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Funded Projects Query Form
78 matches

Program: Preservation Assistance Grants*
Date range: 2017-2017
Sort order: Award year, descending

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PG-251136-17

Shepherd University (Shepherdstown, WV 25443-5000)
Christine Toms (Project Director: 04/11/2016 to present)

Scarborough Library at Shepherd University

A preservation assessment of approximately 390 linear feet of memorabilia, photographs, books, scrapbooks, correspondence, manuscripts, and maps related to the history of Shepherdstown, West Virginia, and Shepherd University, originally established as a normal school in 1871.

The Scarborough Library Preservation Needs Assessment project will address the short-, mid- and long-term preservation priorities of the Shepherd University Archives and Special Collections.  These preservation priorities will be determined through a preservation survey conducted by the Director of Preservation Services from the Northeast Document Conservation Center.  The Shepherd University Archives and Special Collections have never had a preservation needs assessment completed.  The Archives contain items that chronicle the legacy of the progress of education in West Virginia, the social and academic life of Shepherd University students, and the administrative process of higher education.  The Special Collections contain items that chronicle Shepherdstown and Jefferson County, West Virginia, Shepherdstown organizations, public education, individuals and families, and Storer College. Project will start February 2017 and end in June 2017.

Project fields:
History, Other; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,995 (approved)
$5,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


PG-252807-17

Edmond Historical Society & Museum (Edmond, OK 73034-3873)
Deborah Baker (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Preservation of Large Documents and Scrapbooks

The purchase of preservation supplies to create storage enclosures for the Edmond Historical Society and Museum’s collection of scrapbooks, documents, and small objects stored in flat file drawers. The collection documents the history of Edmond, Oklahoma, from its founding as a railway stop in 1889 through present times, and contains over 40,000 artifacts including documents, photographs, textiles, household goods, business memorabilia, furniture, and farm equipment. The museum’s research library is an especially rich resource, containing community directories and phonebooks dating back to 1920 along with complete sets of yearbooks from local high schools and the University of Central Oklahoma. Creating archival storage boxes for these and other materials was noted as a high priority during a 2015 Collection Preservation Plan.

The Edmond Historical Society and Museum (EHS&M) requests funds for the creation or purchase of storage enclosures for collections stored in flat file drawers and exceptional books in the museum’s Research Library. Collections at EHS&M consist of nearly 40,000 artifacts, photos and documents relating to the history of Edmond, Oklahoma before the Land Run days of 1889 to present. Recently completed lead-paint and asbestos remediation at the museum enabled staff to reorganize key storage locations, install high-density shelving and move the Research Library to a more inviting and accessible location, per recommendations in a Collection Preservation Plan completed in 2015. This request is targeted at providing appropriate archival housing to protect fragile and unique items, such as community scrapbooks. It will also allow for the inventory and archival housing of maps and large photographs which are currently difficult to retrieve due to poor organization and housing of these materials.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252840-17

Historic Sugartown, Inc. (Malvern, PA 19355-0623)
Heather Reiffer (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Emergency Preparedness & Response Plan Development for Historic Sugartown

A consultation with a preservation specialist to develop an emergency preparedness and response plan for the historic district of Sugartown, a restored 19th-century rural village that provided goods and services to its surrounding farming community.  Historic Sugartown’s collections are largely domestic, industrial, and agricultural artifacts.  Of note are the bookbinding tools and equipment once owned by rare book conservators Fred and Elke Shihadeh, including over 2,000 embossing tools from c. 1780-1850 manufactured in Philadelphia.  Considered one of the largest collections of its kind in the nation, these tools are studied by scholars and used as teaching resources during bookbinding classes and workshops.

Historic Sugartown, Inc. (HSI) respectfully requests a Preservation Assistance Grant of $6,000 to develop an Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan for HSI's ten structures and collections. Historic Sugartown's historic structures and collections offer visitors, students and scholars the opportunity to explore how America's growing economy and the vital need for transportation networks influenced the creation of rural communities in Chester County, Pennsylvania in the years following the American Revolution. The development of an Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan at Historic Sugartown will support the organization's strategic objective of enhancing the stewardship of its structures and collections, and will serve as a model for a wider effort to improve emergency preparedness among historical and cultural organizations in the Suburban Philadelphia region.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252850-17

Thomas Edison State University (Trenton, NJ 08608-1101)
Michele Stricker (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

New Jersey Cultural Alliance for Response Disaster Preparedness Training and Plans

Three workshops on disaster preparedness training in the preservation of humanities collections, to be offered by the New Jersey State Library in partnership with the New Jersey Cultural Alliance for Response (NJCAR). Workshops would be open to NJCAR member institutions and would focus on risk assessment, disaster plan development, salvage priorities, salvage methods, and wet material recovery. Of NJCAR’s 60 organizational members, 25 collect humanities materials and include small historical societies, municipal and university libraries, and mid-sized regional museums. Representative members include the North Jersey History and Genealogy Center of the Morristown and Morris Township Library, the Vietnam Era Museum and Educational Center at the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial, and the Hoboken Historical Museum. Training would be offered by the Digital and Preservation Services Department of LYRASIS.

The New Jersey State Library (NJSL), an affiliate of Thomas Edison State University, as a lead institution of the statewide membership organization, New Jersey Cultural Alliance for Response (NJCAR), proposes a project to provide disaster preparedness training for the humanities-collecting institutions of NJCAR. These 25 collecting institutions include small historical societies, municipal libraries, and mid-sized regional museums. NJSL will contract with Lyrasis, a preservation consultant, to present a two-session workshop in each of the three geographic areas of New Jersey. The two sessions will focus on risk assessment, salvage priorities and methods, and disaster plan development. At the end of the first session, workshop attendees will have learned the tools necessary for their “homework” of creating draft disaster plans for their institutions. At the second session six weeks later, attendees will review their plans together with the workshop leader and continue their training.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252854-17

Rowan University (Glassboro, NJ 08028-1702)
Rebecca Altermatt (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to 01/06/2017)
Sara Borden (Project Director: 01/06/2017 to present)

Preservation Assistance Grant for Campbell Library University Archives and Special Collections

A general preservation assessment of a collection of 11,000 books and 700 linear feet of manuscripts and documents, along with historic glassware, paintings, and other artworks.  Some highlights: materials related to the history of southern New Jersey and Philadelphia during the colonial period, including family diaries and correspondence and the records of Quaker abolitionist organizations; business records of a nearby glass factory and ironworks; and, from the more recent past, the papers of the Hollybush Summit between President Lyndon Johnson and Soviet Premier Aleksei Kosygin held at Glassboro State College in 1967.

Rowan University will retain the services of a consultant from the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) to prepare the general preservation assessment.  Established in 1977, CCAHA has grown to become the largest non-profit regional conservation center in the United States and specializes in the treatment of works of art and historic artifacts on paper. The assessment and resulting report will assist the archivists in developing a strategic plan for making collections accessible and determine digitization and conservation priorities.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252886-17

Nicholls State University (Thibodaux, LA 70310-6701)
Helen Thomas (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Preservation Assessment for Nicholls State University Archives and Special Collections

A preservation assessment of more than 12,000 linear feet of archival materials consisting of manuscripts, university records, newspapers, maps, rare books, and other items related to the history, politics, economy, culture, and geography of south Louisiana.

The Archives and Special Collections at Ellender Memorial Library, Nicholls State University, are comprised of manuscript materials and university records that provide resources for research in regional history and culture (as well as broader humanities based topics) to the university community and the general public. Of particular regional and national interest are the papers of Allen J. Ellender, who served in the U.S. Senate from 1937 to 1972. His papers contain documentation relating to his work with agriculture, foreign policy, and other historically significant legislation of the 20th century. Through this grant, the Archives seeks support to hire a consultant to perform a general preservation needs assessment for our collections and storage conditions. The grant will also support the purchase of data loggers to enable us to consistently and reliably monitor our collections storage environment, as well as archival quality film cans to rehouse at-risk films in our collection.

Project fields:
U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


PG-252893-17

Old Sturbridge Village (Sturbridge, MA 01566-1138)
Caitlin Emery (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Textile Conservation Assessment

A consultation with a textile conservator and her intern to assess the condition of 450 items of historic clothing housed in hanging storage, as well as the purchase of some rehousing supplies.  The textiles, in addition to the sizeable material culture collection held by the living history museum, document the daily lives of rural, inland New Englanders from 1790 to 1840.  While current exhibits focus on the 1830s, the museum collection and library holdings encompass artifacts that further the understanding and interpretation of early 19th-century life more broadly, reaching an estimated 250,000 students, families, tourists, and scholars every year.

Old Sturbridge Village's nationally known Museum Collection encompasses approximately 60,000 objects made or used in New England between 1790 and 1840. The 6,500 object collection of textiles and clothing is the second largest subset. Objects housed in hanging storage include men's and women's outerwear and dressing gowns; women's gowns, dresses, and petticoats; and men's shirts, vests, tailcoats and jackets, and militia coats. This project will enlist the expertise of an outside consultant to perform a conservation assessment of approximately 450 historic garments and the museum's current storage inadequacies and develop a plan for targeting immediate and long-term storage rectification within the collection of hanging textiles. Recommendations for future targeted conservation efforts will be outlined and focus on garments to be displayed as part of a comprehensive exhibition on fashion and textiles scheduled to open in 2018.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252915-17

Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (Hartford, CT 06105-3243)
Cynthia Cormier (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Upgrading Harriet Beecher Stowe House Light Protection

The purchase of 30 historic-looking, light-filtering linen shades for the interpreted public areas on the first and second floors of the home of writer Harriet Beecher Stowe, as well as nine light-blocking shades for the third-floor storage spaces.  The shades would protect historic artifacts in the home from damaging sunlight.  Furniture, clothing, dishware, and personal items belonging to the Stowe and Beecher families are used to demonstrate everyday routines and provide visitors with a way to connect to the historical themes presented—19th-century women’s history, African American history and racial attitudes in the United States, civic reform, and Stowe’s legacy as a writer—on a personal level.  The work of this heritage tourism site, program center, and research library reaches a wide variety of scholars, students, and members of the general public.

The Stowe Center seeks funding for upgraded light filtering and light blocking window shades for objects in the Harriet Beecher Stowe House, a National Historic Landmark and the home where Stowe lived for 23 years. The Center holds the largest collection of materials related to Stowe. The collections are nationally significant, illustrating Stowe's life and impact and the worldwide response to Uncle Tom's Cabin. The objects date from the late 18th century to the 1950s. 85% of the household objects belonged to Stowe or her family. This project will replace 39 failed window shades with historic-looking light filtering and blocking shades, which together with new interior mounted storm windows (not part of this application), will provide museum-standard light protection throughout the historic building. This project is scheduled following window improvements, environmental control upgrades, and fire suppression installation in the Stowe House to be completed in late spring 2017.

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252920-17

Rice County Historical Society (Lyons, KS 67554-2703)
Grace Evans (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Improving Storage by Rehousing the Collections of the Rice County Kansas Historical Society's Coronado Quivira Museum

A preservation workshop and the purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse 400 artifacts related to the history of Rice County, Kansas.  Collection items include Native American materials from the Quivira and Wichita tribes, and farm implements, glass objects, and utilitarian household items from the homesteading period.

The Rice County Historical Society is requesting $6,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation Assistance Grant for Smaller Institutions to support 1) the training of the collection manager and four volunteers and 2) the purchasing of preservation supplies which will be used to rehouse 400 personal adornment artifacts, utilitarian household items, and glass objects in the permanent collection.  The activities are based upon recommendations in the Conservation Assessment Program's collection survey conducted at the Rice County Historical Society's Coronado Quivira Museum, Lyons, Kansas, in August 2014 by conservator Mary Frederickson.  This project will further advance the preservation efforts which have taken place as a result of the CAP report.

Project fields:
History, General; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252946-17

Colorado Ski and Snowboard Museum and Hall of Fame (Vail, CO 81657-3616)
Dionisia Mathios (Project Director: 05/04/2016 to present)

Preservation of Historic Mountaineering Artifacts

The rehousing of the museum’s clothing and accessories collection related to recreational skiing, the Army’s 10th Mountain Division, the U.S. Forest Service and National Ski Patrol, and Olympic and Paralympic skiing.  They total 2,193 objects, which span the 1880s to the present and explore the history of skiing as a sport and method of transportation.  They include clothing, outerwear, technical base layers, and gear such as climbing skins (straps of animal skin or fabric attached to backcountry skis to add traction), goggles, and helmets.

Guided by previous assessments and with the help of our collections assistant, Dionisia Mathios, the Colorado Ski and Snowboard Museum and Hall of Fame (CSSM) is seeking support to purchase supplies to re-house our clothing and accessories collection to ensure better long term preservation. The clothing and accessories in the collection are used to interpret, honor, celebrate, and preserve the lives of World War II veterans, Olympians, and the human innovation of the ski and snowboard industry. The goal of this project is to ensure this collection is housed in a manner that holds up to the best museum standards for preservation. By archivally re-housing this collection, the Museum will safeguard the longevity of a collection important to the Museum's humanity themed exhibitions, special events and projects, research, and programs.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,791 (approved)
$5,791 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 10/30/2018


PG-252964-17

Franklin County Historical Society, Inc. (Ottawa, KS 66067-2649)
Deborah Barker (Project Director: 05/04/2016 to present)

Conservation and Environmental Assessment

Purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and HEPA-filtered vacuums to improve preventive conservation at the Franklin County Historical Society. Working with the same consultant who prepared a 2011 Conservation Assessment Report, the society plans to monitor the environment of two separate buildings in order to understand better the current environmental conditions and to determine what HVAC and conservation upgrades are needed. Collections stored in these buildings include more than 25,000 historic objects, large and small, such as vehicles, railroad equipment, and agricultural tools, as well as artifacts from local Native American tribes and a fully furnished Victorian parlor.

