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Funded Projects Query Form
11 matches

Program: Seminars for College Teachers*
Date range: 2017-2019
Sort order: Award year, descending

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FS-267096-19

University of Denver (Denver, CO 80208-0001)
Andrea L. Stanton (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Rebecca Paige Scales (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Alejandra Marina Bronfman (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Radio and Decolonization: Bringing Sound into 20th-Century History

A two-week seminar for 16 college and university faculty on the role of radio broadcasting and sound technologies in 20th-century history, with a focus on the era of decolonization.

This project proposes a two-week NEH summer seminar, aimed at higher education faculty members, including graduate students and contract or contingent faculty. To be hosted at the University of Denver in Summer 2020, this seminar brings together three trained historians whose work focuses on sound and radio broadcasting, and who have professional homes in three different disciplines (area studies, history, and religious studies). It aims to support participants in studying the roles of sound in 20th century history, using radio broadcasting as a key case study, and in developing initiatives for incorporating sound and material evidence of sound into their pedagogy.

Project fields:
Communications; Cultural History; Political History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$81,072 (approved)
$81,072 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


FS-267118-19

SUNY Research Foundation, University at Buffalo (Amherst, NY 14228-2577)
Richard A. Cohen (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
James M. McLachlan (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics of Democracy

A One-week seminar for 16 college and university faculty on Levinas and democracy.

One-week Seminar for College and University Teachers, to be held at the University at Buffalo (SUNY), July 20-24, 2020, for sixteen participants. Director: Richard A. Cohen; Co-Director: James McLachlan; Co-Organizer: Jolanta Saldukaityte. Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995) is now accounted one of the most important philosophers of the 20th century for having grounded meaning, truth and politics in an ethics rooted in the obligations of moral responsibility: putting the other person first. The Seminar will present and discuss Levinas’s thought as a profound and relevant framing to grasp the interrelationships which bind freedom to democracy and democracy to ethics.

Project fields:
Phenomenology Existentialism; Political Theory

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$63,789 (approved)
$63,789 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


FS-267176-19

San Diego State University Research Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-0001)
Erika Robb Larkins (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Kathryn Margaret Sanchez (Co Project Director: September 2019 to present)
The Making of Modern Brazil

A three-week seminar for higher education faculty on race and place in contemporary Brazilian history and culture.

This seminar will introduce scholars to the social, racial and cultural diversity of Brazil. We will discuss the aftermath of colonization and slavery in the Americas, the emergence of racial ideologies and contrasting images of urban and rural spaces. Through an exploration of scholarly sources like films, music, ethnographic texts, fiction and historical images and documents, we will examine topics such as modernity, racial politics, and urban spaces, along with social and cultural marginality, gender, class, and ethnicity. Participants will learn to include Brazil in their own courses and research by producing a module/syllabus or draft research project reflecting the themes and issues discussed. Beyond expanding and deepening the scholars' knowledge and understanding of Brazil, the seminar will enable colleagues to develop new insights for interdisciplinary teaching extending beyond Latin America, as many themes are applicable to developing areas of the world and the United States.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Latin American Languages; Latin American Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$105,000 (approved)
$105,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


FS-261503-18

University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Willem A. deVries (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
James R. O'Shea (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Philosophical Responses to Empiricism in Kant, Hegel, and Sellars

A four-week seminar for college and university faculty exploring the philosophical responses to empiricism of Kant, Hegel, and the 20th-century American philosopher Wilfrid Sellars, to be held at the University of New Hampshire.

18th century empiricism evoked a radical response from Kant and Hegel, the German Idealists, emphasizing the agency involved in knowledge and experience. 20th century empiricism evoked a parallel response from Wilfrid Sellars that has left its mark on contemporary philosophy. Juxtaposing readings from historical and contemporary sources, the central issues in this seminar concern the nature of sensory experience, the concepts used to make sense of it, the possibility of radical conceptual change, the role of the empirical sciences in ontology, and the sources of the normativity essential to human agency. Participants will also present their work in progress to the group for discussion.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Epistemology; History of Philosophy; Metaphysics

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$109,668 (approved)
$109,668 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FS-261646-18

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Shirley R. Samuels (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Sandra M. Gustafson (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Situating Democratic Writers in Western New York: Tocqueville, Cooper, Stanton, and Douglass

A two-week seminar for 16 college and university teachers to study the works of significant 19th-century writers in the historical and literary context of western New York.

"Situating Democratic Writers in Western New York" is a two-week seminar designed for advanced graduate students, recent PhDs, and established scholars. The seminar aims to develop fresh teaching and research approaches to classic works by authors including Alexis de Tocqueville, James Fenimore Cooper, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Frederick Douglass, situating them in a region that made important contributions to American democracy. The group will engage in a practice of situated reading, highlighting the historical context tied to the locale and juxtaposing familiar works with lesser-known texts from the area. Gustafson and Samuels, who are experienced editors, will confer with interested participants about organizing conference panels and publishing the product of their research in a special issue of a journal. The seminar will also focus on pedagogical questions, including how to incorporate non-canonical writings into courses, and how to address central texts of American democracy.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$80,160 (approved)
$80,160 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 3/31/2020


FS-261658-18

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James R. Akerman (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Peter Nekola (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Material Maps in the Digital Age, a Summer Seminar for College and University Faculty at the Newberry Library

A four-week seminar for 16 college and university faculty on the impact of the digital revolution on map literacy and humanities research and teaching with material maps.

