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Funded Projects Query Form
103 matches

Program: Preservation Assistance Grants*
Date range: 2019-2019
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PG-266302-19

Museum of the American Military Family and Learning Center (Albuquerque, NM 87185-5085)
Circe Olson Woessner (Project Director: December 2018 to present)

We also Served: Safeguarding our Heritage

The purchase of archival boxes, a HEPA (High-Efficiency Particulate Air) vacuum, and temporary storage rental for a collection of 1,600 items, including coins, textiles, patches, paintings, pottery, photographs, letters, documents, and audiovisual materials that tell the history on the home front and abroad of American military families.  The collections, which are used in exhibits and traveling educational programs, represent a wide range of experiences and include letters between service members and their families during World War II, documents and photographs related to the establishment of the Defense Department school system for children of military personnel, and military artifacts from Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and Europe.

This project will enable our Museum to fulfill the most urgent of CAP recommendations made last May during an Assessment Visit. It will cover costs of obtaining preservation equipment and temporary storage of fragile collection items during a facility upgrade.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, General; Military History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,500 (approved)
$4,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 4/30/2020


PG-263440-19

Waynesburg University (Waynesburg, PA 15370-1258)
Courtney Dennis (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Paul R. Stewart Museum Collection Preservation

The purchase of preservation storage supplies for the college’s archives, comprising 300 linear feet of documents, photographs, campus newspapers, and other materials.  Sources date back to the 1850s and chronicle the school’s history as an early enrollee of African American and Native American students and one of the nation’s first higher education institutions to grant full degrees to women.  Highlights include personal papers of A. B. Miller, who served as president of the college from 1859 to 1899, and issues of the Cumberland Presbyterian, a periodical published by Waynesburg’s parent church, dating from 1869 to 1885.

The Paul R. Stewart Museum (PRSM) at Waynesburg University has a diverse collection that represents the humanities, arts, and sciences. The university was founded by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1849, and its significant tradition of educational and social progressiveness is such that two of its campus buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places. This project will focus on preserving the archival materials in the collection that pertain to the university’s institutional history. Grant funds would support replacing archival-grade containers and materials in this collection that are losing efficacy and purchasing archival-grade containers and materials for the items in this collection that are not currently housed using accepted archival practices or are not housed at all. The PRSM receives 60 requests annually from researchers wishing to utilize these materials. By preserving them, the PRSM can continue to share them with the public and the campus community.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/1/2020


PG-263455-19

Johnson County Community College (Overland Park, KS 66210-1283)
Britt Benjamin (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Preserving Kansas City's Fashion History at Johnson County Community College

The hiring of a consultant to undertake a preservation assessment of a historic fashion collection and a workshop for faculty, students, and staff to ensure improved care of the collection. The collection contains more than 1,500 items that document the history of fashion in Kansas City and that date from the late 19th through the late 20th century.  Included are pieces by the fashion sportswear designer Claire McCardell, and other designers such as Pierre Cardin and Oscar de la Renta, as well as the Kansas City-based designer Nelly Don.  The collection is used extensively by students and faculty in a wide range of university courses, for scholarly research, and for the public through exhibitions and a searchable online database.

Johnson County Community College (JCCC) requests $5,905 through a National Endowment for the Humanities Small Institutions Preservation Assistance grant to fund a textile preservationist to perform a general needs assessment of the College’s fashion collection.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,905 (approved)
$5,905 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263487-19

Old Sturbridge Village (Sturbridge, MA 01566-1138)
Caitlin Emery Avenia (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Environmental Management and Emergency Preparedness Training

Engaging preventive care specialists from the Northeast Document Conservation Center to assess climate control capabilities and provide recommendations on emergency preparedness. The collection, which documents everyday life in rural New England before the Civil War, holds approximately 50,000 items related to daily life, from clothing to furniture, household items, and agricultural tools. The research library has more than 35,000 volumes and 1,000 linear feet of manuscript material such as periodicals and the records of families, businesses, towns, and counties.

The Old Sturbridge Village Museum Collection and Research Library represent one of the single largest holding of materials documenting everyday life in rural New England prior to the Civil War. The Village’s significant collections illuminate the rich history of the fashion, ideas, technologies, and everyday lives of rural New Englanders. The scope of this project is to address collections stewardship practices within the Collections Building, Research Library, and Archives, with respect to the proper environmental standards, emergency preparedness, and mold mitigation. The primary goal of this grant is to utilize the expert knowledge preventative care specialists at the Northeast Document Conservation Center to assess our climate control capabilities, and provide recommendations to better manage the particular risks associated with our collection environments and review our emergency preparedness policies and practices, including providing mold identification and remediation training.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


PG-263489-19

City of Falls Church (Falls Church, VA 22046-3301)
Marshall William Webster (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

General Preservation Assessment for Local History Collection in the Mary Riley Styles Public Library

A general preservation assessment for over 2,000 books, 1,200 maps, 20,000 film negative and print slides, 8,000 photographic prints, 130 linear feet of clipping and pamphlet files, and nearly 600 audiovisual items related to the history of Falls Church, Virginia.  The collection includes maps of original land grants and street and building development from the 1790s through the present; Civil War letters and diaries; over 50 original stereoscopic daguerreotypes depicting daily life at Camp Alger during the Spanish American War; several thousand photographic negatives documenting the area’s culture and transformation in the mid-20th century; over 100 oral histories from the 1970s and 1980s; and city directories, genealogical folders, and records from local organizations.

The Mary Riley Styles Public Library’s Local History Room features collections documenting the rich history of the City of Falls Church, Virginia, from revolutionary times through the Civil War and Spanish American War up to the present day. An NEH Preservation Assistance Grant would help to preserve the life of these diverse collections and make them accessible to researchers and the general public. The Local History Room collections include area maps from the 18th century, thousands of photographic negatives depicting life in Falls Church from the late 40’s to the early 60’s, and oral history sound recordings of prominent citizens, including state senator John A.K. Donovan and relatives of civil rights activist E.B. Henderson. These collections are significant to the humanities because they vividly depict the life of a small but significant town as it experienced all of the major events in the history of the United States.

Project fields:
History, General; History, Other; Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,900 (approved)
$5,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 4/30/2019


PG-263491-19

Victoria College (Victoria, TX 77901-4494)
Elizabeth Neucere (Project Director: April 2018 to June 2019)
Sue Prudhomme (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

2019 Preservation Assistance Grant: Preparation through Preservation at Victoria College’s Museum of the Coastal Bend

Purchase of archival and preservation equipment for improved future implementation of the collections management policy and emergency plan. The MCB’s collections span 13,000 years of history in this part of Texas and number around 25,000 objects, including stone artifacts from early coastal peoples, Native American pottery sherds, and seven French cannons of significance to the colonial history of the area. The collection is used for exhibitions, research, and teaching in this Hispanic-serving community college. The MCB was in an area evacuated during Hurricane Harvey (2017). While staff implemented the short-term emergency procedures, the natural disaster exposed collection objects to high heat and humidity and brought urgency to addressing inadequacies of current shelving, storage, and preservation equipment.

Victoria College’s Museum of the Coastal Bend (MCB) presents the last 13,000 years of history in the 10-county Texas Coastal Bend region. Its 25,000 artifacts include weapons, tools, jewelry, bones, and pottery that let the public explore regional cultural and economic origins through the transition from nomadic lifestyles to European economic and religious settlement to Spanish cattle ranching enterprise and the Mexican culture now ingrained in Texas’ society. This project focuses on the collection’s 90% research and interpretive artifacts. The goal is to align preventive conservation and disaster response capabilities with the standards of MCB’s Collections Management Policy and Emergency Plan. A HEPA vacuum, data logger system, and archival storage will preserve sensitive artifacts. After experiencing Hurricane Harvey’s effects, MCB will also purchase cabinetry and archival bags for the evacuation of on-display gallery artifacts and a dehumidifier for post-disaster mitigation.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Economic History; History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$9,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


PG-263492-19

Shelburne Museum (Shelburne, VT 05482-0010)
Nancie C. Ravenel (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Treatment of Large Paintings at Shelburne Museum

A conservation assessment of 10 damaged over-sized paintings from the Shelburne Museum’s permanent collection that include portraiture and landscapes covering themes of family life, commerce and advertising, transportation history, and wildlife relevant to the history of Vermont, the Adirondack region, and New England at large.  Included in the collection are Racquette Lake by Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait, which depicts a scene near the Shelburne Museum, works by prolific wildlife painter Carl Rungius, and the piece Studebaker Wagon Sign, which connects to the museum’s collection of horse-drawn vehicles.  This project would be the first step in making these paintings accessible to the general public and ready for exhibition.

Shelburne Museum requests funding to support the consultation of two conservators from the Williamstown Regional Art Conservation Lab to visit the Museum and examine the condition of 10 large-scale paintings and frames. The two conservators will provide Shelburne Museum with treatment proposals to address condition issues that prevent the Museum from placing these ten paintings on view. Once examined, Shelburne Museum staff would seek additional funding to set a prospective treatment plan in place and, ultimately, include the works in rotating exhibitions. Electra Havemeyer Webb gathered Shelburne’s collection of American paintings in the late 1950s. In a forward-looking endeavor, Webb assembled a survey of American portraits, landscapes, genre scenes, and still lifes from the 18th and 19th centuries to animate her museum and narrate a story of the United States as an attractive heterogeneous and industrious nation.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,360 (approved)
$4,360 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 4/30/2019


PG-266590-19

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Rehousing MOCA's Newspaper Collection

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse the museum’s newspaper collection, consisting of 8,000 issues dating from 1952 to 2008 that feature news stories on the local politics and community life of Chinese Americans in Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston, Fort Lauderdale, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston.  As recommended by a previous assessment, rehousing the newspapers within flat archival boxes would protect them for use by current and future researchers.  The collection has drawn attention from historians of the Chinese diaspora in the United States and is an important resource of information on socio-economic and political topics, as well as on historical figures not covered by mainstream media outlets at the time.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) respectfully requests a grant of $10,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities in order to rehouse our newspaper collection of over 8,000 individual issues from 33 different publishers located across North America. The publication dates range from 1952 through 2008 with about 40% of the collection written in English and the other 60% written in Chinese. This project will enable us to rehouse, restore, and preserve these newspapers for years of research and scholarship on Chinese American communities to come.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Asian American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


PG-266577-19

United Keetowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (Tahlequah, OK 74465-0746)
Ernestine Berry (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Guarding Oklahoma Native American Heritage

The work of two preservation specialists to update the museum’s disaster plan and offer workshops to museum staff, first responders, and staff of nearby tribal institutions. The workshops would include hands-on training for risk assessment, disaster preparedness and response, and working with first responders, and would result in the establishment of a communication network and collaborations with partner cultural heritage institutions. Collections at the John Hair Cultural Center and Museum include baskets, ceremonial items, photographs, tribal rolls, treaties, and correspondence used for research, exhibits, and programs that benefit the tribe, local schools, and visiting scholars.

The John Hair Cultural Center & Museum (JHCCM) of the United Keetoowah Band (UKB) is applying for support for Guarding Oklahoma Native American Heritage: a preparedness plan update for JHCCM, and two workshops for staff of area Native-led museums: one on preparedness planning and response, and one on the impacts of climate on preparedness in Oklahoma with emphasis on increased vulnerability of Native peoples. The workshops close with a facilitated discussion for co-creating plans for collaborative approaches to risk mitigation, disaster preparedness, and disaster and climate resilience. The project updates earlier work and will include special concerns for special heritage items recently returned to the United Keetoowah Band. Five additional native groups will participate in the two days of workshops.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-266588-19

Washington County Historical Society, Inc (West Bend, WI 53095-3333)
Janean S. Mollet-Van Beckum (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Environmental Monitoring Equipment and Training

The purchase and installation of 29 dataloggers, training staff in the use of the equipment, and preliminary analysis of the data by a consultant, as recommended in a 2018 preservation assessment. This project would address the preservation needs of the historical society’s collection of 35,000 objects, which relate to the people, traditions, and history of Washington County, Wisconsin, and range in date from prehistoric times to the present. Holdings include business ledgers, advertising materials, and company histories from the West Bend Company and Enger-Kress Leather Goods Company, as well as artifacts from local breweries and dairies. The collection also contains 17,100 photographs and more than 800 cubic feet of family collections, school records, and local history books.

The grant will support the installation, implementation and staff training for an environmental monitoring program in the Washington County Historical Society’s two main buildings.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


PG-266593-19

City of Boston (West Roxbury, MA 02132-4905)
John Joseph McColgan (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Purchase of Flat Files and Supplies for Preservation of Oversized Materials

The purchase of preservation supplies recommended in a prior assessment to accommodate and protect oversized materials in the city’s archives, including 180 drawers of flat files and 2,000 rolled items in various formats. Especially noteworthy are items from the Boston Marathon Bombing Memorial collection, such as stuffed animals and banners that have been stored on open shelves. These materials, which were gathered from the grassroots memorial at the marathon finish line in Copley Square, are used by researchers and have been featured in exhibits and articles. Other highlights of the city archives include early panoramic photos of Boston and early plans from the public works and parks departments.

This grant would support the purchase of flat files and preservation supplies needed to fulfill recommendations made in a Preservation Needs Assessment regarding the storage of oversized materials.

Project fields:
Urban History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,975 (approved)
$9,975 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 3/31/2020


PG-266611-19

Museum of African American History, Inc. (Boston, MA 02108-3704)
Chandra S. Harrington (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Collections Storage Optimization Project

The purchase of shelving to house framed prints and paintings in the museum’s collection, including five paintings by Allan Rohan Crite, who was among a small number of African Americans employed by the Federal Arts Project in the 1930s. The museum stewards four historic sites in Boston and on Nantucket and welcomes around 30,000 visitors annually. Its collection represents 400 years of African American history through items such as photographs of African American Civil War soldiers, fine art, issues of The Liberator newspaper, personal effects of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, and rare books. 

As the next step in the Museum of African American History's plan to improve the care of our important collections, we will rehouse improperly stored objects (specifically framed paintings/prints) to optimize their preservation. To do so, we propose to purchase specialized shelving and necessary storage supplies with a Preservation Assistance Grant of $7,186 from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Project fields:
African American History; Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,186 (approved)
$7,186 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/29/2020


PG-266608-19

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Carey Weber (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

James Reed Print Collection Rehousing Project

The purchase of preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment for a recently-acquired collection of over 700 prints by leading French nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists such as Eugène Delacroix, Edouard Manet, and Odilon Redon. The prints encompass a wide range of subject matter and artistic expression, touching on still-life, portraiture, caricature, literary subjects, industrialization, urbanization, class and gender issues, and leisure pursuits. This collection and others at Fairfield University Art Museum are incorporated into interdisciplinary teaching, exhibits, and publications.

The Fairfield University Art Museum received a major gift of 700 19th-century French lithographs and etchings in 2017. The collection includes prints by preeminent artists, including Géricault, Delacroix, Daumier, Manet, Redon, and Fantin-Latour. Also included in the gift are 35 old master engravings, etchings and woodcuts by northern European artists. Prints have always been appreciated as primary source material in the humanities—their imagery and subject matter intimately relate to specific historical currents and events and literary themes and genres. The Reed Collection is extraordinary but the prints are not properly housed. This new Preservation Assistance Grant will allow us to re-house each print into archival solander boxes, placed into storage cabinets in our storeroom, with new dataloggers in place to actively monitor the room’s temperature and humidity.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$8,312 (approved)
$8,312 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


PG-266619-19

Lawrence Technological University (Southfield, MI 48075-1051)
Cynthia Simpson (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Lawrence Technological University's Albert Kahn Library Collection, Improving the storage environment, purchase of preservation supplies, consultation and staff training.

The purchase of preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment, as well as training in preservation methods for staff caring for the personal library of German American architect Albert Kahn, one of this country’s most prolific architects of the early twentieth century.  Kahn designed 1,900 buildings across Michigan and around the United States, and his company was chosen as a consulting firm for the Soviet Union’s first Five-Year Plan (1928-1932).  Notably, the library includes copies of the periodical, USSR in Construction, which feature Margaret Bourke White’s photographs of Kahn’s tractor factories in the Soviet Union.  More than 2,000 monographs and periodicals are complemented by unpublished archival materials such as photographs, scrapbooks, and building folios of interest to architectural and industrial historians.

