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Funded Projects Query Form
65 matches

Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants*
Date range: 2012-2014
Sort order: Award year, descending

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University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Ruth Mostern (Co Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present); Patrick Manning (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51828-14
World-Historical Gazetteer

To support: A two-day workshop in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and follow-up activities for geographers, historians, and information scientists to consider how a world-historical gazetteer might be created that combines earlier work in regional and historical place name databases.

This project will advance work toward creation of a world-historical gazetteer that will provide comprehensive databases of places throughout the world since 1500 CE, including attention to the range of attributes known for each place. To satisfy the needs of all the large-scale historical data resources now being created, there is need for such a comprehensive and general gazetteer system. The convening of a two-day workshop, including leading figures who have developed gazetteers and the datasets in which they are incorporated, will bring about a research design for this world-historical gazetteer system, which can then be implemented in subsequent work. Four small research tasks concerning services, standards, and content will bring immediate advance toward implementation. The project is organized by the Collaborative for Historical Information and Analysis (CHIA), which has a record in sustaining collaborations for large-scale humanities work.

Project fields: Geography, History, General, Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $28,350 (approved); $28,350 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Raffaele Viglianti (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51836-14
Enhancing Music Notation Addressability

To support: The development of software tools that would facilitate citation and annotation of music notation and capture information about multiple participants' contributions to collaborative digital projects. As an initial case study, the project would focus on an existing effort to compile a critical edition of Nicolas Du Chemin's Chansons Nouvelles.

The Enhancing Music Notation Addressability project seeks a Level II DH Startup Grant for developing software to address and extract music notation expressed in the Music Encoding Initiative format. Because addressing music notation segments is central to musicological discourse, we seek to answer such questions as (1) how can one virtually 'circle' music notation? and (2) how can a machine interpret this 'circling' to retrieve music notation? We intend to evaluate our approach by transforming into nanopublications the analytical music annotations already produced by students and scholars as part of the Du Chemin: Lost Voices project, which is reconstructing songs from 16th c. France. Nanopublication is providing the scientific community with a way of outlining attribution and quality of even small contributions to facilitate citation and promote massive collaborative scholarship. We seek to extend its benefits to humanities scholarship.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, Other
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,971 (approved); $59,971 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 5/31/2015

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Jennifer Guiliano (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - 04/01/2014); Julie Greene (Project Director, 04/02/2014 - present)
HD-51839-14
Transforming the Afro-Caribbean World (TAW)

To support: A two-day workshop exploring appropriate digital collections and tools that would facilitate archival research on the relationship between Afro-Caribbean labor and migration history and the construction of the Panama Canal from 1904-1914.

The Transforming the Afro-Caribbean World (TAW) project seeks NEH startup funding to bring together scholars of the Panama Canal, Afro-Caribbean history, and experts in the digital humanities, data modeling, and visualization for a two-day planning workshop that will discuss a large-scale effort to explore Afro-Caribbean labor, migration, and the Panama Canal. The TAW workshop has several aims: 1) digitization of a subset of the proposed records to evaluate potential costs and preservation issues; 2) exploration of structured data tools; 3) the creation of annotated bibliographies for use by teachers and the public as they begin to explore the centennial anniversary; and 4) identification of other archives and repositories to be included in the larger project.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, Other
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $28,961 (approved); $28,961 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2014 – 8/31/2015

Creighton University (Omaha, NE 68178-0133)
Erin Averett (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51851-14
Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future: The Potential of Digital Archaeology

To support: A two-day workshop hosted by the Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, Massachusetts, on the uses of mobile tablet technologies in archaeological field work and interpretative analysis.

This project brings together pioneers in the field during a two-day workshop to discuss the use, creation, and implementation of mobile tablet technology to advance paperless archaeology. Session themes will facilitate presentation, demonstration, and discussion on how archaeologists around the world use tablets or other digital tools in the field and lab and how best practices can be implemented across projects. The workshop will highlight the advantages and future of mobile computing and its challenges and limitations. The workshop will consist of formal paper sessions and opportunities for informal discussion of the issues and themes at moderated discussions, demonstrations, round tables, and speaker meals. The workshop's goal is to synthesize current practices and establish a blueprint for creating best practices and moving forward with mobile tablets in archaeology. The data generated will be made available through a website to promote ongoing discussion and information sharing.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $27,277 (approved); $27,277 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Krysta Ryzewski (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51852-14
Ethnic Layers of Detroit: Experiencing Place through Digital Storytelling

To support: The continued development and testing in the classroom of an interactive, mobile storytelling website that allows for the creation of multimedia narratives of historic sites. This phase of the project would focus on creating narratives that illustrate the traditions and transformation of Detroit's ethnic neighborhoods, with attention to the Corktown, Chinatown, Poletown, and Heidelberg neighborhoods.

