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Funded Projects Query Form
76 matches

Program: Preservation Assistance Grants*
Date range: 2018-2018
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PG-258257-18

St. Mary's College of Maryland (St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3002)
Liza A. Gijanto (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

A Conservation Assessment of the Gambia Archaeological Collections

A conservation assessment of the Gambia Archaeological Collections at St. Mary’s College of Maryland (SMCM), which encompasses around 3,000,000 artifacts and includes earthenware and porcelain ceramics, glass vessels, beads, clay tobacco pipes, and spindle whorls from eight archaeological sites representing the Atlantic (17th to early 19th century) and colonial eras (early 19th to mid-20th century) on the Gambia River, in West Africa. The applicant would also offer a two-week workshop to train students in collections care to ensure ongoing stewardship of the collection within the college for teaching, research, and public programs, including exhibitions and nationally broadcast films.

The Gambia Archaeological Collection at St. Mary’s College of Maryland is the largest assemblage of artifacts representing the long-term trajectory of the Atlantic Slave Trade from its inception to its abolition by the British. This includes artifacts from British trading houses, local commercial towns, slave settlements, French merchants and Liberated Africans. Of particular note are the materials from Kunta Kinte’s home village of Juffure. The proposed assessment will evaluate the current organization, housing and conservation of the collections and provide specific recommendations (e.g., proper housing and storage of the collections) to maximize accessibility of the artifacts. To date, access has been limited for students and researchers not affiliated with the College. The goal is to increase access and enable the development of an online presence for the materials that would raise visibility and thus use.

Project fields:
African History; Archaeology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,925 (approved)
$5,925 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258259-18

Basque Museum and Cultural Center (Boise, ID 83702-5971)
Amanda Bielmann (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Storage Furniture and Archival Supplies for Oversized Collections

The purchase of storage equipment and preservation supplies for oversized print and manuscript materials documenting the history and culture of the Basque population in southwest Idaho and elsewhere in the western United States. Included are 70 posters, 50 maps, 70 certificates (including handwritten documents in Spanish and Basque), and 150 newspapers in tabloid and broadside formats, dating from the 1910s to the present. The sources provide historical information on Basque performing arts groups and cultural festivals along with immigration, naturalization, birth, and marriage records and have been used in scholarly and genealogical research, educational activities, and exhibitions.

The Basque Museum & Cultural Center (BMCC), located in Boise, Idaho, will purchase flat file cabinets and appropriate archival-quality supplies for the storage of selected oversized collections such as posters, documents, newspapers and maps. Curatorial staff and volunteers will then re-house the selected collections and update cataloging records, as needed. These collections comprise a portion of BMCC's permanent collection and are used to carry out its mission to "...preserve, promote and perpetuate Basque history and culture."

Project fields:
Immigration History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258295-18

Bradshaw H. Grady Library (Valley, AL 36854-3212)
Robin Brown (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Margaret Bourke-White Photomurals Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of six photomurals produced by documentary photographer and illustrator Margaret Bourke-White from images taken in 1936 of the West Point Manufacturing Company, headquartered in West Point, Georgia. These 4’ x 8’ murals depict life and work in the factories and villages of a company that encompassed five individual textile mills in eastern Alabama. The project would also include a workshop, led by a preservation specialist, on the care and handling of photographs, open to archivists and other cultural heritage professionals in the region.

In 1936, Margaret Bourke-White was commissioned by the West Point Manufacturing Company, a leading textile manufacturer in the South, to photograph operations at its five mills in Chambers County, Alabama. Already a preeminent photographer and the first female photojournalist with Life magazine, Bourke-White spent two days photographing the interaction of people and machines at the textile mills. From this visit, the company ordered six large photomurals to decorate its new sales room which doubled as its textile research center. Textile manufacturing built, sustained, and defined communities in Chambers County for over 100 years until the industry’s decline in the 1990s. The photomurals preserve a vanishing textile heritage. Cobb Memorial Archives received the photomurals in 2015, after they had sustained damage. With the expertise of an experienced conservator, the Archives will develop a plan to properly store, preserve, and display these visual links to the area’s past.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Labor History; Public History; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,130 (approved)
$5,130 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258324-18

History San Jose (San Jose, CA 95112-2599)
Catherine Mills (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Improving Space Management and Increasing Storage Capacity at History San Jose's Collection Center to Ensure Long-Term Access

The purchase of 86 shelving units for History San Jose’s climate-controlled storage area, adding 330 linear feet of storage, allowing the applicant to move vulnerable material into the collection space. The materials that would be moved include approximately 323 linear feet of personal papers, business, and other institutional records.  Highlights of the collection include early pioneer and immigrant family papers, City of San Jose Council records dating back to the Gold Rush era, and 36 linear feet of material relevant to social justice issues of the 1950s and 1960s.

History San Jose (HSJ) provides access to materials spanning 250 years regarding the city of San Jose, and the Santa Clara Valley. This grant will support expansion of our mobile shelving through the purchase of 86 additional shelves. The increased space will house recently processed backlog of archival materials currently stored on pallets, and create room for new donations. Moving archival materials off of pallets will then allow artifacts to be moved out of an unsuitable warehouse into this space. Shelved storage in an appropriate environment will significantly improve long-term access to materials from HSJ’s collection, and enhance HSJ's exhibit programs. Humanities scholars will benefit from materials that illuminate socio-economic issues such as redevelopment, housing, and urban sprawl; the impact of economic, demographic, and technological changes on the land; and the relationship between our many immigrant groups and the Valley’s culture and historical geography.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,923 (approved)
$5,923 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258333-18

St. Vincent College (Latrobe, PA 15650-2690)
Elizabeth DiGiustino (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Assessing First Priority Conservation Treatment Needs of the Special and Saint Vincent Legacy Collections

A consultation with a preservation specialist to recommend next steps in mold remediation for the library’s special collections. A previous NEH-funded preservation assessment identified an extensive mold outbreak affecting the rare books and manuscripts, and this second, more targeted consultation would determine which materials need individual attention from a trained conservator and which books can be safely cleaned by an outside vendor or by library staff. Of the 6,857 volumes, primarily of paper, parchment, or vellum, more than 100 are at least 500 years old and include theological and philosophical works of the Catholic Church and the Benedictine Order. The Saint Vincent Archabbey and College was founded in 1846 as the first Benedictine monastery in the United States.

An on-site visit and report by a Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts book conservator will identify conservation treatment needs of selected books and manuscripts of Special and Saint Vincent Legacy Collections of the Saint Vincent College Latimer Family Library and address the first priority for the Collections as identified in the Library's previous PAG grant. Determining treatment protocols will help stabilize the Collections in preparation for a move to new secure, climate-controlled rooms and improve their care and public accessibility. The Collection's handwritten documents dating back to the 12th century, incunabula encompassing various theological, literary and philosophical subjects, and works of Milton, Chaucer, Thomas Aquinas and Petrarch are important to scholars for their content, rarity and relevance, and to local and Saint Vincent history. They also show development of Western thought and culture through their texts, provenance and formats.

Project fields:
Literature, General; Philosophy, General; Religion, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


PG-258237-18

Good Will Home Association (Hinckley, ME 04944-0159)
Deborah Staber (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Phase 3 Developing Storage and Housing Spaces for Humanities Collections

Hiring a consultant, purchase of shelving and storage supplies, and training for the staff at a historic home that documents the daily life of children in the 19th and 20th centuries.  The Good Will-Hinckley Homes ran childcare centers and orphanages in Maine. Its collections include farming and ice-cutting tools used by the boys and fabric arts and rug-making equipment used by the girls; they show the work skills taught to those under the care of the Good Will centers. A conservator would assist in the design of new storage spaces and train museum staff in collections care. 


The L.C. Bates Museum’s project preservation goal is to improve collection’s care and storage by developing a new storage space and storing significant historical collections. These materials are relevant to the history and study of Good Will Homes, regional heritage and the history of childhood and childcare. To achieve this goal, we propose to work with conservator, Ron Harvey to implement the recommendations of our past conservation assessments by methods outlined in Harvey’s letter of commitment and storage treatment recommendations. This project is a priority of our 2008 RECAP, 2014 MAP and 2013-2017 long range conservation plan. The project is designed to turn an unused room on the museum’s second floor into appropriate storage space for humanities objects, purchase shelving and storage supplies, train staff in storage methods, store the project collections, and present a public workshop on Storage and Management in a Small Museum.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,970 (approved)
$5,970 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258278-18

Wartburg College (Waverly, IA 50677-2200)
Amy M. Moorman (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Stabilizing Film Collection Materials at Wartburg College/AIB and Improving Environmental Monitoring

The purchase of preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment (and training for staff in its use), to help preserve approximately 23,000 film, video, and audio resources. The Archive of Iowa Broadcasting’s holdings include news broadcasts from local radio and television stations, as well as some archival materials. Together, they cover a wide range of political, economic, and cultural developments in Iowa since the 1920s.   


The Archives of Iowa Broadcasting (AIB) contains oral histories, documents, photographs, promotional materials, artifacts and over 23,000 audiovisual recordings dating back to the early 1920s that document the history and development of radio and television in Iowa. These materials provide a wide variety of resources for research related to media and broadcasting, as well as 20th century regional and national social, political and cultural humanities topics. This project would provide equipment and supplies to rehouse the most at-risk items in the AIB’s film collection as well as purchase environmental monitoring equipment and provide training on its use. These tasks address specific concerns raised in a previous collection assessment and will further efforts to stabilize and preserve the AIB’s extensive audiovisual and other holdings for future researchers.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; Journalism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,942 (approved)
$5,942 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258335-18

University of Massachusetts, Boston (Boston, MA 02125-3300)
Patricia Bruttomesso (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Collection Assessment and Training for the University Archives and Special Collections

A preservation assessment of the materials held by the University Archives and Special Collections, which cover topics of local and national importance, including school desegregation in Boston during the 1970s (Judge W. Arthur Garrity Jr.’s chambers papers on the Boston Schools Desegregation Case, 1972-97) and the history of private social welfare and charitable organizations (orphanages and settlement houses) in 19th- and early and mid-20th-century Boston. Accessed by social and family historians, as well as by students in archival instruction workshops, the collections offer researchers a view into the administration of these social welfare organizations (through annual reports, meeting minutes, and correspondence), as well as a glimpse into the lives of the women and children in their care.

The University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) at University of Massachusetts Boston requests a Preservation Assistance Grant in the amount of $6,367. This grant will allow UASC to contract with the New England Document Conservation Center to accomplish two goals in January 2018-March 2019: Conduct a general preservation assessment, with the assistance of a UMass Boston Archives or Public History graduate student; and host a photograph preservation training workshop, open to the public. UASC will use the assessment, resultant recommendations, and knowledge gained in the workshop to develop a 5-year preservation plan to ensure continued access to the unique collections that document the history of UMass Boston, support its urban mission, and allow the UASC to serve as a research destination for topics such as social welfare, Boston school desegregation, the Boston Harbor Islands, and other multidisciplinary research areas with rich applicability for research in the humanities.

Project fields:
Urban History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,367 (approved)
$6,367 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258336-18

Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm (Stroudsburg, PA 18360-6857)
Katherine Ambry Linhein Muller (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Developing an Emergency Response Plan

The hiring of a consultant to undertake a risk assessment for the historic property Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm, a family-run farm in rural Pennsylvania that dates from the late 18th to early 20th centuries.  Consisting of six major buildings and several outbuildings, the site has collections that include textiles, farm implements, furniture, and photographs, as well as live heritage breed farm animals. Collections are made available for research, to the public through exhibits, and for school field trips and hands-on activities focusing on the agricultural history of the region in the 19th century. The consultant would visit the farm, undertake the assessment, and create an updated risk management and emergency response plan.


Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm is requesting an award of $6,000 to fund the hiring of a risk management specialist consultant, Samantha Forsko, from the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, Philadelphia, to write a comprehensive risk management plan for the organization. The consultant would work with Quiet Valley to develop a plan from January to September 2018. Quiet Valley is a 115 acre traditional family farm dating from 1770, with six major structures, several outbuildings, rural life collections, farm equipment and archival materials dating from the early 19th century to the middle 20th century. The collections, buildings, animals and grounds of the site are critical to the educational interpretation of Quiet Valley as we seek to preserve, educate and inspire our guests about Pennsylvania 19th century agricultural and home life on a small farm.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258337-18

Historic St. Peter's Church Preservation Corporation (Philadelphia, PA 19106-4212)
Nancy Fago (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Collections Assessment of the Archives of St. Peter's Church

A preservation assessment and the purchase of archival supplies to rehouse 100 linear feet of materials related to the history of St. Peter’s Church from 1761 to the present.  The church was founded in 1758 and is located in the South Philadelphia neighborhood now known as Society Hill; its parishioners have included many of Philadelphia’s and the nation’s powerful figures as well as slaves, servants, working-class people, and immigrants.  The collection consists of vestry minutes; parish registers and records of service; accounting and financial records; condition assessment and conservation records for churchyard grave markers; landscape plans; deeds; blueprints; photographs; sound recordings; and materials from parish and affiliated organizations.  Materials are used by genealogists, church and parish historians, and students.