NEH Grant Abstract- Lawrence Technological University In 2015, Lawrence Technological University applied for, and was awarded a NEH Preservation Assistance Grant to obtain a Preservation Assessment of the Albert Kahn Library Collection. The resulting preservation needs report suggested short, medium and long-term goals for the preservation of the collection. The Albert Kahn Library Collection is the personal working library of architect Albert Kahn (1869-1942) and contains over 2,000 books, periodicals and photos that chronicle his work designing and building commercial, religious, academic, and domestic structures both in Michigan, the U.S., and worldwide. The Albert Kahn Library Collection is housed a a space created to mirror Kahn's Detroit architectural office, with original book cabinets and stained glass windows. The current grant request would provide consultation for environmental monitoring, preservation storage equipment, and specialized preservation training.

Project fields:
Architecture; History, General; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$6,664 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 1/31/2021


PG-266627-19

William Paterson University (Wayne, NJ 07470-2152)
Casey Mathern (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Artists' Book Collection Rehousing

The purchase of preservation supplies and storage furniture to improve the long-term care of a collection of 411 artists’ books. These books date from 1960 to the present and were created by canonical twentieth-century artists such as Marina Abramovic, John Baldessari, Louise Bourgeois, John Cage, John Chamberlain, Chuck Close, Sol LeWitt, and Carrie Mae Weems. The books encompass a wide range of content and perspectives and a mix of formats, such as bound volumes, rollout scrolls, and accordion and pop-up books, along with various types of media, including collage, printmaking, and photography. They are frequently used in exhibitions, teaching, and research at the university.

The NEH Preservation Assistance Grant would allow the William Paterson University Galleries to permanently house its collection of artists’ books in archival enclosures for long-term preservation. This collection includes 411 one-of-a-kind and limited-edition books created by nationally and internationally-renowned contemporary visual artists, dating from 1960 to the present. The grant would allow the staff to acquire archival enclosures and a cabinet to rehouse the collection. The goal of the proposed project is to improve the current housing and ensure the long-term preservation of the collection. The long-term preservation of this collection squarely dovetails with the humanities mission of the University Galleries by introducing audiences to contemporary art through hands-on opportunities which link the formal elements and narrative content of these visual arts objects to diverse cultural and social themes, and promotes the development of critical thinking skills.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,500 (approved)
$6,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


PG-266644-19

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Lynne Swanson (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Michigan State University Museum Cultural Collections Rehousing Project

The purchase of cabinets and preservation supplies to rehouse the university’s History, Folklife, and Anthropology collections, totaling some 100,000 objects and representing cultures from around the world.  The History collection contains clothing, textiles, tools, and utilitarian objects that date from the early nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century and that document the history of agriculture and rural life in Michigan, while the Folklife collection features audio recordings of oral histories and musical performances and photographs that document traditional cultures of Michigan and the Great Lakes region from the mid-twentieth century to the present.  The Anthropology collection includes field-collected materials—weapons, decorative arts, and textiles—from various cultures of Africa, Asia, and the Americas. 

MSU Museum hosted a team of conservators in 2016 to perform a General Conservation Survey of the Museum's holdings of natural science and cultural collections. The survey was funded by an IMLS Museums for America grant. The consultants surveyed collections and responded with written reports advising the Museum of next steps for the upgrade of the care and conservation of our collections. This proposal is a request for funding for rehousing supplies to accomplish rehousing of portions of the MSU Museum's cultural collections, as recommended by the consultants in order to meet accepted standards of care. The plan of work will involve appropriately rehousing portions of the collection through the addition of storage supports, replacement of acidic materials, and re-organization of collections to reduce overcrowding.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PG-266645-19

County of Fauquier (Warrenton, VA 20186-3043)
Larry Miller (Project Director: January 2019 to September 2019)
Gary Rzepecki (Project Director: September 2019 to present)

Fauquier County Gold Mining Museum Storage Assessment

An assessment of the museum’s facilities that would provide recommendations for improved environmental conditions, use of space, and storage procedures for its collection of more than 6,000 items. Highlights include objects related to the history of gold mining in Virginia, which took place from 1805 to 1936, and artifacts from the Civil War Rappahannock Station Battlefield in Virginia. Many of these items are presently in storage but would become more accessible to researchers and museum visitors after implementation of consultant recommendations for storage procedures. Since the museum is part of a small parks and recreation department, the expertise of a qualified consultant is essential to the success of lasting preservation efforts.

The NEH Preservation Assistance Grant for Smaller Institutions will fund two activities: 1) contracting with a collections management consultant to assess the existing physical and environmental conditions of the facilities where the collections of the Fauquier County Parks and Recreation Department are housed, and; 2) the creation of a report by the consultant on the findings of the assessment which will also include a plan with short term and long term recommendations to improve the conditions of the physical spaces and the storage techniques. The goal of this project is to better protect and preserve the Fauquier County Parks and Recreation Department collections, which include local artifacts from the historical facilities overseen by the Department and artifacts recovered from archaeological studies of departmental properties.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,750 (approved)
$3,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


PG-266647-19

University of La Verne (La Verne, CA 91750-4401)
Felicia Beardsley (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

General Preservation Assessment for the Humanities Collections in La Verne’s Cultural & Natural History Collections

A general preservation assessment and training for staff to improve care of the university’s humanities collections, containing 30,000 objects that have been amassed over the university’s 128-year history.  The ethnographic collections document the cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas, with highlights including early twentieth-century textiles from Guatemala and Peru, Native American baskets and textiles, and a significant collection of Tarahumara musical instruments, ceremonial items, and clothing.  The collections are used by faculty, staff, and students, in exhibits, and for community-based projects.

University of La Verne’s Cultural & Natural History Collections is requesting funding for a General Preservation Assessment of its humanities collections. Together, the humanities collections consist of roughly 30,000 artifacts, including Native American baskets and textiles, African and Asian cultural heritage materials, the largest collection of Tarahumara artifacts in the U.S., modern Americana objects, the Esther Funk collection of historical central and south American textiles, the Galen S. Beery Collection of southeast Asian ethnographic materials, and ancient archaeological artifacts from the Americas. Funding will support the expertise of conservation specialist, Ms. Irena Calinescu, who has worked with collections in the UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History, LA County Museum of Art, J.Paul Getty Museum-Antiquities Conservation Department. The assessment will focus on current storage of the humanities collections in CNHC and include basic preservation training for CNHC staff.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 1/31/2021


PG-266791-19

Shaker Heritage Society (Albany, NY 12211-1004)
Lorraine Weiss (Project Director: February 2019 to present)

Assessment of Shaker Heritage Society Collections and Preservation Training for Staff and Volunteers

A preservation assessment of the Shaker Heritage Society’s collection of 600 items, composed of household and workshop objects, including Shaker-made chairs, sewing boxes, and tools; photographs; archaeological specimens from daily life, such as ceramic fragments and pipe stems; and textiles. The consultant who would perform the assessment would also train staff and volunteers on the handling of historical objects. The collection supports educational initiatives on Shaker culture through cultural tourism programs, workshops, local exhibits, outreach programs at schools and senior living facilities, and special events on the Shaker Heritage Society property, which serves an average of 15,000 visitors per year.

The project will improve physical control of our collections through a full preservation assessment and a short training workshop for staff and volunteers on object handling. Recommendations from this assessment will be used to improve our preservation practices, and inform the development of new policies and procedures, laying a foundation for stronger intellectual control of the collection.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,250 (approved)
$5,250 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-262071-19

DePauw University (Greencastle, IN 46135-1736)
Craig Ray Hadley (Project Director: March 2018 to present)

Enhanced Preservation and Access for DePauw University's Oversize Works of Art

The purchase of storage furniture to rehouse 24 oversize paintings and works on paper, including works by Indiana artists, former faculty members such as Reid Winsey, and national artists such as Robert Rauschenburg.  The collection is used in both staff and student curated exhibitions, as well as in the classroom setting, to support courses in art and art history, anthropology, Asian studies, chemistry and biochemistry, classical studies, English, religious studies, and women’s studies.  This project would be the second and final phase of a project to rehouse the University’s 2D collection and fits into the University’s larger collections management plans.

DePauw University respectfully requests $6,000 to purchase 12 powder coated art storage racks to support rehousing efforts. These new art storage racks will house approximately 24 oversize paintings and works on paper from the permanent collection, ranging from a late 19th century Hoosier Impressionist painting by Indiana native Walter Hixon Isnogle to a series of paintings and oversize prints by DePauw University faculty and former students. The objects directly support a variety of teaching and research needs at DePauw University, including undergraduate projects, faculty use, and public exhibitions. Per a 2014 Museum Assessment Program site visit, the external reviewer recommended the replacement of substandard wooden painting bins with museum-quality storage furniture. This project is part of a larger collections consolidation project and is included in the board approved 2015-2020 gallery strategic plan.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


PG-266620-19

Appalachian Mountain Club (Boston, MA 02108-1490)
Rebecca Maxwell Fullerton (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Moving Mountains: Rehousing the Appalachian Mountain Club's Historic Outdoor Recreation and Conservation Archives

The project will focus on Appalachian Mountain Club’s (AMC’s) Library & Archives Special Collections and Institutional Records. These materials range from outdoor photography from the 1870s onward, manuscript collections of outdoorspeople of the 19th through the 21st centuries, and complete business records of America’s oldest outdoor recreation and conservation organization. Our primary and secondary source materials document over 140 years of the wilderness experience in the United States through the lens of history, writing, visual arts and culture. Our specific goal within this project to is to continue to upgrade our storage capabilities to meet modern standards of preservation by incorporating high density shelving. The project moves to continue upgrading our storage systems following a move of our Library & Archives from our organization’s headquarters in Boston at the end of 2018 to the heart of the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,700 (approved)
$9,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/29/2020


PG-266633-19

North Park University (Chicago, IL 60625-4823)
Andrew Meyer (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Preserving the Swedish-American Immigrant Experience

A preservation assessment and supplies for 3,500 audiovisual recordings in various formats, such as 16mm film, magnetic tape media, and audiocassette, which document the Swedish American experience.  Highlights of the film collection include footage from the Swedish Pioneer Centennial Celebration from 1948, home videos from the Austin neighborhood in Chicago, and oral histories. The collection also contains amateur film from the Mission Fields in Africa, which recorded daily life in African villages.

The F.M. Johnson Archives and Special Collections at North Park University requests funds for the project Preserving the Swedish-American Immigrant Experience. Funds will improve our ability to preserve and provide access to our unique audiovisual resources. These resources contain significant documentation of Swedish-American immigrant history including neighborhood videos from the early twentieth century and historical and cultural insights into religious responses to refugees, immigration, and other historical events. Grants funds will be used to contract with experts from the Chicago Film Archives to 1) conduct an assessment of our entire audiovisual collection, 2) create a detailed technical inventory of our film collection that will guide future preservation efforts, 3) recommend the purchase preservation supplies, and 4) conduct a workshop that will offer education and training related to film preservation to other archivists in Chicago and the surrounding areas.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Immigration History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,000 (approved)
$9,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-266636-19

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61801-3620)
Marci Smith Uihlein (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Saving University of Illinois School of Architecture Design Project Archives

The purchase of preservation storage supplies for a collection of 1,600 architectural drawings representing 775 student projects dating from the 1890s to the 1980s.  The University of Illinois’ School of Architecture program, founded in 1868, is the second oldest architecture program in the United States.   Projects in the collection include Beaux Arts Contest winners from the 1920s; a design for an evacuation camp in the 1940s; and a proposal for an experimental theater in 1963.  Also represented is work by accomplished architects such as Mary L. Page, the first female to graduate from an architecture school; Walter T. Bailey, the first licensed African-American architect in Illinois; Cesar Pelli, designer of the Petronas Towers; and Jeanne Gang, designer of the Aqua Tower in Chicago.

This grant award would fund the purchasing of preservation and storage supplies to preserve and arrange and describe an endangered collection of historic architectural drawings currently housed in a store room within the School of Architecture to prepare it to move to the Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This collection, consisting of approximately 1,600 student design projects consisting of architectural plans, drawings, and models dates from the earliest years of architectural education (1890’s) to the 1980s.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PG-266649-19

Old Sturbridge Village (Sturbridge, MA 01566-1138)
Caitlin Emery Avenia (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

2019 Preservation Assistance

A preservation assessment of the Collections Building and Research Library of Old Sturbridge Village and the purchase of supplies for rehousing 750 bound volumes pertaining to the history and culture of New England. The collections contain family papers, business accounts, town records, diaries, journals, friendship albums, and other items integral to interpreting rural New England life in the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. Researchers include scholars and students, as well as staff, volunteers, and interns; the library has seen a 15 percent increase in use each year for the last three years. Materials are used for exhibitions, public programs, social media, training lectures, scholarly talks, and publications that are critical to the Village’s interpretation of nineteenth-century life.

Old Sturbridge Village is currently undertaking a campus-wide initiative to develop a five-year strategic plan aimed at rectifying long-standing issues and concerns. As part of this initiative, the Village is eager to address improvements to the storage and security of the collections housed in our Collections Building and Research Library. The implementation of this grant will allow the Research Library staff to address storage concerns in the library’s vault.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,794 (approved)
$9,794 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PG-266650-19

Morris County Park Commission (Morristown, NJ 07960-3161)
Melanie Bump (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Sustainable Management of Collections Environments with Limited Controls

The assessment and monitoring of storage environments for collections maintained in three Morris County Park Commission (MCPC) sites, along with the purchase of e-Climate Notebook monitoring equipment and the training of staff in using this data analysis software. Working with consultants from the Image Permanence Institute, the applicant would explore low-cost or no-cost options for buildings without HVAC and/or with tight budgets. The collections consist of 11,685 artifacts, including artworks, furniture, industrial equipment, and archaeological items; 7,540 books and 2,980 special collections items; 1,381 linear feet of documents on music, agriculture, telecommunications, mining, and more; and 19,200 images. These materials, documenting 300 years in Morris County, New Jersey, are used in exhibits, programs, displays, and scholarship.

Environmental controls, such as heating, cooling and dehumidification, are an integral part of proper collection care. Spaces that are too hot, cold, dry or humid can lead to mold growth, loosen furniture joints, chip paint, corrode metal, and fade dyes. Unfortunately, many historic sites store collections in spaces with limited or no equipment to regulate temperature and humidity. The research partnership between Morris County Park Commission and the Image Permanence Institute will provide guidance for low cost and sustainable methods for stabilizing these environmental conditions. The project will be accomplished in two phases. Phase 1 consists of collecting environmental data and surveying collections areas. Phase 2 uses experimental changes to test effectiveness of new methods of stabilizing storage environments. The goal is to improve collections environments in new ways and make the information available through publications, webinars, and conferences.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PG-266651-19

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Carla Sinopoli (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Preserving and Protecting the Collection Records of the University New Mexico Maxwell Museum of Anthropology

The purchase of cabinetry and preservation supplies for the accession, loan, and donor records associated with archaeological, ethnographic, osteological, and archival collections at the museum that document the long history of human occupation in the American Southwest. The collections are used in exhibits, university teaching, K-12 outreach, community engagement, and scholarly research, and the documentation of their accessions is contained in 6,136 separate files, which contain correspondence, deeds of gift, inventories, condition reports, and photographs.

This proposal requests support to acquire fireproof filing cabinets and supplies to rehouse the irreplaceable accession and loan records associated with the object collections of the UNM Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. With more than 3 million objects acquired through systematic anthropological research and donation, the Maxwell Museum curates irreplaceable archaeological, ethnographic, osteological and archival collections that constitute a critical resource for humanities scholarship on the indigenous people of the North American Southwest. Other collections support teaching, research and public engagement on the global human story from 2 million years ago until the present. The original accession and donor records provide essential information on and context for the collections; here, we request support to ensure that these records are stored in secure archival conditions that will ensure their preservation for future generations.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Biological Anthropology; Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,861 (approved)
$9,861 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


PG-266653-19

CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)
Annie Tummino (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Training and Supplies for the Queens College Rare Book Collection

The purchase of supplies and on-site training for staff to create custom enclosures for 500 rare books, representing the most fragile items from the college’s 2,600 volumes used to support research and teaching in the history of print culture in Europe and the United States.  Particular strengths of the collection include nineteenth-century expedition reports from the American West, late nineteenth-century American dime novels and juvenile fiction, and first editions of the works of Lord Byron, Victor Hugo, and D. H. Lawrence.  The custom enclosures would preserve the books and allow for renewed access to the material after they have been remediated for mold, as identified by a previous assessment.