Established in 1937, the Franklin County Historical Society of Ottawa, Kansas, has acquired a rich permanent collection of 25,000+ museum artifacts, and 33,000+ manuscript and photograph collections, representing the cultural history of Franklin County from the 1854 Kansas Territory-Missouri Border Wars to the present day. We seek an NEH preservation grant to purchase Nilfisk HEPA-filter vacuums to clean our museum artifacts and their display and storage spaces, and to purchase Image Permanence Institute PEM2 environmental data logging equipment and an eClimateNotebook subscription to assess environmental conditions within our Old Depot Museum and storage facility so that we may identify and correct HVAC deficiencies in these buildings. We commit to hire Deborah Long (of the Gerald R. Ford Conservation Center), with our own funds, as the grant project's Consultant to analyze the logged data and report upon its findings with recommendations for our future conservation activities.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,481 (approved)
$5,481 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252776-17

Dominican University (River Forest, IL 60305-1099)
Felice Maciejewski (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

McGreal Center for Dominican Historical Studies and Dominican University’s Archives and Special Collections Assessment

A preservation assessment of two archival repositories administered by the university: 1) the McGreal Center for Dominican Historical Studies and 2) the university’s Archives and Special Collections.  The McGreal Center holds 170 linear feet of historical records, letters, photographs, and multimedia sources pertaining to the history of the Dominican Order of Friars, Nuns, Laity and Apostolic Sisters in the United States.  The Archives and Special Collections unit comprises 1,300 linear feet of records pertaining to the history of the university, along with 1,400 rare books dating from 1551 to the 1900s.  Included is documentation on the Dominican Order’s work with Native American communities, mission activities, and the role of women in American Catholicism. The Archives and Special Collections department also contains 80 linear feet of archival records and manuscripts focusing on the history of libraries and librarianship in the United States.

The McGreal Center for Dominican Historical Studies and Dominican University’s Archives and Special Collections unit seek funding for a preservation assessment. The McGreal Center is home to Project OPUS, a collaborative research endeavor engaged in chronicling the history of the Order of Preachers in the United States. It is the official archives depository for multiple organizations significant to the history of the Dominican Order’s presence in North America. The university library’s Archives and Special Collections unit holds over 1400 rare books and manuscript collections dating from the 1200s to today, and is also the depository for a wide variety of collected papers and records relevant to prominent Chicago individuals and institutions. The project will enable the crafting of a preservation plan for each of the two centers and the establishment of a foundational strategy for their future coordination with shared reference and storage facilities.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252787-17

Oberlin Heritage Center (Oberlin, OH 44074-0455)
Maren McKee (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Collections Preservation and Space Management

The purchase of shelving units, construction materials to store hanging pictures, and preservation supplies for rehousing textiles and other artifacts stored and exhibited in four historic buildings—the Monroe House (1866), the Jewett House (1884), the Little Red Schoolhouse (1836), and a barn (c.1840).  Featured in tours for the public and school groups, the buildings and collections are used to tell the history of the town of Oberlin and the founding of the first co-educational college in the nation (1833), the first African American students who attended the college, global missionary work, and the Progressive Era.  Recommended in a preservation assessment, these supplies would improve the storage of collection items, such as quilts, historic costumes, paintings, and photographs, to ensure their continued use in public programs.


The Oberlin Heritage Center, a complex of historic buildings accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is seeking funds to purchase collections storage furniture and preservation supplies to outfit a storage room. A RECAP, conducted by Shelley Reisman Paine in 2012, recognized that OHC is running out of room to store collections materials. OHC has implemented several of her recommendations regarding collections care, including increasing the Collection Manager's time from 20 hours to 30 hours per week, improving environmental monitoring and implementing an Integrated Pest Management program.  We would now like to address critical space concerns by creating additional storage space in an underutilized room in the climate controlled Jewett House. This will relieve the pressure on current storage facilities, improve the storage conditions for our textile collection and stable framed art and photographs, and prepare for the future collecting activities of the organization.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,267 (approved)
$3,267 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252808-17

Wofford College (Spartanburg, SC 29303-3663)
Kevin Reynolds (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

A Proposal for Preservation Assessment of Wofford College’s Archival and Special Collections and Disaster Recovery Training

A preservation assessment of a collection of 7,500 books and 750 linear feet of archival and manuscript materials documenting the early history of the college (founded in 1854), Methodism, the town of Spartanburg, and South Carolina and Southern history more generally.  Also planned is a disaster recovery workshop for staff from the college and nearby cultural heritage institutions.

Wofford College's archival and special collections include college and United Methodist records, manuscripts, personal papers, ephemera, and rare books that focus on history, literature, religion, the South, and educational history. Researchers, including students and faculty on our campus, genealogists, and scholars throughout the country use these collections to explore their past and make connections to the present.  Cramped conditions have the potential to cause damage to many unique materials.  An overall preservation assessment will help guide our efforts to protect these resources for future researchers. Additionally, a disaster recovery workshop will prepare staff from Wofford and from area institutions to be able to respond effectively should disaster strike our unique collections.

Project fields:
Literature, General; Religion, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,733 (approved)
$5,733 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252845-17

Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library (Indianapolis, IN 46204-1708)
Julia Whitehead (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Continued Preservation of Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Collections

The purchase of storage furniture, environmental monitoring equipment, and staff training in storage techniques and use of the environmental monitors. The collection, which pertains to Kurt Vonnegut’s career, includes 70 first editions of the author’s novels, 25 signed copies, Vonnegut family photographs, approximately 500 volumes representing Vonnegut’s personal library, and assorted memorabilia. Particularly notable are the objects and ephemera associated with Vonnegut’s years as a soldier and prisoner of war, of note to researchers interested in the relationship of World War II and its aftermath with art, literature, and journalism.

The Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library (KVML) honors the legacy of author Kurt Vonnegut and the principles of free expression, common decency, and peaceful coexistence he advocated. KVML operates a small museum in Indianapolis and presents special collections pertaining to Vonnegut’s life and works. The museum hosts approximately 15,000 visitors a year. However, before 2016, KVML did not have a preservation plan for its extensive collection of Vonnegut memorabilia, including first edition texts, artifacts from Vonnegut’s life, and cultural items from the projects Vonnegut inspired. Thanks to a NEH Preservation Grant, KVML has received an on-site assessment from a collections expert and is implementing its recommendations. This project aims to further the organization’s collection preservation through funding for storage furniture and environmental monitoring equipment. Preserving the collections housed by KVML is essential to preserving Vonnegut’s legacy.

Project fields:
American Literature; Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,147 (approved)
$5,147 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252853-17

Chesapeake College (Wye Mills, MD 21679)
Kristy Floyd (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Preserving the Thoreau of Maryland's Eastern Shore

A preservation assessment of 40 linear feet of published and unpublished works by author Gilbert Byron (1903-91), whose writings focused on the history and culture of the Chesapeake Bay region.  The project would also entail staff training on the care and handling of special collections.  The collection comprises first-edition monographs, manuscript drafts, unpublished writings, correspondence, photographs, and drawings produced and maintained by the author, historian, and poet referred to as the “Thoreau of the Chesapeake.”  Most of Byron’s works chronicle the importance of the Chesapeake Bay to the economy and life of the region and touch also upon issues such as race and intercultural relationships on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.  They have been actively consulted for research, classroom use, and public exhibitions.

Chesapeake College, a small community college serving five counties on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, proposes to hire a preservation consultant from LYRASIS to conduct a preservation needs assessment of the library’s recently acquired Gilbert Byron manuscript collection and conduct training on working with and handling the materials. The Gilbert Byron collection includes the full extent of this local author’s published and unpublished literary works, as well as his correspondence and personal artifacts. Gilbert Byron was considered a “Thoreau” of our region during the 1900s. His literary works, correspondence, and personal artifacts have local historical value for their focus on Chesapeake Bay life and culture. Our goals through this project are to assess the collection and create plans for its preservation, so we can assure the collection will be available for our students, humanities scholars, and the community for generations to come.

Project fields:
American Literature; Cultural Anthropology; Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,065 (approved)
$5,065 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252919-17

University of Mississippi, Main Campus (University, MS 38677-1848)
John Edge (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Southern Foodways Alliance General Assessment

The hiring of an audiovisual preservation consultant to conduct an assessment of 800 oral histories and 102 documentary films that include approximately 700 hours of raw interview footage.  The materials were collected over the course of 25 projects documenting the diverse food cultures of the American South.  Footage from the collection has already contributed to several publications in the series entitled Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture, People, and Place; a quarterly academic journal called Gravy; and documentary films.  So far, the oral histories have been organized along four culinary trails—tamales, boudin, barbecue, and gumbo—with additional specialty topics ranging from Greek restaurants in Birmingham, Alabama, to the Southern food traditions that traveled north to Chicago during the Great Migration.

The Southern Foodways Alliance (SFA), based at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture (CSSC), will use the NEH Preservation Grant to hire the consulting firm AV Preserve to review primary source materials, both physical and digital archives, to assess their condition and offer recommendations for preservation as the first steps of creating a new and central SFA archive housed at the CSSC, which will be able to be accessed via research visits and a website. The SFA collection offers a window into the American South through its changing foodways, amassing primary resource materials important to academic work in humanities fields that include U.S. economic, social, and political history; immigration history; labor history; cultural studies, gender studies, race studies, studies, geography, and cultural anthropology. The SFA collection includes 802 completed digital oral histories and 102 documentary films including 700 hours of raw interview and b-roll footage.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252764-17

Oglala Lakota College (Kyle, SD 57752-0490)
Tawa Ducheneaux (Project Director: 04/29/2016 to present)

Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of language, cultural, and historical collections in the archives of Oglala Lakota College. Documentary materials represent traditional and cultural knowledge of the Oyate Kin people, one of the seven bands of the Lakota of the Northern Plains region. Around 500 linear feet of archival records include institutional records of the college, tribal government records, maps, newspapers, photographs, and audiovisual items from the years 1940-2000.

The Woksape Tipi Archives houses unique language, cultural, and historical materials of the Oglala Lakota Nation. The diverse collections are an invaluable cultural resource for the communities of the Pine Ridge Reservation and the students, faculty, and staff of Oglala Lakota College (OLC), and important to the national and international communities who explore and write about indigenous topics. Many of these materials do not exist elsewhere, making preservation of utmost importance. OLC will contract a Conservator to conduct an onsite assessment of our Archive’s collections of 2000 linear feet and do a report including institutional information, staffing , facilities, environment, security, collection policies, disaster preparedness, care of collections, summary of needs, recommendations for storage, preservation and display. We will develop a strong needs-based plan for approaching the varied needs of the collections based upon the assessment report.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252791-17

Tomaquag Indian Memorial Museum (Exeter, RI 02822-1808)
Kimberly Peters (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Collections Care and Risk Mitigation at the Tomaquag Museum

The creation and implementation of housekeeping, integrated pest management, and environmental monitoring plans, to be carried out by the Tomaquag Indian Memorial Museum and a preservation consultant. The consultant would also assist in the selection of preventive conservation supplies to be stored in a mobile Collections Care Cart. These improvements in museum collection management are based on recommendations made in a 2015 preservation assessment of the collections, and will support the long-term preservation of the Tomaquag Museum’s collection of 3,000 Native American and indigenous objects.

As Tomquag Museum works toward obtaining a new facility, we are committed to strengthening and sustaining our collections care and risk mitigation programs. We will create and implement a housekeeping plan, integrated pest management program and an environmental monitoring plan. We will use grant funds to create a Collections Care Cart consisting of appropriate conservation equipment, materials and supplies. We will retain the services of a consultant to provide staff with training on proper equipment use, environmental, pest monitoring and housekeeping activities. The training and equipment will be transferable to our new home. The goals of this project are derived from recommendations made during our 2006 Conservation Assessment Program and our 2015 Preservation Assessment Grant which has resulted in a five-year preservation plan.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252826-17

Ilisagvik College (Barrow, AK 99723-0749)
Christie Burke (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Archival Support for Iñupiaq Historical and Cultural Materials at Tuzzy Consortium Library of Ilisagvik College

Purchase of rehousing supplies and environmental monitoring equipment, which would contribute to the prolonged survival of Native Alaskan archives. The collections include books, pamphlets, newspapers, and other items associated with the Iñupiaq people. Of note are 3,000 rare books (many published on the North Slope), 17,000 photographs, 600 films, and 300 linear feet of manuscript materials documenting the history of northern Alaska and Iñupiaq lifeways.

The archival collections at Tuzzy Consortium Library in Barrow, Alaska are focused upon Iñupiaq culture, history, and language, as well as the history of the North Slope region. Tuzzy is also the library for Ilisagvik College, the only tribal college in Alaska. The funding through this grant would help support the archival work at Tuzzy by covering the costs of supplies that are needed to preserve and house fragile and unprocessed materials in Tuzzy’s rare books, manuscript, and photo and media collections. Tuzzy’s full-time Archivist completed a preservation assessment in 2015 that will guide the project and serve as the informed plan in which the Archivist and other personnel manage the collection. By updating the current environmental control system and purchasing supplies for preservation work, Tuzzy can ensure that the irreplaceable and singular cultural and historical materials documenting Iñupiaq life will remain in good condition and accessible to the public.