Project Description:  Historic St. Peter's Church Preservation Corporation requests $6000 towards efforts to preserve and make accessible to the public the archival records of St. Peter's Church, Philadelphia, founded 1758. The bulk of the records covers the period from ca. 1832 to the present and reflects the history of the church and its neighborhood, one of the nation's most historic square miles. This phase of the project includes a Collections Assessment site visit by the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts, a written report of conclusions and recommendations from that visit, and appropriate materials to carry out recommendations. The project will be completed between January and December 2018.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258343-18

Knoxville Jewish Alliance, Inc. (Knoxville, TN 37919-5943)
Nicki Russler (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

The Knoxville Jewish Archives Preservation Assessment Project

A preservation assessment, including emergency preparedness guidance, for the Barbara Winick Bernstein Archives of the Jewish Community of East Tennessee, comprising 138 linear ft. of archives and manuscripts pertaining to the history and culture of Jewish immigration to the region. Established in the early 1980s, the archives includes organizational records, synagogue newsletters, photographs,  sound recordings, scrapbooks, and other materials, some dating to the Civil War era and the advent of Jewish settlement in eastern Tennessee, as well as western counties of Virginia and North Carolina. Among the sources are minute books for Knoxville-area synagogues and other Jewish institutions that no longer exist, along with documentation on the Jewish community in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a Manhattan Project site during World War II.  The assessment would be conducted by a preservation professional, joined by a graduate student in public history and historic preservation.

The Barbara Winick Bernstein Archives of the Jewish Community of East Tennessee requests support to engage a preservation specialist to develop a general preservation assessment. This assessment will provide critical first steps needed to define a strategic plan, to be developed outside of this grant, to enable our organization’s unique holdings to have the greatest long-term impact for increasing awareness of the immigration, historical significance, contributions, and cultural heritage of the southern Jews in our tri-state area which includes Kentucky and Virginia. We propose a four-month grant for the Northeast Document Conservation Center to fund a site visit and disaster preparedness assessment in addition to a preservation assessment of our holdings. Results of this grant will inform a viable strategic plan that ultimately will facilitate the sustainability as well as the increased use of the Archives’ rare, exceptional, and irreplaceable cultural heritage materials.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,502 (approved)
$6,502 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258344-18

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Milwaukee, WI 53212-1255)
Linda Ann Brazeau (Project Director: May 2017 to January 2018)
Leigh M. W. Mahlik (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

UWM African Ethnographic Collection Preservation and Storage Assessment

Hiring a conservator to assess a collection of more than 700 African objects and to provide recommendations to improve storage practices and to chart both short- and long-term conservation plans. The collection provides a broad overview of 19th- and early 20th- century African artistic innovation. Highlights include rare masks and sculptures from various West African tribal groups and over 100 objects that trace the development of sacred and secular masking and sculptural forms over the course of these centuries on the Côte d’Ivoire. The project would facilitate future exhibition projects and plans to further integrate the collections into university curricula and research projects, including a visible storage classroom for teaching and study by faculty and students in the history of art, fine arts, and the humanities.

The UWM Art Collection (UWMAC) Emile H. Mathis Gallery seeks an NEH Preservation Assistance Grant for an ethnographic conservator to conduct a preservation assessment and develop a plan to improve African art storage. The UWMAC, a pedagogical art collection encompassing 7600 objects-Western and Non-western art, ancient to contemporary, is used for the teaching and study of art history, fine arts, and the humanities. This grant will improve UWMAC's storage system for more than 700 African objects, which provide an encyclopedic overview of 19th and early 20th century African art, with diverse objects from nearly 100 different cultural areas and 23 different countries. The conservator collaboration will facilitate better stewardship of this exceptional collection; it is crucial to UWMAC's pedagogical mission that the African collection is appropriately housed, preserved, and easily accessed, facilitating the collection's instructional and research function and ensuring its preservation.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258346-18

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Michael Kelly (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Preservation Training and Supplies for Handling and Storage of Oversize Materials

A preservation training workshop and the purchase of preservation-quality supplies to rehouse more than 70 oversized items from a variety of collections held by the Archives and Special Collections unit. Many of the items are tightly rolled inside tubes that are too small, and the library’s staff do not have the necessary experience to remove and rehouse them safely. The items include oversized posters and prints related to the Native American literature collection, as well as large-format maps and other pedagogical materials from the Natural History collection. Rehousing these materials would make them accessible to researchers and students for study, and the training would benefit current staff, as well as colleagues from other local instituions who would be invited to attend.

The Archives and Special Collections (ASC) of Amherst College is seeking support to hold a preservation training workshop in caring for oversize materials and to purchase supplies to be used during and after the workshop to rehouse oversize rolled materials. The training will be provided by the NEDCC and attended by ASC staff and local colleagues. This project will improve intellectual control, access to, and longevity of oversize materials found throughout ASC’s collections. Materials positively impacted by this project will be found in all of Amherst’s collecting areas: Native American literature, alternative press and political activism, literature and theater history collections, natural history collections, and history of liberal arts education and public service collections. These collections are used extensively by students and faculty at Amherst College and by scholars throughout the country and world, both in-person and through our online repository.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Literature, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258347-18

Valentine Museum (Richmond, VA 23219-1527)
Alicia Guillama (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Renovation Preservation Assessment and Plan

Hiring a preservation consultant to assess current conditions in areas of the museum targeted for renovation and ultimately to provide recommendations for inclusion in the renovation design plan. The Valentine’s renovation plans will improve the museum’s storage capacity, research access, and workspace for its extensive collection of artifacts and works of art. These include more than 30,000 textiles and costumes reflecting the largest collection of its kind in the American South, and an archive of more than 1,200,000 objects (rare and reference books, prints, ephemera, manuscripts, research files, and photographs) that represent four hundred years of the history of Richmond.

The Valentine is launching the final phase of its Second Century Campaign, designed to strengthen the institution’s physical and financial assets. This is the most significant part of the campaign, as it involves renovating the upper two floors of the museum building to create state-of-the-art storage and access spaces for the Valentine’s holdings of 1.6 million objects representing 400-year old Richmond, Virginia—a region that has played a significant part in America’s history and growth. To ensure the protection and sustainability of the collection, the Valentine is requesting a National Endowment of the Humanities (NEH) Preservation Assistance Grant (PAG) for Small Institutions to hire a preservation consultant. The consultant will assess the museum’s renovation plans to address environmental conditions, storage/infrastructure, staff work areas, collections security and public access. The consultant will also provide input during the development of the design and construction plans.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258325-18

Bostonian Society (Boston, MA 02109-1702)
Sira Dooley Fairchild (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Bostonian Society Textile Collection Conservation Survey

An assessment by a professional textile conservator of a collection of approximately 100 textiles and costumes, dating to the 18th century, to be highlighted in the newly interpreted exhibition. The examination would focus on condition assessments, handling requirements, museum mounting recommendations, and required conservation needs to ensure safe display of the textile collection, which includes the velvet jacket, embroidered waistcoat, silk shirt, and breeches worn by John Hancock when he was inaugurated as governor of Massachusetts and other important pieces, such as the original Liberty Tree Flag that was hung from Liberty Tree in Boston in the year leading up to the Revolution.

The textile collection at the Old State House museum is one of the most important and evocative subsets of the object collection. The museum is currently undergoing a large-scale process of inventory, condition assessment, and gap analysis to support an upcoming reinterpretation. The textile collection comprises more than 200 objects dating from the 17th to the 20th century. A collection assessment was last conducted in 1988, after which poor and damaging storage conditions were rectified. This grant, if successful, will allow us to engage a textile conservator to conduct a condition survey of the textiles in the collection and provide us with treatment plans and cost estimates for conservation. As textiles will be featured in the new exhibits, this project is an essential step towards building a complete picture of our object collection. We will also take this opportunity to rehouse any textiles stored in substandard conditions.

Project fields:
Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258284-18

Oakland University (Rochester, MI 48309-4402)
Dominique Renee Daniel (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Oakland University Archives and Special Collections Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of the University Archives and Special Collections, which hold a wide range of material important to local and Michigan state history, including tax records for Oakland County and its townships (1827-1931) and the papers of Congressmen Billie S. Farnum and Mike Rogers. In addition, the library’s rare book collection includes many first editions of English and American literature. Of special note are 913 books and pamphlets by women writers in the United Kingdom from the 17th to the early 20th century, including a 1623 edition of Dorothy Leigh’s Mother’s Blessing, which was a popular and frequently reprinted conduct manual of maternal advice. Numerous first editions of works by Mark Twain are a special focus of the library’s work with students of American literature, which allows classes to examine the frontispieces, chapter illustrations, and publisher’s subscription advertisements that are absent in contemporary scholarly editions of these texts.

The goal of this grant is to hire a consultant to conduct a preservation assessment of Oakland University Archives and Special Collections. In addition to the university’s records, the papers of two Congressmen, other manuscripts, tax rolls, and rare books allow for research in local history. Notable special collections also include a comprehensive collection of English women’s 17th to 19th century literature, including unique items, and a collection of Lincolniana containing books, manuscripts, images, and memorabilia. The consultant would give us a snapshot of current conditions, policies and practices affecting the preservation of the collections, and create a five-year preservation plan offering us realistic and sustainable strategies for improvement. The consultant would be assisted by a library science student and would mentor a junior librarian at our library, who could continue to help care for our collections after the grant project is over.

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,410 (approved)
$6,410 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258302-18

DePauw University (Greencastle, IN 46135-1736)
Craig Ray Hadley (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Enhanced Preservation and Access for DePauw University's Oversize Works of Art

The purchase of storage structures, including racks with coroplast sheeting, for 19 oversize paintings and framed works of American art on paper from the late 19th and the 20th century. As part of a larger consolidation effort for the applicant’s entire collection of 3,600 objects, the project would further address issues of overcrowding in storage areas and provide additional opportunities for study and teaching within the oversize collection. Highlights include Things I like to Draw by Peter Helck and The Green Goddess by Elmer Taflinger, as well as important works by James Henry Beard and Robert Rauschenberg.

DePauw University respectfully requests $5,989 to purchase 12 powder coated art storage racks along with coroplast interleaving sheeting to support rehousing efforts. These new art storage racks will house approximately 19 oversize paintings and works on paper from the permanent collection, ranging from a late 19th century narrative painting by American artist James Henry Beard to a series of oversize lithographs by abstract expressionist Robert Rauschenberg. The objects directly support a variety of teaching and research needs at DePauw University, including undergraduate projects, faculty use, and public exhibitions. Per a 2014 Museum Assessment Program site visit, the external reviewer recommended the replacement of substandard wooden painting bins with museum-quality storage furniture. This project is part of a larger collections consolidation project and is included in the board approved 2015-2020 gallery strategic plan.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,989 (approved)
$5,989 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258268-18

Beverly Historical Society (Beverly, MA 01915-5196)
Abby Battis (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Cabot House Collection Storage Planning

A preservation assessment of a collection in the historic Cabot House, which includes archival records, photographs, and historic objects (750,000 items in total). They document the history of Beverly, an early industrial town and seaport, incorporated in 1668, as well as the maritime history of New England in the 18th and 19th centuries.


The Beverly Historical Society's headquarters is a Beverly history museum and the repository for its archival, photographic and artifact storage. The collection’s strengths are 18th and 19th c. maritime material and images of the people, organizations, and places of Beverly over 200 years. The structure is ill-equipped to serve as a museum, lacking climate-controlled collection storage or accessibility. The Society is exploring a renovation which would result in an accessible facility with fully-conditioned storage spaces and expanded services. The collection, with approximately 750,000 total items will need to be packed and stored for the duration of the project, and the new storage spaces will need to be properly configured. The Society will engage a collections preservation consultant to conduct a needs assessment of the collection and develop a storage plan to guide the proposed renovations. These will useful for planning purposes and critical if the renovation moves forward.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258269-18

Mount St. Mary's University and Seminary (Emmitsburg, MD 21727-7700)
Jessica J. Whitmore (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Comprehensive Preservation Assessment of Hugh J. Phillips Library

A preservation assessment of the library’s special collections and archival materials, which include 40,000 manuscripts relating to the school’s founding in 1808, the growth and development of Catholicism in America, and early Church bishops and leaders. The library also houses 500 rare books, including incunabula, as well as works of art by European and American artists, such as Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Hedley Fitton, and John LaFarge. The collections are incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum and serve scholars world-wide through the library’s participation in the Catholic Research Resources Alliance.