Queens College's Department of Special Collections and Archives is home to a rare book collection (over 2,500 volumes) that demonstrates the history of print culture over the past 600 years. The collection has significant potential as an educational resource for a diverse range of students, faculty, and researchers. The NEH grant will support purchase of supplies to better preserve the collection, as well as hiring consultants to conduct on-site trainings for staff and graduate students. Goals of the project include placing 500 fragile volumes in protective boxes, increasing the knowledge and skills of staff who manage the rare book collection, and offering a unique professional development opportunity for graduate students interested in preservation.

Project fields:
History, Other; Literature, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,708 (approved)
$6,708 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


PG-266654-19

High Desert Museum (Bend, OR 97708-5035)
Dana Whitelaw (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Doris Swayze Bounds Collection Assessment

A preservation assessment of approximately 7,000 objects, which document many of the indigenous groups of the Columbia River Plateau, including the Colville, Yakama, Klamath, Nez Perce, and Umatilla tribes, over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection includes beaded bags, cedar root baskets, clothing and textiles, cradleboards, tools, horse trappings, and jewelry and is used to convey the experiences and perspectives of Plateau Indians through permanent and traveling exhibits, educational programs, and scholarly research.

The 7,000 objects related to American Indians in the Museum’s collection are essential to understanding the experiences and perspectives of Columbia Plateau Indians and enhancing the public’s knowledge of the American West. Dating from the 1800s to 1960s, these objects, including beaded and cornhusk bags, baskets, articles of clothing and cradleboards, demonstrate how Indigenous groups navigated dramatic changes in the region. This collection is essential to our exhibitions and programs, making its long-term care a high priority for the Museum. Consultant Ellen Pearlstein will assess this collection to provide an accurate understanding of its preservation needs and inform two projects related to the long-term care of the collection. We are developing a new culturally responsive collections care plan and in the initial stages of renovating our 4,500 square-foot By Hand Through Memory permanent exhibition, which uses this collection to convey the experiences of Plateau Indians.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$8,653 (approved)
$8,653 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


PG-266659-19

County of Yolo (Woodland, CA 95695-3448)
Mark Fink (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Improving Storage and Mitigating Light Pollution for the Yolo County Historical Collection

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse 70 works of art on paper and 25 textiles currently stored in the attic of a historic house museum, the Gibson House. The request also includes the purchase of ultraviolet window film to mitigate light damage to objects on display, and the purchase of data loggers for environmental monitoring, all recommended in a previous museum assessment. Yolo County was established in 1850 with California statehood, and the Gibson House dates from the same era. Highlights include landscape paintings that portray the early agricultural settings of Yolo County and a collection of nineteenth-century crazy quilts. The museum serves as an educational resource for students in the Sacramento State University graduate public history program, as well as for approximately 300 third-grade students studying local history.

This grant will support preservation objectives that improve the storage and material integrity of objects in the Yolo County Historical Collection on display at the Gibson House historic home. The purpose of the Yolo County Historical Collection is to illustrate, through objects and archives, the stories of individuals and families who settled Yolo County and created the thriving cultural and economic center we know today. The proposed project intends to improve the collections storage by rehousing 70 artworks and 25 textile quilts into archival painting racks and rolled textile supports. The project would also provide light filtration for display areas through the use of UV film on the windows of the historic home. Ongoing environmental monitoring of display areas will be facilitated through the use of data loggers. This grant will improve the preservation and storage of artworks and quilts as well as the mitigation of light pollution and ongoing environmental monitoring.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 1/31/2020


PG-266664-19

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218-2625)
Julia Rose (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Purchase of Furniture and Supplies to Upgrade Homewood Museum's Collections Storage Room

The purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies to rehouse 434 metal and leather objects pertaining to early nineteenth-century life in Baltimore, Maryland.  Materials mainly consist of homewares, such as a leather trunk, silver salver, and leather fireplace bellows, used to portray the lives of the wealthy Charles Carroll family and their slaves, the Ross and Conner families. The award would also support the hiring of a consultant to plan a storage layout for the museum’s holdings.  Collection items are used for exhibitions, such as More Than a Name: Enslaved Families at Historic Homewood, and in undergraduate classes such as Conservation of Material Culture: Art, Artifacts, and Heritage Sites.

Grant funding would support the purchase of storage solutions and supplies to house Homewood Museum’s metal and leather collections, as recommended by a Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) report developed for the museum in 2018. Homewood Museum will upgrade a dedicated room on the historic house’s second floor to serve as a suitable collections storage space. Metal and leather objects in Homewood Museum’s collections were identified in its CAP assessment as a high priority for improved storage conditions. In consultation with an objects conservator, Homewood will purchase archival furniture and supplies, design the storage room’s overall layout, install and retrofit suitable storage solutions for metal and leather objects, and monitor environmental conditions. The museum will partner with Johns Hopkins University students in the interdisciplinary "Museums and Society" academic program who will provide an appropriate level of supervised project assistance.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,926 (approved)
$9,926 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


PG-266669-19

Daytona State College (Daytona Beach, FL 32114-2817)
James Pearson (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Southeast Museum of Photography Preservation Assessment Project

A preservation assessment of a collection of 4,500 photographs dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, 1,500 objects representing photographic processes (such as photo transfer screen prints and glass lantern slides), and 372 vintage or antique cameras.  Highlights of the collection include prints from Edward Weston, Tina Modotti, and Paul Strand; a catalog of photojournalistic images taken by National Geographic photographer Steve McCurry, photo-journalist Kate Brooks, and documentary filmmaker Louie Palu; daguerreotype portraits from the 1880s; and photographs from the revolution and early post-revolution periods in Cuba from 1955 to 1970.

Support from the National Endowment for the Humanities will fund three primary activities for the Southeast Museum of Photography (SMP) Preservation Assessment Project: • A formal assessment of the photographs and photographic objects from the museum’s 4,500 piece collection by a professional conservator of photographs. • In consultation with a professional conservator of photographs, the creation of a long-term preservation strategy for existing materials and future accessions. • In consultation with a professional conservator of photographs, the creation of a list of appropriate archival collections materials to reinforce existing collection materials and to support the care of future acquisitions. Through these activities, SMP aims to become better stewards of its cultural artifacts ensuring the photographs and photographic materials in the museum’s care can be preserved and maintained in accordance with the highest standards for future generations.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,997 (approved)
$9,199 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 3/31/2020


PG-266670-19

Peace Resource Center at Wilmington College (Wilmington, OH 45177-2499)
Tanya Maus (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

PRC BRMA Environmental Monitoring and Collections Storage Improvements

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and storage furniture to support the preservation of 81.5 linear feet (40,000 documents) chronicling the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings and the international nuclear disarmament movement from the 1950s through the 1970s.  The collection contains atomic bombing survivor testimonials, correspondence among Japanese and American nuclear disarmament activists, newsletters, photographs, slides, audiovisual materials, and scientific reports authored by the United States Atomic Bombing Casualty Commission.

This project pursues two key preservation improvements for the Wilmington College Peace Resource Center Barbara Reynolds Memorial Archives (PRC BRMA), an extensive collection of documents, photographs, artifacts, and audio/visual materials pertaining to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, nuclear disarmament movement history, and the Cold War. The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment will allow for a year-long assessment of temperature, humidity, and light at the PRC BRMA. The data will be shared with the College’s Physical Plant to create a long-term plan for stable environmental conditions for archival preservation. The PRC BRMA also seeks to improve collections storage by purchasing powder coated steel shelving and a map cabinet for its rare Japanese-language scholarship and poster exhibit collection, which are currently housed on wood-stained shelving. Powder coated steel shelving will remove the threat of off gasses from wood stain and the wood itself.

Project fields:
East Asian History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,798 (approved)
$9,798 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 1/31/2021


PG-266672-19

Joan & Sanford I.Weill Medical College of Cornell University (New York, NY 10065-4805)
Nicole Milano (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Preserving the History of America's Second Oldest Hospital

The purchase of preservation supplies, such as acid-free boxes and folders, to rehouse the medical center archives of New York Presbyterian Hospital, the second oldest hospital in the United States and chartered in 1771 by King George III of England.  The archives contain over 1,500 linear feet of materials that document the full 250-year history of the hospital, including records of Aaron Burr, who served as a member of the Board of Governors; Alexander Hamilton, who supported the Lying-In Hospital of the City of New York; Dr. David Hosack, the personal physician for Hamilton and Burr; early illnesses and epidemics; and nineteenth-century medical and surgical casebooks.

The Medical Center Archives at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medicine requests $15,000 from National Endowment for the Humanities to preserve and rehouse collections related to the 250th anniversary of American independence. Following the recommendations of a preservation consultant, the NEH funding will be used to purchase acid-free supplies after a HEPA cleaning of the collections by a professional disaster recovery agency. Two staff members, both of whom have strong experience in preservation projects, will safely rehouse the newly cleaned collections following decades of poor storage conditions. The unique collections covered under the scope of this grant document the history of the second oldest hospital in the U.S., created around the time of the American Revolution. The rehousing of these collections will help ensure their preservation and accessibility moving forward, including for projects supporting the 250th anniversaries of both the hospital and the U.S.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$15,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


PG-266660-19

Hula Preservation Society (Kaneohe, HI 96744-9171)
Keau George (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Preserving the Past, Planning the Future

A preservation assessment and recommendations for disaster planning, staff education and training through webinars, and the purchase of environmental dataloggers and storage boxes. This small organization holds approximately 30,000 items dating from the 1930s to the present, including oral histories, photographs, scrapbooks, manuscripts, vinyl records, textiles, hula implements and musical instruments, books, and audiovisual materials. The request focuses on support for the Oral History Library, a repository of histories and artifacts from more than 100 elders born in the early twentieth century. Topics range from dance, music, and cultural traditions to history, poetry, art, literature, philosophy, religion, socioeconomic impacts, and changes in the teaching of the mother tongue. The periods covered, seen through Native Hawaiian eyes, begin with the late nineteenth century and proceed through the pivotal periods of the Territory of Hawaii, World War II, statehood, and the Hawaiian Renaissance of the 1970s.

Since 2000, Hula Preservation Society (HPS) has been building a one-of-a-kind repository preserving the voices of our esteemed native elders, through conducting oral histories that capture their lives, careers, wisdom, insights, and knowledge, and gathering associated tangible elements of those lives shared from their personal collections. The resulting HPS Archive was formally established in 2013. This preservation assistance grant will support three complementary activities – assessment, education and training, and supply purchase. Expected results are two-fold: 1-HPS will receive a final assessment report from project consultant which includes a survey of HPS's physical holdings and recommendations for preservation needs, storage and safe handling, adequate disaster planning, appropriate environmental conditions, and recommendations to enhance collections care policies and practices, and 2-the capacity of the team and its knowlege in collections care and management will be expanded.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


PG-266661-19

Broward Public Library Foundation (Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301-1830)
Brittney Farley (Project Director: January 2019 to August 2019)
James B. Jones (Project Director: August 2019 to present)

African American Research Library and Cultural Center Special Collections Preservation Project

A preservation assessment of the library’s special collections and archives, which contain more than one million items, including rare books, artifacts, artwork, manuscripts and reference materials.  Highlights include print materials from the personal library of Dorothy Porter Wesley (1852-1995), the first African American to graduate from Columbia University’s school of library science.  The library also holds manuscript collections pertaining to Alex Haley (1921-1992), author of the 1976 novel Roots: The Saga of an American Family, and actress Esther Rolle (1920-1998), best known for her role as Florida Evans on the television series Good Times.  Situated in a historically black community, the library features artifacts and photographs from its special collections and archives in regular exhibits and serves researchers working on historical, journalistic, and genealogical projects.

The African-American Research Library and Cultural Center (AARLCC) is seeking support for the development of a two stage preservation initiative. The first stage will employ an external consultant to create a comprehensive preservation assessment report. The purpose of the assessment is to provide an actionable report of archival planning needs and will serve as documentation for future institutional budgeting. The second stage will be the implementation of two preservation workshops. AARLCC is located in the oldest historically black community in Broward County, Florida. As the surrounding neighborhoods undergo a change in population, it is of great importance to collect and preserve the history of the local community. The proposed workshops seek to capture the underrepresented narratives of this community and encourage residents to consider donating their materials to AARLCC.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,711 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PG-266766-19

Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (Hartford, CT 06105-3243)
Beth Burgess (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Updating Manuscript Collections Housing

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse manuscripts associated with Harriet Beecher Stowe, contained in 49 collections (316 linear feet) with substantial correspondence from Stowe and fellow nineteenth-century American authors Mark Twain, Charles Dudley Warner, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman; abolitionists John Greenleaf Whittier and Thomas W. Higginson; women’s rights activists Isabella Beecher Hooker, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucy Stone; and actor and playwright William Gillette.  Of special note are the 560 letters and documents written by or to Harriet Beecher Stowe between 1822 and 1896, which are regularly used by scholars, teachers, and local history researchers.  As recommended by a previous assessment, the new preservation-quality folders and boxes would allow the staff of the historic site and research library to replace well-worn enclosures from the 1970s, many of which pose threats to the collection.

This request to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a $10,000 Preservation Assistance Grant is to support purchasing preservation housing supplies for the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center’s (HBSC) Manuscript Collections as recommended by Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC).

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


PG-266785-19

Eastham Historical Society (Eastham, MA 02642-0008)
Debra DeJonker-Berry (Project Director: February 2019 to present)

Preparing the Eastham Historical Society Archive's Collection for the 400th Anniversary of the First Encounter between the Nauset (Wampanoag) people and the Pilgrim settlers on December 8, 2020

The rehousing of historical records and the completion of a disaster plan for the Eastham Historical Society (EHS) Archive, as recommended in a 2013 preservation assessment performed by the Northeast Document Conservation Center, which would provide a consultant to assist in the project. Dating to the eighteenth century and totaling more than 100 linear feet, the holdings consist of manuscripts, maps, pamphlets, bound volumes (including rare books), deeds, wills, maritime ledgers, journals, an indenture document, Civil War uniforms, and photographic prints, as well as a small amount of audiovisual material. Although EHS is open fewer than 119 days a year, its unpaid archivists annually assist some 160 researchers ranging from genealogists (including descendants of the Mayflower voyage) to visitors to the EHS site on “Digital Commonwealth,” the Massachusetts digital library platform.

The Town of Eastham is one of the oldest communities in the country and is situated in the middle of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. This grant would support the rehousing of materials in the Eastham Historical Society's (EHS) Archive, the purchase of storage furniture, registration for a disaster planning webinar, and the purchase of disaster response supplies. The goal is to complete this work in preparation for the Town of Eastham's commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the First Encounter between the Nauset (Wampanoag) people and the Pilgrim settlers on December 8, 2020.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,841 (approved)
$9,841 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


PG-266688-19

Pikes Peak Library District Foundation (Colorado Springs, CO 80903-1694)
Tim Morris (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Pikes Peak Library District - Special Collections General Preservation Assessment

A comprehensive preservation assessment of the library’s special collections to establish baseline measurements for environmental monitoring and collections assessment, as well as to develop security and disaster plans. The Pikes Peak Library special collections, comprising over 50,000 cataloged titles and a substantial backlog of uncatalogued material, document the history of Colorado Springs and the surrounding area. Highlights include oral histories collected after the 2012 Waldo Canyon fire as well as mineral maps and bank records from the nineteenth-century mining town of Cripple Creek, Colorado, where the “unsinkable” Molly Brown made her fortune. The completed assessment would guide prioritization of future workflow and growth for the library’s special collections.