Project fields:
Journalism; Languages, Other; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252938-17

Museum of Chinese in America (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Condition Reporting and Rehousing the Paper Sculpture Collection at the Museum of Chinese in America

Hiring of an object conservator and the purchase of preservation supplies to support the rehousing of 175 paper sculptures created by passengers of the Golden Venture ship during their detention by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service between 1993 and 1997. Using recycled and found materials, the sculptures range in size from a few inches to a 4-foot-long replica of the Golden Venture. The conservation consultant will create detailed condition reports for each object and train museum staff to construct custom archival boxes and supports for each sculpture.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) requests $6,000 to commission Lauren Paige Isaacs, an objects conservation specialist, to evaluate and rehouse the museum’s collection of 175 paper sculptures. This project would be a follow-up to the recommendations made by Tara D. Kennedy in her 2012 Conservation Assessment. The sculptures belong to MOCA’s Fly to Freedom collection, which explores the circumstances and hardships faced by a group of undocumented Chinese immigrants that were detained by the Immigration and Naturalization Services after their ship ran aground at Rockaway Beach in Queens, NY in 1993. In 2018 - 25 years after the refugees’ arrival - the museum plans to display these sculptures in a show that will examine the current state of immigration in America. It is imperative that we are able to properly house these pieces to retard their deterioration as well as evaluate them for any damage they may have sustained while being housed in inadequate containers.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Asian American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252820-17

University of Northern Colorado (Greeley, CO 80639-6900)
Andrew Creekmore (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

University of Northern Colorado Anthropology Department Collections Preservation Assessment

A general preservation assessment for a collection of 300 prehistoric and historic artifacts made of ceramics, wood, fiber, leather, stone, quills, glass, and feathers that documents Native American cultures of the Plains and Southwest.  Highlights include prehistoric ceramics in the Mesa Verde, Chaco, and Casas Grandes styles and historic Pueblo pots from Acoma, Cochiti, San Ildefonso, and Santa Clara pueblos, among others. While at the university, the consultant would also offer a workshop on the basics of environmental monitoring, develop short- and long-term sustainable plans for collection preservation, and mentor a graduate conservation intern.

The Anthropology Department Collections at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) include thousands of archaeological and historic Native American artifacts. An important part of this collection consists of 300 artifacts from the Pueblo, Hohokam, and Plains Cultures of the Western Plains and Southwest. This collection is significant because the prehistoric artifacts document a time of growing social complexity and cultural innovation. Similarly, the historic artifacts were produced at a time when artisan traditions were transforming as they entered an emerging tourist and art market, signaling new, modern cultural identities. With the goal of increasing safe access and preservation, the UNC seeks consultation with a preservation professional for: a) An assessment of exhibit and storage areas and policies; b) Help developing a short and long-term, sustainable preservation plan; c) Providing a workshop on environmental monitoring, handling protocols, and storage upgrades.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252207-17

East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania (Stroudsburg, PA 18301-2999)
Kelly Smith (Project Director: 04/28/2016 to present)

General Preservation Assessment of the Special Collections at East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

A preservation assessment of special collections at East Stroudsburg University. A consultant would provide preservation recommendations to provide better long-term care for two collections in particular: the Al Cohn Memorial Jazz Collection, consisting of 16,000 items with oral histories, photographs, sheet music manuscripts, audio recordings, and accompanying materials, mostly from the 1940s; and the Sterling Strauser Collection of outsider art, including about 200 works by folk artists.

Concerns related to the storage and management of the Sterling Strauser Collection and the Al Cohn Memorial Jazz Collection, in addition to the preparation for a move to the new building, necessitate a preservation assessment by a professional consultant trained in the care of cultural collections. The consultant will survey the collections, review policies regarding collection management, and evaluate storage and exhibit areas to identify strengths and potential vulnerabilities, and will recommend steps to take to ensure the longevity of the collections. A written report created by the consultant will assist those involved with the management of the collections in prioritizing time and funds for future projects.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,900 (approved)
$5,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252921-17

Corita Art Center (Los Angeles, CA 90028-5901)
Keri Marken (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Preservation of the Art Center’s Collection

The purchase of environmental monitors, UV light filters, archival enclosures, and storage furniture to rehouse, reorganize, and preserve 12,000 serigraphs produced by Corita Kent, an artist, educator, activist, and nun from Los Angeles’s Immaculate Heart Community.  The Center’s serigraph collection contains over 12,000 examples from 800 unique print editions dating from 1952 through 1986. Subjects include abstract religious themes, popular culture, social justice and, in later years, the natural world. The applicant would reorganize and rehouse the collection to protect the prints from handling risks and environmental conditions, as recommended in a 2016 Collection Stewardship Assessment.

The collections held at the Corita Art Center include over 12,000 serigraphs produced by artist, educator, and activist, Corita Kent. Spanning from 1952 through 1986, the collection displays Corita’s development as an artist and illustrates her impact as a designer and printmaker. The collection is significant to the humanities, not only because of Corita’s influence on art history and graphic design, but also her use of literature, philosophy, and social and political themes, which make the collection invaluable for research in a number of areas, including art, religion, and history. In order to preserve the collection for future research and exhibitions, the Corita Art Center is working to reorganize and rehouse the collection using supplies and equipment recommended during a Collections Stewardship Assessment performed in January 2016. An NEH grant would fund the purchase of supplies and environmental monitoring equipment to improve the conditions of the serigraph collection.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,715 (approved)
$5,715 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252862-17

Noyes School of Rhythm Foundation, Inc. (East Hampton, CT 06424-1347)
Margaret Brooker (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Noyes School of Rhythm Foundation Archive General Preservation Assessment Project

A preservation assessment of a collection of records from a historic dance school established by artist and educator Florence Fleming Noyes (1871-1928). The archive consists of 100 linear feet of correspondence, newspapers, brochures, photographs, and film. The consultant would also conduct a workshop for staff on protecting the collection.

The Noyes School of Rhythm Foundation archives document the 100-year history of a dance practice that significantly contributed to early twentieth-century modern dance performance, therapeutic movement, the women's movement, and progressive education. The archive includes 100 linear feet of manuscript and other primary source material in a variety of formats, including business records, brochures, newsletters, correspondence, scrapbooks, newspapers, photographs, slides, and film. The depth and breadth of documentation is unique for an American dance school from the early 1900s. The school had a national reach in the 1920s, maintaining studios in New York at Carnegie Hall and in ten other major U.S. cities, and the founder, Florence Noyes, was highly visible as a woman's suffrage performer. This grant will fund consultation with the Northeast Document Conservation Center, including a general preservation assessment, a "protecting collections" workshop, and related preservation supplies.

Project fields:
Dance History and Criticism; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,990 (approved)
$5,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


PG-252929-17

Canyon Cinema Foundation (San Francisco, CA 94124-2653)
Seth Mitter (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Preservation Assessment of Canyon Cinema Foundation’s Circulating Film and Historical Document Collections

The hiring of a preservation consultant to conduct a general preservation assessment of over 3,200 film titles spanning 90 years and including important documentary, animation, structural, personal, and experimental works representing over 250 artists.  The collection has a strong emphasis on American West Coast and San Francisco Bay Area filmmakers such as James Benning, Bruce Billie, Kenneth Anger, Marie Menken, and Les Blank.  Highlights include 470 reels of experimental filmmaker and teacher Stan Brakhage and 43 reels of anthropologist and ethnographic filmmaker Chick Strand, known for her animated and experimental documentaries focused on women in Mesoamerican cultures.

Canyon Cinema Foundation’s (CCF) collections of film and related paper material represent 90 years of independent, artist-made film history. CCF’s loan program for its circulating film print collection (over 3200 reels) supports programming and exhibition by educational and cultural institutions across the globe. CCF’s collections of historical documents are important to researchers studying the history and culture of independent filmmaking. We are seeking funds to hire a professional preservation consultant to complete a general preservation assessment and the purchase of archival supplies to house the objects that are most at risk. This project is the necessary first step towards the proper storage, care, and management for our collections of motion picture film, periodicals, and documents. Current storage conditions of both the film print collection and paper and ephemera collections risks accelerating the decay of these historically significant objects.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252782-17

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Helen Rees (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Preserving the World Musical Instrument Collection at UCLA

Hiring a consultant to undertake a preservation assessment of 800 objects in the World Musical Instrument Collection, part of UCLA’s Department of Ethnomusicology.  Items include musical instruments from West Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Americas, with percussion, string, and wind instruments in wood, bamboo, metal, ivory, bone, and hide dating from the mid-19th century to the present.  Highlights include a Javanese gamelan, consisting of 80 gongs; a set of Ghanaian drums, bells, and rattles from the Akan and Ewe ethnic groups; and a Vietnamese one-string zither, gifted in 1968 in memory of an American soldier killed in Vietnam.  The instruments are part of a working collection that is used in performance and community outreach, and for teaching and research.

The UCLA World Musical Instrument Collection (WMIC) is part of the Department of Ethnomusicology, one of the oldest, largest, and most highly regarded programs in the field in the US. Initiated in 1958 via a Rockefeller Foundation grant, the collection has grown to around 800 items, including large instrument sets from West Africa and several Asian countries, and smaller Native American, Latin American, and East European sets. Some instruments are used for performance classes, while others are display items of historical value. Central to our teaching and research mission for nearly 60 years, the WMIC is also accessible to the public. It features constantly in community outreach and public education programs, exposing innumerable people to musical cultures from around the world. We request funding for a general preservation assessment to identify ways to improve current care practices and conditions, and to help us draft a plan for the long-term care and sustainability of the WMIC.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252704-17

Dubuque Museum of Art (Dubuque, IA 52001-6817)
David Schmitz (Project Director: 04/29/2016 to present)

General Preservation Assessment of the Dubuque Museum of Art's Collections

Hiring a consultant from the Midwest Art Conservation Center to perform a general preservation assessment of the holdings of the Dubuque Museum of Art and develop a prioritized list of collection items in need of specialized conservation treatment. Founded in 1874, the Dubuque Museum of Art contains 2,300 fine art objects that preserve and interpret the history and culture of Iowa, Illinois, and Wisconsin. Significant collections include Edward S. Curtis’s North American Indian series, a collection of over 700 photogravures and writings documenting 80 tribes throughout the American West, and a complete archive of illustrations by the children’s author Art Geisert. Significant American and European artists are also represented, including John Stuart Curry, Charles Burchfield, Pablo Picasso, and Salvador Dali.

The Dubuque Museum of Art (DuMA) will consult with the Midwest Art Conservation Center to conduct a general preservation assessment of the museum’s collections of approximately 2,300 paintings, sculptures and works on paper by regionally, nationally and internationally known artists, including Edward S. Curtis and Grant Wood. DuMA’s collections are primarily used for supporting its exhibition and museum education programs, with a particular focus on community engagement and outreach, while also contributing to the broader cultural record through traveling exhibits, loans and research. We anticipate that the assessment will focus on a) the current conditions of collections storage, the environment and display of objects in the collection; b) prioritization of works in the collection requiring further assessment and conservation treatments; and c) recommendations on how to balance conservation needs of the current collection with plans to grow and expand the museum.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


PG-252800-17

DePauw University (Greencastle, IN 46135-1736)
Craig Hadley (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Enhanced Preservation and Access for DePauw University's Works on Paper Collection

Purchase of rehousing supplies and five flat file cabinets to alleviate overcrowding and consolidate print collections owned by DePauw University. Holdings included in the rehousing project include: a teaching collection of old master prints from the Carnegie Corporation, surrealist prints by Salvador Dali, and works by Midwestern 20th-century printmakers such as Richard Mock, Paul W. Darro, and George Jo Mess. An important and heavily used collection of Japanese postwar prints representing over 40 different artists would also be rehoused in its entirety. As part of the university’s renewed commitment to collection care, the purchase of new storage equipment would support recommendations from a 2014 Museum Assessment Program evaluation and 2015 Strategic Plan for Collection Care.

The Galleries at Peeler on the campus of DePauw University respectfully requests $4,348 to purchase five Mayline flat files, along with unbuffered interleaving tissue to support rehousing efforts. These new flat files will house approximately 220 works on paper from the permanent collection, ranging from an early gift of historic teaching prints from the Carnegie Foundation to Japanese postwar prints. The objects directly support a variety of teaching and research needs at DePauw University, including undergraduate projects, faculty use, and exhibitions. Per a 2014 Museum Assessment Program site visit, the external reviewer recommended the consolidation of the university art collection in one location. Expanding flat file capacity is vital to centralization efforts, and will also alleviate overcrowding while improving access to works on paper. This project is part of a larger collections consolidation project and is included in the board approved 2015-2020 gallery strategic plan.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General; East Asian History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,348 (approved)
$4,348 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252857-17

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Jill Hartz (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Conservation of Photographs from a 1957 Exhibition Designed by 20th-Century Japanese Landscape Architect Mirei Shigemori

Hiring of a professional photograph conservator to design treatment protocol and train staff on appropriate conservation techniques for 187 photographs and text on panels in the collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. Originally created for the 1957 Japanese Gardens exhibition, the panels showcase garden designs from Japanese landscape architect Mirei Shigemori (1896-1975), and represent an early foray into contemporary Asian topics in the Pacific Northwest. The applicant would document this formerly hidden collection and remove the original photographs from Masonite panels, reducing the storage space requirement and improving accessibility.

The proposed grant will fund conservation of 141 photographs on panels and 46 un-accessioned photographs and text on panels that were the subject of a 1957 exhibition, Japanese Gardens, at the Univ. of Oregon Museum of Art (now Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art). Designed by notable 20th Century Japanese landscape architect Mirei Shigemori (1896-1975) – a friend and mentor of renowned American sculptor Isamu Noguchi (1904 -1988), the works feature many of Shigemori’s projects. The collection is significant to the humanities because it offers unique insight into the creative processes of both Shigemori’s landscape and garden designs and his creation of an exhibition from photographs of his own work. A wealth of personal communication dated 1955-1958 between then museum director, Dr. Wallace Baldinger, and Shigemori, adds even greater depth and value to the collection. Grant funds would be used for conservator fees, travel, and per diem, and conservation and rehousing supplies.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,646 (approved)
$5,646 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252887-17

Saginaw Valley State University (University Center, MI 48710-0001)
Marilyn Wheaton (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

SVSU Marshall M. Fredericks Collection Environmental Study

The purchase of five data loggers and the preparation of a plan for improving the environmental conditions in the galleries and storage areas of the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum. Founded in 1988, the museum collection spans the 70-year career of sculptor Marshall M. Fredericks (1908-1998), and contains over 2,400 plaster models, carved bronze and stone sculptures, historical medallions, and a range of associated objects such as armatures, tools, photographs, and sketch models. Two hundred linear feet of archives contain correspondence, project files, drawings, contracts, and other materials related to the artist’s monumental sculpture and public memorials. Establishing an environmental monitoring program and collaborating with professional engineers specializing in museum climate would provide high-quality data and result in a plan for long-term environmental improvements.

The Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum (MFSM) houses an inimitable collection that spans the 70-year career of Fredericks, who is known in America and abroad for his monumental figurative sculpture, public memorials, fountains, portraits, and animals. The collection houses over 2,400 objects including original plaster models and molds, carved sculptures, bronze and stone sculptures from monumental to miniature, and historical medallions. The collection contains armatures, site and sketch models, tools, photographs, memorabilia, and more than 200 linear feet of archives. This educational resource is available for those seeking to understand more about Fredericks’s life and works, and the relationship of Fredericks to 20th century American sculpture, a field poorly understood due to lack of access to materials and the complexity of the art form. With funding, MFSM would purchase five environmental data loggers and develop a plan for improving the Museum's environmental conditions.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,935 (approved)
$5,935 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252898-17

National Western Art Foundation (San Antonio, TX 78205-2988)
Hannah Haney (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Briscoe Western Art Museum Collections Storage Plan

The development of a collections storage plan for a museum that houses over 1,300 objects from the early 1600s to the present including artworks and artifacts such as textiles, furniture, weaponry, and materials relating to horse riding.  A large photography collection includes works by Edward Curtis, William Henry Jackson, and George Fisk.  The museum also houses items by noted Native American artists Allan Houser and public sculptor Glenna Maxey Goodacre.  The collections are used to explore the culture and history of the Western United States.

This project is for the Briscoe Western Art Museum's collections storage plan. We are intending to bring in conservator and consultant Wendy Jessup to help us create a comprehensive plan for the facility that meets the standards of the American Alliance of Museums. The museum's collection is currently comprised of over 1,300 objects ranging from the 1600's to present day. The collection comprises approximately 400 artifacts which include; textiles, weaponry, furniture, saddles, spurs, and instruments. It also contains about 900 pieces of artwork including paintings, photography, prints and sculptures. It is important for us to preserve these items because they play a large part in understanding the development, the importance, and the mystique that surrounds the American West. Our objects expose the visitor to a unique story that we hope travels with the visitor after they have left. That means that we need to care for our collection that we have been given.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-251649-17

University of Alaska, Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK 99775-7500)
Leonared Kamerling (Project Director: 04/25/2016 to present)

University of Alaska Museum of the North Film Preservation Assistance

The drafting of a disaster preparedness and response plan and the purchase of storage and rehousing supplies for an audiovisual ethnographic collection that includes approximately 200,000 feet of unedited prints, camera negatives, and release productions, as well as 300 videocassettes.  In the early 1970s, Alaska filmmakers Sarah Elder and Leonard Kamerling pioneered a collaborative approach to making films with Native partner communities.  They produced dozens of hours of visual and aural materials of subsistence activities; celebrations and ceremonies; interviews with elders, leaders, and community members; gift exchange potlatches; and other observations of daily life.  Their film, video, and audio collections have been used in documentaries on Alaska Native culture, as well as in museum exhibitions, public events, classroom instruction, and scholarly and student research.  For example, their exhibition “Then and Now: The Changing Arctic Landscape” presented visual evidence of climate change in the North by comparing early 20th-century photos with contemporary views from the same vantage points; personal narratives of Iñupiaq elders helped visitors to understand the consequences of climate change for the Native peoples who subsist on the land.

The Film Collection of the University of Alaska Museum of the North is an ethnographic collection focused on Alaska Native culture and issues from 1970 to the present. It represents a visual and aural record of Alaska Native knowledge during a period of rapid cultural and social change. Use of the collection in museum exhibitions, by scholars, students, Alaska Native communities and schools, speaks to its ongoing significance to the humanities.  We are seeking funding to implement specific recommendations made in the 2013 assessment of the collection (funded by the NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions Program).  This includes the development of a disaster preparedness and response plan, the transfer of film and audio materials to vented storage containers, purchase of a dust-proof cabinet for storing materials undergoing conservation,  and the purchase of essential archive supplies such as film deterioration indicator strips, durable labels, and other essential materials.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


PG-251651-17

Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO 80521-2807)
Linda Frickman (Project Director: 04/25/2016 to present)

Gregory Allicar Museum of Art Collection Storage Enhancement

A preservation assessment and purchase of shelving to house a recently acquired collection of African art that includes beaded jewelry and ceramic vessels, and which complements a larger collection of some 900 objects from across the African continent. The new collection, including 17 large ceramic vessels, documents a variety of forms, pot-making techniques, and surface embellishments and includes objects of the Yoruba, Dogon, and Lobi peoples of West Africa, and the Masai and Kamba peoples of Kenya.  The collections are used for research, teaching, and public programming.

The Gregory Allicar Museum of Art at Colorado State University requests a grant for the purchase of a Spacesaver storage carriage, and additional shelves to maximize the use of existing carriages, in order to house recent gifts of African art objects and make more efficient use of existing units. Recent gifts include 40 objects in various media and 17 large ceramic vessels. These additions enhance the eminence of the museum’s African collections by expanding existing categories, broadening artistic representation, and providing CSU with one of the few top quality collections of African ceramics in the country. The original Spacesaver system, installed in 2008, was selected with conservators Eileen Clancy and Judy Greenfield. Greenfield consulted on the preparations for this proposal and the grant will also support her two-day conservation assessment.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252823-17

Vermont Folklife Center (Middlebury, VT 05753-1425)
Andrew Kolovos (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Vermont Folklife Center Archive Digital Collections Assessment

The hiring of an audiovisual preservation consultant to conduct an assessment of 5,302 digitized audio field recordings of interviews and regional traditional music and associated still images and manuscripts from the 1940s to the present.  This collection focuses on the cultural heritage and life experiences of residents of Vermont and the surrounding region.  The materials were generated by staff folklorists conducting interviews and cultural documentation across the state as well as by other researchers, community scholars, documentarians, and journalists.  Significant areas of study represented in the archive include farm and rural community life in Northern New England; social, economic, environmental and cultural history of distinct geographic regions such as Lake Champlain, the Northern Forest, and the Mad River Valley; ethnic cultures; and occupational traditions and labor history.  One of the highlights of the archive is the Turner Family Collection, which includes an 80-hour interview with 100-year-old Daisy Turner, who recounted her family’s history as slaves during the Civil War to her time raising a family in Vermont.

Bertram Lyons of AVPreserve will assess the digital collections of the Vermont Folklife Center (VFC) Archive. The consultancy will focus on the following activities: 1) Lyons will visit VFC in Middlebury, VT and conduct an onsite assessment of the current digital storage and digital preservation practices employed by VFC; 2) Lyons will craft a report outlining ways for VFC to improve file management workflows and align our approaches with current best practices for the storage and preservation of digital cultural heritage materials. At the conclusion of the project VFC will have in hand a clearly articulated set of institutional needs in relation to our digital collections as well as an actionable plan for addressing these needs. The report produced by Lyons will be a vital tool for VFC in a planned, large scale, fund- raising initiative to ensure the preservation and accessibility of our multimedia holdings in perpetuity.

Project fields:
Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


PG-252848-17

Women's Museum of California (San Diego, CA 92106-6011)
Charla Wilson (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to 01/04/2017)
Julia Friedman (Project Director: 01/04/2017 to present)

Improving Disaster Preparedness and Response and Environmental Monitoring at the Women’s Museum of California

The purchase of disaster preparedness, storage, and environmental monitoring supplies with a focus on safeguarding collections against the risks of theft and earthquake.  The holdings of the library, archive, and museum help to document women’s history in the United States, with a particular focus on California. They include approximately 5,000 books, journals, audiovisual materials and oral histories from the 1800s to the present; special collections documenting women’s activities in politics, agriculture, economics, and culture; and art, artifacts, and fashion items dating from the 1600s to the 1970s.  Notable items in the collection include the papers of California suffragist Alice Park and California Senator Lucy Killea and a first edition of The History of Women’s Suffrage, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper.

The Women's Museum of California is requesting support from the National Endowment for the Humanities to purchase disaster preparedness and response supplies and environmental monitoring equipment needed to fulfill recommendations from a 2015 CalPreservation Collection Assessment. Support from the National Endowment for the Humanities will be used to purchase a stash of emergency supplies, sturdier shelving, earthquake straps, a security alarm, water detector, and PEM2.  The Women's Museum of California is one of six museums that exclusively focuses on women's history in the nation, and is the only women's museum on the West Coast. The purchase of these supplies will prolong the life of its Archival Collection, Historic Clothing, Costume, and Textile Collection, Library and Special Collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,956 (approved)
$3,361 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252891-17

University of Vermont (Burlington, VT 05405-0160)
Christopher Burns (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Emergency Response Training for Collections for the University of Vermont Libraries

Training in disaster planning and response for staff across the university’s library system, located in five separate facilities.  The project would help to ensure that steps outlined in recently produced disaster plans would be carried out most effectively.  The library’s holdings include a circulating collection of 2.9 million volumes, along with 10,000 linear feet of unique published and unpublished materials housed in its Special Collections Department supporting scholarship on Vermont history and culture, the Civil War, art history, literature, natural history, linguistics, and the history of medicine.  Highlights include the papers of Dorothy Canfield Fisher, which include correspondence with Willa Cather, Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen), Richard Wright, and other notable authors. The training would provide guidance to staff on methods for minimizing damage to collections caused by water or smoke and would offer opportunities for practice in recovering wet materials.

The University of Vermont Libraries requests a $6,000 Preservation Assistance Grant to train an Emergency Response Team for Collections to to respond efficiently and effectively to minimize damage to collections after a flood, fire, or other disaster. As the largest research library in Vermont, the Bailey/Howe Library is home to 2.9 million volumes and distinctive collections including the most comprehensive collection of Vermont materials in the world. The UVM Libraries will ask Mary Jo (MJ) Davis and Barbara Moore, conservators with extensive experience in disaster planning and response for cultural heritage collections, to hold a day-long, hands-on disaster response workshop for 40 UVM Libraries staff members (20 in the hands-on portion).

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252883-17

Hampton University (Hampton, VA 23668-0001)
Valinda Carroll (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Home by the Sea: Preservation of Architectural Drawings at Hampton University

The purchase of four flat file cabinets and interleaving paper to store 316 prints and drawings by Hampton students from the Bachelor of Architecture program. These materials, dating from 1934 through 1970, document the evolving history of African American education in architecture, from training in skilled trades and industrial arts to research-oriented professional development. Purchase of flat files was recommended as part of a 2011 survey, and reiterated during a 2014 effort to document, clean, and rehouse individual objects in the collection.

The William R. and Norma B. Harvey Library requests $5,916 for a Preservation Assistance Grant from the National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) for “Home by the Sea: preserving architectural thesis drawings at Hampton University.” This project supports humanities scholarship by demonstrating Hampton University’s contributions to the world of architecture and by illustrating the evolution of African American education from vocational training to professional formation. The drawings had constituted a hidden collection, stored in a closet until their rediscovery five years ago. The collection was inventoried, cleaned, and transferred to the library, but there was not adequate flat file cabinet space for these oversized items. Many of the drawings feature overlays and collage elements that require them to be stored flat; grant funds would permit the library to purchase appropriate storage furniture.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Architecture

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,916 (approved)
$5,916 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252937-17

Carnegie Hall Society (New York , NY 10019-3293)
Gino Francesconi (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Carnegie Hall Archives Preservation Project: Architectural Drawings Collection

The purchase of archival supplies to properly rehouse and store 410 architectural drawings—dated 1889 through 1977—associated with the planning, construction, and history of New York’s Carnegie Hall. The purchase of archival folders, interleaving paper, archival tubes, and polyester film would implement recommendations presented in a March 2016 collection survey conducted by conservators from the Northeast Document Conservation Center, and result in improved organization and environmental conditions for this historic collection. Significant items to be rehoused include William B. Tuthill’s 45 original drawings from the 1891 construction of Carnegie Hall, John McNamara’s 1969 pencil sketch for a new marquee, and floor-by-floor plans of the historic studio apartments once populated by some of the world’s leading artists.

The project will enable Carnegie Hall's Archives to purchase archival folders, interleaving paper, and archival polyester film to properly house the Hall’s Architectural Drawings Collection. Spanning 1889-1977, the collection consists of 410 drawings by architects associated with Carnegie Hall’s history—including William B. Tuthill, Ely Jacques Kahn and Robert Allan Jacobs (Kahn and Jacobs), and John J. McNamara. The Collection documents the construction of Carnegie Hall in 1891 and subsequent renovations and improvements. Preservation measures of this project are based on an assessment conducted in 2016 by professional consultants in paper conservation. The architectural drawings are noteworthy for those studying the humanities because they not only document the building plans of Carnegie Hall, but have broader historical significance in terms of the cultural, social, and economic trends of their time.

