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19 matches

Program: Seminars for College Teachers*
Date range: 2014-2016
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FS-250327-16

Westminster College, PA (New Wilmington, PA 16172-0001)
Bethany Hicok (Project Director: 01/27/2016 to present)

Elizabeth Bishop and the Literary Archive

A three-week seminar for college and university faculty to study the work and archive of the American poet Elizabeth Bishop.

Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979) has emerged as one of the most studied and discussed American poets of the 20th century. The three-week NEH Summer Seminar for College and University Professors that Westminster College is proposing, Elizabeth Bishop and the Literary Archive, draws on the extensive Bishop archive at Vassar College (120 boxes, 3500 pages of drafts of poems and prose, hundreds of letters to many of the major poets and writers of the twentieth century, notebooks, memorabilia and artwork) in order to approach broader questions on teaching, research, and writing in the humanities. The goals of this seminar are to extend and deepen our knowledge and understanding about Bishop, her circle, and literary history; introduce and develop new methods of interdisciplinary teaching and research in the humanities; strengthen the academic discourse surrounding the ethics of archival research; and develop a deeper understanding of how social issues affect artistic expression.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$105,414 (approved)
$105,414 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


FS-250646-16

Huntington Library (San Marino, CA 91108-1299)
Mark Rankin (Project Director: 02/16/2016 to present)

The Formation and Re-formation of the Book: 1450-1650

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty that would examine development of the book between 1450 and 1650.

We are pleased to propose a four-week-long Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers on “The Formation and Re-formation of the Book: 1450-1650.” Sponsored by The Huntington Library, this program will investigate the gradual transformation of the production, dissemination, and reading of Western European books during the two centuries that followed the mid-fifteenth-century invention of printing with movable type on hand-operated presses. We shall investigate the impact of the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Reformation (or Counter-Reformation) on the reshaping of the organization and material nature of books during a turbulent era of religious, intellectual, literary, and cultural change. We plan to consider multiple “Reformations” with respect not only to Protestant and Catholic book publication, but also the gradual re-forming of the production, dissemination, and reading of books, in addition to paradigm-shifting treatises that spurred the Scientific Revolution.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$129,535 (approved)
$129,535 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FS-250766-16

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Benjamin Johnson (Project Director: 02/19/2016 to present)

Bridging National Borders in North America

A four-week summer seminar for college and university faculty on the historical development of territorial boundaries and national borders in North America.

This application proposes an NEH Summer Seminar for faculty on the history of borderlands in North America, to be held at the Newberry Library from July 10, 2017 to August 4, 2017. Borderlands studies have emerged from their conceptual cradle, New Spain’s northern frontier, to serve as an analytic concept for illuminating contact zones across the wider North American continent and beyond. The seminar’s organizing theme is the process of border-making. We will examine three aspects of this theme: how nation-states claiming exclusive territorial sovereignty re-drew the continent’s map; the intersection and sometimes collision of these efforts with other ways of organizing space and people; and the social and political consequences of the enforcement of national territoriality. The seminar’s format, readings, and guest scholars have been selected with the goal of bringing together participants with diverse scholarly agendas into a common conversation about these developments.

Project fields:
Latino History; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$134,242 (approved)
$134,242 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FS-250796-16

CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)
Jonathan Jacobs (Project Director: 02/23/2016 to present)

Will, Commandment, and Human Perfection in Medieval Jewish Philosophy

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers to study key ideas on the will and moral agency in Saadia Gaon and Moses Maimonides.

This is an in-depth exploration of key ideas concerning the will, moral agency, and moral epistemology in two key figures in medieval Jewish philosophy Saadia Gaon and Moses Maimonides. Saadia largely set the agenda for medieval Jewish philosophy and Maimonides is its most influential thinker—his influence continuing to today. Their views of volition, relations between reason and revelation, and the role of tradition in transmitting moral knowledge are relevant to enduring debates in moral epistemology. Though they discuss many of the same fundamental issues their methods differ and Maimonides is critical of Saadia’s conception of the rational justification of revealed law. Their respective conceptions of “the reasons for the commandments” are key elements of their views and there are important contrasts with conceptions of natural law. Aquinas’ “Questions on Law” will be discussed, to highlight diverse views of the rational justification of moral requirements.

Project fields:
Ethics; History of Philosophy

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$118,937 (approved)
$118,937 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


FS-250826-16

University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Nancy Young (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Gender, the State, and the 1977 International Women’s Year Conference

A one-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers on the National Women’s Conference of 1977 and its impact on American public life.