Pikes Peak Library District, a 14 branch library system serving El Paso County, Colorado, will conduct a general preservation assessment of the institution’s Special Collections. A 1905 Carnegie library, restored in 2001, houses the collection. The comprehensive collection documents the history of Colorado Springs and the surrounding region, from the exploration era to the recent massive population and economic growth. An independent consultant, Northeast Document Conservation Center, will administer an assessment to establish a realistic baseline for stewarding and protecting our significant community assets. The assessment will include evaluation of the building and environment, fire protection and emergency preparedness, preservation related policies and procedures, and general care for paper, photography, and digital collections. After completion, the recommendations will inform and guide organizational decisions on prioritizing staffing, projects, and capital purchases.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$8,045 (approved)
$8,045 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


PG-266689-19

Luther College (Decorah, IA 52101-1041)
Hayley Jackson (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Luther College Collections Conservation Assessment and Preventive Conservation Workshop

A preservation assessment and preventive conservation workshop to improve care of Luther College’s collections, which range from fine arts and archaeology to archives and special collections and that document world history, visual culture, Norwegian-American history, and Lutheranism in the United States. Highlights include archaeological materials from sites across Iowa, as well as Inuit and Zulu collections donated by Lutheran missionaries.  The collections are used by the college’s students, faculty/staff, and community members, and by visiting scholars.  The Fine Arts collection contains 2,100 objects, and the Archaeology, Ethnography, and Numismatic collection totals 37,000 items.  The Archives holds nearly 2,400 linear feet of institutional records, while Special Collections holds 2,400 volumes dating from pre-1500 through 2018.  The workshop would be open to museum staff, facilities and administration, and staff from nearby institutions.

This project will fund a conservation assessment and long-range preservation plan for the Luther College Collections. In addition, it will fund a preventive conservation workshop for College staff and stakeholders, as well as other interested professionals in the region. Located in rural Decorah, Iowa, these collections are unparalleled in the region, spanning from archaeological and ethnographic artifacts to historical archives and fine art pieces. The Luther College Collections enable faculty, staff, students, and the local community to learn about and connect with both the rich history of the local Native American tribes and Norwegian-American immigrants as well as cultures from distant countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia. Together, the assessment, long-range conservation plan, and workshop will allow staff to collaborate across campus and create a sustainable preservation program, ensuring the preservation and continued accessibility of these collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,215 (approved)
$9,215 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PG-266702-19

University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (San Juan, PR 00925-2512)
Jose Flores-Ramos (Project Director: January 2019 to September 2019)
Laurie Ortiz-Rivera (Project Director: September 2019 to present)

Rare Books Preservation Assessment of the Biblioteca Santiago Iglesias, hijo of the School of Architecture at the UPR

An item-level survey of the physical condition of rare books held by the Biblioteca Santiago Iglesias, the library of the School of Architecture at the University of Puerto Rico in Río Piedras.  The 892 titles (1,271 volumes) include influential texts on the history of architecture, aesthetic theory, and visual representation in European art.  Highlights include the 3rd edition of Andrea Palladio’s I Quattro libri della architettura (1601), the 1769 Roman edition of Diverse maniere d'Adornare i Cammini ed ogni altra parte degli edifizi desunte dall'archiettura Egizia, Etrusca e Greca by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, and the 1782 Italian edition of Leon Battista Alberti’s works Della Architettura, Della pittura e Della statua.  The rare books collection supports research and teaching at the School of Architecture, as well as at the Graduate School of Information Sciences, where faculty and students use the books to study printing techniques and the challenges rare books present for preservation and bibliographic control.

The Biblioteca Santiago Iglesias, hijo is the most important research facility of the School of Architecture at the University of Puerto Rico and of architectural studies in the whole of the Island. This information unit is requesting a grant of $10,000 from the National Endowment for Humanities’ Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions program. The reason for this request is to hire a paper conservator who will be conducting an initial item-by-item preservation assessment of our Rare Books Collection. Two librarians will be assisting the consultant. A written assessment report with recommendations for storage and proper housing of the collections will be provided. The final activity will be a two-hour workshop in which the Deans of Academic and Administrative Affairs and/or their designated representatives and Directors from other libraries can partake of the results of our endeavors.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,938 (approved)
$9,938 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PG-266704-19

Oakland University (Rochester, MI 48309-4402)
Dominique Renee Daniel (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Improving the storage environment of Oakland University Archives and Special Collections

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and other supplies to improve storage conditions for Oakland University’s archives and special collections.  Holdings include the Hicks Collection of Women’s Writings, a collection of epistles, poetry, memoirs, cookbooks, conduct manuals, and pro-feminist pamphlets spanning the seventeenth through twentieth centuries; the William Springer Collection, which contains over 1,000 books, nearly 1,000 pamphlets, historical newspapers, ephemera, photographs, and memorabilia relating to Abraham Lincoln’s life, assassination, and representation in American culture; and local records of Oakland County, Michigan from 1827 to 1931.

To ensure the long-term preservation of university archives and special collections, this grant will support an environmental monitoring program for collections storage areas and the purchase of supplies to rehouse fragile books and pamphlets. These projects are derived from a preservation assessment conducted by a Northeast Document Conservation Center preservation specialist in 2018. The grant will purchase dataloggers to record temperatures and relative humidity, and a consultant’s visit to train staff how to install and use the equipment, and how to interpret its data. The grant will also fund custom enclosures for rare books and pamphlets. The consultant will host a rare book care workshop, open to library staff and the general public. A library science graduate student from Wayne State University will shadow the consultant.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,943 (approved)
$9,943 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


PG-266710-19

Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, Inc. (Indianapolis, IN 46222-2550)
Roxine Dunbar (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Improving the Museum's High-Polish Metal Trophy Storage Environment

The purchase of storage cabinets, shelves, and preservation supplies to enable the rehousing of 391 trophies from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum’s collection documenting the history of the automobile industry and wheeled racing.  These artifacts also help to tell the stories of trophy design, sports marketing, and corporate involvement in the auto racing world.  The trophies date from 1903 to 2017 and represent road races, dirt track contests, oval and road courses, endurance races, hill climbs, and motorcycle races from across the globe.

This project will support ongoing preservation and collections care efforts at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum through the purchase of three hermetically-sealed, museum-quality cabinets, as well as supplies to properly clean and house objects in our high-polish metal trophy collection. The rehousing and storage of this collection will be the culmination of a greater effort that includes updates to our collections management database, and the creation of a new housekeeping plan and handling guide specifically for our trophy collection.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 7/31/2020


PG-266715-19

Sonoma County Library (Santa Rosa, CA 95404-4425)
Joanna Kolosov (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Sonoma County Library Preservation and Disaster Supply Project

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment, storage furniture, and disaster recovery supplies to preserve special collections held across four of the library’s divisions: the Sonoma County History & Genealogy Library in Santa Rosa, the County Archives located east of downtown Santa Rosa, the Wine Library in Healdsburg, and the Petaluma History Room in Petaluma.  Recommended in a previous assessment, the equipment and furniture would benefit the History & Genealogy Library, which holds rare books and archival materials from Sonoma County families and businesses, and the County Archives, comprising 5,000 cubic feet of records, including the county’s earliest court, naturalization, tax, and vital records as well as Board of Supervisor minutes, road petitions, and architectural drawings.  The disaster recovery supplies would be housed in all four divisions and reflect the library’s efforts to develop an integrated disaster plan after the fires of October 2017 threatened the County Archives.  Library staff have recently attended disaster preparedness workshops taught by the Western States & Territories Preservation Assistance Service.

Sonoma County Library requests funds for the ongoing preservation and protection of its Special Collections through the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment, shelving for oversized archival materials, and disaster recovery supplies for easy mobilization in an emergency. The History & Genealogy Library, having the largest collections and staff, will lead the project that is designed to address specific recommendations made by a preservation consultant and to bolster the library’s disaster preparedness for its irreplaceable collections. This includes the Sonoma County Archives, a warehouse of local government records vital to understanding who we are and where the county fits within the context of state and national history. The fires of October 2017 came within a quarter mile of the building housing these records. The funds from this grant will support the library’s overall goals to better care for its collections, improve disaster readiness, and enhance access to materials.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,663 (approved)
$7,663 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-266728-19

Travellers Rest Historic House Museum, Inc. (Nashville, TN 37220-1218)
Jennifer Butt (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Assessment of Environmental Conditions and Mechanical Systems for Historic House at Historic Travellers Rest

A preservation assessment, as well as the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment, to develop a plan to improve climate control for the collections at the Travellers Rest Historic House Museum.  Holdings include over 6,000 Southern and Tennessee artifacts such as furniture, paintings, textiles, homewares, and decorative and personal items, many of which belonged to the original home owner, Judge John Overton.  The house and its collections are used to present early nineteenth-century Tennessee history and Judge Overton’s influence in state politics, as well as the political rise of Andrew Jackson.

This project seeks to contract with a consultant to assess the environmental conditions of a historic house museum constructed between 1799-1885. Upon completion of the assessment, a report would be provided outlining recommendations for an HVAC system designed to provide for a proper conservation environment in the house. The system design would take into account the multiple additions of the house built of both brick and wood construction over a hundred-year period with the permeable membrane inherent to a historic structure. The house was home to the Overton family from 1799-1949. Started by Judge John Overton, the historic house grew as the generations grew, until it was donated to The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Tennessee which ran the site as a historic house museum. It also serves as the organization’s state headquarters. For the last thirty years it has been operated by a paid professional staff which ensures it is open to the public.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,273 (approved)
$9,273 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 1/31/2021


PG-266731-19

Columbus Lowndes Public Library (Columbus, MS 39701-4680)
Mona Vance-Ali (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Focusing the Camera's Lens: Assessing and Preserving Lowndes County, Mississippi's Photographic History

A preservation assessment of the library’s collection of more than 1,000 photographs, along with the purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse them. In addition, one staff member would participate in a series of professional development webinars. Collection highlights include nineteenth-century photographs documenting county history, photographs of World War I soldiers, and a rare photo of a World War II African American regiment. These materials are used by researchers from all over the world and have been featured in publications and exhibits, including permanent exhibits at the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum.

The Local History Department (LHD) at the Columbus-Lowndes Public Library System (CLPL) in Mississippi will utilize the Preservation Assistance Grant for Smaller Institutions to complete three activities. First, the hiring of professional photograph conservators to examine the photograph collections housed in the LHD. The conservators will evaluate their physical and environmental conditions and write an assessment giving recommendations for their preservation. Secondly, the LHD will purchase supplies such as archival envelopes, paper, and boxes as suggested by the conservators. Finally, the LHD will pursue continuing education training for the archivist through online webinars available from the Northeast Document Conservation Center. These activities will result in the LHD's ability to be better stewards of the community's history, the stabilization of and greater access to a wider number of photographs housed at the LHD, and staff training that will be put toward future donations.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 4/30/2020


PG-266734-19

Chester County Historical Society (West Chester, PA 19380-2658)
Heather Hansen (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Expansion and Improvement of Works of Art on Paper Storage

The purchase of storage furniture for artworks held by the Chester County Historical Society (CCHS). Materials range from high-style decorative arts to items of everyday life and include 8,000 paper toys and dolls, 1,100 drawings, 650 prints, 315 silhouettes, and 281 watercolor paintings spanning the eighteenth to twentieth centuries. These collections document life in one of the nation’s earliest areas of settlement. They are used by scholars, local historians, genealogists, attorneys, property researchers, reporters, local officials, and students from the Cooperstown Museum Studies program, who regularly visit CCHS for an introduction to collections care and museum work. Curatorial research supports collections documentation and provides material for interpretive exhibits, magazine and journal articles, and lectures.

Chester County Historical Society (CCHS) requests a Preservation Assistance Grant from NEH to purchase new storage furniture for framed works of art and works of art on paper in order to expand and improve their storage conditions, an institutional strategic priority. These additional shelves, flat file, and vertical storage units will improve storage conditions for over 10,000 artifacts that reflect local people and their lifestyles, belief systems, and communities. Both primitive and fine art document the changes over two hundred years in the ways that childhood, education, and recreation are perceived and enacted locally and within national trends. Local artists’ renderings of the natural and built landscapes of Chester County add a significant visual layer to interpreting not only modes of expression but the ideas of what was and is important in the community. The project will make these objects more accessible and identify areas lacking in representation for future collecting.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$8,615 (approved)
$8,615 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 3/31/2020


PG-266735-19

Chicago Film Archives (Chicago, IL 60616-1772)
Brian Belak (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Increasing Chicago Film Archives' storage Capacity with Archival Shelving

The purchase of shelving units for film storage, in response to the Chicago Film Archives' ongoing acquisition of film collections and as recommended in an earlier preservation assessment. The shelving would house nearly 2,000 items from eight collections, including an audiovisual collection that documents the work of modern dancer and choreographer Sybil Sherer, and a film collection that documents the life of Marya Lilien, the first woman to apprentice under Frank Lloyd Wright. These materials are used by documentary filmmakers, researchers, and dancers studying choreography. Increased storage capacity would not only facilitate preservation but would also contribute to the accessibility of these collections.

This grant seeks to purchase additional steel archival shelving for CFA's growing collections. Throughout the past 15 years CFA has acquired on the average ten collections each year requiring additional horizontal storage for its films on a regular basis. This project would include the manufacturing of 16 steel shelving units designed for optimal storage efficiency in CFA's climate-controlled space. The units would be shipped to CFA's site and then assembled by staff.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Dance History and Criticism; Film History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 3/31/2020


PG-266736-19

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society (Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701-1202)
Aimee E. Newell (Project Director: January 2019 to October 2019)
Amanda Fontenova (Project Director: October 2019 to present)

Laying the Foundation: Storage Materials and Envrionmental Monitoring Tools for Luzerne County Historical Society

The purchase of preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment for the Luzerne County Historical Society’s local history collection, under the auspices of the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society. The historical society holds an estimated 250,000 items in its museum, library, archives, and two historic house museums. Among these materials are 40,000 Native American artifacts, 3,000 textiles, 10,000 glass and ceramic items, 2,000 pieces of art, 5,000 pieces of furniture, 40,000 household items, 15,000 photographs, 400 maps, 3,000 blueprints, 500 rolls of microfilm, 15,000 books, and 2,000 cubic feet of manuscripts. The collection is used for research (publications, genealogy, History Day projects), public programs, and exhibitions; the public has access both on-site (four days a week) and online.

The Luzerne County Historical Society is seeking a Preservation Assistance Grant to purchase storage supplies to better house our collection of objects and documents. We are also seeking funding for data loggers and a lux meter to monitor the environmental conditions of our museum and library.

Project fields:
Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$9,358 (approved)
$9,358 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-266745-19

St. Vincent College (Latrobe, PA 15650-2690)
Andrew Julo (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Expanding Care and Access to the Art & Heritage Collections at Saint Vincent

Expert consultation for rehousing and moving a collection of over 4,000 art objects into a climate-controlled storage space as well as the curator’s attendance at a disaster planning workshop. The collection includes European paintings, old master and modern prints, and work relating to the Covington Altar Stock Building Company. It is used regularly in teaching, for outside loans, and in exhibitions that are open to the public.

The Saint Vincent Gallery will engage a preservation consultant for an on-site visit to advise on best practices for rehousing the Art & Heritage Collections' paintings, works on paper, ceramic murals, and other objects in a new, expanded space. The Gallery will purchase durable preservation and storage materials and environmental monitors that correspond to the consultant's recommendations and the Collections' previous Conservation Assessment Program (CAP) Report. The Gallery Curator will attend a disaster response and recovery planning workshop. The Collections' 17th, 18th, and 19th century works reflect the relationship between a European monarch and the German immigrants served by America's first Benedictine community. These and many other works in the Collections enrich humanities courses and public programming in myriad ways. Improved storage and monitoring will increase access to the Collections and help to preserve them. The project period is 9/1/2019-9/30/2020 (13 months).

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


PG-266748-19

City of El Paso (El Paso, TX 79901-1402)
Alicia Rascon (Project Director: January 2019 to September 2019)
Vladimir Von Tsurikov (Project Director: September 2019 to present)

El Paso Museum of History Collection Preservation

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment recommended in a previous museum assessment, to include data loggers, a light meter, and hydrothermographs to assist in maintaining a stable environment for artifacts. The El Paso Museum of History focuses on the local region from the Spanish Colonial period, to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, to contemporary borderlands culture. Highlights include Spanish Colonial objects, such as a trunk, a mission door, and an ox cart used on the Camino Real, as well as mid-century Route 66 ephemera.  The museum’s 16,000 artifacts reflect the history and culture of El Paso County, over 80 percent of which is composed of persons with Hispanic ethnicity. The museum has more than 65,000 visitors annually, including school groups, who experience an opportunity to broaden their understanding of the region’s long history as a crossroads in the largest continuous border metroplex in North America.