The Hugh J. Phillips Library at Mount St. Mary’s University houses significant historical and cultural collections that include the history of the second oldest Catholic university in the United States; manuscripts dating from 1320 to the present; incunabula; the St. John’s Bible; and rare, original artwork. This grant would support a comprehensive preservation assessment. The consultant would provide an overview of the current condition of the collections, highlight specific problems, and provide guidance and plan for addressing these issues over the short- and long-term. Additionally, the library would purchase monitoring devices to track the environmental conditions in the storage, display and work areas.

Project fields:
History, General; Literature, General; Religion, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,749 (approved)
$5,749 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258544-18

German American National Congress Chapter Chicago (Chicago, IL 60625-2013)
Marlen Lux (Project Director: May 2017 to December 2017)
Monica Felix (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

General Preservation Assessment of Newly-Acquired Newspaper Collection

A preservation assessment for a collection related to Eintracht (“Harmony”), a family-run German-language newspaper published in Chicago from 1922 to 2017.  Materials include editions of the newspaper from the 1960s to 2017; photographs of Chicago-area German clubs, churches, and language schools; celebrations such as carnival, Easter, Mayfest, Oktoberfest, and Christmas; booklets and pamphlets published by over 100 local German clubs; and obituaries with mounted photographs.  The grant would include support for an internship for two advanced students or recent graduates to gain experience in museum registration, artifact housing, collections management, and working with small community collections.

The purpose of this project is to conduct a general preservation assessment for a recently acquired newspaper collection donated by the editors of the Eintracht, a family-run, German-language newspaper that was published in Chicago for the last 95 years. The collection consists of four major categories: past editions of the newspaper itself, a large number of photographs, booklets and pamphlets published by local German clubs, and obituaries. Given this unique combination of mutually complementary media, the Eintracht collection is an invaluable resource for documenting the development of the German-American community in the Chicagoland area after the Second World War. The collection is currently housed in a temporary space in non-archival boxes. On the basis of his preservation assessment, our consultant Mr. Leith will provide a report with detailed recommendations which will enable us to transfer the collection to an adequate storage space.

Project fields:

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258296-18

Trinity College, Hartford (Hartford, CT 06106-3100)
Richard J. Ring (Project Director: April 2017 to December 2017)
Sally S. Dickinson (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Watkinson Library Almanac Preservation

The purchase of preservation-quality supplies to rehouse 1,700 American almanacs, predominantly published in the 19th century. Many are loosely stitched together with no covers, making them too fragile to be handled by researchers. A collecting priority for the library, the almanacs represent American popular science, and once they are rehoused, scholars and students would be able to study them in a variety of disciplinary contexts: environmental history, American literature and print culture, and early American cookery and foodways. A number of current faculty are involved in developing courses focused on the almanacs.

The Watkinson Library at Trinity College, a public research library containing rare books and special collections, contains over 2,000 American almanacs as part of a larger holding of materials that document the history and culture of pre-colonial America through the early 20th century. This collection offers a rich source of information about many aspects of day-to-day American life: astronomical and calendric calculations, astrological predictions, religious and moral advice, science, history, poetry, mathematics and business data, geography, politics, medicine, cooking, weather, and more. The almanacs are not accessible to users because they are susceptible to damage without structural support. Funds from this grant will purchase acid-free, lignin-free, buffered pamphlet binders to house and protect the collection from damage and deterioration. Stabilizing these articles will allow students, professors and the public to use them for research, classroom projects and general viewing.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258248-18

Hindman Settlement School, Inc. (Hindman, KY 41822-0844)
Brett Ratliff (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Hindman Settlement School Archives Preservation Project

A preservation assessment and purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for a collection of 31,000 photographs, oral histories, manuscripts, and other sources documenting the history and culture of the Appalachian region from the early 1900s to the present.  The project would also encompass a workshop for Hindman School staff on the care and handling of archival collections.  Highlights include published and unpublished writings from authors participating in the annual Appalachian Writers Workshop, hosted by the school for the past 40 years. Notable among these writers are Harriette Arnow (1908–1986), author of the 1954 novel, The Dollmaker, and a founding member of a writing collective at Hindman; Silas House (1971- ), novelist, playwright, and NEH-Endowed Chair for Appalachian Studies at Berea College; and James Still (1906-2001), former poet laureate of Kentucky.

Hindman Settlement School will engage a professional conservator to provide a general preservation needs assessment for the institution’s historical archives and special collections. The collection, consisting of an estimated 31,000 photographs, recordings, manuscripts, oral histories, and other objects, represents more than 115 years of the history and culture of the central Appalachian region, specifically eastern Kentucky. Items in the collection cover a variety of topics including the progressive education movement in rural America during the early 20th century, folk music and dance traditions, Appalachian literature and poetry, historical documentation of the region and the institution, and other related fields. In addition to an assessment, the grant will also support the purchase of data loggers to enable us to consistently and reliably monitor our collections storage environment, as well as provide for staff professional development.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; Rural Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258292-18

Princeton Theological Seminary (Princeton, NJ 08540-6819)
Jenifer Gundry (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Princeton Theological Seminary Library Preservation Plan Development

A consultation with a specialist to prepare a comprehensive preservation plan for the seminary’s library. Acquired and developed over 200 years, the library’s collections offer a broad range of primary source materials to scholars in theology, religion, philosophy, and ethics, with a particular strength in the documentation of American religious heritage and the history of the Presbyterian and Reformed traditions. The special collections include early imprints, including American printed sermons such as Increase Mather’s Returning Unto God: A Sermon (1680); the Sprague Collection of over 20,000 early American religious pamphlets from the 18th and early 19th centuries; the Puritan Collection of English and American Literature, including over 5,000 volumes of Puritan and Nonconformist works (primarily 17th-century imprints); and the Benson Collection of Hymnals and Hymnology of more than 10,000 hymn books and works of secondary literature.

The Princeton Theological Seminary Library proposes to engage a professional preservation consultant to write the library’s first formal preservation plan, developing a framework for implementation that encompasses the most important and urgent recommendations of the recent 2016 preservation needs assessment survey. The collection is one of the largest on theology, religion, and philosophy in the country, housing a wide array of primary and secondary sources from around the world dating from the 1st century B.C.E. (cuneiform tablets) to the present. The collection also supports a wide range of creative advanced research in the humanities, including in the fields of history, literature, languages, art history, and music. The preservation plan will set measurable benchmarks and goals, as well as assign staff responsibilities, bringing structure to the ongoing work of collections care.

Project fields:
Philosophy, General; Religion, General; Western Civilization

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258298-18

University of Central Oklahoma (Edmond, OK 73034-5209)
Shikoh Shiraiwa (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

UCO Melton Legacy Collection: Assessment of the Conservation Treatment Needs

 The hiring of two conservators to assess a collection of 62 European and American works of art dating from the 16th to the 20th centuries that include oil paintings and works on paper, with works by artists in the studios of El Greco and Peter Paul Rubens, as well as modern artists Grant Wood, Georges Rouault, and Edvard Munch.  As part of an existing U.S. Department of Education Strengthening Institutions Program Grant, undergraduate student interns would assist the conservators in the assessments.  Faculty and students from the Museum Studies and Global Art and Visual Culture Programs would also participate in conservation workshops offered by the conservators, to learn about proper care and preservation practices for art collections.

Archives and Special Collections of the Max Chambers Library at the University of Central Oklahoma is requesting $6000 for assessing the conservation treatment needs of selected items in a collection by two painting conservators to assess the conservation treatment needs of 62 2-dimensional art pieces, providing a recommendation in the written assessment a prioritized list for most needed pieces for the conservation treatment.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258311-18

Old Sturbridge Village (Sturbridge, MA 01566-1138)
Caitlin Emery Avenia (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Preventive Conservation of Hanging Textiles

The hiring of two conservators to conduct staff training and the purchase of rehousing supplies for preservation of 300 historic costumes dating to the 19th century. Opened in 1946, Old Sturbridge Village is one of the earliest living history museums in the United States.  The costume collection that is the subject of the proposed project consists of gowns, capes, cloaks, uniforms, and bags, documenting everyday life in rural New England prior to the Civil War.  It was identified in a recent assessment as a high priority for rehousing, due to its fragility, and is used frequently for research, education, and exhibits on 19th- century textile production.

The scope of this project is to build on the textile conservation assessment that was generously funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities at the end of 2016 and carried out in March 2017. A Preservation Assistance grant from NEH will allow the Village to 1) purchase archival garment boxes and acid free tissue to rehouse ten garments deemed most fragile by the conservation assessment, 2) construct hanging storage garment bags out of silk fabric for 299 garments, and 3) bring conservators from Museum Textile Services to conduct a textile conservation training workshop for staff and curatorial volunteers.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258326-18

Dallas County Historical Foundation (Dallas, TX 75202-3301)
Lindsey Richardson (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Developing a Digital Collections Preservation Plan

Consultation with a digital preservation expert from the Northeast Document Conservation Center to assist in the development of a comprehensive preservation plan to ensure the preservation of born-digital and digitized material related to the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The Sixth Floor Museum, administered by the Dallas County Historical Foundation, is the primary research archive for the events of November 22, 1963, and is responsible for over 50,000 items including three of the four known films to have captured the Kennedy assassination, and over 6,000 photographs and photographic negatives taken by amateurs and professional newspaper photographers. The primary focus of the proposed preservation plan will be the museum’s digital collections, which include many of the 1,600 oral history accounts, and digitized copies of television, radio, and film accounts of the event. 

This proposal requests funds to support consultation with a digital assets expert to help The Sixth Floor Museum (TSFM) develop a digital collections preservation plan. TSFM collections document the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the events before and after, and the cultural context and legacy of Kennedy's death. Most collections are either already digitized or expected to be digitized in the near future. While the Museum has professional standards for the creation and use of such digital collections, consultation will help ensure that the long-term preservation of these assets is planned for with the same professionalism and care as the Museum applies to its physical collections. The resulting report will include assessments of TSFM protocols, standards and workflows, as well as recommendations for improvement of digital preservation at the Museum. The Museum will use findings and recommendations to develop a 5-year digital collections preservation plan.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,910 (approved)
$5,910 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258286-18

Noble & Cooley Center for Historic Preservation, Corp. (Granville, MA 01034)
Robert Stewart (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Collections Preservation Assessment

Staff training in collections care and the purchase of storage furniture to help preserve 154 linear feet of business records and more than 1,000 musical drums and toys produced by the Massachusetts manufacturing firm of Noble & Cooley between 1860 and 2000.  

 


NCCHP’s collections consist of thousands of Noble & Cooley business records (154 linear feet dating between 1892 and 1933 rehoused so far) and over 1,000 historical musical drums and musical and non-musical toys that Noble & Cooley manufactured. These collections are significant to the humanities because they reflect not only the history of American small town manufacturing ingenuity and prowess since the mid-1800’s, but also show the evolution of American historic events and cultural trends. This grant application is seeking a general preservation assessment of these historical documents, musical instruments, and toys. The focus will be on collection management, preservation planning, storage, handling, care of exhibited objects, and prioritization for conservation. The grant will also provide personnel training through workshops and webinars and the purchase of a flat drawer cabinet to house large archival documents. The project period will be January 2, 2018 to June 28, 2019.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258247-18

Town of East Haddam, Connecticut (East Haddam, CT 06423-0295)
Michael J Gilroy (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Shelving Replacement for the Rathbun Historical Room, Rathbun Free Memorial Library, East Haddam Library System

The purchase of storage shelving for a collection of 648 published and handwritten archival volumes associated with the town of East Haddam, Connecticut.  Holdings include family genealogies, war participation records, cemetery records, architectural surveys, historical photographs, and an Arctic exploration archive.  This project focuses on the preservation of 30 account books and ledgers from East Haddam businesses and local farmers; 13 diaries; two hotel registers; the letters and business correspondence of the Sisson-Balen family; 39 scrapbooks; and minutes of various town committees including the local chapter of the American Red Cross, the Women’s Progressive Club, and the Middlesex Chapter of the Temperance Society.  Materials are used by genealogists, historians, students, and town residents.  The activities proposed were recommended in a 2012 preservation assessment.