Project fields:
Geography; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$124,941 (approved)
$124,941 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FS-261675-18

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Lori Branch (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Mark Knight (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Religion, Secularism, and the Novel

A three-week seminar for 16 college and university faculty examining the history of the novel as it relates to theses about the secularization of society or the continuing hold of religion on society, to be held at the University of Iowa.

Postsecular studies and the "religious turn" in the humanities speak to the need for more complex scholarly accounts of the relationship between religion and the secular in modernity. Our seminar focuses on the implications of postsecular studies for our understanding of the novel. Literary scholars have traditionally seen the rise of the novel as a clear sign of secularization. Although there are good reasons for this, as we will acknowledge, religion does not disappear in fiction, and we need to expand our histories and theories of the novel to better understand the changing roles played by religion in modernity. Following the classic NEH seminar format, our three-week seminar will meet three mornings a week to discuss five representative novels from the eighteenth century to the present and a range of interdisciplinary work on postsecular studies. Through shared conversations, the seminar will provide a stimulating environment to participants' individual projects on related topics.

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$105,000 (approved)
$105,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FS-256801-17

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Paul Cheney (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Enlightenment Thinkers: from Mandeville to Hegel

A three-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty examining Enlightenment political and social thought.

Invisible Bonds: The Enlightenment Science of Society from Mandeville to Hegel is a three-week seminar designed for college and university teachers in the humanities. We will look at the ways in which several eighteenth-century thinkers sought out alternatives to religious moral doctrine or state imposed force in their search for social stability. Believing that their own societies had become too large, complex, and pluralistic to impose solutions from above, Enlightenment social thinkers turned to the self-organizing potential of the market; to the other-regarding virtues that ripened in polite, commercial societies; and to the good government and progress ensured by the free discussion of ideas. These Enlightenment solutions resemble twenty-first century approaches; but we will ask, along with the Enlightenment thinkers we will examine in this course, whether they are a match for the anomic forces that are destabilizing society and politics in the Western world.

Project fields:
European History; Political Theory

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$110,694 (approved)
$110,694 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


FS-256837-17

Illinois Wesleyan University (Bloomington, IL 61701-1773)
Christopher John Callahan (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Courtly Lyric in the Medieval French Tradition

A three-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty on medieval French courtly lyric poetry, read dually as text and as music.

Christopher Callahan and William Hudson, faculty at Illinois Wesleyan University in French and Music, respectively, propose an interdisciplinary Summer Seminar on the trouvères, medieval France’s lyric poets (1180 – 1300). The seminar will foster collaboration between language/literature scholars and music faculty expanding their curriculum into the Middle Ages. Trouvère poetry requires a dual approach—as text and as music; the seminar is designed to bring each constituency to relative fluency in the other’s discipline. Studying themes introduced in trouvère poetry still relevant today such as love versus family obligation, gender and empowerment, and medievalism will improve integration with participants’ curricula. The participants will work from images of 13th-century manuscripts and learn to transcribe, analyze and interpret them, through recitation and song. Genres and styles of both poetry and music in this period and polyphonic motet settings will be studied.

Project fields:
French Literature; Medieval Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$128,528 (approved)
$128,528 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


FS-256885-17

Texas State University - San Marcos (San Marcos, TX 78666-4684)
Joseph Falocco (Project Director: March 2017 to December 2019)
Teaching Shakespeare's Plays

A one-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty on the language and staging of Shakespeare’s drama.

“Overcoming ‘Shakesfear’” will take place at the Curtain Theatre, a reconstructed Elizabethan playhouse on the outskirts of Austin, Texas. It will feature the participation of a company of student actors from Texas State University’s nationally recognized Theatre program. The objective of this Seminar is to familiarize participants with Shakespeare’s language and the original theatrical conventions with which his plays were first staged in order that they may better teach Shakespeare to their students. The seminar will involve some lectures by the Director and demonstrations by the student acting company and Visiting Faculty. As much as possible, however, seminarians will actively participate by paraphrasing, scanning, and rhetorically analyzing a piece of Shakespearean text and then presenting their analysis to the group; editing a Shakespearean scene and supervising its performance; and staging a different Shakespearean scene that poses specific challenges related to the architecture

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance Studies; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$63,300 (approved)
$59,969 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


FS-256932-17

Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Richard H. Davis (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
The Bhagavad Gita: Ancient Poem, Modern Readers

A three-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty on the Bhagavad Gita in its historical context, as well as what it has meant to modern readers, to be held at Yale University.

In this three-week seminar, sixteen college and university teachers will study intensively the Bhagavad Gita, an Indian religious classic from the early centuries C.E. The seminar will focus on the work in its original historical context and on how it has continued to live for modern readers. What is it that enables some of the works of the past to break across the boundaries of their own times? A religious work of undoubted longevity, the Bhagavad Gita and its history of readings will provide an excellent vantage point to consider this question. The seminar will be directed towards teachers in the various disciplines of the humanities, including religious studies , world literature, global history, and classics. Participants will examine how the Bhagavad Gita addresses perennial religious and humanistic concerns, and how modern readers have interpreted the work. Together we will consider how this ancient Indian work may be integrated into modern humanities undergraduate courses.

Project fields:
History of Religion; South Asian History; South Asian Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$91,328 (approved)
$91,328 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018