The NEH Preservation Assistance Grant will support the El Paso Museum of History's improvement in environmental monitoring system. The Museum's collection includes more than 16,000 artifacts and archival materials reflective of the local history and region of El Paso, Texas. The collection are an integral part of the mission of the Museum and play a critical role in the exhibitions and program development. Drawing upon recommendations from a MAP assessment, the Museum intends to improve its environmental monitoring program to gather proper temperature and relative humidity date for collections and exhibition areas. Currently the collection needs consist of updating our environmental controls and monitoring. With support from NEH, the Museum plans to implement technology needed to ensure climate control critical in maintaining stable environments for artifacts by acquiring dataloggers, a light meter as well as hygrothermographs.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Latino History; Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PG-266753-19

Southern Utah University (Cedar City, UT 84720-2470)
Jessica Farling (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Purchase of New Storage and Supplies to Re-House the Southern Utah Museum of Art's Permanent Collection

The purchase of a storage cabinet and preservation supplies for rehousing a collection of around 1,900 artworks including works on paper by Winslow Homer, paintings by Chaim Soutine, and twentieth-century textiles, photography, and ceramics. The collection is used for teaching, exhibitions, and campus loans. 

The Southern Utah Museum of Art (SUMA) will purchase new storage and preservation supplies required to satisfy immediate recommendations for object storage made in a Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) in 2018. Collections staff will follow a three-phase plan from September 1, 2018 to February 28, 2021 to accomplish this: 1) re-organize current flat file objects and re-house ceramic and sculptural objects, 2) de-frame and re-house new flat file-related objects, and 3) re-shelve canvas and linen paintings. By doing this, the museum will be able to provide long-term care for objects, allow for easier and safer ways to create more public access to the museum’s permanent collection, and create necessary space for SUMA to begin new acquisitions of high cultural value to the region and beyond.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,196 (approved)
$2,909 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/29/2020


PG-266756-19

Santa Monica Historical Society & Museum (Santa Monica, CA 90401-1608)
Sara Crown (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Bill Beebe Collection Cold Storage Project

The purchase of two freezers and preservation supplies to rehouse 40 linear feet of photographic negatives from the Bill Beebe Collection. The photographs were taken between the 1930s and 1990s for the Santa Monica Evening Outlook newspaper and provide a visual record of the city’s public history and daily life, covering subjects such as parades and celebrations, buildings and land developments, local officials, and political activities.  In its proposed project, the museum would be following the guidance of authorities in the preservation field, such as the Image Permanence Institute and the National Park Service.  Through the museum’s online photograph archive, it shares its historical photograph collection, having received over 3,300 views in 2018.

The Santa Monica History Museum (SMHM) respectfully requests a $4,033 National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation Assistance Grant to enhance the preservation of one of the museum’s most significant photography collections—the Bill Beebe Collection, which consists of 87 linear feet of negatives. The proposed project includes the purchase and implementation of a cold storage program to house the sensitive portion of the Bill Beebe Collection within the museum’s building. Cold storage preservation is integral to halting the deterioration of the photographic negatives in this collection. The collection documents Santa Monica, one of Southern California’s most vibrant cities, from the 1930s to the 1990s. Successful completion of the proposed project addresses one of the priorities specified in a preservation assessment conducted by an outside consultant in 2017. The SMHM is dedicated to preserving Santa Monica’s rich history and making it available to members of the community.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,033 (approved)
$4,033 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 6/30/2021


PG-262235-19

Bridgton Historical Society (Bridgton, ME 04009-0044)
Edward Allen (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Collections Storage Upgrade

The purchase of shelving and preservation supplies to store a diverse collection of historical objects, furniture, textiles, photographs, town and business records, and other items related to the history of Bridgton.  Founded originally as an agricultural community in the 1760s, Bridgton later became a transportation center and today serves as a popular tourist destination in southern Maine.  Highlights of the collection include 220 glass plate negatives, 100 tools and household items from a local farmhouse inhabited by the same family for more than two centuries, and firearms and edged weapons dating to the Civil War era or earlier.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,140 (approved)
$5,140 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-262249-19

Appalachian Mountain Club (Boston, MA 02108-1490)
Rebecca Maxwell Fullerton (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Historic Outdoors: A Preservation Initiative

The purchase of high density shelving units for the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Library and Archives collections, which offer a rich history of mountaineering from the 19th century to the present.  A 10,000 photographic slide collection visually documents the club’s early history, recreation gear, trails, as well as wilderness camps, cabins, and alpine mountain huts in the White Mountain region of New Hampshire.  Additional collections include the writings, correspondence, and scrapbooks of Thelma Bonney Hall Towle, a journalist and rock climber who chronicled her experiences in the 1930s and 40s.  Institutional records dating from the club’s founding in 1876 document hiking trails, such as the 230-mile Bay Circuit Trail circumnavigating Boston, programmatic and education programs, and partnerships with the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and Northern Forest Alliance.

The project will focus on Appalachian Mountain Club’s (AMC’s) Library & Archives Special Collections and Institutional Records. These materials range from outdoor photography from 1870s, manuscript collections of outdoorspeople of the 19th through the 21st centuries, and complete business records of the nation’s oldest outdoor recreation and conservation organization. Our primary and secondary source materials document over 140 years of the wilderness experience in this country through the lens of history, writing, visual arts and culture. Our specific goal within this project to is to upgrade our storage capabilities to meet modern standards of preservation by incorporating high density shelving into our new Archives location.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 4/30/2020


PG-263396-19

Good Will Home Association (Hinckley, ME 04944-0159)
Deborah Staber (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Phase 4 of Developing Storage and Housing Spaces for Humanities Collections relating to Good Will Orphanage History

The purchase of shelving and acid-free housing to store the collections of the Good Will-Hinckley Homes, which include over 10,000 archaeological artifacts, 2,400 shelf feet of archives, 4,000 cultural objects, 4,500 art or decorative arts objects, “numerous” natural history materials, and 5,500 historical objects. The latter include items used in the domestic life of orphans, such as farm equipment and looms, illuminating the social history of childcare and orphanages in the 19th and 20th centuries. Partnering with Maine Archives and Museums, the museum would also engage a conservator to present a collections care workshop on storage methods, designed for regional museum staff.

The goal of the L.C. Bates Museum’s Phase 4: Developing Storage Space and Housing Significant Humanities Collections project is to work with conservator Ron Harvey to improve collection’s care by completing the final phase of the second floor north storage space. The project would purchase shelving and acid free housing to store humanities collections. The project collections are relevant to the national history of childcare and its study as exemplified by Good Will-Hinckley Homes and Maine history. This storage project, a prioritized collections care goal of the Museum’s 2018-22 Strategic Plan, follows the recommendations of our 2008 RE-CAP, 2012 MAP Collections Stewardship and Ron Harvey’s 2000 Collection Survey and 2010 climate monitoring report. Partnering with Maine Archives and Museums, the Museum will engage the conservator to present a collections care workshop. The workshop, designed for regional museum staff, will use the project activities to exemplify storage methods.

Project fields:
American Studies; History, Other; Urban History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,926 (approved)
$5,926 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 4/30/2020


PG-263403-19

Precita Eyes Muralists Association, Inc. (San Francisco, CA 94110-4133)
Julio Enrique Badel (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Precita Eyes Muralists Preservation Implentation

Precita Eyes Muralists Association, Inc. received an NEH Preservation Assistance Grant in 2016 for an assessment of its unique collection of narrative materials, drawings and photographs, documenting over forty years of mural art in San Francisco. Our consultant, Dr. Cornelia Bleul-Gohlke, reviewed the documentation of 540 Precita murals and many others, primarily from the heavily Hispanic Mission District. Over 15,000 individual documents were sorted and partially cataloged. She also reviewed space in our building and the actions needed to house and preserve these materials, including the types of archival storage we would need. We are now requesting funding for shelving and archival storage materials. We are also requesting funding for a consultant to train and work with our staff in determining the ideal storage for existing and future mural documents and methods of inventory for access by scholars. This project will commence January 1, 2019 and run through December 31, 2019.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other; History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263410-19

International Tennis Hall of Fame (Newport, RI 02840-3515)
Douglas Andrew Stark (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

International Tennis Hall of Fame Spatial Analysis Project

A preservation assessment of a museum collection of approximately 30,000 artifacts housed in the historic Newport Casino, site of the first U.S. National Lawn Tennis Championship in 1881.  Highlights include a variety of fine and decorative art works, jewelry, trophies, clothing, and memorabilia relating to the history of tennis from its origins during the Renaissance to the present. In addition, the museum maintains 300,000 photographs and slides and 8,500 books, periodicals, and audiovisual records associated with the history of tennis.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263526-19

County of Yolo (Woodland, CA 95695-3448)
Mark Fink (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Rehousing Board of Supervisors Materials for Long-Term Preservation of County History

The purchase of preservation supplies and the rehousing of Yolo County Board of Supervisors meeting records, comprising 540 linear feet.  Dating from 1850 to 2007, the materials document numerous issues and challenges confronted by one of California’s original 27 counties, located west/northwest of Sacramento, including transportation, agriculture, property and water rights, immigration, sanitation, recreation, commerce, education, and more. The collection provides insights into regional and local community life and local government decision-making as it has evolved since the county’s incorporation up to the present era.

This grant will support the refoldering and reboxing of a collection of 540 boxes of Yolo County Board of Supervisors meeting materials, which date back to the 1850s. This collection is integral to understanding the history and development of Yolo County and also provides windows onto the experiences of community members. The meeting materials document agreements, ordinances, appointments, etc. which often serve to illustrate larger concepts such as the employment of women, public programs, health services, the creation of public libraries and other county services, and water rights, among others. Volunteers will perform the work of processing this collection, which will include removing metal fasteners and rubber bands, transferring documents from their original folders into archival folders, labeling the folders with the accession number, record group number, collection name, and all information from the original folder label, and then moving those folders to new archival boxes.

Project fields:
American Government; History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263528-19

Edmundson Art Foundation Inc. (Des Moines, IA 50312-2099)
Michelle Ryan (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

General Preservation Needs Assessment Survey of Art Center Collections

A preservation assessment of the Des Moines Art Center’s permanent collection of 5,458 objects created by modern and contemporary artists, such as Edward Hopper, Henri Matisse, Georgia O’Keeffe, Vincent Van Gogh, Edvard Munch, Constantin Brancusi, Keith Haring, and Yayoi Kusama.  This assessment would be the next phase in preservation activities for the center and builds on a long-term preservation plan.

The Des Moines Art Center respectfully requests a Preservation Assistance Grant of $6,000 to conduct a General Preservation Needs Assessment Survey by the Midwest Art Conservation Center (MACC). This broad-based, on-site survey will culminate in a comprehensive report that will outline short-, medium-, and long-term recommendations that will affect overall preservation and care of the collections, including: environment, storage and exhibition methods, policies and procedures, and digital documentary images. The primary goal of this project is to provide guidance in developing a Long-Range Preservation Plan for the Des Moines Art Center collections in order to ensure the longevity of the permanent collections.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 10/31/2019


PG-263515-19

Regis University (Denver, CO 80221-1099)
Hannah Miller (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Rehousing and Preservation Supplies for the Regis University Santo Collection

The rehousing of approximately 1,000 objects in preservation quality cabinets as well as environmental monitoring equipment to protect Regis University’s collection of New Mexican Santo art.  The collection, ranging from the 18th century to the present day, comprises paintings and drawings on canvas, tin, and wood tablets, as well as sculptures and mixed media objects made out of ceramic, plastic, bone, cactus, cardboard, textiles, and glass that represent images of Jesus and Catholic saints. The collection is used in the study of religious history, missionary history, and Latino history and culture in New Mexico and Colorado.

Regis University Library is requesting funds to purchase storage furniture and environmental monitoring supplies to support preservation efforts for Regis University’s Santo Collection.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; Religion, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,987 (approved)
$5,987 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263517-19

University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Mayaguez, PR 00680-6475)
Anidza Valentin (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Preservation at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagu¨ez (UPRM): Building Capacity for Collection Care and Disaster Preparedness

The purchase of a biosafety cabinet as part of a larger preservation and disaster preparedness plan for humanities collections including the Puerto Rican Collection of over 40,000 books, periodicals, maps, photographs, letters, and other artifacts related to the history of Puerto Rico and of the university; the Josefina and Manuel Álvarez Nazario Collection of over 5,000 books of Puerto-Rican and Spanish literature and the couple’s ephemera connected with literary criticism; and a Rare Books Collection. Hurricane Maria (2017) caused a failure of the library’s HVAC system and a mold outbreak in the collection. A biosafety cabinet is a precaution for safely and economically housing collections in the event of future natural disasters.

Dating back to late 17th Century, the Puerto Rican and the Alvarez Nazario Collections withheld extraordinary resources, e.g. rare books, maps, documents, photographs, manuscripts, art works, pertaining to the history, culture and literary evolution of Puerto Rico, Ibero-America, and Spain. These collections support the understanding of the complex heritage background of our Island through first accountant of events and primary sources not available anywhere else. The UPRM Library will create the foundation for a preservation program and disaster preparedness plan. Proposed activities include the renovation of a space within the library for cleaning and rehousing collections; acquisition of a Biosafety Cabinet to treat infested resources in an economical sustainable manner; training of library, archives, and museum personnel in the proper use of the equipment; development of preservation manual, and establishment of collections monitoring and cleaning program.

Project fields:
Languages, Other; Latin American Literature

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$9,980 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263520-19

Jewish Federation of St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63146-5776)
Diane Everman (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Jewish Federation of St. Louis Community Archives

A preservation assessment of 700 cubic feet of material related to Jewish life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The collection is held by the Holocaust Museum & Learning Center Archives, which is part of the Jewish Federation of St. Louis, and includes oral histories, films, artifacts, photographs, artwork, letters and archival records that chronicle the movement of immigrants who made their way to St. Louis.  Additional materials document the World War II experience, including the activities of American soldiers who fought in Europe and helped liberate camps.  Several collections focus on individual Jewish families, such as the Schweich Collection, which traces the history of a family living in France, some of whose members joined the French Foreign Legion and later the resistance, before immigrating to St. Louis.  Besides offering recommendations to improve environmental and storage conditions in the center’s current location, the consultant would also assist with planning for its anticipated move and expansion.

The humanities collections of the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center consist of 235 oral histories (48 feet linear feet of material, 9 cubic feet of films, 5 cubic feet) of photographs, and 5 cubic feet of Holocaust-related films. It includes photographs, material culture, pre- and post-WWII personal items, period items and documents, military items, money, publications, letters, press items, sheet music, artwork, LPs, films etc. The Archives has two relatively large collections of documents relating to the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. The collections offer personal views into life in pre-WWII Europe, the changes with the rise of the Third Reich and the Holocaust and the war’s aftermath. The material illustrates post-war struggles and the movement of people making their way to St. Louis. The project’s goal is to conduct a formal assessment identifying short-term goals to guide and assist us in addressing the long-term preservation issues of the collections.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 11/30/2019


PG-263521-19

di Rosa Preserve (Napa, CA 94559-9761)
Robin Bernhard (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Professional conservation treatment to restore an iconic outdoor sculpture affected by the Northern California wildfires.

Conservation treatment of Wind House (2003) by Ned Kahn, an outdoor kinetic sculpture at the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, whose collection has approximately 1,700 works by Bay Area artists of note including Enrique Chagoya, Bruce Conner, Judy Dater, and Mark di Suvero. Wind House is one of five sculptures in the collection by Kahn, whose multi-disciplinary work bridges art, the environment, and public spaces. It is also the terminus of Art and Nature Hikes through the museum’s sculpture park and is visible from the neighboring highway. In 2017, wildfires caused significant damage to 40 percent of the collection, rendering necessary prompt conservation treatment of outdoor sculpture in particular.