The grant would support the acquisition of shelving appropriate for the local historic materials currently under the care of the Rathbun Free Memorial Library. These collections reside in a dedicated storage room (The Rathbun Historical Room) on the library's top floor. Books held in the Local History Collection include a mixture of published volumes and handwritten archival volumes, many dating from the early 1800's. Storage space for these local history materials is at a premium, and the current wooden shelving is too narrow to fully support archival boxes and large books, which currently hang a few inches past the edge of their shelves and are at risk for damage through being accidentally bumped. A detailed preservation needs assessment identified the need to replace the wooden shelving with deeper shelves (some of which need to be at least 16" deep) made of powder-coated steel.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,710 (approved)
$4,710 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258314-18

County of Mohave (Kingman, AZ 86401-5711)
Robert Wayne Ballard (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Mohave County, Arizona: Detailed Storage Planning, Environmental Upgrades and Training

Development of a detailed storage plan and environmental monitoring for 1,873 linear feet of historical materials from six departments in Mohave County, Arizona.  The county is the home of the Native American Mohave, Kaibab-Paiute, and Hualapai Tribes, the Grand Canyon, the Arizona Strip, Davis Dam, the London Bridge, parts of the Mojave Desert, wilderness areas, and ghost towns.  Collections illustrate pre-statehood, immigration, ranching, mining, water rights, polygamist settlement, and construction of Route 66 and the Hoover Dam.  The consultant would also provide training in collections care, preventive conservation, storage planning, and environmental monitoring for local cultural institutions and city government staff.  The activities proposed were recommended in a 2017 assessment.

Mohave County, Arizona, requests $6,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities in the category of Preservation Assistance Grants to conduct detailed storage planning, environmental upgrades, and preservation training for Mohave County's historical and permanent collections of approximately 1873 linear feet. A conservator will conduct onsite training and work with staff to develop a detailed storage plan. The grant activities will provide us the opportunity to work with Mohave County departments and community partners to understand the preservation requirements for significant and historical records, improve environmental conditions, and begin planning our long-term goal of a shared climate-controlled storage facility.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258350-18

Chester County Historical Society (West Chester, PA 19380-2658)
Jasmine Smith (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Rehousing of Hidden Library Collections

The purchase of archival storage supplies for five collections of books, manuscripts, periodicals, ephemera, and media resources documenting Chester County, Pennsylvania. They include the Tom Chambers Collection documenting diversity and community social justice initiatives during Chambers’s three-term tenure as West Chester Mayor; architectural drawings from the Frens and Frens Restoration Architecture firm, including Historic Sugartown and Birmingham Friends Meeting House; a Postal History collection of rare stamps, postal covers, postmarks, and other ephemera; 125 years of the CCHS institutional archives; and over 75 linear feet of YWCA records capturing the experiences of African Americans and Women in Chester County between 1957 and 1996.

The Chester County Historical Society (CCHS) requests a Preservation Assistance Grant to purchase protective storage enclosures for library manuscript collections that are currently inaccessible and inadequately housed. The CCHS Strategic Plan includes in the collections department mission the need to “gather, preserve, and provide access to CCHS’s extraordinary collection.” The collections targeted with this grant must be preserved and made accessible. Collection preservation through rehousing is specified in the institutional Preservation Plan 2011-2018, Objective C: “All collections are properly housed using appropriate storage materials.” Grant funds will be used to rehouse collections that capture: 1) minority communities and social justice movements, 2) postal history, 3) architectural history, and 4) CCHS’s role in the county. These four topics are underrepresented in available library collections and will build the Library’s limited documentation of 20th century history.

Project fields:
African American History; Architecture; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,606 (approved)
$5,606 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258322-18

Girard College Development Fund (Philadelphia, PA 19121-4800)
Katherine H. Haas (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Rehousing and Improved Environmental Monitoring of the Stephen Girard Archive

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse the papers of Stephen Girard (1750-1831), a prominent financier and philanthropist in the Early American Republic, along with environmental monitoring equipment for the college’s archival storage areas. The collection, housed in 800 boxes, includes 36,000 letters sent by individuals throughout the world to Girard, who at his time of death was the nation’s wealthiest person.  Also included are financial records pertaining to a crucial loan his bank provided to the U.S. government during the War of 1812.

Girard College houses the extensive archives and collection of Stephen Girard (1750 – 1831) the nationally significant merchant, banker, and philanthropist who at the time of his death, was the wealthiest person in America. The archive contains over 100,000 pages of documents and volumes and Girard’s personal belongings constitute Philadelphia’s greatest intact, single-owner object collection from the early national period; the pairing creates an exceptional resource for visitors and scholars which is also a touchstone for museums or individuals with related artifacts. Girard’s influence has been exhibited in a wide array of projects including scholarly publications, educational activities, exhibits, and media programming. Funding from this grant would be used to support improvements to the storage and preservation of the boxed manuscript materials in the Stephen Girard Archive, as well environmental monitoring for the archive, objects collection, and related historical collections.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,978 (approved)
$5,978 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258323-18

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)
Eunice Haugen (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Preserving and Accessing Textiles

The purchase of re-housing  materials and additional storage equipment for a collection of 130 textiles dating to the 1930s and 1940s, which are largely made up of screen prints and block prints that capture the stylistic nuances of early 20th-century American modern textile design. The collection is widely used for coursework, research, and exhibitions, such as the 2013 Printed Textiles: Pattern Stories, which featured pieces from Folly Cove Designers and Ruth Reeves, Henriette Reiss, and Paul Poiret. The textiles provide examples of early and mid-20th-century design principles related to color theory and modern design, and offer a visual record of American folk craft and culture, with techniques and styles that can be traced back to their European origins.

The Goldstein Museum of Design, part of the College of Design at the University of Minnesota, plans to purchase archival materials and additional storage equipment for re-housing a group of approximately 130 historically and culturally significant textiles transferred to GMD from the University Gallery (now the Weisman Art Museum) in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Completion of this project would provide safer and easier access to this group of textiles. Outcomes include long-term preservation of the textiles and much-enhanced accessibility for scholarship, documentation, and exhibition, and use in university classes and outreach programs.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258330-18

County of Charleston (North Charleston, SC 29405-7469)
Haley Doty Vaden (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Charleston County Records Center: Improving the Storage Environment of the Collections

The purchase of environmental monitoring and climate control equipment and preservation and archival supplies to maintain over 20,000 cubic feet of boxed records and over 3,500 sets of bound and unbound large documents originating in county departments in Charleston, South Carolina.  Among the holdings are probate court files including wills and estates; land use records; marriage licenses; mortgages and deeds; and civil, criminal, and family court proceedings.  This project would focus on the oldest and most delicate paper-based materials, which document the development of early county government and daily life from the early 1700s.  The collection is used by abstractors, clerks, legal professionals, historical researchers, genealogists, property owners, and students.  The proposal is based on recommendations from a 2016 preservation assessment supported by NEH.

The goal of the Preservation Assistance Grant project is to support the purchase of preservation supplies and materials to improve the storage environment at the Charleston County Records Center (CCRC). The activities are based on the recommendations made in a Preservation Needs Assessment conducted in May 2016 through a previously funded Preservation Assistance Grant. The goal of the project will be to preserve historic records of value to the State of South Carolina, re-house collections in archival enclosures, and improve environmental conditions at CCRC. The historic records include Probate Estate Files from the 1760s – 1850s, Plats from the 1750s – 1960s, Clerk of Court Case Files from the early 1800s – 1960s, and Mortgages & Deeds from the late 1800s – 1960s. The Preservation Assistance Grant will support CCRC by improving the physical environment of the center and reducing risks to the collections.

Project fields:
American Government; Legal History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258338-18

Rochester General Hospital (Rochester, NY 14621-3095)
Kathleen Britton (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Baker-Cederberg Archival Collection Preservation

The purchase of preservation supplies for rehousing 211 linear feet of historical records documenting the development and expansion of health care, nursing education, and philanthropy in Rochester, New York, from the mid-19th century to the present. The sources originate with Rochester General Hospital, its precursor, Rochester City Hospital, and its associated School of Nursing. Highlights include materials pertaining to two military medical units the hospital partnered with during the first and second World Wars as well as records of groups such as the Rochester Female Charitable Society and the Board of Lady Managers, depicting the role of women in the operation of the hospital.

The Baker-Cederberg Archival Collection chronicles the history of Rochester City and Rochester General Hospitals, as well as the related School of Nursing, from 1847 to the present. The proposed project will allow us to rehouse all materials in the collection, including specialized housing for more delicate materials. It will also allow us to integrate organized backlogged material into the collection.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,676 (approved)
$5,676 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258394-18

Seymour Public Library District (Auburn, NY 13021-3404)
Dori Gottschalk-Fielding (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Seymour Library History Center Environmental Monitoring and Archival Rehousing Project

The purchase of environmental and disaster preparedness equipment and archival supplies for a collection of 3,000 books, 286 bound editions of local newspapers, 380 postcards, 28 ledgers and scrapbooks, and maps, letters, documents, photographs, paintings, and artifacts related to Auburn, New York.  Auburn was home to national companies such as International Harvester and Columbian Rope, as well as important social, political, and economic figures.  Notable items include ledgers from colonial and 19th-century New York; stereoscope cards documenting daily life in the time of William Seward and Harriet Tubman; views of the town during the 1929 Auburn Prison riots; files on central New York railroads, prisons, and schools; and early to mid-19th century almanacs, playbills, and theatre ads.  Materials are used by genealogists, teachers, K-12 and college students, and professors.  The activities proposed were recommended in a 2017 preservation assessment.

The Seymour Public Library in Auburn, NY is requesting $4,738 for preservation equipment and supplies for the care of its historical collections.   Auburn, referred to as "History's Hometown," was the residence of notable Americans including William Seward, Harriet Tubman, and inventor Theodore Case.  Our collections, which document the history of the area from the early 1800s to the present day, highlight the political, social, and economic context in which these and other local individuals lived.  Based on a 2017 Preservation Needs Assessment by DHPSNY, we are requesting funding for equipment to monitor temperature, humidity, and light; light filtering materials; basic disaster preparedness supplies; and archival-quality materials for rehousing and protecting our photographs, stereoscope cards, postcards, pamphlets, letters, scrapbooks, ledgers, and bound newspapers.  NEH funding will assist us in preserving our collections for use by an increasing number of visitors and researchers.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,738 (approved)
$4,738 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258395-18

Mariners' Museum (Newport News, VA 23606-3759)
Jay Moore (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

The Mariners' Museum Motion Picture Film Preservation Project

The purchase of preservation supplies to support the rehousing of 690 historic films related to United States maritime history. Dating from the 1920s, the collection documents developments in the manufacture of commercial and military vessels. The largest single group of films features historic ship launchings, commissioning ceremonies, and shipyard activities at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company. 

 

The Mariners' Museum Motion Picture Film Preservation Project will protect a collection of 690 films that reflect significant moments in American life, including US Navy explorations of the Antarctic, the launching of important military and commercial ships, and the building of the SS United States, the fastest passenger steamer ever built. They document endangered maritime cultures of local and national importance, such as the oystermen and menhaden fishermen of the Chesapeake Bay. They depict historic ships, such as the RMS Olympic, sister ship to the doomed luxury liner Titanic; the NS Savannah, the only nuclear-powered passenger ship ever built; and the first of 3 sets of replicas of the Jamestown discovery ships Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery. The films explore scientific and technical advances in shipbuilding and provides perspective on maritime history, traditional and modern maritime cultures, and geographic exploration.  Project is January 1, 2018 through May 1, 2019.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,381 (approved)
$4,381 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258399-18

Medford Historical Society (Medford, MA 02155-3007)
Allison Andrews (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2018)
Lani O'Donnell (Project Director: March 2018 to present)

Medford Historical Society & Museum, Collections Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of a local history collection consisting of 20 linear feet of letters, land documents, scrapbooks, and other archival records; 30 linear feet of reference books and journal articles; 15 linear feet of photographs; and more than one thousand Native American artifacts and other historic objects related to the history of Medford, Massachusetts.


The Medford Historical Society & Museum (MHSM) preserves and shares with the public a diverse collection of unique and valuable items documenting the rich history of Medford, Massachusetts and its role in the development of the nation. Its humanities collections consist of archives and objects, largely items from the 18th and 19th centuries and a major Civil War photograph collection, as well as Native American and 20th century. Significant figures from Colonial through the post-Revolutionary eras - military, government, and industry; also authors and abolitionists - are represented, as well as items from ordinary citizens which tell the story of daily life. The museum serves the local and broad public through exhibits, programs, educational outreach, and research resources. The grant would provide a comprehensive collections assessment with the goal of preserving and properly maintaining the wide variety of materials to serve this mission.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258310-18

Hopi Tribe (Kykotsmovi Village, AZ 86039-0123)
Stewart Koyiyumptewa (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Rehousing the Hopi Tutuveni Collection

The purchase of preservation supplies and staff training to rehouse a collection of 20,000 images (print photographs, slides, and negatives) from the Hopi Tutuveni, the tribe’s newspaper, which began publication in the 1970s and continues to the present.  The images, taken by Hopi photographers, depict daily life on the Hopi reservation, and encompass themes of education and cultural activities, sports, women’s roles, farming and landscape, and tribal politics, among others.  The collection includes photographs of individuals and historic meetings, such as between tribal chairmen and Arizona governors Jane Hull and Bruce Babbitt.  Archival staff from the Cline Library at Northern Arizona University would provide training to the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office staff on preservation topics. 