We propose to host a one-week summer seminar for college and university instructors, which explores the only federally funded policy convention devoted to women's issues. The National Women's Conference of 1977 provides an opportunity to study the juncture of gender, party politics, and the state in the late 20th century. Gender dynamics shifted alongside changes in cultural attitudes, institutional barriers, workplace practices, and political behavior. The conference offers a fresh vantage point through which to study the 1970s, a pivotal but understudied decade. This seminar will unpack the influences on and legacy of the conference. The seminar is designed to bring into conversation a broad range of political, legal, economic, and socio-cultural historiography, which we will read and discuss with the seminar participants. The seminar content will also draw together regional and transnational themes, and engage digital and public history alongside traditional methodology.

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$71,678 (approved)
$71,678 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


FS-250855-16

SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)
Richard Cohen (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Emmanuel Levinas on Morality, Justice, and the Political

A one-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers on the ethical and political philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas.

This proposal is for a one-week seminar for college and university teachers on the ethical and political philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995). Levinas is now accounted one of the most important philosophers of the 20th century for having re-grounded knowledge and politics in ethics, and ethics in responsibility: being-for-the-other before being for oneself. The seminar will be at the University at Buffalo (SUNY) in July of 2017. It is designed for colleagues seeking sustained intellectual engagement with Levinas’s thought as a profound and relevant re-framing of the relationships between morality, justice and the political.

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$80,994 (approved)
$70,338 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FS-250939-16

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Richard Strier (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

King Lear and Shakespeare Studies

A three-week seminar for college faculty to explore a range of topics in Shakespeare studies through a close reading of King Lear.

This seminar will provide its participants with the opportunity to get up to speed with the latest developments and some of the history of Shakespeare studies by focusing on one of his greatest plays: King Lear.

Project fields:
English

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$77,693 (approved)
$77,693 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


FS-231075-15

Kent State University Main Campus (Kent, OH 44242-0001)
Susanna Fein (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers on Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

We propose a four-week Seminar for College Teachers on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, to be held July 18-August 13, 2016, at Kent State University. The focus of the Seminar is on careful reading of the Canterbury Tales in light of current research in Chaucer studies and medieval literary studies more generally. Writing two centuries before Shakespeare, Chaucer is one of the foundational literary voices in the English language. His subjects include science and faith, art and society, philosophy and human nature. A superb fashioner of words and ideas, he is a poet whose work rewards each new encounter. Alongside daily meetings, the Seminar will feature visits by three senior scholars and a visit to the medieval collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art, hosted by the Curator of Medieval Art. The Seminar readings will encourage collegial discussion while satisfying the research, instructional, and professional interests of college teachers.

Project fields:
British Literature; Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$114,616 (approved)
$100,111 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FS-231090-15

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Olivier Zunz (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Exploring American Democracy, with Alexis de Tocqueville as Guide

A two-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers to engage in a close reading of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America.

A two-week seminar for college and university teachers on Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (1835, 1840) to be held at the University of Virginia in summer 2016. The seminar is designed for colleagues looking for sustained intellectual engagement with this profound and still unsurpassed study of democracy as both political system and social form. No political thinker has delved into the question of the “common good” more profoundly than Alexis de Tocqueville. For Tocqueville, the idea of the common good was the result of a society’s reflection upon itself, a reflection guided by the light of the Tocquevillean concept of “self-interest properly understood.” Tocqueville's insights penetrate to the heart of the “liberal democratic values” frequently invoked in contemporary political debate but less frequently examined. This two-week seminar aims to unpack the meaning of those values and show how they bear on contemporary debates.

Project fields:
History, General; Political Theory; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$75,368 (approved)
$75,346 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


FS-231100-15

Winthrop University (Rock Hill, SC 29733-7001)
Laura Gardner (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)

Take Note and Remember: The Commonplace Book and Its American Descendants

A two-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers to explore the development of the commonplace book and regional examples of its American descendants.

Feeling overwhelmed with facts, figures, data, details, and experiences is not unique to the digital age. Commonplace books and their descendant, the scrapbook, came into being for just that reason. We have two primary goals for our seminar: 1. To create a learning community of humanities scholars with whom we will look closely at examples of material culture. We will put them into historical context to ground theoretical discussion of commonplacing and scrapbooking. And 2: To research previously overlooked material found in Western North Carolina regional collections, artifacts that may have been passed over as insignificant by prevailing standards of the past. We will take a look at this material with a fresh eye - move it to the center to study from various disciplines - to look at what was being collected and why. We will examine closely material that is no longer looked at as detritus, but rather as attempts to make sense of life.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$93,129 (approved)
$85,105 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


FS-231135-15

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Lori Branch (Project Director: 02/23/2015 to present)
Mark Knight (Co Project Director: 08/17/2015 to present)

Postsecular Studies and the Rise of the English Novel, 1719-1897

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers to explore new accounts of the rise of the English novel through the lens of six works written between 1719 and 1897.