The goal of this project is to conduct professional conservation treatment on an outdoor sculpture damaged by fire. Wind House (2003) is a wind-animated kinetic sculpture by local environmental artist and sculptor Ned Kahn. Kahn’s work combines art, science, and public space. He has designed notable exhibits for San Francisco’s Exploratorium museum and has gone on to complete numerous public art commissions around the world. di Rosa has five sculptures by Kahn in its collection that are used to demonstrate how art can convey scientific ideas and concepts to a broad audience. Kahn’s work is incredibly topical and prescient in our current economic and political moment in the United States, bringing issues around climate change and the environment to the fore. Wind House was specially designed for the di Rosa campus and is located on Milliken Peak, the highest summit in this area of Napa Valley. The conservation work will begin January 2019 and culminate the end of February 2019.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


PG-263523-19

West Kentucky Community and Technical College (Paducah, KY 42001-6774)
Amy Sullivan (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Store, Access, Value, and Engage (SAVE)

A preservation assessment of the college’s archives, along with the purchase of preservation supplies and staff participation in workshops on the fundamentals of preservation. Collections include over 300 books and 92 linear feet of documents, scrapbooks, photographs, sound recordings, administrative records, ledgers, and artifacts mainly documenting the history of the college, founded in the early 1900s as a training school for African American teachers.  Of particular note are the personal papers of Robert Gordon Matheson, president of Paducah Junior College from 1936 to 1968 and a leader in Paducah’s African American community.

In 1909, Dr. D. H. Anderson began digging the foundation of the first building for West Kentucky Industrial College in Paducah, Kentucky, establishing one of the first African American teacher training colleges in the south, paving the way for what later became a preeminent community college, West Kentucky Community and Technical College (WKCTC). The College has a rich history from its previous institutions documented through photos, scrapbooks, and memorabilia, which are unfortunately inaccessible to the public. Items have been exposed to unfavorable conditions, including flooding, temperature fluctuations, and storage issues, creating an urgent need to preserve. Continued assessment by a professional consultant and staff training on proper archiving techniques are crucial to preserve and showcase items from one of the first African American schools in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 3/31/2020


PG-263524-19

Heurich House Foundation (Washington, DC 20036-1531)
Allison Anne LaCroix (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Heurich House Museum, Phased Collections Storage Improvement Implementation

Purchase of storage furniture and supplies to improve care for the museum’s primary collection storage area, currently inaccessible to outside researchers. The museum is the historic home of brewer Christian Heurich (1842-1945), a German immigrant who was the largest non-governmental employer and landholder in Washington, DC, at the turn of the 20th century. The mansion and its collection of over 1,000 objects, including upholstered settees and sofas, hand-carved chairs, Oriental and Persian rugs, and sculptures and vases, provide insight into late-Victorian design and revival styles—Renaissance, Rococo, and Neoclassical. They also tell the story of the Heurich family and their experiences as German immigrants living through both World Wars, as well as what it was like to be a brewer in the era of Prohibition.

This grant will fund the purchase of museum-quality storage furniture and supplies to improve the Heurich House Museum’s primary collection storage area. This will initiate phased implementation of the museum’s Collections Storage Improvements Plan, which was developed using a 2017 PAG grant. The museum is the historic home of brewer Christian Heurich (1842-1945) and his family. Heurich, a German immigrant, was the largest non-governmental employer and landholder in Washington, DC at the turn of the 20th century. The Heurich’s lived in their technologically innovative Dupont Circle mansion for over 50 years. The museum interprets its highly intact furnishings, finishes, and rich archival collections to illustrate the family’s life and its connection to the city’s history. The objects in storage do not have proper storage furniture, making them difficult to access. Implementing the storage plan will allow better conditions for and use of the collections for exhibits and public programs.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


PG-263530-19

Central Washington University (Ellensburg, WA 98926-7500)
Lynn A. Bethke (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Improving Storage Conditions for Two At-Risk Collections

The purchase and installation of storage racks and shelving for an ethnographic collection that includes strong holdings from the Pacific Northwest, Central and South America, New Guinea, and West Africa.  The racks and shelving would improve storage conditions for the collection’s most vulnerable objects, a set of large carved and decorated wooden shields from Papua New Guinea and a collection of Native American dance regalia from central Washington State.  The collections play an important role in the university’s Museum Studies courses, and are used in exhibits, and by students, faculty, and outside researchers.

The Museum of Culture and Environment (MCE) requests funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation Assistance Grant for Smaller institutions for: the purchase and installation of art racking for a collection of eight Mengen shields from New Britain, Papua New Guinea and the purchase of shelving and storage supplies for a collection of sixteen pieces of Native American dance regalia, clothing, and accessories. The MCE’s eclectic holdings reflect the varied history of collecting by individuals in central Washington State. The objects are vital for display at the MCE, for study by individuals at Central Washington University and beyond, and for supporting the training of students enrolled in the Museum Studies minor. These dual rehousing projects contribute to the Museum’s goal of long term preservation of its collections at the highest professional standards. The MCE requests $5673 for the completion of these projects.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Cultural Anthropology; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,673 (approved)
$5,673 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263532-19

Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana (Charlo, MT 59824-9789)
Amy Webster (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment and the purchase of preservation supplies to house a  collection of approximately 2,000 artifacts, artworks, photographs, manuscripts, and other items documenting the history of western Montana.  The museum is located on the Flathead Reservation of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe; about one-third of the collection consists of items illuminating the culture and history of western Montana’s Native peoples. Also included are materials related to settlement of the region by fur traders, missionaries, homesteaders, ranchers, and others.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,775 (approved)
$5,775 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 3/30/2020


PG-263537-19

Friends of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (Raleigh, NC 27611-6928)
Margaret Cotrufo (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Collection Care: Archives of the H. H. Brimley Memorial Library

The purchase of preservation supplies for the archives of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. The archives comprise 4155 items, most of them from the administrations of the first two museum directors, H.H. Brimley (1895-1936) and Harry Davis (1937-1966). As part of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, the museum represented the state at the World’s Fair and the Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta; many of its archival records are connected to these activities. Other items in the collection reflect the museum’s involvement with community organizations, such as Boy Scouts, the Carolina Bird Club, and the North Carolina Academy of Sciences. Grant funds would support the purchase of items recommended in a 2017 conservation assessment, including archival supplies, a fireproof cabinet, environmental data loggers and software, and a HEPA vacuum.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,699 (approved)
$5,678 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263543-19

Wofford College (Spartanburg, SC 29303-3663)
Kevin Reynolds (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

A Proposal for a Digital Preservation Assessment for Wofford College’s Archival and Special Collections and Digital Preservation Training

A digital preservation assessment of Wofford College’s archival and special collections, which chronicle South Carolina and southern regional history and encompass more than two terabytes of content.  The United Methodist Collection includes clergy directories, historical addresses, and photographs.  The B. R. Littlejohn Collection, documenting state history, contains 19th-century manuscripts and ledgers related to the slave trade, letters and journals of a Confederate prisoner-of-war who was one of the so-called “Immortal Six Hundred” Confederate officers held by the Union Army in 1864-66, and correspondence by Confederate General William R. Boggs and his family.  Additional unique items include a 1587 edition of Strabo’s Geography, with a fold-out map of the world by Gerardus and Rumold Mercator, and an 1880 South Carolina cookbook recording the cultural customs of the South.

Wofford College’s archival and special collections include college and United Methodist records, manuscripts, personal papers, ephemera, and rare books focused on history, literature, religion, the South, and educational history. Researchers, including Wofford students and faculty, genealogists and scholars use these collections to explore the past and interpret the present. The Sandor Teszler Library has been digitizing archives and special collections materials for over 10 years without a digital preservation plan. Over 2TB worth of digitized content exists on hard drives that lack remote archival backup. A digital preservation assessment will guide Wofford in developing a plan for preserving the college’s digitized and born-digital assets, improving access to in-demand archives and special collections materials. A digital preservation peer assessment workshop for local institutions will complement the college’s general assessment and build both preservation skills and community.

Project fields:
Literature, General; Religion, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,260 (approved)
$6,260 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 5/31/2020


PG-263545-19

Mark Twain House (Hartford, CT 06105-6400)
Tracy Brindle (Project Director: May 2018 to November 2019)
Mallory Howard (Project Director: November 2019 to present)

Conservation Assessment of Objects with Twain Provenance from the Collections of The Mark Twain House & Museum

Engaging a professional conservator to assess the conservation treatment needs of twenty-six objects in the Mark Twain House that need conservation and play key roles in house interpretation. They include Twain’s billiard table and other furniture, travel case and trunks, walking cane, and personal items, such as his pipe case. The objects are described as invaluable to the accurate and comprehensive interpretation of the house, offering unique insight into Twain’s life and work and illuminating the evolution of Samuel Clemens from a poor boy of the South to an upper-class “Connecticut Yankee.” The billiard table, for example, dominates the room where he did his writing and entertained his male friends. The items illustrate upper-class domestic life of Twain’s era, including its conspicuous consumption.

The Mark Twain House & Museum will engage a professional conservator to assess the conservation treatment needs of twenty-six objects in the museum’s collections. The objects include personal items and furnishings, all of which belonged to Samuel Clemens("Mark Twain")or his family members. They are irreplaceable artifacts of America’s literary history and culture, which provide unique and valuable insight into Mark Twain, his work, his era, and his enduring legacy. The project will provide the information the museum needs to set conservation priorities, and to budget and fundraise for needed conservation work. The project’s ultimate goal is to ensure that the collection objects are properly preserved so that they will continue to be available for display in the historic Mark Twain House, which is a National Historic Landmark, and in exhibitions at the museum and at other cultural institutions, as well as for research by museum staff, scholars, and others.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$1,690 (approved)
$1,690 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263598-19

Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (Hartford, CT 06105-3243)
Elizabeth Giard Burgess (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Photograph Collections Rehousing

Purchasing preservation housing and storage supplies for the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center’s Photograph Collection, as recommended by Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) conservators. The collection holds 12,000 items dating from 1840 to the present, with 4,500 images documenting the life of Stowe, writer of the influential abolitionist novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and her extended family. Other holdings include fifty photographs of Uncle Tom’s Cabin stage and screen dramatizations that capture racial, stereotypical imagery in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as 4,900 photographs and negatives from the 1970s that document historic buildings during Hartford’s urban renewal. The contents are widely used for scholarly and educational study.

This request to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a $6,000 Preservation Assistance Grant is to support purchasing preservation housing and storage supplies for the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center’s (HBSC) Photograph Collection as recommended by Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) conservators Mary Todd Glaser, Deborah Wender, Monique C. Fischer in an assessment of the Library Collection.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263603-19

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History (Fort Worth, TX 76107-4062)
Lacie Ballinger (Project Director: May 2018 to December 2018)
Chanin Scanlon (Project Director: December 2018 to present)

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History Collections and Archives Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of history, archival, and science collections related to Texas and the Southwest, located in two storage facilities. The collections comprise more than 180,000 items, with emphasis on pre-Columbian, Native American, and ranch and agricultural life in Texas and the southwestern United States, as well as Fort Worth history. Specific items include saddlery, household materials, photographs, and manuscripts.

Project fields:
History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 10/31/2019


PG-263605-19

Colorado State University-Pueblo (Pueblo, CO 81001-4901)
Beverly Allen (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Improved Storage for Orman Collection Rolled Textiles Project

The purchase of a hanging rack system and environmental monitoring equipment to preserve 44 blankets and rugs, mostly of Navajo (Diné) origin, that date from the 1880s to the 1940s. Previous PAG awards in 2012 and 2014 supported a preservation assessment of holdings in the University Archives and Special Collections, including the Orman Native American Artifact Collection, as well as the purchase of rehousing supplies and training for staff.  The current proposal would implement recommendations from the preservation consultant to improve storage conditions for the 44 blankets and rugs in the Orman Collection, which is used by students and faculty across university departments, by outside researchers, and for exhibits and public programming.

The grant will support the purchase of equipment to install a wall hanging system for rolled textiles in the Orman Native American Artifact Collection. The textiles consist of 44 blankets and rugs of varying sizes. The textiles date from the 1880s -1940s, and are mostly of Navajo (Dine) origin, with a smattering of other tribes. Seven of the rugs are Navajo (Dine) Germantown “eyedazzler” rugs, which are highly prized. The textiles were cleaned, cataloged and rolled on acid-free tubes as part of a previous NEH Preservation grant. The textile rolls are stored on flat shelving--less than optimum storage as well as a very inefficient use of space. In addition to the wall hanging system, we are requesting a datalogger to monitor environmental conditions in the new storage area. The goal of this conservation project is derived from recommendations from a 2012 general preservation assessment funded by NEH’s Preservation Assistance for Smaller Institutions program.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,387 (approved)
$3,387 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 10/31/2019


PG-263550-19

Randolph-Macon College (Ashland, VA 23005-1634)
Laurie A. Preston (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Improving the Storage Environment of the Collections in the Flavia Reed Owen Special Collections and Archives at Randolph-Macon College

The purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies to rehouse materials in the McGraw-Page Library’s Special Collections.  Among the unique items housed therein are an 1853 edition of Lord Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, a rare 1860 Virginia Republic presidential ballot, and a 14th-century Spanish illuminated manuscript.  The library’s special collections also include 2,000 rare items and volumes related to 18th-century Italian author Giacomo Girolamo Casanova, 132 linear feet of publications documenting the intellectual life of the colonial South, and an historic archive of the Virginia Conference of the United Methodist Church, dating from the colonial period to the present.

The Flavia Reed Owen Special Collections and Archives in the McGraw-Page Library at Randolph-Macon College houses significant historical and literary collections. Consultant recommendations from a 2016 NEH funded grant provide the basis for this proposal to purchase materials to rehouse and stabilize the most fragile and vulnerable portions of the collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 5/31/2020


PG-263551-19

Otterbein University (Westerville, OH 43081-2004)
Stephen D. Grinch (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Preparing our Past for the Future: Evaluation of the Otterbein University Archives

A preservation assessment of the university’s archives and special collections, comprising 3,000 linear feet of official records, personal papers, publications, and artifacts.  Materials primarily document the history of the university, founded in 1847 by the United Brethren Church, the nation’s first Christian denomination not transplanted from Europe.  Highlights of the collection include the papers of alumni John and Zella Bates King, who ran the United Brethren’s Albert Academy Missionary School in Freetown, Sierra Leone, from 1894 to 1912, and of alumna Ila Grindell, who served as secretary to Ernest Cherrington, a leader of the American temperance movement in the early 20th century.

The Otterbein University Archive in Westerville, Ohio is dedicated to the collection of historical materials related to the university and the United Brethren Church, which founded Otterbein in 1847. Small colleges stand at the intersection of the intellectual history of the country and the social history of their communities. Otterbein’s archive, unique in both size and scope, documents the interplay of those histories. Its 3000 + linear feet of materials capture everything from the birth of the Temperance Movement to personal accounts of the lives of our alumni. This archive is actively used by our community and outside historians, but we want to improve our preservation and access efforts. We are seeking this grant to hire a professional archival consultant to assess the state of our collection, specifically the means of preservation; the facility; the ways in which the collection is made available for research; and the policies governing the collection in our operation.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,999 (approved)
$5,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263554-19

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Gayle Strege (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Bonnie Cashin American Sportswear Collection Rehousing Project

The rehousing of a collection of 400 apparel materials that document the contribution of Bonnie Cashin to the fashion industry from the 1950s through the 1970s.  Cashin’s career ranged widely from costume design on Broadway and for Hollywood movies to design of women’s uniforms in World War II, as well as for major fashion houses, including Coach and Hermès.  The Historic Costume and Textile Collection, and the Bonnie Cashin collection in particular, is used regularly in major exhibits and in humanities courses at the university, including art history, women and gender, aesthetics, literature, and the history of industry.

The project is to rehouse an archive collection of 400 apparel textile materials that document the partnership between American Sportswear designer Bonnie Cashin and manufacturer Philip Sills from 1952-1977. The collection is currently stored in at-risk conditions. The artifacts represent the years when Cashin’s design significance emerged in the history of American fashion, capitalizing on the influence of the baby boomers in post WWII American History and an emergence of global cultural awareness on design. Cashin is one of a handful of American women fashion designers whose focus on practical and functional clothing design along with a minimalist aesthetic appeal led to the development of a uniquely American contribution to the history of the garment industry, namely Sportswear. The grant would support purchase of archival hangers, boxes, tissue and other materials needed to properly store and preserve these artifacts.

Project fields:
Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$5,019 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263555-19

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Linda Wolk-Simon (Project Director: May 2018 to March 2019)
Carey Weber (Project Director: March 2019 to present)

James Reed Print Collection, Fairfield University Art Museum Preservation Assessment Project

A conservation assessment of 700 19th-century French lithographs, including works by artists such as Honoré Daumier, Édouard Manet, Odilon Redon, and Eugène Delacroix.  The consulting conservator would work with a graduate student or recent graduate in art history or conservation in handling and assessing the preservation needs of works on paper.