This grant would support the purchase of archival-quality supplies to rehouse the Hopi Tutuveni photograph collection. This collection of over 20,000 photographs that date from the 1970s to the present is unique in that it documents modern Hopi life from a Hopi viewpoint. The majority of photographs that currently represent the Hopi people at other archival repositories are predominantly taken from the point of view of anthropologists, missionaries, or professional photographers. This important collection was donated from the newspaper to the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office (HCPO) in 2016, and is in a state of disorganization. This grant would help the HCPO achieve a vital step towards making these images available to the Hopi community and local, national, and international researchers. To accomplish this, the HCPO proposes to work with archivists in the Special Collections and Archives Department of Cline Library, Northern Arizona University.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,967 (approved)
$3,967 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258321-18

Wheaton College (Wheaton, IL 60187-5593)
Laura Schmidt (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Conservation Assessment for C.S. Lewis's Personal Library Books

A conservation assessment of 420 books in need of treatment from the personal library of British author C.S. Lewis. The books were selected from a larger collection of over 2,400 volumes belonging to Lewis, because they are in fragile condition and can no longer sustain handling by researchers. Many of the books are annotated by Lewis or his family members and show the breadth of his personal reading habits and the depth of his engagement with works on education and literary criticism. Lewis’s annotations are of interest to scholars, as well as to general visitors. Library staff showcase Lewis’s note at the back of Don Juan by Lord Byron, where he wrote the date he read the book followed by the statement: “Never again!”

The Marion E. Wade Center is the most comprehensive repository in the world for materials relating to British author C.S. Lewis and owns over 2,400 volumes from Lewis’s personal library. Although best known for his classic children’s books The Chronicles of Narnia, the scholar and author also remains popular today in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and religious studies. Lewis’s library books form one of the Wade Center's most heavily accessed collections, making them especially vulnerable to usage-damage. The volumes, never before evaluated by a conservator, contain Lewis’s annotations with unique, unpublished content. A NEH Preservation Assistance Grant would fund a conservation assessment for 420 of Lewis’s books judged most in need of treatment. Following the assessment, the Wade Center will create a long-term fundraising plan for conservation treatment of the books based on the assessment recommendations.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258318-18

Richmond Museum Association (Richmond, CA 94802-0267)
Melinda McCrary (Project Director: April 2017 to present)

Richmond Museum of History Environmental Monitoring Equipment & Training Project

The Richmond Museum of History seeks preservation assistance to implement an environmental monitoring program and create better storage conditions for local newspapers. The project would support purchasing IPI PEM2 environmental monitors and archival quality storage boxes for local newspapers currently stacked on open shelving without protection. The goal of both tasks is to improve storage conditions and facilitate long term preservation of museum collections. The permanent collection of the Richmond Museum of History is comprised of significant materials dating from prehistory, early industrial development on the shores of the San Francisco, a strong collection of World War II Home Front and Richmond Kaiser Shipyards related materials and a growing segment of postwar/civil rights history. The collection is a significant source of primary sources related to the development of industry in the SF Bay Area, the Great Migration of the 1940s, and the progression of the Civil Rights.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258352-18

Denver Botanic Gardens, Inc. (Denver, CO 80206-3751)
Allaina Wallace (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Conservation and Preservation Assessment of the Rare Books Collection at the Helen Fowler Library

A preservation assessment of 1,300 rare books pertaining to the history of botany, botanical folklore, studies of the Rocky Mountains, and the development of the city of Denver. Collection highlights include rare 16th- and 17th-century books on plants, as well as books with local interest, those by Enos Mills (the father of Rocky Mountain National Park), Alice Eastwood (a self-taught and prolific botanist), and George Kelly and Walter Pesman (two of the founders of the Colorado Forestry and Horticultural Association and the Denver Botanic Gardens). An assessment would facilitate the long-term care of this collection and support its use by researchers and other visitors to the gardens.

Denver Botanic Gardens Helen Fowler Library is the largest botanical and horticultural library in the Rocky Mountain region. Uncommon among botanical and horticultural libraries, the library circulates a collection of about 30,000 items. The non-circulating Rare Books Collection, the focus of this project, includes about 1,300 books dating back to the 16th century. Items in this collection represent some of the earliest botanical illustrations in the field. Funds for the support and growth of the collection dissipated sometime in the 1990s. Access decreased to prevent damage to the collection. Prior to that time, the collection was used by staff seeking public domain images, prints were displayed in art exhibitions, artists and historians used the collection in their research. Our goals include a conservation assessment of the rare books collection to guide future use and provide recommendations for the design of a new rare books storage and reading room.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,450 (approved)
$5,450 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258353-18

Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (Peshawbestown, MI 49682-9275)
Cindy Winslow (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Preserving the Grand Traverse Band's Eyaawing Museum Collections

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and training for staff in basic collections care.  The tribe’s cultural center preserves textiles, baskets, leather, and paintings, as well as archives and photographs that document the history and culture of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan.  Collections are accessed by tribal members and the public through regular offerings of educational and public programming.

 


The Preservation Assistance grant would support the preservation and care of the the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians’ (GTB, Grand Traverse Band) Eyaawing Museum and Cultural Center’s (Eyaawing) historical collections. The project includes the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for humanities collections and training.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,141 (approved)
$5,141 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258404-18

SUNY Rockland Community College (Suffern, NY 10901-3620)
Andrea Winograd (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Holocaust Museum & Center for Tolerance and Education Preservation Assessment

A general preservation assessment and training workshop, along with the purchase of preservation supplies, to improve the care of a museum collection related to the Holocaust.  Included are books, photographs, newspapers, audiovisual materials, and some 1,500 artifacts from Nazi-era Germany, World War II, and the postwar period, many of them contributed by survivors of concentration camps or their family members. 


Rockland Community College (RCC), in partnership with the Holocaust Museum & Center for Tolerance and Education, applies for the NEH Preservation Assistance Grant for Smaller Institutions. RCC will provide institutional support as the Holocaust Museum undergoes a preservation assessment and implements its recommendations. The Museum’s collection comprises approximately 1,500 objects, many of them rare artifacts such as unique survivor testimonies, photographs, and Nazi weaponry and propaganda. These support the Museum’s vital work of promoting tolerance and memorializing Holocaust victims. With the Museum planning a new facility on RCC’s campus, an assessment will guide the care of the collection and inform the design of the facility’s collections storage space. For a small institution without a collections manager on staff, the assessment and resulting report will provide guidance for staff on collections care best practices and the development of appropriate policies and procedures.

Project fields:
European History; Jewish Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,999 (approved)
$5,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258424-18

Jacksonville Public Libraries Foundation, Inc. (Jacksonville, FL 32202-3505)
Laura Minor (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

A Preservation Assessment of Jacksonville Public Library Special Collections

A preservation assessment and staff training in preservation basics and disaster preparedness for local history materials in Jacksonville, Florida.  The collection comprises books and documents about Florida. Some highlights include 14,000 photographs and negatives from the estate of local photographer Loyd Sandgren; the papers of Joseph Lee, an early black lawyer in the area, and David H. and Florida C. Dwight, who sought to improve life for local African Americans in the first half of the 20th century; genealogies focusing on the Southeastern United States and the original colonies; censuses, city documents, military rosters, pension records, and Spanish land grants; papers by Seminole Wars participant Isaac Ogden; and materials related to composer Frederick Delius, who lived in Jacksonville.  The collection is used by students, authors, newspaper columnists, genealogists, city planners, historians, and the public.

The Special Collections Department of the Jacksonville Public Library owns print and non-print materials related to local African American history, Genealogy, Federal Documents, North Florida, composer Frederick Delius, and a variety of maps, photographs and manuscripts. These materials are used to support the needs of students, researchers and authors worldwide.  While many of the items are recent (19th-21st century), there are also books published as early as the 1600's. The storage and handling conditions of these older and delicate items are in need of professional evaluation. The proposed project will involve 1) developing detailed plans for improving storage of these collections; 2) assessing the conservation treatment needs of selected items in the collections; 3) training Special Collections staff in preservation basics and disaster preparedness and 4) implementing preventive conservation strategies that ensure the safety, security and longevity of the collections.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2018 – 7/31/2019


PG-258427-18

Stillwater Public Library (Stillwater, OK 74074-4449)
Stacy DeLano (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Stillwater Public Library Preservation Supplies Project

The purchase of preservation supplies for a collection of 1,800 books and 3,200 scrapbooks, photographs, vertical files, maps, pamphlets, booklets, and documents related to the history of Stillwater, Oklahoma.  Stillwater was the first settlement in the Unassigned Lands of Oklahoma, the focus of white settlement during the late 19th century “Boomer Movement,” and an important part of the 1889 Land Run; it is now the home of Oklahoma State University, the state’s only land grant university and its second largest.  Items include agricultural census records; recently discovered records of the United Spanish War Veterans and the Women’s Auxiliary to the United Spanish War Veterans; city directories and high school annuals; photographs and correspondence from one of Stillwater’s “First Families”; and archives of a number of local clubs.  The collection is used by genealogists, historians, and educators researching African American history, flooding, World War II veterans, local churches and organizations, historic murders, local businesses, and local history.  Special collection materials have also been used to provide the Iowa Tribe with never-before-seen photos of tribe members and documents from 1850 to 1930.

The Stillwater Public Library owns a collection of directories, annuals, local organizations' archives, Stillwater, Payne County, and Oklahoma history material and other archived items that help detail the Stillwater area and the hundreds of thousands of residents and students who have passed through our community.  After receiving an NEH grant in 2017, along with a grant from the Oklahoma Historical Records Advisory Board, library staff created a secure storage and workspace for the collection. The present grant request would provide supplies, so that staff may now continue the work of preserving specific, prioritized items. The project also includes the development of processing procedures for the collection's archive items, which will be followed by Special Collections and Technical Services staff.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,547 (approved)
$5,547 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258429-18

Earlham College (Richmond, IN 47374-4095)
Ann-Eliza Lewis (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Creating Preservation Storage Plan for Lady Ta'an

Hiring a conservator to design new permanent housing for the museum’s Egyptian mummy from the Fayum Valley, known as Lady Ta’an, which has been a focal point of the collection since 1889; the new housing will serve as the first step in a long-term storage solution for the mummy, who has been identified by X-ray analysis as a female in her early 20s. This project would facilitate further conservation treatment and study of the mummy, including closer investigation of the body, wrappings, and the painted coffin to provide relative dates and other contextual information. The project would also improve visibility so that she can be examined more thoroughly by other audiences and be better integrated into the museum’s educational programs for both the college community and the broader public.


The Joseph Moore Museum (JMM) at Earlham College (EC) seeks support to hire a conservator to design permanent, open storage housing for the museum’s mummy, Lady Ta’an. In 2007 a conservator identified climate control as a critical element in the conservation plan and set out a series of short, medium, and long term solutions. JMM staff implemented the short- and medium-term solutions. Designing a long-term storage solution is the next step and requires input from a qualified conservator who will consult with JMM staff and act as a liaison with designers. We cannot invest in conservation treatments without adequate, stable storage. Purchased in 1889 by EC’s fourth president, Lady Ta’an has been displayed continuously and remains a significant draw for visitors. As a formative object of the collection, preserving Lady Ta’an is integral to preserving the museum’s history. The JMM’s humanities collections are used in many EC courses across all disciplines.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,621 (approved)
$4,621 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2018 – 7/31/2019


PG-258433-18

Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture (Santa Fe, NM 87508-1300)
Ryan Flahive (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Preserving the Records of the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

The purchase of archival supplies for the rehousing of 95 cubic feet of institutional records that document the activities, exhibits, and programs of the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts at the Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture. Founded in 1962, the Institute is the only center of multi-tribal higher education in the United States and has fostered generations of students pursuing creative and intellectual engagement with native art and culture. The museum, which opened in 1973, is dedicated to exhibiting, collecting, and interpreting the work of contemporary Native artists. The museum’s archival records support the study of humanities topics such as art and tribal education, 20th-century American art history, and the Native art movement and its themes of story-telling, landscape, and the environment. They are used by faculty, students, curators, and scholars of Native contemporary art.