Project fields:
Architecture; Music History and Criticism; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$2,261 (approved)
$2,261 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252747-17

Marco Island Historical Society (Marco Island, FL 34145-5028)
Austin Bell (Project Director: 04/29/2016 to present)

The Rehabilitation of Archaeological Materials from Marco Island, Florida

Purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse a collection of site records and archaeological materials, including bone, wood, shell, stone, and ceramics, that document a native American history that spans more than 6,000 years on Marco Island, Florida.  The collection includes approximately 83 cubic feet of materials, in addition to 1,500 photographs and 350 negatives that derive from excavations conducted over the past century.  The sites include Key Marco, Caxambas Point Shell Midden, Horr’s Island Archaic Village, and Goodland Point.  The collections are used for research, education, and public programming.  This would be the institution’s first NEH award.

The MIHS is seeking a grant for the rehabilitation and long-term preservation of its collection of culturally significant archaeological materials. Marco Island is home to some of the most well-known archaeological sites in Florida. For more than 120 years, artifacts from Marco Island have been collected by revered institutions such as the Smithsonian and the British Museum. Now, the fledgling Marco Island Historical Museum is developing a collection of its own, largely a consequence of required modern archaeological surveys. The collection holds enormous potential as a resource for public access and academic research, but its accessibility is currently limited by inadequate curation and storage. Most materials are housed in deteriorating non-archival field bags and boxes, with any associated context in danger of being lost. A grant to the MIHS would ensure a comprehensive rehabilitation of these important collections so that they are preserved in perpetuity to benefit the public.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252806-17

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Carla Sinopoli (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Rehousing Collections of the Museum of Anthropological Archaeology

Purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse an international collection of ethnobotanical samples. The collection consists of a total of 30,000 specimens including seeds, leaves, wood, flowers, and roots and associated documentation. Botanical samples from more than 700 archaeological sites provide evidence of domestication of wild species, climate change, and human interactions with the environment over the past 10,000 years. Also included are objects made from plant materials, such as cordage, basketry, and sandals, one of which is estimated to be more than 7,000 years old. The collection is used by students, researchers, and members of source communities.

The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropological Archaeology (UMMAA) houses collections from more than a century of anthropological research in the United States and around the world. The Museum’s ethnobotanical laboratory, the first of its kind in the U.S., curates more than 30,000 specimens—including plant materials from archaeological sites, specimens gathered from ethnographic research on traditional plant use in indigenous communities, comparative specimens, and associated documentation (field notes, photographs and reports). Together, these collections constitute one of the nation’s leading ethnobotanical collections and a site for research and teaching on long term histories of human-environment relations and indigenous plant use. This proposal requests support for supplies necessary to complete a multi-year project to rehouse the collection, enhancing its stability and assuring its access for students, scholars, and members of source communities for generations to come.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,997 (approved)
$5,997 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252890-17

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Benjamin Porter (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

The Phoebe Hearst Museum’s Classical Mediterranean Metal Collections: A Request for Preservation Supplies

Purchase of preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment for a collection of metalwork, consisting of 720 decorative and utilitarian objects, and 3,200 coins, documenting Classical cultures of the Mediterranean, that would be rehoused as a part of the project.  Etruscan and Roman items include lamps, vessels, furniture fittings, mirrors, pendants, and statuettes, while the coins represent Greek and Roman cultures, including two complete coin hoards from Ptolemaic Egypt.  The collections are used for research and teaching, especially for art history, Classics, and ancient history courses.

The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology houses an important collection of over 700 metal objects and 3200 coins. These objects are currently stored in acidic cardboard trays and unsealed cabinets without climate control. Many are currently too fragile to be safely handled directly. The Museum recently purchased sealed archival steel cabinets with the assistance of a small gift. The Hearst Museum now seeks funding for archival materials to rehouse the artifacts with appropriate supports or enclosures in the new cabinets. Objects will also be photographed to improve the quality of the collection’s documentation. This work will insure the long term preservation of the collection and improve access to it for classroom instruction, research, and public exhibition.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Classics

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,693 (approved)
$5,693 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-251598-17

L.C. Bates Museum (Hinckley, ME 04944)
Deborah Staber (Project Director: 04/25/2016 to present)

Phase 2 of Developing Storage and Housing Spaces for Humanities Collections

The rehousing of over 450 artworks and artifacts related to the daily life of children living in Good Will-Hinckley Homes, childcare centers and orphanages that operated in Maine in the 19th and 20th centuries.  The collections include farming and ice-cutting tools used by the boys, and fabric arts and rug-making equipment used by the girls, which help to show the work skills taught to those under the care of the Good Will centers. A conservator would assist in the installation of new storage furniture and train museum staff in collections care.  The applicant would continue to use the collection to tell the history of childcare and children’s education through exhibits.

The L.C. Bates Museum's project preservation goal is to improve collection's care and storage by developing a new storage space and storing significant historical collections. These materials are relevant to the history and study of Good Will Homes, designed institutional landscapes and the history of childhood and childcare. To achieve this goal, we propose to work with conservator Ron Harvey to implement the recommendations of our past conservation assessments by methods outlined in Harvey's letter of commitment and storage treatment recommendations. This project is a priority of our 2008 RECAP, 2014 MAP and 2013-2017 long range conservation plan. The project is designed to turn an unused room on the museum's second floor into appropriate storage space for humanities objects, purchase shelving and storage supplies, train staff in storage methods, store the project collections, and present a public workshop on Storage Management in a Small Museum.

Project fields:
History, General; Public History; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,990 (approved)
$5,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-251706-17

Bridgton Historical Society (Bridgton, ME 04009-0044)
Edward Allen (Project Director: 04/26/2016 to present)

Collections Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of the collections at the Gibbs Avenue Museum and Archives, part of the Bridgton Historical Society. The purpose of the society is to trace the evolution of Bridgton, Maine, from its 1768 incorporation as a farming community, through expansion as a railroad- and canal-supported industrial town, to its present tourist-focused character. Its collections constitute 180 linear feet of archival materials, which include 45 cubic feet of oversized material and over 10,000 photographic images. Highlights include late 18th-century range maps, military regimental records, and patterns used by the Bridgton Machine Company, which invented the Perry Turbine. The proposed preservation assessment would update a 1998 Conservation Assessment Program report and focus on optimizing storage capacity and prioritizing conservation treatment needs.

The project will bring conservator Ronald Harvey to the Bridgton Historical Society to assess the preservation needs of the collections at the Gibbs Avenue Museum and Archives, and produce a report that will outline steps to take to insure the future well-being of the collection.  The collection includes photographs, personal, business, and town records and other documents, as well as transportation vehicles, household artifacts, agricultural and manufacturing tools and equipment, fine arts, textiles, military artifacts, and other items used or produced in Bridgton or by Bridgton residents. It tells the story of the town's social, religious, political, industrial and commercial growth from its agrarian roots in the 1760s, through its heyday as a busy commercial and industrial center, to its growing popularity as a tourist destination, the rise and decline of the narrow gauge railroad, and the economic and demographic transformations of the 20th and early 21st centuries.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Economic History; History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-251882-17

Southeast Missouri State University (Cape Girardeau, MO 63701-4710)
Roxanne Dunn (Project Director: 04/27/2016 to present)

General Preservation Assessment in Special Collections and Archives, Kent Library

A preservation assessment and the development of disaster preparedness plans for the university’s archives and special collections, comprising 3,300 linear feet of historical records, manuscript collections, and rare books.  The collection includes personal papers, business records, maps, oral histories, and photographs documenting the economic and cultural history of rural southeastern Missouri and the broader Mississippi Valley region, primarily during the 19th and 20th centuries. Among the rare books are European and Arabic works, dating to the Middle Ages, that support study in the history of printing and bookmaking.  Also contained are numerous first editions of notable authors, including Charles Dickens and Mark Twain and an internationally prominent collection of published works by and about William Faulkner, along with original research materials accumulated by Faulkner biographer Joseph Blotner.

Kent will hire a recognized, award-winning preservation consultant to assess environmental conditions, storage policies, and provide strategies to optimize preservation. Assessment will include development and implementation of a disaster preparedness and recovery plan. The assessor will provide condition reports pertaining to the needs of the University Archives, the regional history collections of southeast Missouri and the rare book collection. While the department contains a substantial rare book collection considering its University’s size, this assessment will provide insights pertaining to all aspects of the operations of Special Collections and Archives. Recommendations will be used to establish policies and procedures to integrate preservation practices into daily work, strategic planning, and development activities. Outcomes will improve the level of care and use by focusing on the needs of collections and by increasing communication with stakeholders.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,910 (approved)
$5,910 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252740-17

Ramsey County Historical Society, Inc. (St. Paul, MN 55102-1431)
Mollie Spillman (Project Director: 04/29/2016 to present)

Conservation Condition Survey of RCHS's Collection of Horse-Drawn Vehicles

The preservation of an important collection of eleven horse-drawn vehicles by hiring a conservation consultant to conduct an object-by-object condition survey, and by development of an environmental monitoring program in each of three storage facilities. Founded in 1949, the Ramsey County Historical Society operates two major sites: Gibbs Farm, which is a historic site, and a research center and administrative offices in nearby Saint Paul. RCHS also maintains two off-site storage buildings. In addition to the horse-drawn vehicles that are the focus of this application, RCHS maintains a collection of nearly 15,000 historic objects and over 55,000 library and archival objects related to the history of Minnesota’s capital county.

Ramsey County Historical Society (RCHS) requests a grant of $6,000.00 to fund a conservation condition survey of the Society’s collection of eleven horse-drawn vehicles and the implementation of environmental monitoring within their storage environments. As detailed in the Preservation Assessment Survey by the Midwest Art Conservation Center in 2014, these horse-drawn vehicles are a high-priority group within the RCHS collection as many of the vehicles belonged to the prominent Saint Paul family of James J. Hill. This survey will conduct an object-by-object analysis to determine each vehicles current condition. The final report will detail strategies for the next steps necessary to preserve and conserve this special collection that will then be incorporated into RCHS’s strategic and facilities planning to develop long-term collection plans for artifact conservation, improvement of storage facilities, and increasing accessibility by making the horse-drawn vehicle collection available to

Project fields:
History, General; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252786-17

Eastham Historical Society (Eastham, MA 02642-0008)
Debra DeJonker Berry (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Eastham Cultural Resource Institutions: Collaborating for Preservation in a Small, Close-knit Community

Conservation workshops on paper and photographic preservation, digital preservation, and exhibition handling, each accommodating 20 participants from the three Eastham, Massachusetts, institutions which hold historical materials related to the town and Cape Cod: the Library, the Historical Society, and the Town Clerk. The Historical Society Archives contain more than 100 linear feet of manuscript material, bound volumes, and photographic prints, as well as a small amount of audiovisual and digital material.  The Library’s special collections hold nearly 1,000 circulating and non-circulating published historical volumes and town and local records, as well as a small amount of original genealogical research.  The Town Clerk holds numerous files related to town history.  Notable items at the three institutions are 18th-century land deeds; 19th-century maritime ledgers, a light keeper’s log; early town maps; and Eastham’s 1770s indenture document, signed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, with its original wax seal.  The workshops are based on recommendations from a 2013 preservation needs assessment.

Those responsible for preservation of cultural institutions in Eastham, a small, historic town on Cape Cod, meet regularly to share information and work together on preservation, disaster planning and digitization. The group addresses areas that staff and volunteers feel they need training for and highlight resources to protect and make their collections more accessible. Over the last two years, several of the larger institutions (library, historical society, town clerk) have worked to begin digitizing their collections, attended an all day Disaster Planning workshop, and offered a workshop called "Broken Windows and Leaky Pipes" to those responsible for smaller collections.  This grant application will bring staff from the Northeast Document Conservation Center to Eastham for three full-day workshops on conservation techniques to further the group's collaborative goals to protect, digitize and display their collections and to offer training to other smaller cultural institutions.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,573 (approved)
$5,573 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


PG-252817-17

Xavier University of Louisiana (New Orleans, LA 70125-1056)
Irwin Lachoff (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)
Herbert McGuin (Co Project Director: 01/03/2017 to present)

Disaster Planning and Preparedness for Archives and Special Collections

The preparation of a disaster plan and the purchase of climate monitoring equipment, water detectors, and a light meter for the university’s Library Resource Center, which houses the institution’s archives and special collections.  Sources include 2,000 linear feet of records documenting the nation’s only historically black and Catholic university, established in 1915.  Notable special collections include the Charles F. Heartman Manuscripts of Slavery Collection, chronicling the lives of African Americans in Louisiana, both free and slave, from 1750 to 1890 as well as photographs of New Orleans-area black Catholic churches, clipping files from an anti-segregationist newspaper, The Crusader, and a handwritten poem by Fredrick Douglass.  A rare book collection comprising 7,500 volumes includes one of only three or four known original copies of Les Cennelles, the first anthology of African American poetry published in the United States.

The Xavier University of Louisiana Library Resource Center is requesting funding for the hiring of a consultant to assist in creating a disaster plan for the Library, as well as additional funding for monitoring equipment for the Archives and Special Collections department.  Xavier University of Louisiana is the only historically black and Catholic university in the United States.  The Library Resource Center, consisting of six stories, with the first four comprising the Library, was built in 1993.  While there is an "Emergency Procedures" policy in place for fire and smoke alarms, there is no disaster plan.  This grant will provide funds to hire a consultant to lead the Library in the creation of such a disaster plan.  The Archives and Special Collections recently concluded a NEH funded Preservation Assistance Grant.  That grant funded a consultant who reviewed Archives policies and procedure.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,621 (approved)
$5,621 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


PG-252867-17

Gloucester County Library System (Mullica Hill, NJ 08062-1553)
Nancy Polhamus (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Preservation and Access: Gloucester County Library System Local History Collection

The purchase of storage equipment for a collection of 69 rare books and numerous directories, booklets, and pamphlets.  Significant items include a four-volume set of Civil War letters from Gloucester County soldiers; A Permanent United Nations (1942) and United Nations Government (1945), authored by Gloucester native Amos J. Peaslee, member of one of the county’s founding Quaker families; and materials describing the first commercially successful glass factories in the American colonies, which were established in Gloucester and nearby Salem counties in the early 18th century.  A preservation report recommended the purchase of this locked cabinet to improve the security and accessibility of the collection.

