

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to explore World War I in the Middle East.

With the approach of the war’s centennial in 2014, we propose this seminar to launch “World War I in the Middle East” as a distinct subfield of historical study. We aim to consolidate the growing, but fragmented body of existing research, inspire new avenues of inquiry, and begin a holistic reassessment of the war, based upon a fuller appreciation of the role played by the Middle East. We will do so by uniting scholars from disparate subfields and by building a website to perpetuate contact among them. Our seminar takes a holistic view of the war. It ties together operational history with the state’s political program of national mobilization and social developments across a region stretching from the Balkans to Libya, the Caucasus to the Persian Gulf. We emphasize the interconnection of these different levels of history in our exploration of the totality of the war.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$123,500 (approved)
$106,287 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2012


FS-50282-11

American Academy in Rome (New York, NY 10021-4905)
Richard J. A. Talbert (Project Director: March 2011 to May 2014)
Michael R. Maas (Co Project Director: March 2011 to May 2014)
Communication, Empire, and the City of Rome

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to study the system of communication in imperial Rome.

The city of Rome stood as the symbolic and practical center point of the ancient world’s most successful and long-lived imperial system. This five-week seminar, to be co-directed by Richard Talbert (UNC Chapel Hill) and Michael Maas (Rice University), is a topic now attracting avid attention from scholars, but it has not been investigated before as a unified phenomenon in a Roman imperial context. It addresses questions fundamental to our understanding of the ancient Roman empire including: What demands for communication does such a vast state create? How, in an age before telecommunications and rapid transportation, could an imperial system manifest its sovereignty and enable the circulation of personnel, ideas, and material goods? This approach should appeal not only to faculty with a primary interest in the Romans, but also to those (teachers of World Civilizations, for example) who situate Rome’s achievements in a wider pre-modern context.

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$159,865 (approved)
$154,863 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2012


FS-50283-11

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Monica H. Green (Project Director: March 2011 to November 2014)
Rachel E. Scott (Co Project Director: March 2011 to November 2014)
Health and Disease in The Middle Ages

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to explore the intersections of religion, economics, and medicine in the midieval interpretation and treatment of disease.

“Health and Disease in the Middle Ages” will be a five-week seminar for college and university teachers to be held June 17-July 21, 2012, in London, England. Administered by the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and based physically at the Wellcome Library in London—the world’s premier research center for medical history—this Seminar will gather scholars from across the disciplines interested in fundamental humanistic questions of health and disease. A primary goal of “Health and Disease in the Middle Ages” will be to explore how scientific technologies of assessing disease prevalence and identifying pathogens (particularly leprosy and plague) can inform humanistic methods (historical, literary, art historical, and linguistic) of interpreting health-seeking behaviors and cultural responses to disease. This Seminar, co-directed by a historian and a bioarcheologist, connects with the NEH’s “Bridging Cultures” initiative.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$177,757 (approved)
$166,081 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2012

Funding details:
Original grant (2011) $0
Supplement (2011) $-1,677


FS-50299-11

University of Missouri, Columbia (Columbia, MO 65211-3020)
Devoney K. Looser (Project Director: March 2011 to November 2014)
Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to study the works of Jane Austen and other writers of her time.

This proposed 5-week seminar(June 18–July 20, 2012) sets out to demonstrate that new insights can be realized about Jane Austen when reading her closely alongside the once well-known—writers of her own time. Whether we are seeking to understand Austen’s fictional techniques, political views, religious beliefs, reception in her lifetime, or posthumous reputation, we stand to learn a great deal by reading her in newly emerging contexts. This seminar will have a two-pronged emphasis: 1) undertaking collective close reading and discussion of primary texts by Austen in tandem with those of her once-celebrated contemporaries and 2) providing tools for pursuing advanced study of Austen among the now-understudied authors of this era, using both digital and traditional archival research techniques. Seminar members will have the opportunity to make new discoveries about these writers and to advance their own independent research, editorial, pedagogical,or curatorial projects.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$119,658 (approved)
$119,658 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 6/30/2014


FS-50300-11

Texas A & M Research Foundation (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
Richard J. Golsan (Project Director: March 2011 to April 2016)
France's Haunting Past: Recent Debates on Twentieth Century French History and National Identity

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to examine recent debates in France concerning the Vichy Regime and the Holocaust.

This Seminar will examine recent debates in France concerning Vichy and the history of World War II and the Holocaust; decolonization and the Algerian War; the history and memory of Communism’s crimes; and changing perceptions of World War I and commemorative practices associated with it.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$163,319 (approved)
$163,252 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2012