This grant proposal, “Supporting the Processing of the Records of the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts” (IAIA MoCNA) is aimed to purchase supplies necessary to appraise, arrange, preserve, and describe an important group of records from the world’s only museum dedicated to contemporary personal expression of American Indian artists, 1990-2012. The collection documents the activities, programs, and exhibitions of the museum and is significant to the humanities due to the museums unique mission, “dedicated to increasing public understanding and appreciation of contemporary Native art, history and culture through presentation, collection and acquisition, preservation, and interpretation.” Specifically, the project goal is to purchase necessary supplies for the rehousing of the collection during archival processing to be completed by IAIA archives staff.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,877 (approved)
$3,877 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258435-18

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Mary Leverance (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Disaster Response Workshop and Equipment Purchase

A disaster response and recovery workshop conducted by a preservation specialist, as well as the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for the Mullins Library, which houses the university’s special collections of manuscripts, rare books, and photographs. Items cover a range of topics, but focus on Arkansas history—from the papers of Governors Orval Faubus and David Pryor to the models, drawings, and photographs of prominent architects Fay Jones and Edward Durell Stone. The special collections unit fields 4,000 research requests annually from historians and students. In an area susceptible to flooding, tornadoes, and high thunderstorm winds, the workshop would provide library staff with the hands-on training they need to handle wet materials and employ best practices for salvaging collections.

The Libraries at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, house collections in Mullins Library, Special Collections, and the Fine Arts Library that are the focus of the project. These collections provide students, faculty, researchers, and the public with material covering a broad range of humanities subjects. Prominent collections include Arkansas and Ozarks history, the J. William Fulbright manuscripts, political manuscripts, rare books, architectural drawings, maps, and photographs. The grant will support a disaster response and recovery workshop conducted by a consultant, and the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for use in the Libraries. The workshop will simulate an emergency to prepare participants to respond appropriately to an actual emergency; the Libraries will develop and implement an emergency response plan and policies. Monitoring equipment will provide baseline environmental measurements, and will ensure staff maintain proper collection conditions.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,996 (approved)
$5,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258450-18

Canyon Cinema Foundation (San Francisco, CA 94124-2653)
Seth Mitter (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Purchase of Film Storage Shelving and Preservation Supplies.

The purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies for more than 3,200 non-commercial, independent, and avant-garde films dating from the 1920s to the present; the collection consists of works by some 250 filmmakers, including Stan Brakhage, Peter Hutton, and Chick Strand, many of them based in the San Francisco area and in other parts of the West Coast.

 


Canyon Cinema Foundation’s (CCF) collections of film and related paper material represent 90 years of independent, artist-made film history. CCF’s loan program for its circulating film print collection (over 3200 reels) supports programming and exhibition by educational and cultural institutions across the globe. CCF’s collections of historical documents are important to researchers studying the history and culture of independent filmmaking. We are seeking funding to fulfill the recommendations of a 2017 collections preservation needs assessment with the purchase of horizontal shelving and preservation supplies. This project supports ongoing efforts to improve storage, care, and management for our collections of motion picture film, periodicals, and documents.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258451-18

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Nicholas Mathew (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Preserving and Sustaining the Department of Music's Instrument Collection, University of California, Berkeley

Purchasing environmental monitoring equipment, storage furniture, and preservation supplies with which to preserve and sustain a large collection of historical and rare musical instruments dating from the 17th through the 19th centuries. The collection encompasses more than 150 instruments, including the world-renowned Salz Collection of stringed instruments (with antique violins, violas, and bows), a collection of 18 Baroque instruments, as well as wind instruments (woodwinds and brasses), percussion, keyboard, and other significant plucked and bowed stringed instruments. Highlights from the collection, which are used for research and educational programs, include the 1620 Antonio and Hieronymus Amati viola, made in Cremona, Italy, that bears the unique painted coat of arms of the Venetian Radetti family and was later acquired by Robert von Mendelssohn in Berlin in the early 19th century.

This NEH Preservation Grant is being sought to preserve a rare and important collection of historical musical instruments in the Department of Music at the University of California, Berkeley. Students, faculty, and the community benefit from access to this collection through many avenues. These include research into the object histories, their authenticity, and provenance. It also includes instruction, performance, and public programming. Some of the instruments are used for exhibition purposes in the Department of Music and elsewhere. With a historical range situated primarily in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, the instruments intersect with a long and rich cultural history. The NEH grant would support an environmental monitoring program and necessary preservation supplies and equipment so that these musical instruments will continue to resonate long into the foreseeable future.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,963 (approved)
$5,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258407-18

University of South Dakota (Vermillion, SD 57069-2390)
Emanuele Marconi (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Improving National Music Museum's Storage Conditions

Purchasing preservation supplies and storage furniture and rehousing a collection of 15,000 musical instruments and related objects from both Western and non-Western cultures dating from the 16th century through the present. The collection, which includes pre-1800 instruments by renowned European master instrument makers, including Antonio Stradivari, and the Amati family, is used for teaching and research within the university community, as well as for national and international exhibits.

The National Music Museum houses one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive collections of musical instruments and archival material (more than 15,000 objects from the 16th century to the present). The grant will allows us, with proper conservation materials on hand, to rehouse objects more professionally following current best practices and to make possible a dedicated workspace for objects that are transitioning between exhibition and storage or that are being pulled from storage for study and cataloging. This area (and these new materials) will allow us to elevate our standards and procedures for packing and unpacking.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,950 (approved)
$5,950 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258413-18

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2446)
Stuart Hinds (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Cuban Small Press Books Preservation

A consultation with a preservation specialist and the purchase of preservation-quality supplies to rehouse the library’s Cuban Small Press Collection containing 129 hand-made art books created and assembled by the Ediciones Vigía art book and literary collective in Matanzas, Cuba. The books reflect modern-day Cuban culture through their stories, poetry, and artwork, as well as through the materials used to create them, including paper made from the outer core of sugar cane. The collection complements the strong interest and curriculum in book arts and book binding in the university’s departments of English and Art & Art History. Custom-built enclosures would protect the books from deterioration and ensure their long-term accessibility to researchers and students.

In 2016, the University of Missouri-Kansas City received a donation of 129 Cuban Small Press Books from Jeanne Drewes, Chief of Binding and Collections Care in the Preservation Directorate at the Library of Congress, which she has collected over a number of years in her travels to Cuba. The limited edition art books published by Ediciones Vigia are hand-assembled by collective members. Because of the paucity of materials available in Cuba, the materials used to construct these works of art are whatever the collective members can glean from their environment. By her own admission, Ms. Drewes recognizes the preservation nightmare these beautiful works pose. The books vary in size and shape and have loose or protruding components adhered to the cover. These books require individual boxes for protection. Ms. Drewes has not only donated the books but also her time and expertise to train an intern to construct customized boxes and trays.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Hispanic American Studies; Latin American Literature

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,448 (approved)
$4,448 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258416-18

Historical Society of Harford County, Inc. (Bel Air, MD 21014-3539)
Maryanna Skowronski (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Conservation and Preservation Plan for the Dr. Percy V. Williams Collection

The assessment of nine boxes of photographs, manuscripts, and other documents constituting the Dr. Percy V. Williams Collection. The project will be undertaken by staff at the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts who would rehouse the materials to address mold contamination, conduct a condition assessment, and develop a stabilization plan for the historical society. Materials in the Dr. Percy V. Williams Collection include first-hand accounts and government documents pertaining to race relations and the eventual desegregation of the Harford County, Maryland, public school system, which are currently inaccessible to researchers or the general public due to their condition.

The Historical Society of Harford County, Inc. is requesting funds to hire a conservation consultant to examine the Papers of Dr. Percy V. Williams, a prominent African-American educator, and create a plan for their conservation and preservation. The collection consists of nine boxes of papers, photographs, and other materials and includes personal and professional items related to Dr. Williams' career as an educator before, during, and after the desegregation of the Harford County Public Schools. Upon the Society's receipt of the items, it was discovered that the papers had been exposed to elements that encouraged the growth of mold, which had then spread throughout the collection. The Society is not equipped to safely work with this collection or make it accessible to the public and requires a plan for the conservation treatment and preservation of these items.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258417-18

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (Coral Gables, FL 33156-4233)
Brett Anthony Jestrow (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Planning for the future of the Fairchild Archives

A preservation assessment for the Fairchild Archives, comprising 150,000 documents, 30,000 photographs, and audiovisual recordings depicting the history of botany in in the southeastern United States and the Bahama Archipelago. The collection includes the papers of noted plant explorer David Fairchild and several other prominent plant taxonomists, illustrators, and growers. Highlights include sources documenting the history of the mango and avocado industries in the United States as well as handwritten field notes and photos chronicling the flora and topography of the Florida Everglades in the early 1900s.

The Fairchild Archives serve as the cornerstone of the institutional knowledge of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. By maintaining the work of Dr. David Fairchild and other accomplished plant explorers, the archives are fundamental for understanding the history of exploration, introduction, and breeding of plants. The archives have directly served scholarly articles in affiliation with colleges and universities in numerous ways. Furthermore, the archives are often the basis of popular articles found in Fairchild’s publication “The Tropical Garden.” In order to maintain the collections, a professional consultation for a preservation assessment is critical for making decisions as we move forward. With both staff changes and planned building renovations, the time for a preservation assessment is now. This grant application requests to funds for such a preservation assessment.

Project fields:
History of Science

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,890 (approved)
$5,890 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258361-18

Boone County Public Library (Burlington, KY 41005-9557)
Bridget B. Striker (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Boone County Public Library Local History Department Collection Assessment

A preservation assessment and the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and archival supplies for a collection of over 3,500 books, 1,100 microforms, 900 periodicals, 125 audiovisual items, and 14,000 digital files, including photographs, documents, video and audio files, and an encyclopedia related to the history of Boone County, Kentucky.  The collection contains church and court records; deeds; guardianship bonds; marriage, school, and tax records; will books; family files; and secondary sources.  Due to strengths documenting the African American experience and the Underground Railroad in the Ohio Valley region, the National Park Service designated the library a Network to Freedom Facility in April 2017.  The request to NEH includes a stipend of $1,000 for a recent graduate, who would work closely with the consultant on the preservation assessment.

The Boone County Public Library (BCPL) seeks assistance from the NEH for the preservation needs of their Local History Department. Collections recently acquired through donation to the Department are the focus of the project; all of which consist of primary resources pertinent to the history of Boone County. Because of Boone County's history of enslavement and its connections to the Underground Railroad, evidence of the African American experience is interwoven into nearly every primary Boone County resource. BCPL was designated by the National Park Service as a Network to Freedom Facility and would like to be proactive in pursuing the preservation of their collection. Through hiring a consultant for an assessment of the Department's collection, recommendations will be made for the current storage and arrangement of materials, environmental conditions for the space where the collection is housed and ways to integrate preservation needs into the strategic planning of the overall institution.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258362-18

Camera News, Inc. (New York, NY 10018-2916)
Orinne J. T. Takagi (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Newsreel Collection Preservation Assistance

A preservation assessment of a collection of approximately 60 16mm films stored at the University of Wisconsin. Other portions of the collection are held in New York City.  Produced between 1968 and 1973 by the New York film collective Third World Newsreel, these short, mostly black-and-white films focus on aspects of the civil rights, antiwar, and women’s movements.  The films have contributed to recent documentaries, including Berkeley in the Sixties, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution and the upcoming SoundTracks: Songs that Defined History.  They have also been screened at the Brooklyn Museum, the Museum of the City of New York, and the Film Society of Lincoln Center.


Camera News, Inc. requests $7000 (with $1000 for an advanced student) for consultant fees and travel costs to conduct a general preservation assessment to help draft a short and long-range plan for the care and sustainability of its Newsreel 16mm film collection.This project would bring a preservation consultant to the Collection being held at the University of Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research to review and correct its cataloging, and to assess the preservation needs of that portion of the collection, then to assess the remainder of the collection based in New York,and help to produce a short term and long term plan for the future of the entire collection, that includes preservation needs, housing and storage and making the films accessible.The Newsreel Collection is a unique group of films documenting social movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s, one of the most comprehensive collections of protest and alternative movement documentaries from that time period.

Project fields:
American Studies; Film History and Criticism; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2018 – 8/31/2019


PG-258446-18

Fort Fairfield Public Library (Fort Fairfieldf, ME 04742-1199)
Jennifer Gaenzle (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Fort Fairfield Public Library Town and County Historical Room Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment for a collection of over 2,000 books, newspapers, periodicals, and ephemera including early vital records of many towns from around Maine; genealogical studies of local, state, and Northeast region families; and county cemetery registers.  Notable items include 19th-century newspapers reporting marriages, births, and deaths from Fairfield, which is located on the United States-Canadian border; town reports dating back to 1865; and 70 years of Potato Blossom Festival brochures.  The foundation of the collection is a 1925 donation by Col. Franklin Drew of an extensive Civil War-era book collection.  Materials are used for historical and genealogical research across the United States and internationally. 