Postsecular studies and the "religious turn" in the humanities recognize the need for more complex accounts of the relationship between religion and the secular in modernity. Our seminar focuses on the implications of postsecular studies for our understanding of the English Novel (1719-1897). Literary scholars have traditionally seen the rise of the novel as a clear sign of secularization. Although there are good reasons for this, as we will acknowledge, religion does not disappear in 18th- and 19th-century fiction, and we need to expand our histories and theories of the novel to better understand the changing roles played by religion in modernity. Following the classic NEH seminar format, our four-week seminar will meet three mornings a week to discuss six representative novels and a range of interdisciplinary work on postsecular studies. Through shared conversations, the seminar will provide a stimulating environment to participants' individual projects on related topics.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$139,000 (approved)
$126,878 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 5/31/2017


FS-231189-15

St. Mary's College of Maryland (St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3002)
Betul Basaran (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Transcending Boundaries: The Ottoman Empire, Europe, and the Mediterranean World, 1500 - 1800

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty on the Ottoman Empire and Mediterranean world in the early modern era.

The four-week NEH summer seminar offers college and university professors an opportunity to integrate stimulating approaches toward Ottoman, European and Mediterranean history. Recent scholarship problematizes the notion of a pre-modern world composed of isolated blocks in constant conflict with each other, promoting instead the idea of an uncentered transcultural region of intense interaction and exchange. This focus on global encounters urges us to revisit the role of the Ottoman Empire in European and Mediterranean history and to incorporate the latest insights into our research and teaching in the humanities. Indeed, when we move away from essentializing contrasts, Ottoman relations with the rest of Europe assume a startling character. Such a perspective reveals a relationship in which the ideological walls that seemed to divide Christian Europe from the Ottoman Empire instead become the framework to a rich and intricate web of interactions.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Near and Middle Eastern History; Women's History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$120,774 (approved)
$103,244 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FS-231220-15

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James Akerman (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Mapping, Text, and Travel

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to explore the scholarly connections between mapping, texts, and travel.

The Newberry Library’s Hermon Smith Center for the History of Cartography seeks funding for a five-week summer seminar for college and university faculty in 2016 that will examine the interplay between mapping and the history and literary culture of travel from the fifteenth through the twentieth centuries. "Mapping, Text, and Travel," led by James Akerman (The Newberry Library) and Jordana Dym (Skidmore College) will discuss the relationship between mapping, wayfinding, describing, and narrating the experience of travel as manifested in separately published maps, atlases, guidebooks, travel narratives, and travel fiction. Drawing on the Newberry's rich holdings of cartography, travel accounts, and guidebooks, the seminar will offer 16 participants an opportunity to cross disciplinary, regional, and chronological boundaries to reflect on the ways in which mapping has shaped travelers’ imagination and the experience of place and landscape, of identity and history, and of time and space.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$160,169 (approved)
$158,936 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


FS-50379-14

Whittier College (Whittier, CA 90601-4446)
Gustavo Geirola (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Latin American Theater Today: Aesthetics and Performance

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers on contemporary Latin American theater as stage production and as literature.

Project fields:
Latin American Languages; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$113,432 (approved)
$106,808 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


FS-50390-14

California State University, Bakersfield (Bakersfield, CA 93311-1022)
Charles MacQuarrie (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The Irish Sea Cultural Province: Crossroads of Medieval Literature and Languages

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to study the cultural and linguistic confluence of five distinct but related populations of the medieval British Isles.

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$149,260 (approved)
$149,260 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


FS-50392-14

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Roger Waldinger (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The Cross-Border Connection: Immigrants, Emigrants, and their Homelands

A five-week summer seminar for sixteen college and university faculty on international migration in historical perspective.

Project fields:
Sociology

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$128,580 (approved)
$128,580 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


FS-50394-14

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Jonathan Wilcox (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

The Materiality of Medieval Manuscripts: Interpretation Through Production

A four-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to explore the production of manuscripts and the role of these works in medieval culture.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Literature, Other; Medieval History; Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$141,286 (approved)
$134,678 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2016


FS-50395-14

Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI 49546-4388)
Daniel Bays (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

America and China: 150 Years of Aspirations and Encounters

A three-week summer seminar for sixteen college and university teachers on U.S.-China political and cultural relations from the 1850s to the present.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$113,222 (approved)
$105,558 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


FS-50396-14

Sarah Lawrence College (Bronxville, NY 10708-5999)
Komozi Woodard (Project Director: 03/07/2014 to present)

Rethinking Black Freedom Studies in the Jim Crow North

A two-week college and university faculty summer seminar for sixteen participants on African-American freedom movements beyond the U.S. South.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$104,981 (approved)
$104,853 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2016