The Gloucester County Library System (NJ) owns a local history collection that is currently stored in a secure work area of the library not open to the public. Interested parties must request that the items be retrieved in order to use them. The Preservation Assistance Grant will be used to purchase furniture and supplies to properly and securely store books, booklets, and other paper items in the local history collection at the headquarters library in Mullica Hill, NJ. GCLS will purchase two conservation grade locking cabinets with acrylic doors, UV-filtering film for the doors, and conservation quality bookends and other supplies to prevent deterioration of the collection. New cabinets will allow the collection to be returned to the public area of the library. Patrons wishing to use these items will sign them out with the reference librarian on duty. This will increase the visibility and accessibility of the collection, while greatly reducing the risk of damage or loss.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$1,650 (approved)
$1,650 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252876-17

Sheboygan County Historical Society and Museum (Sheboygan, WI 53081-3660)
Travis Gross (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Expanding Environmental Monitoring, Education, and Awareness for Sheboygan County Historical Society

Purchase of 13 HOBO data loggers, UV/Visible light meters, and supporting equipment to implement an advanced environmental monitoring program at the Sheboygan County Historical Society and Museum. The collection of over 30,000 objects documents the history of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, dating from 10,000 B.C.E to the present. Collection highlights include artifacts documenting the influence of the Cold War on small Midwestern communities, including an eight-foot radio-controlled drone and anti-aircraft artillery casings. The improved environmental monitoring plan is based on recommendations from three Museum Assessment Program evaluations, and will support a 2014 Institutional Plan that lists improved environmental monitoring as a priority for collection stewardship.

The Sheboygan County Historical Society and Museum’s permanent collection of 30,000 archaeological and material culture objects provides a broad and vibrant picture of the people, economics, and culture dating back 12,000 years, supporting the mission to collect, preserve, and educate about the history of Sheboygan County. An expanded environmental monitoring program, including upgraded equipment and staff knowledge on environment standards, is a critical part of long-term preservation and collection stewardship. Grant funds will support purchase of new environmental monitoring equipment, consultation on installation and use, along with staff training. This project, beginning January 2017 and ending May 2018, is an important aspect of the Museum’s Institutional Plan goals to improve collection maintenance and preservation through improved environmental and physical conditions, along with preservation planning, for the collection.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252907-17

David Lipscomb University (Nashville, TN 37204-3956)
Elizabeth Rivera (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Lipscomb University Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment and the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and preservation supplies for a collection of documents, books, periodicals, photographs, and audiovisual materials covering various aspects of the history of Tennessee, including the founding of the university in Nashville in 1891. 

Lipscomb University seeks a preservation assistance grant to assess the university's collections and develop a long-range preservation plan. Lipscomb's archives tell humanities stories of local, national, and international significance and include records of prominent American Restoration Movement leaders (1800s) and of local civil rights-era history (1900s); a vast collection of Christian hymnals dating back three centuries; letters written by former German POWs to Tennesseans who befriended them during their World War II-era captivity; and garments designed by iconic American fashion designer Ray Halston Frowick.  Through the grant, Lipscomb will retain a professional preservation consultant to assess the collections' physical and environmental storage conditions, as well as evaluate policies and practices that affect the university's preservation efforts. This assessment will be the basis for improved archival practices that ensure the collections' preservation for years to come.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252859-17

Withers Collection, Inc. (Memphis, TN 38103-3135)
Carol McCarley (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Withers Collection Archive Preservation Project

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and rehousing supplies, as well as online training for museum staff, for the collection of photographs, negatives, letters, and records of photojournalist Ernest C. Withers (1922-2007).  In the 1950s, Withers helped spur the movement for civil rights with a self-published photo pamphlet on the murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till.  Over the next two decades, Withers formed close personal relationships with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Medgar Evers, James Meredith, Ralph David Abernathy, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young and other prominent leaders of the early civil rights movement.  Perhaps the best-known of Withers’s photographs from the civil rights period were those of the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike.  He also photographed baseball players Satchel Paige, Jackie Robinson, and Willie Mays, as well as W.C. Handy, B.B. King, Elvis Presley, and Bill Clinton.  Supplies would be used to rehouse the oldest negatives, prioritized for their historical importance.

The Withers Collection, Inc. /dba/ The Withers Collection Museum and Gallery of Memphis, TN seeks NEH grant funding in support of efforts to archive and preserve the million plus items that comprise the Withers Collection. The Withers Collection is the works of Dr. Ernest C. Withers collected over a 60 year span as a photographer and photojournalist. The historic collection of black and white and also color images reflect the African American community in the Deep South from the 40’s to 2007, and has a visual representation of Civil Rights, Sports, Music, Politics and Life Style. The goal of the Withers Collection, Inc. in seeking NEH funding is to purchase environmental monitoring equipment (dataloggers and e-climate notebook), housing materials (sleeves, boxes, dividers) for negatives of all sizes and select 8x10 prints. The rehousing of our oldest materials is the next phase in our long term preservation efforts.

Project fields:
African American History; Journalism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,973 (approved)
$5,973 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


PG-252899-17

Black Archives of Mid-America, Inc. (Kansas City, MO 64108-1644)
Geraldyn Sanders (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

"History in Our Hands," The Black Archives of Mid-America 3-D Collection Items Preservation Project

A preservation assessment of 260 artifacts from the 1820s to the 1970s that help document the social, economic, political, and cultural history and contributions of African Americans, particularly in the American Midwest and Kansas City, Missouri.  Collections include historic farming equipment, military uniforms, medical equipment, textiles and quilts, furniture, and sculptures.  These objects are used by researchers ranging from K-12 to PhD students, from the general public to textbook publishers.

The mission of the Black Archives of Mid-America, Inc. is to collect, preserve and make available to the public materials documenting the social, economic, political and cultural contributions of African Americans to the central United States, with emphasis on Kansas City, Missouri. The Black Archives serves the community by offering itself as an educational resource and repository of culture, music, art, theater, education, the military, medicine, sports, and community affairs.  The goals of this project are to consult with an experienced conservator in conducting a preservation assessment and the creation of a preservation plan for three dimensional collection items such as historic farm tools, medical equipment, textiles such as quilts, military uniforms and designer gowns, furniture, and sculptures.  These items represent the socio-economic evolution of Africans Americans in the Midwest and are integral to understanding our shared history as Americans.

Project fields:
African American History; Cultural History; Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252251-17

Museum of Jewish Heritage (New York, NY 10280-1502)
Erica Blumenfeld (Project Director: 04/28/2016 to present)

Storage Rehousing Materials for Textile Collection

Purchase of storage equipment and preservation supplies for rehousing 900 textiles dating from the late 19th century to the present that document Jewish ritual and communal and private life.  The collection includes historic and contemporary garments and theatrical costumes, household linens, flags and banners, and items of personal adornment.  The textiles are used in permanent and traveling exhibits and are loaned to institutions around the world.  They are also used in classroom lessons on world history and Holocaust studies and for research by individuals and other institutions that focus on Jewish history and cultural traditions.

The Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust requests funding for the purchase of storage racks and archival materials for the second phase of its textile rehousing project. The Museum’s collection includes 900 textiles dating from the late 19th century to the present and represents all aspects of Jewish ritual, communal, and private life. This broad-ranging collection includes garments, household linens, theater costumes, and ritual textiles which require storage solutions beyond the Museum’s current box housing methods. As recommended in a recent assessment of the textile collection, the Museum’s rehousing plan focuses on the introduction of hanging and rolled storage systems and plans to update our current box supply. Implementing this tri-part system will allow the Museum to house each piece in its textile collection in the manner best suited to that item’s condition, construction, and needs.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Jewish Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252833-17

Davis and Elkins College (Elkins, WV 26241-3996)
Mary Jo DeJoice (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Special Colelctions and Archives: Purchase of Preservation Supplies and Environmental Monitoring Equipment

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and preservation supplies to maintain books, recordings, manuscripts, and historical objects documenting the history of the college (founded  in 1904) and the surrounding region in West Virginia. Highlights include video, audio, and photographs related to the folklore and music of Appalachia and the papers of writer Pearl Buck.

Davis & Elkins College will purchase recommended preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment for their Special Collections and Archives (SCA). Significant to Appalachian history and culture, the SCA include: the Augusta Collection, an assemblage of primarily audiovisual material documenting over 40 years of traditional Appalachian music and dance; the Comstock Collection, including original manuscripts and correspondence from Nobel Prize-winning author Pearl Buck; and the College Archives which house records for the Davis & Elkins Historic District (a National Historic Landmark), as well as from the prolific Senators Davis and Elkins. These supplies will allow Davis & Elkins College to continue short-term efforts recommended in a recently completed preservation assessment to improve current collections care and practices, as well as to facilitate forward momentum on a comprehensive preservation plan that will act as a guide for future preservation projects.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,684 (approved)
$5,684 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


PG-253018-17

Grundy County Historical Society (Tracy City, TN 37387-4072)
Cynthia Killian (Project Director: 05/10/2016 to present)

The Grundy County Historical Society’s Preservation Program for Materials in the Heritage Center, Tracy City, Tennessee

A preservation assessment; purchase of archival shelving, an environmental monitor, and preservation supplies; a three-day training workshop and in-house preservation training for staff and volunteers responsible for managing this local history collection.  Records include 2,470 original papers relating to the coal mining in Grundy County; rare 20th-century children’s and young adult fiction; 62 bound volumes of financial, county court, and other legal records from 1845-1948; atlases, maps, and plats of the area; 1,040 original postcards and photographs, including images of tourist attractions and of people and activities at the Highlander Folk School, a training ground for Civil Rights activists and Southern labor organizers; and five plats of the original Highlander Folk School property from the 1950s and ‘60s.  The collection is used by local and outside scholars, genealogists, and teachers.

To support the hiring of a preservation specialist to conduct an assessment of rare photographs, books and historical documents in the museum and special collections library in the Grundy County Historical Society (GCHS) Heritage Center; Tracy City, Tennessee.  The second activity is purchasing conservation tools, archives shelving and preservation supplies for images, county documents and rare books in the collections. Finally, a member of the library staff will attend a three-day workshop on preservation and archival techniques while in tandem, the preservation consultant will train volunteers on the use and installation of environmental monitoring equipment and the interpretation of the monitoring data.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; Rural Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,945 (approved)
$3,945 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252825-17

Nordic Heritage Museum Foundation (Seattle, WA 98117-6215)
Fred Poyner IV (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

National Costume Conservation at the Nordic Heritage Museum

A preservation assessment and the rehousing of a collection of 17 costumes, comprising 79 individual items of clothing, footwear, and accessories documenting the heritage of Scandinavia.  Two consultants, one specializing in textiles and the other in metals, would undertake a condition assessment of 17 men’s, women’s, and children’s folk costumes from Iceland, Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, dating from the late 19th century through the 1970s.  The costumes are used for in-house and traveling exhibits, educational programming for all ages, and research.

The Nordic Heritage Museum, in preparation for transfer to its new facility, respectfully seeks $5997 in funding support to rehouse a select portion of its textile collection. The selection, consisting of 79 items, is a unique collection of 17 National Costumes representing the five Nordic countries and the Sami people, obtained from the Seattle Nordic-American community. The National Costumes collection has been on display continuously for 10 years in Museum’s folk art gallery. To prepare the collection for moving and long term storage, archival quality boxes and clothes racks are needed to safely store these important representations of cultural and everyday Pacific Northwest Nordic-American life. All items require inspection, condition reporting, packing, and storage for transfer to padded archival boxes. Support would provide for conservation services and supplies to undertake this essential work for the long term care of the collection.

Project fields:
Folklore and Folklife; Immigration History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,997 (approved)
$5,997 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


PG-252832-17

Radford University (Radford, VA 24142-0001)
Aaron Spelbring (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Radford University McConnell Library Archives Bragg New River Coalfields Photographic Collections Preservation Assessment

The hiring of a preservation consultant to conduct a general preservation assessment of 1,280 glass plate negatives, approximately 300 large and medium-format Cirkut Camera negatives, and approximately 1,000 photographic prints of various sizes.  The collection documents the work of three photographers active in the New River Valley region of southeastern West Virginia: Rufus E. Ribble, William O. Trevey, and Willis W. Vail.  It provides a unique record of the New River coalfields over a 50-year span from their early years, the Great Depression, and through the industry’s postwar modernization.  Also documented are portraits of individuals of Italian and Eastern European descent, as well as African American subjects.  The photographs have been used in several local exhibits, books about the social and labor history of mining, and the PBS American Experience documentary, The Mine Wars.

The McConnell Library’s Archives and Special Collections seeks to hire the services of a conservation consultant to perform a preservation assessment on it George and Melody Bragg New River Coal Fields Photographic Collections. These collections document social and environmental conditions in the southern West Virginia coalfields from their early inception through the post-World War II years, highlighting labor forces, social groups, architecture, and environmental scenes. Consisting primarily of glass-plate negatives and rolled Cirkut Camera negatives, these collections are particularly at risk if proper preservation measures are not ensured.

Project fields:
Labor History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252190-17

Monroe County Historical Society Museum (Bloomington, IN 47408-3518)
Hilary Fleck (Project Director: 04/28/2016 to present)

Collections Storage Shelving Upgrade

The purchase of archival quality storage units to rehouse the small and medium-sized objects in the permanent collection of the Monroe County History Center (MCHC). These objects make up approximately 40% of MCHC’s 50,000-item collection and are currently stored on cantilever shelving which is both dangerous for the objects and an inefficient use of space. Objects contained in the collection pertain to the history of Monroe County, Indiana, and include cultural and historical items such as children’s toys, antique medical devices, and limestone carving tools. Of particular importance are objects and archives pertaining to the history of Indiana University and the locally started, but nationally famous, Gentry Brothers Circus.