The Fort Fairfield Public Library is applying for the Preservation Assistance Grant to assess the needs and requirements to adequately care for and preserve the Jesse Drew Room collection. This collection was first established in 1925 upon the death of Col. Franklin M. Drew, who willed his entire library to the Fort Fairfield Library in memory of his father Jesse Drew. This collection consists primarily of Civil War era books, genealogy, state and local history books, originally collected over the years by Col. Drew, as well as additional acquisitions collected, purchased, or donated to the library. The collection houses over 2,000 books; local newspapers and school yearbooks and news; genealogy and cemetery records and town reports, which date back to the mid to late 1800's to present day. Many of the books in the collection are not known to be available anywhere else in Maine or the northeast for research.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Other; Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,915 (approved)
$5,915 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2019


PG-258447-18

Anthology Film Archives, Inc. (New York, NY 10012-4412)
John Klacsmann (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Anthology Film Archives'(AFA) Film and Video Cold Vault Storage Upgrade

The purchase of steel shelving to store part of a collection consisting of approximately 25,000 independent, avant-garde, and artist-made films and videos.  They include works by Stan Brakhage, Shirley Clarke, Joseph Cornell, Mayan Daren, and other American filmmakers, dating from 1899 to the present. Anthology’s collections are regularly accessed by scholars, students, curators, writers, and artists. They have been used in preparations for books, journal articles, dissertations, general scholarly work, museum and gallery exhibitions, and film screenings. Prints and digitized versions are frequently loaned to theaters and institutions around the world; they include the British Film Institute, the Broad Museum, the Cinémathèque de Toulouse, the Exploratorium in San Francisco, and the Melbourne International Film Festival.


Anthology Film Archives seeks funding to replace and upgrade shelving for film print storage in its on-site film vault. Anthology's archive maintains a collection of ca. 20,000 films and 5,000 videotapes, and preserves a range of 25-40 films each year. Anthology's unique mission is to preserve, present, and promote independent, avant-garde, and artist-made cinema; its collections are of local, national, and international significance, encompassing the multifaceted history of American and international experimental cinema. AFA's collections are of high research value for the scholarly study of moving images, specifically 20th-century American avant-garde and independent filmmaking. This project will help to safeguard a large portion of AFA's film print collection, mostly 16mm celluloid films, by creating more efficient and secure long-term storage for our film holdings in all formats from 16mm and 35mm, to 8mm and Super-8mm.

 


Project fields:
Film History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258452-18

Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation (Scottsdale, AZ 85259-2537)
Margo Stipe (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Taliesin and Taliesin West Site-Wide Temperature & Humidity Monitoring

The purchase and installation of environmental monitoring equipment to aid in the preservation of collections housed at Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin, and Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona, modern historic homes designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright.  The library, archival, and museum collections in each home include historic furnishings, many designed by Wright himself, Wright’s own Asian art collection, and architecture and design materials related to the practice, history, and theory of architecture.

The purpose of this project is to purchase and install 31 Data Loggers in the historic interiors and collection storage areas at Taliesin in Wisconsin and Taliesin West in Arizona, Frank Lloyd Wright’s homes and working complexes. The Data Loggers will monitor spaces where historic furnishings and art are on display, books and periodicals are actively used, and drawings, artifacts and artworks are stored. The data will inform selection of future mechanical climate control systems, maximizing our ability to preserve these treasures. Wright and his apprentices designed, built and often modified the buildings at both locations. The pastoral Wisconsin estate sharply contrasts his Arizona desert camp. These extraordinary buildings did not feature mechanical climate control during Wright’s lifetime, relying instead on architectural design elements to address changing weather. Today, as National Historic Landmarks, artificial climate control IS a concern.

Project fields:
Aesthetics; American Studies; Architecture

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258454-18

Asheville Art Museum (Asheville, NC 28802-1717)
Carolyn Grosch (Project Director: May 2017 to January 2018)
Thomas Schram (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Asheville Art Museum Works on Paper Assessment

Hiring a specialist conservator to conduct a preservation assessment of approximately 100 selected works on paper, to record the condition of the works, and to help train the museum’s curatorial staff in stewardship practices for this media. The project would also support workshops for the general public to raise awareness on preventive care for works on paper. The collection includes American art from the Civil War era to the present day, including work by both regional and national artists, including Josef and Anni Albers and George Bellows, and the primary collection from Black Mountain College that dates from 1933 to 1957 and represents several of the most influential American artists of the 20th century, such as John Rauschenberg, John Cage, and Jacob Lawrence. As a whole, the collection serves as an important center for modern and contemporary art and crafts and a significant educational resource for the western North Carolina region.

The Asheville Art Museum requests support for a conservation assessment of selected works on paper from its Permanent Collection. Funding will specifically support bringing a paper conservator to the Museum to record the condition of these works, determine conservation priorities, and help train the Museum’s curatorial staff on best practices for the storage of works on paper.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258458-18

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Linda Collins (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center(Wilberforce,Ohio)Collections Archival Storage

The purchase of preservation supplies for rehousing collections maintained by the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center (NAAMCC) in Wilberforce, Ohio, a city that is the home of two historically black universities: Wilberforce University and Central State University.  The NAAMCC is one of the country’s first museums dedicated to preserving and presenting African American history and culture on a national scale.  Opened in 1988, the center holds 350 manuscript collections and over 9,000 artifacts, artworks, and photographs.  Collection highlights include the papers of civil rights activist Anna Hedgeman, one of the organizers of the March on Washington; politician James McGee, the first African American mayor of Dayton; and author Alex Haley, best known for his novel Roots.

This grant request proposes to fund the purchase of archival supplies needed to improve the preservation of selected collections at the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center (NAAMCC) in Wilberforce, Ohio. NAAMCC holds a wide range of documents, photographs, and other archival materials that document African American history. The grant funds will be used to preserve these collections: The Anna Arnold Hedgeman Collection Anna Hedgeman was a civil rights activist, educator and politician. Hedgeman was one of the three lead organizers of the 1963 March on Washington. The Alex Haley Collection Alex Haley is most famous for his family history novel Roots, however he was a prolific author and journalist. The James H. McGee Collection James McGee was an alumnus of both Wilberforce and Ohio State Universities and was the first African American mayor of Dayton, Ohio.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258461-18

Appalshop, Inc. (Whitesburg, KY 41858-0743)
Caroline Rubens (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Safeguarding Appalshop Archive Collections

The purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies to rehouse a collection of more than 1.8 million feet of 16mm film footage; approximately 1,600 photographic images; and 300 boxes of archival materials and mixed media.  The collection focuses on the history and culture of eastern Kentucky and western North Carolina and documents a wide range of topics, including daily life, coal mining, and the musical traditions of Appalachia.


Appalshop Archive is requesting funds to support improvement of our long-term storage for audiovisual, photographs, and paper records documenting central Appalachian history, culture and social issues, as well as the institution’s 48-year history. Targeted collections are: The Appalshop Films Collection and The June Appal Recordings Collection which contain first-voice documentation of the region and Appalachian musical recordings; The Robert Gumpert-Harlan County Photograph Collection documenting the Harlan County strike of 1973-74; The Kristen Mendenhall Photograph Collection of photographs of rural artisans, activists and residents in rural eastern KY and NC in the early 1970s; and The Mountain Eagle/Tom and Pat Gish Archives Collection, which contains materials on poverty, housing, education, drug abuse, and other issues affecting eastern KY.

Project fields:
Folklore and Folklife; Rural Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258462-18

Bishop Paiute Tribe (Bishop, CA 93514-8058)
Tara Frank (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Emergency and Disaster Preparedness for Collections and Archives Project

Training in disaster preparedness for staff at the cultural center of the Bishop Paiute tribe and purchase of emergency supplies for care of the tribe’s cultural heritage collections. The cultural center cares for approximately 4,500 historic and ethnographic objects, such as basketry and textiles, and 3,000 photographs and archival materials, documenting the culture and lifeways of the Paiute and Shoshone peoples. Staff would attend workshops at the California Preservation Program and would implement a disaster plan, following recommendations of previous preservation assessments.

The Bishop Paiute Tribe requests a Preservation Assistance Grant in the amount of $6,000 from the National Endowment for Humanities to fund Education and training and Supplies for the Owens Valley Paiute Shoshone Cultural Center which will result in a short and long term Emergency and Disaster Plan for the Humanities Collections and Archives of the Tribe.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258471-18

Noah Webster Foundation and Historical Society (West Hartford, CT 06107-3430)
Sheila Daley (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Data-driven Environmental Monitoring and Digital Preservation Training

Purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and hiring of a consultant to offer training in digital preservation and use of environmental data for care of the collections at the historic house and birthplace of Noah Webster. Collections document 18th- century New England life and culture through the collections associated with Webster and his family and social milieu. Highlights of the archival collections are original editions of books by Webster, including his dictionaries, history and geography textbooks, and other published writings, as well as correspondence, photographs, and early land records. Objects include Webster’s desk, furniture, and decorative art.  The training offered by the consultants at the Webster house would be open to staff at neighboring institutions.


The Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society is located in the birthplace and childhood home of Noah Webster, a nationally registered historic landmark. The museum offers award-winning programming to thousands of students and visitors each year, and holds manuscript and 3d object collections related to Noah Webster and to the local community spanning the 17th through the 21st century. We request funds for (1) purchase of 4 PEM2 dataloggers for environmental monitoring and staff training in their use, and (2) staff training in standards and best practices for digital preservation and safe handling of collections during digitization. Staff will receive training in environmental data interpretation, and a consultant will develop a three-part workshop covering safe handling and digital preservation topics for small institutions.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258386-18

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Jill Hartz (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Rehousing of 134 Asian Paintings

The purchase of supplies for the rehousing of a collection of 134 rolled Asian painted scrolls and to facilitate the reorganization and storage of the paintings in custom archival boxes. This work would improve preservation of the historic scrolls, including Chinese, Japanese, and Korean paintings on multiple media (paper, silk, and other fabrics), and promote access to this significant collection of 19th-century works for extensive use within the university community, for undergraduate research projects, museum exhibitions, as well as for related public programs that reach a broad audience.

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) at the University of Oregon respectfully requests NEH funding to support a project to improve storage conditions for our rolled Asian Paintings Collection. Specifically, the grant will fund the cost of supplies for the rehousing of these scrolls. The project will be supervised by the museum’s collections manager, Christopher White, who is a professional conservator with experience treating paper and wood. In addition to Mr. White, other key staff to the project will include Anne Rose Kitagawa, the museum’s chief curator and curator of Asian art, and Jonathan Smith, the museum’s on-staff professional photographer. The goals of the proposed project are to (1) significantly improve storage conditions for this heavily used section of the collections and (2) also improve public digital access to these paintings, some of which have never been publicly available.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General; East Asian Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258537-18

American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, Inc. (New York, NY 10017-4014)
Linda G. Levi (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Preservation Assessment of the JDC Archives Artifacts and Ephemera Collection

A preservation assessment of the artifacts and ephemera collection of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) Archives, along with purchase of preservation supplies. The collection comprises 600 lithographs, prints, textiles, correspondence, diaries, scrapbooks, posters, maps, and other items documenting the work of the JDC from its founding in 1914 to the present. Highlights include crafts made by Jewish children in orphanages in Poland sponsored by the JDC during the 1920s, as well as scrapbooks chronicling the development of an agricultural settlement for Jewish refugees in the Dominican Republic established during World War II. The assessment would be conducted by a preservation professional, joined by a graduate student in library and museum conservation.

The JDC Archives is the institutional repository of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), the world’s leading Jewish humanitarian relief organization, founded in 1914. The JDC Archives requests NEH funds to provide expert consultation to assess the preservation needs of select items in JDC’s Artifacts and Ephemera Collection. This newly catalogued collection offers a remarkable and vital perspective on JDC’s global relief efforts, over the last century, in over 90 countries. This project will focus on a review of selected items of diverse media, especially paper-based items, which are demonstrably fragile and require expert advice to ensure their stability and accessibility for future generations of researchers. After the consultant’s recommendations have been reviewed by Archives staff, appropriate storage and preservation supplies will be purchased for the re-housing of select items.

Project fields:
European History; Jewish Studies; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258545-18

Nashville Public Library Foundation (Nashville, TN 37219-2314)
Michael Lusk (Project Director: May 2017 to December 2017)
Carl Kenneth Fieth (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Audiovisual Conservation Center at the Nashville Public Library - Preserving Rare and At-Risk Film

The purchase of preservation and archival supplies to rehouse a collection of 400 professional and amateur acetate films documenting life in Tennessee and the American Middle South.  Examples include footage of Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking at Fisk University after a bomb scare in 1960; recordings of students traveling to the Selma March in 1965; rare early color home movies of American soldiers in Europe and America during World War II; documentation of the 1982 World’s Fair in Knoxville, Tennessee; and footage of daily life, local culture, personal celebrations, travel, and regional architectural parks and landmarks.  The project’s activities are based on a 2016 Collections Assessment Report.