The Fairfield University Art Museum recently received a major gift of over 700 19th-century French lithographs and etchings from artist, collector and master printer James Reed. Prints have always been appreciated as primary source material in the humanities, their imagery and subject matter are intimately tied to specific historical currents and events, literary themes and genres, and religious and political ideas; indeed, they record learning and innovation in all branches of human inquiry and endeavor, including artistic experimentation and ambition, and in a medium that was the most affordable, accessible, and widely disseminated to the greatest population demographic. The James Reed Collection of European Prints are not at present properly housed, nor has their condition been evaluated. A Preservation Assistance grant will allow us to assess each print and determine its storage and conservation requirements, thereby providing an implementation road map.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263556-19

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Denise Nicole Green (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Preservation Assessment for the Cornell Costume & Textile Collection

The hiring of a consultant to undertake a general preservation assessment of a historic costume and textile collection consisting of over 10,000 items that document diverse aspects of cultural expression through dress, costume, fashion, and design.  Included in the collections are Euro-American historical dress, ethnographic dress and textiles from across the globe, and functional apparel, including protective clothing, athletic wear, and military uniforms.  Highlights include clothing from Olivia Langdon Clemens, wife of Mark Twain, and their children; Eleanor Roosevelt's 1937 inaugural ball gown; Turkish textiles; and Nigerian traditional dress from the 1950s, on the eve of the country’s independence from the United Kingdom. The collection is used for exhibition, research, and teaching, making it a resource to the general public, scholars, and students.

The Cornell Costume & Textile Collection seeks a grant to support a general preservation assessment. A preservation assistance grant would provide for consultation services of an expert costume historian to evaluate our collection inventory and advise on storage organization and best practices. In 2020 our storage space will be renovated to comply with fire code. A preservation assessment is critical as we proceed with this mandatory renovation. Our collection is comprised of diverse materials: furs, leathers, synthetics, metals, cellulosic fibers, and protein fibers. Properly segregating portions of the collection which require different storage environments will ensure long-term preservation by minimizing/slowing further deterioration and protecting the remainder of the collection. A preservation assessment and long-term care plan will enable us to make the best decisions around storage and organization of our complex humanities collection.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural Anthropology; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 7/30/2019


PG-263576-19

University of Vermont (Burlington, VT 05405-0160)
Margaret M. Tamulonis (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Developing a Storage Master Plan for the Fleming Museum of Art

The hiring of a consultant to develop a storage master plan for an encyclopedic collection consisting of 24,000 art, anthropological, and material culture objects that span human civilization and represent ancient Mediterranean, European, Asian, African, and indigenous cultures of Oceania and the Americas. Highlights include Sumerian cuneiform tablets, Coptic textiles, African masks, prints by Dürer and Piranesi, Shang dynasty bronze vessels, and Aboriginal paintings from Australia. The Fleming Museum presents exhibitions, hosts researchers, offers extensive programming for faculty and students, and serves as an educational resource for the university, K-12 schools, and the regional community.

The Fleming Museum of Art at the University of Vermont is requesting funding to work with a conservation consultant to develop a storage master plan for its collections. The collection of over 24,000 objects is stored entirely on site, with a small offsite storage space in development on the University campus. The storage master plan will enable the Museum to significantly improve its storage space in large and small ways in an efficient and cost-effective way. The collection is used by dozens of university classes throughout the academic year, as well as in changing exhibitions. The collections include art, anthropological, and material culture objects that span the history of human civilization, from early Mesopotamia through contemporary America.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,831 (approved)
$5,796 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


PG-263579-19

Marlboro College (Marlboro, VT 05344-9888)
Beth Ruane (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Foundational Training for the Preservation and Management of the Marlboro College Archives

Online training on the fundamentals of archives administration to be undertaken by the librarian of Marlboro College.  The training, offered by Simmons College, would facilitate the stewardship of Marlboro’s archives, comprising 275 linear feet of institutional records, publications, and audiovisual materials documenting the school’s establishment in 1946, and its focus on educating returning veterans in the post-World War II period.  Sources include oral history interviews with veterans who were among the first graduates of the college during the mid-1940s, as well as information on poet Robert Frost, who delivered the school’s first commencement address.

Marlboro College’s Rice-Aron Library respectfully requests $6,000.00 from the NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions program. The proposed grant will enable the Library Director to gain foundational training in the area of archives management and access, which in turn will allow for greater preservation activities with the collection, as well as increased access and use. The Marlboro College Archives documents the rich history of this unique educational institution and situates it in within the larger context of a shifting landscape of higher education during the last century and the United States during the tumultuous post-WWII era.

Project fields:
Military History; Rural Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263580-19

College of New Jersey (Ewing, NJ 08628-0718)
Margaret Pezalla-Granlund (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Conservation Survey of The Sarnoff Collection at The College of New Jersey

A preservation assessment of the Sarnoff Collection consisting of more than 6,000 objects documenting major developments in communication and electronics through the lens of the Radio Corporation of America (RCA). Initially part of a museum and technical archive located at RCA’s research laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey, the collection was transferred to The College of New Jersey in 2010.  It consists of vacuum tubes and early versions of phonographs, radios, televisions, computers, and flat screen technology, along with assorted RCA memorabilia. Among its highlights are the audion, a limited run vacuum tube manufactured in 1915; the first commercially available color television set (1954); and experimental recordings made in 1955 from the world’s first programmable electronic synthesizer.

Project fields:
Communications; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,947 (approved)
$6,947 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 10/31/2020


PG-263582-19

Portland Art Museum (Portland, OR 97205-2430)
Samantha Springer (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Portland Art Museum Workshop for Northwest Photography Collection Survey

A workshop to train museum staff and a graduate fellow in preservation, conservation, and the collection management needs of the Portland Art Museum’s 3,180 prints and negatives from its Northwest art collection.  Included are works by modernist photographer Minor White, photographs documenting Native Americans from the Pacific Northwest by Edward Curtis, and portraits by Imogen Cunningham of important 20th-century artists including Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Weston, and Morris Graves.

The Portland Art Museum (PAM) seeks $7,000 to complete a condition survey of the Museum’s photograph collection of 3,000 works in the Museum’s distinguished Northwest art collection. Due to the fact that no photograph conservator specialist currently works in the state of Oregon, the Museum will bring a specialist onsite to assist with process identification and train permanent full-time staff, allowing PAM staff to carry out this work on a sustainable, long-term basis. Based on areas of PAM staff knowledge, workshop topics will focus on photographic process identification; condition survey practices specific to photograph examination; and best practices for documentation, focusing on UV photography. The Museum seeks $1,000 as part of this request to support the attendance of an advanced student or recent graduate Fellow at the workshop. PAM will contribute $4,495 to pay the Fellow following the workshop for an 8 week fellowship to help carry out a survey of the photograph collection.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/30/2019


PG-263583-19

McLean County Historical Society (Bloomington, IL 61701-3912)
Emma Meyer (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Improve Environmental Storage for Collections

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment to ensure the preservation of more than 20,000 historical objects, 15,000 books and periodicals, and 1,700 linear feet of correspondence, photographs, manuscripts and other archival records. Through an active set of public and educational programs, the museum draws on this extensive collection of materials to document the history of McLean County and central Illinois from the time of its first inhabitants up to the present.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$2,999 (approved)
$2,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263610-19

Canyon Cinema Foundation (San Francisco, CA 94124-2653)
Seth Mitter (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Purchase of archival housing and preservation supplies

The purchase of archival housing and preservation supplies for a collection of 3,200 non-commercial, independent, and avant-garde works primarily by American West Coast and San Francisco Bay Area filmmakers.  The film collection includes works by over 250 artists including Stan Brakhage, Peter Hutton, and Chick Strand.  A historical document collection of 43 linear feet of paper and ephemera includes original artworks, printed catalogs, correspondence with filmmakers and exhibitors, photographs, postcards, posters, videocassettes, and the organization’s Cinemanews periodical.  Previous NEH grants supported a preservation assessment and the purchase of metal shelving.  Following the recommendations of the preservation consultant, the applicant would purchase appropriate materials to rehouse all film and paper materials and acquire data loggers to monitor temperature and humidity.

Canyon Cinema Foundation’s (CCF) collections of film and related paper material represent 90 years of independent, artist-made film history. CCF’s loan program for its circulating film print collection (over 3200 reels) supports programming and exhibition by educational and cultural institutions across the globe. CCF’s collections of historical documents are important to researchers studying the history and culture of independent filmmaking. CCF is seeking funding to continue implementing the recommendations of a 2017 preservation needs assessment of CCF’s collections. Purchase of housing that meets archival standards for film, paper ephemera and magnetic media will enable CCF to fulfill key recommendations of this assessment. Additional acquisition of recommended preservation supplies will support ongoing improvements in storage environment and management of our film and paper collections.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 1/30/2020


PG-263561-19

Hermosa Arts and History Association (Hermosa, SD 57744-0175)
Candice Leigh (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

American Experience of Immigration

The purchase of preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment for the association’s humanities collections, which hold some 6,000 documents and photographs in addition to 300 wood, glass, and metal objects; 300 media documents; and 200 books. The items, such as personal journals, letters, newspapers, and ranching and homesteading artifacts, tell the story of immigration, homesteader migration, conflict, settlement, and community-building in the Black Hills region of South Dakota. This small-town, volunteer-run organization offers robust programming, as well as community involvement that includes Native American Reservation schools and residents.

The Hermosa Arts & History Association’s Collections record stories waiting to be told, revealing and preserving the history of a particular geographic area in western South Dakota, a small part of the American experience of immigration. Our stories will tell of the human movement of people from a variety of cultures coming to settle on the Great Plains prairie and in the Black Hills, an often-repeated historical theme that is still modern in our time. The stories we record can answer questions: Who came? Why did they come? Who was already here? Was there conflict? How was it resolved? Does conflict linger? What were the hardships? Who were the heroes? Who were the thieves? How was a community carved out? How did they meet needs for food, clothing, shelter? How did they prosper or despair? The experience of immigration is a human one. Hearing the stories may add to understanding, reflection, and open minds. HAHA is asking for financial assistance for archival supplies and tools.

Project fields:
History, General; Immigration History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,300 (approved)
$4,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263562-19

Broward Public Library Foundation (Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301-1830)
Erin Purdy (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Broward County Historical Archives Preservation Project

A preservation assessment for a collection of approximately 1,400 linear feet of manuscripts, maps, photographs, archaeological and museum objects, audiovisual materials, and microfilm reels documenting the history and culture of Broward County, Florida.  The collection includes papers of notable area residents; materials from early residents dubbed “Broward County Pioneers”; organizational records such as the Florida East Coast Railway’s employee records (1918-50); photographs dating back to the 1880s; maps ranging from 16th- century sailing charts to modern development plats; an oral history project related to race and place in South Florida; and a Broward County “hanging chad” voting booth and ballot from the 2000 presidential election.  The project would also support a day-long disaster preparedness and response workshop open to South Florida cultural heritage organizations.

The Broward County Historical Archives’ collections range from prehistoric artifacts to present-day audiovisual recordings, and is the county’s official repository for historical government records and archaeological materials. The collections in the Historical Archives document the history and culture of Broward County and its diverse communities and are used by a wide range of library customers. This project will fund a preservation assessment by a professional consultant that will increase Broward County Library’s ability to preserve the collections in the current, far-from-ideal conditions. Although outside the scope of this project, the assessment will also inform upcoming renovation projects in Main Library. Broward County Library will also host a disaster preparedness and response workshop that will be attended by library special collections staff and be provided for free to staff of local historical organizations that collect and preserve heritage materials.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263563-19

Sargent Murray Gilman Hough House Association (Gloucester, MA 01930-5736)
Thomas A. Manning (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Museum Preservation Environment Plan

Hiring a consultant to develop a plan for environmental controls to preserve a collection housed in the Gloucester, Massachusetts, home of Judith Sargent Murray (1751-1821), women’s rights advocate and writer. The holdings include more than 1,300 historic objects: furniture; artworks that include pieces by Murray’s nephew, the noted portraitist John Singer Sargent; and household and decorative objects such as silver by Paul Revere, china, porcelain, textiles, jewelry, and ephemera. The archives contain 35 linear feet of rare books, photographs, and documents that include sermons, deeds, and wills. These items help researchers and visitors explore life in a Northeast port during the Revolutionary era, on topics such as religious freedom and tolerance and women’s roles in the new Republic.

The collection consists of 1,350 objects and archival materials. The majority of the collection dates from 1750-1840. The majority of the objects relate to Judith Sargent Murray (1751-1820),her family, work and life in Gloucester MA. The objects dating from 1860 to 1925 include textiles and works on paper as well as works by John Singer Sargent (Judith’s great nephew) and his immediate family. The collection provides tangible evidence of ideas inherent in humanities themes: Judith’s ideas evidenced in her writings, John Murray’s in his sermons and John Singer Sargent’s distress over war, evident in his watercolor of British and American troops in 1917. The Museum has moved well beyond decorative arts to programming that engages visitors in questions of the day by using collections in creative ways. The objective of this grant is to obtain an environmental control plan from a consultant so the collection will be better preserved.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$2,650 (approved)
$2,650 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2019 – 5/31/2019


PG-263564-19

Nantucket Historical Association (Nantucket, MA 02554-3502)
Amelia W. Holmes (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Increasing NHA Collections Access through Cased Photographs Collection Conservation

A preservation assessment and the acquisition of preservation supplies to maintain a collection of 285 photographs which date from 1845 to the 1870s, constituting a unique record of the final years of Nantucket’s whaling industry.  The museum also holds extensive book, manuscript, and additional photographic materials related to the history of the island and its residents.  Because of their exceptionally fragile condition, these historic photographs remain in storage. Improved preservation conditions would allow staff to better care for and catalog these objects, making them available to the public through the museum’s online collections catalog.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 9/30/2019


PG-263565-19

Montclair Art Museum (Montclair, NJ 07042-1582)
Osanna Urbay (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

General Preservation Assessment of the MAM's Native American collection

The hiring of a consultant to undertake a general preservation assessment of the museum’s 4,000 Native American art objects and to develop a long-term plan for the care of the collection.  This is one of the most significant collections of Native American art in the mid-Atlantic region and represents cultures from across the United States.  Included are ceramics, basketry, jewelry, textiles, ceremonial objects, tools, and musical instruments and works by leading contemporary artists, such as Dan Namingha (Hopi), Allan Houser (Apache), Tony Abeyta (Navajo), Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo), and Marie Watt (Seneca).  The museum and community art center serve a broad audience of students, faculty, the public, and tribal members, in addition to partnering with Montclair State University and local K-12 educators.

With goals to improve the Museum’s capacity to preserve it’s collection of Native American art and artifacts and make them accessible for future generations, the Montclair Art Museum (MAM) respectfully requests a Preservation Assistance Grant from the NEH to hire a preservation specialist to conduct a general preservation assessment of the Native American collection and draft a long-range plan for its care and sustainability.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


PG-263571-19

Ohio Wesleyan University (Delaware, OH 43015-2398)
Erin Fletcher (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Preservation Planning at the Richard M. Ross Art Museum

A preservation assessment by a local consultant of the Ross Art Museum’s collection of 3,000 objects, which consists mainly of works on paper from important 20th century American photographers, such as Alfred Stieglitz, Dorothy Norman, and Edward Weston, as well as prints from 19th and 20th century artists, such as Francisco de Goya, Joan Miró, Honoré Daumier, George Bellows, Alberto Giacometti, Édouard Manet, and Robert Rauschenberg.  The collection also includes works by Native American artists, contemporary Japanese prints, and Chicano art, and is used as a teaching resource as well as in exhibitions.