The Monroe County History Center (MCHC) houses a collection of approximately 50,000 objects, documents, and photographs that relate to the history and culture of Monroe County, Indiana. The mission of the MCHC is to foster a deeper understanding and appreciation of Monroe County's history, culture, and natural environment; we accomplish this through the use of items from our collection in exhibits, displays, programs, and research made available to the public. The items covered in this request include our small to medium-sized objects, which constitute about 40% of our entire collection. Our current storage for the majority of these smaller objects consists of steel cantilever library shelving, which poses significant risks to the integrity of the artifacts. The funds requested here would support the purchase of four professional storage furniture units to rehouse the small and medium-sized objects in the permanent collection.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252751-17

City of San Jose, Library Department (San Jose, CA 95112-3580)
Erin Herzog (Project Director: 04/29/2016 to present)

Preservation of a Library Collection

The purchase of protective enclosures, light-filtering window film, and environmental monitoring equipment for the California Room collection documenting the history of the first civic settlement on the West Coast, its adjacent mission, and the agricultural region known as The Valley of Heart’s Delight.  Materials include 4,421 books, including publications of local San Jose area authors; personal photo and travel books of area residents; 300 books of California poetry ranging from 1866 to 1920; local yearbooks and city directories; and 1,288 maps documenting the growth of Santa Clara County from 1781 to 2004.

The California Room, a unit within the San José Public Library, a department of the City of San José, holds many unique materials chronicling the development of Northern California, emphasizing Santa Clara County and the City of San José. This project focuses on our most highly used collections supporting history, anthropology, political science, urbanization and geology research. Materials range from photographs and ephemera to government records dating from the late 1840's. Materials include; maps (street and subdivisions, Sanborn books, block books, city and county, 1837-2004), directories (the most extensive collection of Santa Clara County and San José City Directories, 1870-1970), and books (including local poets and authors published in San José, 1767- present). Custom protective enclosures for those materials in fragile condition will be provided, and two environmental concerns will be addressed: light exposure and temperature and humidity controls.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,351 (approved)
$5,351 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252881-17

Tusculum College (Greeneville, TN 37745-0595)
Dollie Boyd (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Textile Conservation and Training

A preservation assessment of the textile collections of the Doak House Museum and Andrew Johnson Museum and Library.  They include items owned by President Andrew Johnson and his family, such as quilts and coverlets, particularly during their time in the White House, and objects related to the history of Tusculum College, such as pennants and sports uniforms.  The consulting conservator would also hold a workshop on the care and preservation of textiles for museum staff, volunteers, and students in the museum studies, history, and public history programs.

The focus of this project is the entire textile collection of the Museums of Tusculum College.  The collection includes 19th century quilts, woven coverlets, handwork, hand-crafted garments, College uniforms, College ephemera, and items that belonged to President Andrew Johnson. This collection documents the history of the oldest College in the state of Tennessee and its surrounding community. In order to better care for our small but significant collection of textiles, we intend to pay a textile conservator's fees and travel to the College for assessment, advice, and training of our museum studies students and the museum's staff. Remaining funds will be used to purchase better supplies to increase the standard of care for our textile collection. Purchases will be based on the conservator's advice regarding storage needs and disposition. The education component will provide an invaluable educational experience for our undergraduate students, volunteers, and staff.

Project fields:
Folklore and Folklife; Public History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252903-17

Contra Costa County Historical Society (Martinez, CA 94553-1114)
Priscilla Couden (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Implementation of a Preservation Plan for the Contra Costa County History Center

The hiring of a consultant and the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and supplies for a collection of over 2,000 linear feet of materials documenting the history of one of California’s original counties.  Highlights of the collection include judicial records dating back to 1850; historic newspapers and naturalization documents from the 19th and 20th centuries; detailed histories and genealogies of California’s pioneer families and Native American peoples; mid-19th century California maps; and the files of R.R. Veale, county sheriff from 1895 to 1935 and an early proponent of fingerprinting and the humane treatment of prisoners.  Materials from the collection have been used in exhibitions on elections, the women’s suffrage movement, and the Panama Pacific International Exposition of 1915. 

The Contra Costa County History Center, located in Martinez, California, contains over 2000 linear feet of collections relating to the history of Contra Costa County, the 9th largest county in California, with a population of 1,000,000.  The History Center's collections date back to pre-statehood days and include important documents available to the public relating to Native American and pioneer California history, law enforcement history from 1895-1935¸original U.S. naturalization documents from 1869-1984, and ledgers and court case papers from 1850 onward.  It is also the repository of the Contra Costa County Superior Court's mandated records up to the year 1911.  With grant funds, the Contra Costa County History Center would hire a consultant and purchase equipment that will help the Center implement a preservation plan that includes installing monitoring equipment for temperature and humidity, light mitigation, and preservation of these valuable collections.

Project fields:
History, Other; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252912-17

University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0001)
Lydia Joffray (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Gorgas House Museum Art and Paper Conservation Project

A conditions survey of the works of art on paper in the Gorgas House Collection dating from the 17th to the early 20th centuries, including early Dutch prints inherited by the Gorgas family, historic photographs of family members and the University of Alabama, and painted portraits of Gorgas and Gayle family members.  The collections provide interpretive material not only for the Gorgas family (General Josiah Gorgas served as the eighth president of the University), but also for the history of the University of Alabama, from the day it first opened, through its role as a military institution during the Civil War, to the days of the Civil Rights movement.  The collections also provide the foundation for the developing public history curriculum; the Gorgas House has increased its number of student volunteers, who dedicate more than 1,000 hours a semester to support the museum and its mission with interpretation and educational programming.

The Gorgas House Museum seeks a Preservation Assistance grant to hire a certified conservator to conduct an item by item assessment of paintings and other works on paper as recommended by the Collections Assessment Program. Conservator David Goist would conduct the assessment and provide a prioritized list for conservation. Goist will also present "Best Conservation is Prevention" Power Point to further the education of our stakeholders in conservation care. The Gorgas House Museum is the oldest structure on the University of Alabama campus (1829) and provides an important role in educating students in campus history, as well as providing them with a hands-on learning experience in public history and museum science. The artifacts in the Gorgas House feature furnishings from a 19th century Alabama family, but also features pieces connected to William Gorgas, Surgeon General of the United States Army, and eradicator of yellow fever during the construction of the Panama Canal.

Project fields:
Military History; Public History; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252935-17

City of Whittier (Whittier, CA 90602-1730)
Paymaneh Maghsoudi (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Shelves and Consultant Recommendations for the Handling and Long-Term Conservation of City Tax Assessment Ledgers, 1898-1950

The purchase of shelving and a conservator’s assessment for historic tax records located in the Whittier History Collection.  The 52 tax assessment ledgers and 24 accompanying indexes cover the years 1898 to 1950 and include names of property owners, dimensions of lots, the amounts of personal property and taxes levied, and notes on sales and purchases.  Volumes from 1898 to 1903 hold particular significance as they contain the only comprehensive record of Whittier residents at that time.  Researchers in genealogy, social and economic history, architectural trends, migration patterns, education, business, and cultural organizations use these materials in tandem with other resources on Whittier and California history.  A 2015 report recommended the proposed activities.

This project provides for the proper storage of an irreplaceable local history resource: 76 volumes of tax assessment ledgers and indexes. Proper storage of these ledgers was identified as a priority by a California Preservation Assessment Project report in 2015. This project also provides expert conservator's assessment, which will include recommendations on safe handling and long-term conservation plans for the ledgers. This resource is significant to the humanities as it encourages people to draw connections between their own history and identity and that of the town, state, and nation. The historical context of researchers' families and homes becomes interesting, and broader themes of the humanities are illuminated. Examples include genealogy and home research leading to reference questions regarding the economic history of Whittier, architectural trends, migration patterns, and the history of area schools, businesses, and cultural organizations.

Project fields:
Economics; Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-253011-17

Muhlenberg County Public Libraries (Greenville, KY 42345-1539)
Amie Waltrip (Project Director: 05/09/2016 to present)

Preservation Assessment

Hiring a team of consultants to complete a general preservation assessment of collections housed within Thistle Cottage, a historic home built in 1912 and operated by the Muhlenberg Public Library. The Cottage contains over 3,000 artifacts, including household furniture and décor, rare books, financial documents, and a large textile collection. These items document the local history of Greenville, Kentucky, with an emphasis on the coal mining industry and local music, and are used for interpretive school and community programs throughout the year. In addition to a general preservation assessment, the consultants will focus on the preservation needs of paper documents and textiles, which have been identified by staff as needing additional assessment.

Our historic 1912 home has been turned into a museum containing approximately 3,000 items. Amongother items, this collection includes large amounts of paper documents, books and textiles that we useto demonstrate our local and national heritage to visitors. These items, which date back to the 1840s,illustrate life in Muhlenberg County, Ky. and the surrounding area throughout the past 150 years. Manyof these items were victims of neglect before coming into our possession, but it is now our duty tomake sure they do not fall into further disrepair. To that end, with funding through the NationalEndowment for the Humanities Preservation Assistance Grant, we will be employing a pair ofconsultants to assess our property and the specific collection items mentioned above, which we havedeemed to be the most at risk. This assessment will enable us to better care for these vitally importantpieces of history.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252842-17

American Jewish Historical Society (New York, NY 10011-6301)
Susan Malbin (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Hadassah Archives: Record Group 21: Architectural Records Oversized Materials Housing

Purchase of storage furniture for oversized architectural records, including over 1,000 linear feet of materials in the Hadassah Archives that document activities of the Women’s Zionist Organization of America. Founded in 1912, Hadassah sponsors a variety of educational, medical, and cultural programs in both the United States and Israel.

This grant would support the American Jewish Historical Society (“AJHS”) with the expansion of storage for oversized materials from the Hadassah Archives collection, specifically Record Group 21: Architectural Records which is comprised of building plans for projects with Hadassah Hospital on Mount Scopus and in Ein Kerem and buildings managed by Youth Aliyah, Hadassah Youth Services, Young Judea, the National office, Hadassah Israel Education Services, Educational Services and the Hadassah Medical Organization from the 1920s-2000s. The Hadassah Archives is one of the most valuable collections at the AJHS and the most utilized collection in the reading room at the Center for Jewish History (“the Center”). AJHS is committed to preserving and safeguarding the materials for long-time storage and making the materials available for researchers worldwide who come to view the records in the collection.

Project fields:
Architecture; Jewish Studies; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,411 (approved)
$5,411 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252856-17

Loretto Literary and Benevolent Institution (Nerinx, KY 40049-9998)
Eleanor Craig (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

General Preservation Assessment of the Archival Collections of the Sisters of Loretto

A preservation assessment for the Loretto Heritage Center’s archives and a training workshop on collections care for local cultural heritage institutions. The archives represent over 200 years of educational, social, and spiritual efforts of the Sisters of Loretto, a Catholic congregation founded in 1812. The collection consists of about 900 linear feet of paper documents, 300 books, over 3,000 artifacts and art works, photographs, and audiovisual media. Archival records include administrative documents, materials on slavery, and documents chronicling the history of the school maintained by the order.

The Sisters of Loretto Heritage Center preserves, displays and makes accessible to the public the documents, audio-visual media and artifacts that document 200 years of Loretto education in the US and abroad. The Heritage Center will contract with the Northeast Document Conservation Center for a preservation assessment of its archival collections, followed by a training workshop on preservation for Loretto and four other archives. The half-day site visit will yield a written report of observations and recommendations, identifying short-, mid-, and long-term preservation priorities for Loretto, along with guidance on implementing a long-range preservation plan. The 3-hour training workshop will focus on handling and storage for collections, particularly fragile bound volumes, collection management and processing standards, and disaster preparedness. This assessment begins a long-range preservation program which will allow responsible programming for greater public access.

Project fields:
Religion, Other; U.S. Regional Studies; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,150 (approved)
$5,150 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252738-17

Colorado Railroad Historical Foundation (Golden, CO 80402-0010)
Stephanie Gilmore (Project Director: 04/29/2016 to present)

Environmental Monitoring Program for Collections Care at the Colorado Railroad Museum

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for use in storage and exhibition areas of the Colorado Railroad Museum.  The museum’s collections include over 100 railroad cars and 3,500 artifacts, engineering maps, photographs, uniforms, tools, and other railroad equipment from the mid-19th century to the present.  The foundation also holds an archive of 10,000 railroad books, timetables, mechanical drawings, travel brochures, films, and other railroad ephemera.  A qualified preservation consultant would train museum staff and volunteers in the installation of the environmental monitoring equipment as well in the interpretation of the collected data.

This project entails the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for the collections storage areas and the permanent galleries on site at the Colorado Railroad Museum. It will also include a consultant-led online training session for Museum staff and volunteers on how to set up the equipment and how to offload and interpret data collected from it.  The goals of this project are based upon recommendations from a Preservation Site Assessment conducted in 2013 through the Colorado Connecting to Collections IMLS program.  The Museum plans to develop an environmental monitoring system for areas throughout the Museum where collections are stored or exhibited. Dataloggers will be purchased to record temperature and humidity in collections areas. We will train staff and volunteers on the use and installation of the data loggers, as well as how to interpret the data through the web program eClimate Notebook.  Results from this project will inform future collections management decisions.

Project fields:
American Studies; History, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,867 (approved)
$5,867 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252802-17

Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI 49931-1200)
Lindsay Hiltunen (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Michigan Tech Archives Map and Blue Print Assessment 2017

A preservation assessment of more than 18,000 engineering drawings, tracings, and blueprints and 7,000 historical maps, as well as photographs, posters, and other illustrations documenting the early history and economic development of Michigan’s mineral-rich Upper Peninsula.