The Nashville Public Library collection contains over 5,500 analog audiovisual assets on formats ranging from 16mm film to video cassette and wire recording. This rich humanities collection provides an expansive look into the life, culture, and history of the American Middle South and beyond and spans a period of nearly 80 years. Highlights of the collection include early color footage of World War II; civil rights-era events, presidential visits, regional cultural events, and home movies documenting the culture of everyday life.

Funding will be used to improve the lifespan of 400 rare and content-rich films in the collection. The project fulfills recommendations from the 2016 Consultant's Report (funded by the Nashville Public Library Foundation). The grant supports the purchase of Image Permanence Institute A-D test strips, archival film storage cores, a storage freezer, and a project assistant. The project will be conducted by the consultant (now on staff) and assistant.

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258549-18

Lee Library Association (Lee, MA 01238-1614)
Damon Vorce (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Collection Storage Improvements for the Lee Library Historical Collection

A preservation assessment and the purchase of archival supplies to rehouse items documenting the local history of Lee, Massachusetts, and its historical businesses.  The collection contains materials from some of Lee’s 26 paper mills, including business and family records, artifacts, and sample papers, as well as documentation of the town’s marble industry.  The collection includes 850 rare books; town reports from 1777 to the present; 19th-century scrapbooks; records of all of the town’s Revolutionary War participants; and religious organization materials from the 1790s to the present, including correspondence, church records, printed sermons and addresses, and photographs.  Materials are used for scholarly research, exhibits, lectures, publications, genealogy, and school projects.

Our project will allow us to make major collection storage improvements for preserving the Lee Library Historical Collection. The collection contains town records, maps, photos, books, newspapers, early letters, business ledgers, and a record of early life to the present. Records include the history of papermaking and the marble industry. The Lee Library is the only institution that holds the original newspapers of the Valley Gleaner (1857-1944). Approximately 1,500 photos, from the 1800s to the present, provide a visual record of a small New England town.  The money requested for the supplies would enhance the stability of the collection and preserve it for future generations. It is essential to the library and community that these materials have a safe and protected future here as well as access to them. We intend to hire a consultant to recommend the appropriate archival storage enclosures and help us create a comprehensive plan for preserving and maintaining the collection.

Project fields:

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258550-18

Jewish Historical Society of North Jersey (Fairlawn, NJ 07410-1252)
Joy Kurland (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Small Institution Grant for Preservation Jewish Historical Society of North Jersey

Contracting with a consultant from the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, to conduct a preservation assessment of a collection of library and archival material documenting the social, cultural, economic, political, and religious history of the Jewish communities of Passaic, Bergen, and Hudson counties, New Jersey. Included are personal and family papers, photographs, and synagogue records dating to 1848 documenting the foundation of Barnert Hospital, where Jewish doctors, shut out of local hospitals, could practice.  Other material chronicles the role of Jewish immigrants in manufacturing uniforms for the Union Army, the development of Jewish football teams in the 1920s, and domestic religious practices throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. In addition, the historical society maintains an oral history archive of over 150 interviews of Holocaust survivors, civil rights leaders, and pop culture icons.

The Jewish Historical Society of North Jersey would like to retain the services of Dyani Fiege, the
Director of Preservation Services at the Philadelphia-based firm, Conservation Center for Art and Historic
Artifacts to conduct a general preservation assessment of the collections and operations at the society’s
new location in Fairlawn, NJ. The mission of the Society is the collection, preservation, exhibition,
publication and popularization of material of every kind having reference to settlement, history and life of
American Jewry in Northern New Jersey. A 501 (c) 3 non-profit educational organization, a museum and
library are open year round. Collections are used by students, scholars, researchers, and general interest
visitors. After years of making the best of the situation, the society is now poised to improve conservation
policies. New standards of preservation are needed. This preservation assessment will be the foundation
of all future growth and stability for the collections.

Project fields:

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,970 (approved)
$5,970 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258339-18

Huguenot Historical Society, New Paltz, N.Y. (New Paltz, NY 12561-1415)
Josephine Bloodgood (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Enhancing Emergency Preparedness at Historic Huguenot Street

Hiring a consultant to undertake a risk assessment and offer staff training for care of humanities collections at the Historic Huguenot Street site in New York’s Hudson Valley.  Seven stone houses and structures, dating to the 17th and 18th centuries, make up the National Historic Landmark site, which collects, preserves, and interprets the stories of the Huguenots’ journey in America. The museum collections include paintings, furniture, jewelry, clothing, quilts, and musical instruments, while a research library and archives preserve early business account books, family papers, and other original documents that tell the history of New Paltz from its founding in 1677 through the 20th century.


Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) seeks support to augment emergency preparedness planning specifically for humanities collections at its 10-acre National Historic Landmark District in New York’s Hudson Valley. The project entails a risk assessment for each of the buildings where collections are stored or displayed; a comprehensive Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan; and subsequent training for HHS staff and volunteers. With more than 14,000 collections pieces and seven historic house museums, resource-specific planning for emergency preparedness and disaster response is critical. A wide-range of potential events must be considered, including extreme weather such as record snow and intense rain associated with hurricanes such as Sandy and Irene. HHS staff has enlisted Barbara Moore, a conservator and experienced emergency preparedness consultant, to guide the plan development process and train staff in disaster recovery techniques.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258340-18

University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)
Donna E. McCrea (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Preservation Rehousing of Film Collections at the University of Montana

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse a collection of 5,300 films dating from the 1920s to the 1970s documenting aspects of the history and culture of Montana. They include, for example, amateur home movies, promotional films produced for the Northern Pacific Railway, video of the influential Montana Congressman and Senator Mike Mansfield, and footage of the national “Trail of Broken Treaties” student protests.


This project proposal requests $3,414 to purchase supplies to help ensure the long-term preservation of 16mm and 8mm films held in the University of Montana’s Archives and Special Collections. This preservation rehousing activity is done at the recommendation of a consultant hired with a 2014 NEH Preservation Assistance Grant. Our film collections have demonstrated use by students, scholars, businesses and the general public for their personal and professional research. These collections have significance to the humanities because they provide primary source documentation of the people, events and activities of Montana and Montanans from the 1920s to the 1970s. A large portion of these films, including home movies, are held uniquely by the University of Montana.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,414 (approved)
$3,414 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258351-18

Hardin County (Kountze, TX 77625-5994)
Dana M. Hogg (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Preservation of Historic Hardin County, Texas, Court Records

A preservation assessment and the purchase of archival supplies and environmental monitoring equipment for a collection of records documenting local history and the development of Texas’s oil and timber industries.  The Texas Company (Texaco) struck its first productive well in Sour Lake, Hardin County, in 1903.  The collection contains court documents for 24,000 criminal and 58,000 civil cases including hundreds of tri-fold documents, thousands of documents in legal folders, bound volumes of grand jury minutes, civil minutes, tax indices, clerk records of trust funds, judgments, fee sheets, indices of criminal minutes, execution dockets, and docket sheets.  Materials are used for research on genealogy, sociology, political science, criminal studies, legal history, and Texas history.

The Hardin County District Clerk's office maintains 2,300 square feet of records that help tell the story of our county, including information about the history of the beginnings of the oil and timber industry.  These records are stored in an old hospital building in far from ideal conditions, and staff are not knowledgeable about proper care of historic records.  With this grant, we will hire a conservator to perform a preservation assessment of our collection and help us create a preservation plan we can follow for our collection.  We will also purchase supplies to house our collection and monitor the environment.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258368-18

SUNY Research Foundation, Maritime College (Bronx, NY 10465-4127)
Kristin Hart (Project Director: May 2017 to December 2017)
Annie Tummino (Project Director: December 2017 to August 2018)
Corey S. Halaychik (Project Director: August 2018 to present)

Preserving Maritime Heritage Collections at SUNY Maritime College

The purchase of preservation supplies to house 425 minute books, financial ledgers, and scrapbooks, along with 100 linear feet of archives and manuscripts, documenting American maritime history from the late 18th to mid-20th centuries, with an emphasis on the history of the Merchant Marines. The collection includes records of Sailors’ Snug Harbor hospital and home for retired sailors, established in 1801; the Marine Society of New York, chartered in 1770; and Maritime College, the nation’s first school dedicated to training merchant marines, founded in 1874.

The Stephen B. Luce Library of SUNY Maritime College holds the records of several significant maritime organizations, including the Marine Society of New York, Sailors’ Snug Harbor, and the Sandy Hook Pilots Association. Additionally, the library holds college records and alumni papers that shed light on the structure and role of the Merchant Marine during peacetime and war. Together, these collections help document the role of mariners in our nation’s economic and military history from 1769 through World War II. These collections have recently been moved into a newly renovated, climate controlled environment, and appropriate archival housing will further ensure their preservation. Funds will support the purchase of over 400 custom enclosures for bound volumes, ship logs, and scrapbooks that are currently unhoused, and the replacement of close to 200 acidic boxes.

Project fields:
Military History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258369-18

City of Worcester, Massachusetts (Worcester, MA 01608-1891)
Stephen A.J. Pottle (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Worcester City Clerk’s Office - NEH Preservation Grant

A preservation assessment and the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for a collection of 30,000 historical records in New England’s second largest city.  Materials include vital records certificates filed since the 1720s, hundreds of audio and video recordings of and documents presented to city council meetings, city ordinances, and voter and business registrations.  Notable items include a photogravure of Worcester City Hall; a 1774 Worcester Town Record account of Tory protests in a town meeting; and a 1969 map and list of “Locations of Graves on Worcester Common.”  The collection is used by researchers, members of the public, and students.

The City of Worcester's City Clerk's Office is seeking a Preservation grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access to support an in-depth preservation assessment of our collection of historic materials and artifacts. Through the hiring of a consultant, the project will result in a written report to establish a long-range plan for the care and sustainability of our collection of vital statistics and City Council records. As the second largest city in New England, Worcester, MA, has an expansive collection of materials and this project will highlight the twenty-first century methods for the conservation and preservation of our records.

Project fields:
American Government; Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258370-18

South Dakota State University (Brookings, SD 57007-0001)
Michelle Christian (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

SDSU Archives and Special Collections Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment for the university’s Archives and Special Collections unit, comprising 7,000 linear feet of manuscripts, records, publications, photographs, audiovisual materials, and artifacts chiefly documenting the history and culture of South Dakota. The collection holds primary sources pertaining to the state’s agriculture industry, South Dakota politicians and political affairs, and the state’s literary heritage. Highlights include the records of the South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Farmers Union, papers of Ben Reifel, the first Lakota member of the U.S. House of Representatives, papers of Congressman and Senator Thomas A. Daschle, and the writings of notable authors and poets Kathleen Norris, Audrae Visser, and David A. Evans, the latter two being former state poets laureate.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Archives and Special Collections (ASC) is part of the Hilton M. Briggs Library on the SDSU campus. The collections in the ASC preserve not only the history of SDSU, but also the history and culture of South Dakota, development of agriculture and rural life, and American Indian life and culture. With this grant, the ASC will hire a consultant to provide a preservation needs assessment of the environmental conditions in which the collections are housed. The assessment will produce a detailed report providing guidance to improve these conditions, which when applied will increase the longevity of the collections.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258373-18

Mark Twain House (Hartford, CT 06105-6400)
Tracy Brindle (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

The Mark Twain House & Museum Collection Preservation Project

Purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and rehousing supplies for a collection of museum artifacts and rare and valuable books associated with Mark Twain and that document his life and America’s literary and cultural history. The home, located in Hartford, Connecticut, is a National Historic Landmark. Some 6,000 objects are on display, with highlights including Twain’s billiard table and an elaborately carved bed that he purchased in Venice in 1878. Archival boxes would be used to house books from Twain’s personal library.  Collections are viewed by 65,000 visitors each year, while the research library has supported research, educational programming, exhibits, documentary films, and the creation of new scholarly editions of Twain’s work.

The project encompasses the purchase of data loggers, to monitor environmental conditions in the landmark Mark Twain House, and archival storage boxes for books in the museum’s collections. The House was Twain’s home from 1874 to 1891. It has been meticulously restored, and furnished with thousands of period artifacts, including many objects that belonged to Twain and his family. The data loggers will allow the monitoring of the specific conditions in each room in which historic artifacts are displayed. The storage boxes will house rare and valuable books, including books from Twain’s personal library, some of which contain his marginalia, as well as books that belonged to, were authored by, or inscribed by, individuals who were significant to his life and work. The objects to be preserved through this project are irreplaceable artifacts of America’s literary history and culture, which provide unique and valuable insight into Mark Twain, his work, his era, and his enduring legacy.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019