The aim of this project is to conduct a preservation assessment on the Richard M. Ross Museum’s collection of works on paper, which is a resource of Ohio Wesleyan University. The museum engages Humanities disciplines on campus such as English, History, Modern Foreign Languages, Black World Studies, and Women and Gender Studies through exhibition development, collection visits, and object-based learning opportunities. In 2016, the museum underwent a director transition. In conjunction with the Museum Advisory Board, the director is currently developing a strategic plan for 2019-2021. One of the main goals of this plan is to improve use and preservation of the collection. The museum currently faces a number of preservation challenges and opportunities to professionalize its practices. This assessment, and the subsequent report, will help the museum prioritize steps, develop a preservation plan, and set actionable fundraising goals.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,664 (approved)
$4,664 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263572-19

Texas Christian University (Fort Worth, TX 76129-0001)
Julie Christenson (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Mary Couts Burnett Library Special Collections General Preservation Assessment and Emergency Preparedness Project

A preservation assessment of nearly 26,000 volumes housed at the Mary Couts Burnett Library’s Special Collections, with materials ranging from a first edition of Imitatio Christi by Thomas à Kempis dating from about 1473 to 21st-century artists’ books.  Highlights of the collection include 254 Shakespeare volumes and first editions of Jane Austen and Charles Dickens; maps, broadsides, books, and manuscripts of Colonial Spanish America dating from the 16th through the 19th centuries; and a first edition of the King James Bible and works representing the revival of interest in Hebrew and Judaism during the Reformation.  In addition, this project would support a full-day disaster-preparedness workshop open to staff members from special collections in the North Texas area.

TCU Special Collections proposes to engage a preservation consultant to conduct their first preservation assessment and disaster-preparedness workshop. The latter will be open to special collections staff in the North Texas area. TCU’s collections are small but diverse. Highlights include the Pavier Quartos (1619), an attempt to issue a collected Shakespeare that predates the First Folio; books and broadsides in Spanish, Latin, Nahuatl, and Quechua that are among the earliest works printed in the New World; and two early twentieth-century Ashkenazi Torah scrolls that serve as poignant reminders of Jewish communities destroyed during WWII. Outcomes include bringing disaster preparedness training to an area with few existing opportunities for in-person instruction, the drafting of disaster plans, providing hands-on experience with disaster response, and the creation of a list of preservation recommendations to inform TCU’s preservation plan.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263573-19

Washington County Museum of Fine Arts (Hagerstown, MD 21740-6495)
Daniel Fulco (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Collections Storage Furniture Project

The purchase of two storage cabinets and preservation supplies to rehouse the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts’ 3-D objects from its East Asian collection, including Chinese jade sculptures and Qianlong-era porcelain, Japanese okimono and netsuke figures, as well as Persian earthenware.  These collections include objects donated by the museum’s founders, Anna Brugh and William H. Singer, Jr., as well as items acquired by the museum’s director and donated by other local families.  Chinese and Japanese ceramics are currently on display and past exhibits have drawn upon the collection, such as Konichiwa: Japanese Culture and Ukiyo-e (2010).

The Washington County Museum of Fine Arts (WCMFA) seeks support from the NEH Preservation Assistance Grants to assist with its Collections Storage Furniture Project to adapt the existing multi-use “Art Vault” to a dedicated Painting and Print Vault (PPV). This project will relocate 3-D objects to the newly secured 3-D Storage Area. WCMFA requests NEH’s support for the purchase of two cabinets to house the Museum’s collection of East Asian artworks currently housed in the PPV. The acquisition of cabinets will open much needed space in the PPV for 2-D work and will provide an essential update to a plywood cabinet housing Asian artworks. The rehousing of 3-D objects is crucial to allow for efficient and safe access to them. Ultimately, this project will enable the WCMFA to more effectively exhibit its East Asian artworks which is critical to the Museum’s Mission of interpreting the art of world cultures and educating the public about them through humanities-based programming.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,651 (approved)
$5,651 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263574-19

University of Alabama, Huntsville (Huntsville, AL 35805-1911)
Reagan L. Grimsley (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Improving Environmental Monitoring and Document Enclosures at The University of Alabama in Huntsville

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and archival storage supplies for the University of Alabama, Huntsville’s Special Collections and Archives, which has collecting strengths in the history of aerospace and flight, local and regional politics, and the history of Alabama’s Tennessee River Valley.  Among the 3,200 linear feet of archival materials are the architectural drawings, maps, and research of architect Harvie P. Jones, who frequently worked on historic preservation projects; a 114-linear feet collection of northern Alabama’s Huntsville family covering the period from 1810 to 1990; the business records of the historic Harrison Brothers Hardware Company founded in 1879; and the papers of U.S. Congressman Robert E. Jones, Jr, who was instrumental in the passage of the 1949 Rural Housing Act and co-authored the Interstate Highway Act.

Special Collections and Archives at The University of Alabama in Huntsville proposes to improve environmental monitoring with better monitoring equipment and to facilitate preservation of archival materials with document enclosures. This grant will purchase acid free boxes and folders for the humanities materials housed in the archives, monitoring equipment to help measure the stability of the environment, and flat files to facilitate the storage of oversized materials.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Political Science, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,996 (approved)
$5,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263588-19

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Lynne Swanson (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Michigan State University Museum Romani Collections Rehousing Project

The purchase of two storage cabinets for a recently acquired collection of 433 items from Europe and the United States that were made or used by, or that represent, the Romani people.  The collection includes cooking equipment, musical instruments, tools, jewelry, toys, and furnishings, as well as objects, such as dolls, dishes, cookie tins, and tarot cards, that demonstrate stereotypes of Romani people.

Michigan State University Museum is the recent recipient of a collection of 433 objects made and/or used by Romani people from around the world and objects that present stereotypes of Romani people. The William G. Lockwood Collection of Romani Ethnology and Gypsy Stereotypes is as geographically diverse as the Rom themselves, with objects from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. The collection will be an outstanding resource for students and scholars who are researching the lives and the stereotypes of the often misunderstood Romani People. The specific goal of this project is to appropriately house this collection in museum-quality cabinetry, using appropriate storage materials and methods. New cabinetry is necessary to provide safe and permanently housing, once cataloguing and photography have been completed. The goal of the project is to provide this protection to promote the preservation of the collection over time.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,968 (approved)
$5,968 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


PG-263619-19

Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico, Inc. (San Juan, PR 00940-1209)
Marta Mabel Pérez (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Preservation Assessment and Planning for MAPR Research Center and Documentation Center

Development of a long-term preservation plan specific to the library and archives, physical relocation of collections, purchase of supplies, digital reformatting of VHS tapes, and preservation training for staff. The collection includes 1,998 books and audiovisual materials on visual arts and museology and approximately 1,100 archives of artists and exhibitions at the museum. In the days following Hurricane Maria (2017), the first floor of the museum building was flooded, resulting in structural damage and affecting 12 to 15 percent of these collections.

The Puerto Rico Art Museum looks to perform with the Preservation Assistance Grant: a Preservation needs assessment plan and the draft of a long-range preservation plan for care and sustainability of the library and archive collection (Center of Documentation and Curatorial Studies); to relocate the rest of the collection of the library from the 1st floor to the 5th floor together with the archives of the Center of Documentation and Curatorial Studies after the flash flood occurred on November 7, 2017 after hurricane Maria impacted; to purchase storage/preservation supplies as per final recommendations of the assessment plan; and to perform training on assessment, planning and preparedness for MAPR staff handling the library’s collection and archives.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 7/31/2020


PG-263620-19

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Linda Collins (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center Lillian M. Bartok Doll Collection

The purchase of archival supplies to preserve the 800 dolls in the recently donated Lillian M. Bartok Doll Collection. NAAMCC holds one of the largest African American doll collections in the United States, and its staff served on the advisory board that created “Addy,” the first Black American Girl doll. The collection includes rarities, such as male dolls as well as dolls by makers Karen Germany, Norah Wellings, Mrs. Conception Vargas Alfonso, and Marcella Welch. Proper preservation supplies will help prevent deterioration of fabric, discoloration, fading, and other conditions.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


PG-263639-19

Patronato San Xavier (Tucson, AZ 85745-3057)
Miles Green (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Preservation of Historic Mission Bells

A preservation assessment of the metal bells at San Xavier del Bac Mission, a National Historic Landmark located on the Tohono O’odham Nation in Arizona. Eusebio Kino, a Jesuit priest, established the mission in 1692. The current church at San Xavier was built in the Mexican Baroque style between 1783 and 1797 and is the oldest European-designed building in Arizona. Of the four bells that hang in the main bell tower of the mission, three date to the late 18th century, and the fourth dates to the late 19th century. These bells are in regular use. Other bells hang above the mortuary chapel and at the entrance to the friary. As a vehicle for training conservators from the region in the treatment of historic bells, metal conservation experts would examine the bells at San Xavier, provide stabilization treatments and adjustments to the hanging methods, and develop maintenance schedules.  Grant funds would also support the purchase of preservation supplies and the rental of a portable XRF spectrometer and a mechanical lift.

Project fields:

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,997 (approved)
$5,997 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 4/30/2020


PG-263398-19

Eastern Shore Public Library Foundation (Accomac, VA 23301-0554)
Cara Jane Burton (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Preservation of Eastern Shore Public Library Archives

A preservation needs assessment for more than 1,000 volumes, 500 rolls of microfilm, and 350 linear feet of manuscripts, published materials, and photographs documenting the history of Virginia’s Eastern Shore, and preservation training for area cultural heritage organizations.  The collection includes manuscript records of antebellum yeoman farmers, important area businesses, and an 1885 railroad-adjacent planned community; photographs of Eastern Shore scenes in the 1890s; a dozen local newspapers continuously collected since the 19th century; and a comprehensive collection of books written about the area.  Recent bequests augment the library’s collections on local and African American history and genealogy.  The planned assessment would assist the applicant in planning a new library and heritage center.

Eastern Shore Public Library Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, financially supports the mission of the Eastern Shore Public Library. The Eastern Shore Public Library (ESPL), which serves Accomack and Northampton Counties on Virginia’s Eastern Shore peninsula, has a unique local history and archives collection frequently used by historians, authors, and genealogists. ESPL proposes to hire a preservation consultant from LYRASIS to conduct a preservation needs assessment of collections and conduct training on their care and handling. ESPL’s archives include documents detailing the Shore’s rich history from its Native Americans’ European contact in the 17th century to the present, including documents about the “culture of manumission” unique to this area. ESPL’s goal through this project is to assess the collection, create plans for its preservation, and train staff and volunteers to ensure they are available to students, humanities scholars, and the community in then care and handling.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263469-19

Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Robert Schimelpfenig (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Washington State School for the Blind, a preservation pre-assessment of archives

A preservation assessment of archival records and artifacts maintained by the Washington State School for the Blind, established in 1886, along with two in-house workshops on preservation methods. Comprising 250 linear feet of archival sources and 400 objects, the collection includes correspondence and books in braille, audio recordings in multiple formats, photographs and scrapbooks, newsletters, campus maps for the blind, Dictaphones, an Edison cylinder phonograph, braille machines, and other sources documenting the school’s history as well as the history of technologies used for educating the blind.

The Washington State School for the Blind (WSSB) Archives documents the 130-year history of the school and the students who lived there. These histories are preserved in scrapbooks, news clippings, photographs and student records. The evolution of technologies is documented through antique sound equipment, volumes of braille, and Talking Books on vinyl. With limited staff, the collections from one of the oldest schools for the blind in the Western United States remains hidden. We propose a preservation pre-assessment of WSSB’s collections. After that the WSUV Library Archivist, in consultation with WSSB employees, will develop a 5-year plan to begin making the history of WSSB visible for its students and the public.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263484-19

Henry Sheldon Art and Archaeological Society, Inc. (Middlebury, VT 05753-1101)
Eva Garcelon-Hart (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Digital Preservation Assessment for the Henry Sheldon Museum Stewart-Swift Research Center

A preservation assessment of a digital collection consisting of approximately 8,500 items focused on the history of Vermont’s Addison County.  Most are photographs and negatives dating from the 1860s to 1930s. Also included are digitized maps, posters, watercolor drawings and other artworks, as well as a variety of unpublished manuscripts. The collection provides portraits of historic schools, farms and marble quarries, as well as some notable, as well as ordinary, residents of central Vermont. Featured also are architectural and urban landscape views scanned for the museum’s publication, Walking History of Middlebury.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,860 (approved)
$5,860 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2019 – 1/31/2020


PG-263447-19

Missouri Botanical Garden (St. Louis, MO 63166-0299)
Susie Cobbledidck (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Improving Environmental Conditions in the Peter H Raven Library by Eliminating UV and Some Visible Light Using Window Film and Shades

The purchase and installation of UV filter film and shades to protect special collection materials located in the Missouri Botanical Garden Library’s reading room and cataloging processing room.  The 10,500 books in Special Collections include more than 1,000 volumes published between 1474 and 1753, predating the publication of Carl Linnaeus’s Species Plantarum, which used binomial nomenclature for the first time.  Other collection highlights include 960 botanical volumes by and about Linnaeus, a first edition of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, a first octavo edition of Audubon’s Birds of America, and an edition of 738 engravings made from 18th-century copper plates that record the botanical discoveries made on Captain James Cook’s first voyage.

The Peter H Raven Library specializes in botany, but it also contains works of biography, natural history, exploration, anthropology, garden design, illustration and art. The Library holds about 240,000 monographs and journals in its General Collection and 10,500 books in Special Collections, the earliest dating from 1474. Our Collections contain illustrated volumes of interest to artists and art historians, many original bindings to support the work of bibliographers, and pre-Linnaean works of natural history whose contents reveal pre-scientific cosmologies. We are tasked with caring for these materials and passing them on in good condition to future generations, so we want to provide them with the best possible environmental conditions. Acting on the recommendation of the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, we are requesting grant support to mitigate light exposure in our Reading Room and cataloging area via the installation of UV filter film and shades.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Philosophy, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263471-19

Illinois Institute of Technology (Chicago, IL 60616-3732)
Adam Strohm (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Environmental Monitoring of UASC 2018

The purchase and installation of environmental monitoring equipment and the analysis of temperature and relative humidity conditions for the university’s archives and special collections.  Consisting of 1,000 individual collections totaling 4,400 linear feet, the holdings include institutional records, correspondence, maps, minutes, reports, audio recordings, and student newspapers documenting the history of the Institute and its alumni and faculty, as well as the Near South Side and “Bronzeville” neighborhoods of Chicago.  Among the personal papers of former faculty members are transcripts of some of the earliest interviews conducted with Holocaust survivors by David Pablo Boder, author of the book, I Did Not Interview the Dead (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1949).

The Paul V. Galvin Library at the Illinois Institute of Technology seeks a $3,297 Preservation Assistance Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to implement an environmental monitoring program for the University Archives and Special Collections. This project would entail the placement of five dataloggers in locations in which UASC collections are stored, and will result in a final report of the monitoring results and analysis of environmental risks to UASC collections. The project would be the first comprehensive environmental monitoring of the UASC spaces since the University Archives was instituted in 1998, and would be the first step in establishing in instituting a long-term sustainable preservation plan for University Archives and Special Collections to mitigate the environmental threats posed to the UASC collections by a lack of adequate climate control, and the age of the library building and its mechanical systems.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,297 (approved)
$2,715 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263474-19

University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0001)
Jaycie Vos (Project Director: April 2018 to present)

Improving Preservation Policies and Practices for Rod Library Manuscripts and University Archives

A preservation assessment of the university’s special collections and archives, along with an on-site workshop for staff on the care, handling, and storage of historical research materials. The collection comprises 18,000 books, 200,000 photographs, and 5,400 linear feet of archival records and personal papers focusing largely on the history and culture of Cedar Falls, Waterloo, and surrounding communities in Iowa’s Cedar Valley region.  Highlights include the papers of longtime U.S. senator, and UNI alumnus, Charles Grassley, along with prominent literature faculty members, including writer Robert James Waller and poet James Hearst.

This project will improve preservation in Special Collections & University Archives at the University of Northern Iowa, supporting future research, teaching, and outreach. The Manuscripts Collection and University Archives are the focus, consisting of over 5,400 linear feet of items with strengths in the Cedar Valley community and university history. The collection includes materials that reflect humanities research, teaching, and creation; records from area groups supporting engagement in the humanities; and items that reflect local political, social, and economic activities. The collections provide documentary evidence of experiences from diverse perspectives on campus and across the region. The grant would provide a site visit, report, and workshop that will identify priorities for improved policies and practices in material storage, handling, and preservation to align with professional standards after decades of neglect. The project dates are January 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020.

Project fields:
History, General; Literature, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,986 (approved)
$5,986 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020