For over a century and a half, Michigan's "Copper Country"  was the center of the nation's copper mining industry, the rise and fall of which has left a rich historical and fraught environmental legacy. This history can be further illuminated through use of the Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections ("archives"), an archives with the largest and deepest collection related to this subject. A flat file collection composed of over 25,000 regional maps, engineering drawings, blueprints and surveys is currently undiscoverable and without condition descriptions. A preservation consulting firm will be engaged to develop a detailed assessment report that will form the basis of an internal action plan that will be used by archives' staff to produce a complete inventory, catalog and index of the collections, preserve the material for future generations, and optimize accessibility for the wide variety of patrons visiting the archives annually.

Project fields:
History, General; History, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252434-17

Stephen F. Austin State University (Nacogdoches, TX 75965-3940)
Jamie Cupit (Project Director: 04/28/2016 to present)

Costume Collection General Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of nearly 800 pieces of clothing and accessories ranging from the 1880s to the 1990s.  The collection includes both readymade and designer clothing from local design houses such as Mize Modes and large and well-known designers and retailers such as Christian Dior, Neiman Marcus, Saks, and Bergdorf Goodman, as well as military uniforms and a large collection of hats and shoes.  Items in the collection are used to teach the history of fashion and design through exhibitions and courses on topics such as costumes and visual merchandising in the 20th century.

The proposed project relates to the Stephen F. Austin State University School of Human Sciences Costume Collection, a collection of apparel and accessory pieces dating from the late 1800's.  The proposed project would involve engaging a conservator with expertise in preservation and exhibition of textiles and costume artifacts to visit and conduct a general preservation assessment of the collection. Used for teaching and community outreach, the collection provides an important link for studies in human culture.  The overall goal of the project is to improve ability to responsibly preserve and care for the costume collection and provide a foundation for its future use, care and storage. Specific goals of the conservator's visit are to assess condition and preservation needs of the costume collection, its management and storage. The grant will support the on-site general preservation assessment, preparation of a report and travel expenses of a conservator.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,978 (approved)
$4,978 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252861-17

Robert Aqqaluk Newlin, Sr. Memorial Trust (Kotzebue, AK 99752-0509)
Hans Nelson (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

General Preservation Assessment of Aqqaluk Memorial Trust Iñupiaq Collections

The hiring of an audiovisual preservation consultant to conduct an assessment of, and draft a disaster preparedness plan for, 4,000 items including audiocassettes, photographs, videos, hard copy transcriptions, translations, and other materials documenting the history of the Iñupiat people.  Over 500 recordings made during the Elders Conference movement between 1965 and the 1980s are in the native language, Iñupiaq, and cover the social and economic changes that were taking place among the northwest Iñupiat.  Highlights of the tapes include recordings of elders and other leaders such as Robert Newlin Sr., Frank Ferguson, Willie Hensley, and John Schaeffer, who became Alaska senators and first board Chairs and Presidents of the NANA Regional Corporation.  Among the highlights of the video collection is “Caribou Crisis, An Eskimo Perspective 1977,” which documents the “hunting restrictions, subsistence living, and the struggle to find a balance between the old ways and new corporate realities.”

Aqqaluk Memorial Trust collections are exceedingly rare and unique recordings of Iñupiat people of northwest Arctic Alaska. Elders speaking in their native tongue address topics from traditional subsistence practices to personal life stories above the Arctic Circle, against the backdrop of historical U.S. legislation that changed their world forever. Aging audio and videotapes begin to fail on playback, causing irreparable damage. The assessment will identify practical improvements to current environmental storage practices and enhance methods for handling, cataloging and digitization. A disaster plan for the collection will also result. Outcomes will ensure the magnetic tape recordings are safely copied, cataloged, and made broadly accessible in digital form. Preserving these recordings is a race against time. President Obama, addressing climate change in Kotzebue in 2015, noted the way of life practiced for thousands of years by Alaska Natives "is in danger of slipping away."

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Cultural History; Linguistic Anthropology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


PG-251862-17

University of Central Oklahoma (Edmond, OK 73034-5209)
Mary Huffman (Project Director: 04/27/2016 to present)

UCO Fashion Museum Collection: Assessment and Preservation Training

A general preservation assessment, conservation assessment of selected items, and a preservation workshop related to the museum’s collection of 800 pieces of clothing and accessories from the 1890s through the 1970s.  They include designer items as well as fashions representing social, economic, and cultural changes during this period. Some items of note include costumes, uniforms, and formal dress worn by students at the university and a collection of flapper dresses and accessories.

The University of Central Oklahoma is requesting $6,000 for a general preservation assessment of the Fashion Museum Collection on campus, as well as for education and training of preservation techniques by a textile conservator. This collection is the only collection of designer clothing available in the state on a college campus available for research and study. It contains over 800 pieces of designer and/or representative clothing from the 1890s through the 1970s, and over 300 hats, 100 shoes, and miscellaneous accessories.  All items were collected by and/or donated by prominent women in Oklahoma. The textile conservator will be contracted to: 1) perform a collections survey, 2) develop detailed plans for improving storage, 3) assess the conservation treatment of selected items in the collection, 4) provide a one day workshop on preservation techniques, and 5) serve as a mentor for an advanced student or recent graduate from UCO's Museum Studies program on this project.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252794-17

Indiana University of Pennsylvania Research Institute (Indiana, PA 15701-2898)
Harrison Wick (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to present)

Preserve the Humanities Collections in the IUP Special Collections and University Archives

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and supplies to help preserve 160 linear feet of archival records; the collection includes correspondence, exhibition materials, newspaper articles, artwork, and photographs pertaining to artists, authors, and humanities scholars affiliated with the university or based in western Pennsylvania.

The purpose of this project is to further support the short-term, mid-range, and long-term recommendations of survey reports conducted by consultants Rachel Onuf and Rachel Wetzel.  The survey included assessments of the collections storage and handling, environmental conditions in the storage areas, emergency preparedness, and security, among other issues.  The humanities collections in the IUP Special Collections and University Archives were assessed in their entirety, and requested storage furniture, preservation equipment, and archival supplies were specified and justified in the attached consultant's assessment survey.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$5,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


PG-252851-17

Spelman College (Atlanta, GA 30314-4399)
Holly Smith (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Documenting Our Stories: Preserving the Archival Collections of Spelman College

A preservation assessment, the purchase of preservation supplies, and online preservation training for staff, in an effort to ensure the preservation of more than 5,000 linear feet of administrative records, newspapers, and yearbooks dealing with the history of this college for African American women established in Atlanta in 1881. Highlights include more than 30,000 photographs depicting life at Spelman and assorted materials related to feminism, civil rights, and LGBTQ activism.

This project seeks funding for a conservator to perform a preservation assessment for the Spelman College Archival Collections. A comprehensive assessment is crucial for planning long-term preservation strategies and goals for the diverse collections.  The Spelman Archives were officially established in 1981, as part of the Women's Research and Resource Center. As the official repository for Spelman College, the Archives contains the papers of the past presidents, faculty, staff, alumnae, and students, as well as a rich photographic collection containing more than 30,000 images from the late 19th century to the present.  In addition to preserving the institutional history of the College, as part of the Women's Center the Archives also documents women of the African Diaspora involved in social justice activism, civil rights, LGBTQ advocacy, and black feminism.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,884 (approved)
$5,884 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


PG-251921-17

University of Vermont (Burlington, VT 05405-0160)
Margaret Tamulonis (Project Director: 04/27/2016 to present)

Assessing and Improving the Housing of the Access to Works on Paper

The purchase of new flat file cabinets and environmental monitors to support the care of the Fleming Museum’s 5,300-item collection of works on paper. This project addresses two high-priority recommendations from a 2010 Conservation Assessment Program survey, namely better care of and access to high-use and oversized works on paper, and more accurate recording of temperature and relative humidity in storage spaces. Works to be rehoused include 33 etchings by 18th-century Italian printmaker Giovanni Piranesi, a collection of propaganda posters from World War I and World War II, and original Disney animation cels from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Oversize modern and contemporary prints and drawings by Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, and Andy Warhol would also be stored in the new flat files, allowing museum staff to accommodate requests from students and faculty to access these important works.

The Fleming Museum of Art proposes to improve its collections storage facilities with the addition of two new flat file cabinets and three environmental monitors. The Fleming collection consists of 24,978 items, including fine arts, ethnographic, and historical material, amassed since the University’s original “Curator’s Cabinet” began in 1827. We seek to significantly improve our storage of works on paper—primarily European and American prints, drawings, paintings, and photographs from the seventeenth century to the present—by replacing one outdated and difficult-to-use flat file cabinet and adding two new ones. By easing access to and handling of this part of our collection, which is frequently used by curators, faculty, students, and scholars, we will improve the condition of the works and prevent damage. Furthermore, the acquisition and installation of PEM2 monitors on 3 levels of collections storage will greatly improve environmental monitoring of our spaces.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,742 (approved)
$5,742 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252739-17

Leslie/Lohman Gay Art Foundation, Inc. (New York, NY 10013-2227)
Hunter O'Hanian (Project Director: 04/29/2016 to present)

Collection Preservation Assessment and Emergency/Disaster Preparedness Plan

A preservation assessment of the Leslie/Lohman Gay Art Foundation’s artist and institutional files and a workshop on collections care for staff of local cultural heritage organizations. The collection includes unique files on over 2,000 LGBTQ artists who exhibited in New York City, as well as institutional files dating from 1969–85 chronicling over 200 exhibits and the LGBTQ art scene during the AIDS crisis, among other events.

To conduct a preservation assessment of the Museum‘s files examining policies and practices supporting collection preservation, assess current storage and condition of artist and institutional files (146 linear ft.), identify preservation and conservation needs of the materials contained, and recommend preservation and conservation actions needed for future care and sustainability of these files. It will provide staff training covering archival collections care, handling techniques, housing and storage strategies, and supply selection. The files contain information relating to national and international LGBTQ art makers from the last quarter of the 20th century which in some cases, researchers state, has not been available elsewhere. Also, a 3-hour training workshop will review key concepts of emergency preparedness including risk assessment, response procedures, and recovery actions. This workshop, hosted by the Museum, will be open to other local area cultural organizations.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Gender Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,980 (approved)
$5,980 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252758-17

William Paterson University (Wayne, NJ 07470-2152)
Kristen Evangelista (Project Director: 04/29/2016 to present)

William Paterson University Collection Storage Improvement Plan

The preparation of a comprehensive collection storage improvement plan, focusing on both immediate and long-term storage needs of the 3,418-object William Patterson University art collection. This collection, which dates to the university’s 1855 founding, has grown from a core collection of historic furnishings and decorative arts to include 530 ethnographic objects, 51 sculptures, 409 artists’ books, 138 paintings, and over 2,000 photographic prints and negatives. Highlights include a large wooden D’mba headdress worn by the Baba peoples of the Guinea coast, 19th-century paintings by Willard Leroy Metcalf and Edwin Lord Weeks, and over 300 photographs by Artie Van Blarcum, who was active in vanguard New Jersey camera clubs in the 1960s. A comprehensive collection storage plan would provide a strategy for reconfiguring collections storage and inform future facilities and HVAC renovations, and was recommended as a high priority during a 2014 conservation assessment.

William Paterson University Galleries’ collection consists of approximately 3,418 objects in diverse media; highlights include significant 19th century paintings by Willard Leroy Metcalf and Edwin Lord Weeks, 530 African and Oceanic ethnographic objects, and 409 unique or limited edition artists’ books dating from 1960 to the present. The collection is a valuable tool for broadening and deepening cultural awareness and understanding through educational instruction, scholarly research, exhibitions, and public programs for WPU faculty and students, visiting scholars, and the general public. This project addresses the most pressing institutional challenges of WPU Galleries, whose exhibition galleries and storage areas were built in 1968 and are long overdue for museum-quality storage. The project will build upon the 2014 conservation assessment and develop a detailed plan for the implementation of collections storage improvements that will inform future facilities and HVAC renovations.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-252821-17

Heurich House Foundation (Washington, DC 20036-1531)
Erika Goergen (Project Director: 05/02/2016 to 03/02/2017)
Rachel Jerome (Project Director: 03/02/2017 to present)

Heurich House Museum Collections Storage Improvement Plan

Consultation with a conservator to develop a collections storage plan for approximately 60 objects—original furnishings, decorative art, and textiles—used to interpret the “Brewmaster’s Castle,” the late-Victorian home of German immigrant, local brewer, and philanthropist Christian Heurich in the Dupont Circle area of Washington, DC.  Building on recommendations from a 2015 collections assessment, the storage plan would allow the house museum to better preserve objects that are original to the Heurich family and more conveniently rotate items between storage and public display.  Collection items are exhibited the way the family used them; displays provide insight into late-Victorian decorating trends and the technical processes companies used to create the artifacts.

This grant will fund the Heurich House Museum's Collections Storage Improvement Plan, which will be created by a professional conservator to improve the preventative conservation and accessibility of collections. The museum is the former home of Christian Heurich (1842-1945) and his family. Heurich was a German immigrant and Washington, DC's most successful brewer; his Christian Heurich Brewing Co. was the largest private employer in the city at the turn of the century. The Heurich family lived in their mansion on New Hampshire Avenue for over fifty years and maintained many of the original furnishings and finishes throughout the house. The materials addressed with this grant include Oriental and Persian rugs, settees, chairs, painted murals, lighting fixtures and other decorative pieces that illustrate popular styles and craftsmanship during the late-Victorian period and interpret the history of the Heurich family.

Project fields:
American Studies; Arts, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,995 (approved)
$5,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018