Ethnic Layers of Detroit (ELD) seeks to engage students in documenting and sharing the complex layers of Detroit’s ethnic histories though an interactive digital storytelling web portal. We are requesting Level II funding to expand on our pilot project to hire student assistants to develop 20-25 additional multimedia narratives over an 18-month period.This project is innovative in that it facilitates interdisciplinary investigation and collaboration, and uses available technology in new ways to explore the multilayered connections between people, practices and the urban environment through narrative and experientially-based learning activities. By constructing a student-centered project with overlapping creative, intellectual, and technical training opportunities, our project will provide students with the transferable skills and experience to communicate with and contribute to a range of humanities, multimedia, and urban-focused colleagues and careers.

Project fields: Anthropology, Ethnic Studies, Languages, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 11/30/2015

Northern Kentucky University Research Foundation (Highland Heights, KY 41099-0001)
Tamara O'Callaghan (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51858-14
The Augmented Palimpsest: Engaging Students through AR Encounters with the Past

To support: The development of tools that would allow students to access supplementary digital content alongside Geoffrey Chaucer's prologue to The Canterbury Tales using mobile devices.

The Augmented Palimpsest is a digital humanities tool that explores how the medium of Augmented Reality (AR) can be used in teaching medieval literature. Using Chaucer's General Prologue, the tool will deliver digital enhancements that emerge from the printed page via a smart device. They will provide the reader with linguistic, historical, and cultural contexts, thus giving students greater access to medieval material culture and history. The digital content will include 3D models of medieval artifacts and architecture, large and complex enough to be walked around and viewed from multiple angles. Because the enhancements emerge from the printed page, the tool will maintain a pedagogical emphasis on close reading while encouraging students to develop their skills in textual analysis, critical thinking, interdisciplinary study, and new media literacy. It will improve the reader's comprehension of the text by preserving the physical and kinesthetic connection to the text.

Project fields: British Literature, Medieval Studies
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,924 (approved); $59,924 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 11/30/2015

Modern Language Association of America (New York, NY 10003-6981)
Kathleen Fitzpatrick (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present); Rebecca Kennison (Co Project Director, 09/10/2014 - present)
HD-51863-14
Humanities CORE

To support: The development of software to connect the Commons-In-A-Box (CBOX) social network platform (which is the basis of MLA Commons) to a Fedora-based institutional repository system. This combined system would be called Humanities Commons, a social network and repository system that would be made available for use by other scholarly societies.

The Modern Language Association (MLA) and the Columbia University Libraries/Information Services' Center for Digital Research and Scholarship (CDRS) are currently working together on the development of Humanities Commons, a platform for scholarly societies and related groups across the humanities, enabling members of those organizations to communicate, collaborate, and share their work with one another. Humanities Commons will link a federated group of social networking systems, modeled on MLA Commons, with a library-quality repository, modeled on Columbia's Academic Commons. We propose in this stage of the project to develop a working prototype for the user interface connecting the Commons with the repository system, which we are calling Humanities Commons Open Repository Exchange, or Humanities CORE. This interface will allow Commons members to upload, share, discover, retrieve, and archive digital work and other objects within the same system in which they are already collaborating with one another.

Participating institutions
Modern Language Association of America (New York, NY) - Applicant/Grantee
Columbia University Libraries (New York, NY) - Participating institution
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712)
Adam Rabinowitz (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51864-14
Periods, Organized (PeriodO): A gazetteer of period assertions for linking and visualizing periodized data

To support: The development of a gazetteer that incorporates different scholarly definitions of historical and archaeological periods.

The PeriodO project seeks to create an online gazetteer of authoritative assertions about the chronological and geographic extent of historical and archaeological periods. Starting with a trial dataset related to Classical antiquity, this gazetteer will combine period thesauri used by museums and cultural heritage bodies with published assertions about the dates and locations of periods in authoritative print sources. These assertions will be modeled in a Linked Data format (JSON-LD, a serialization of RDF). They will be given Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) and served from a public GitHub repository, where they can act as a shared reference point to describe data in datasets with periodized information. We will also create a search and visualization tool to view the temporal and geographic extent of an assertion and compare it with others. Authoritative users will be able to add their own period assertions.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Archaeology, Classics, Interdisciplinary Studies, Other
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $54,096 (approved); $54,096 (awarded)
Grant period: 3/1/2014 – 12/31/2015

West Virginia University Research Corporation (Morgantown, WV 26505)
Charles Baldwin (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51866-14
A Search Engine for Electronic Literature

To support: Development of a search interface and implementation of shared metadata standards that would join the databases for nine international research centers in electronic literature, allowing researchers to cross-search the complete archives.

Our Level II grant proposal emerges from the Consortium for Electronic Literature (CELL), a partnership founded by the Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) and joining nine research centers, all developing online database projects devoted to research in electronic literature (e-lit). Building on existing achievements, we request $59,973 to implement the following: a web-based search engine for e-lit to display results from across the consortium databases; a unified name authority system to improve the data harvested by the search engine and to create more faceted and complex search results; and a training/how-to framework to extend our initiative to include future projects and partners and to establish standards and best practices in using the e-lit search engine.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,973 (approved); $59,973 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 10/31/2015

Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)
Harry Mairson (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51881-14
Functional Geometry and the Traite de Lutherie

To support: The development of a software language and protocols for digitally reconstructing and studying historical musical instruments. This stage of the project would focus on historic string instruments.

We propose to design, implement, and experiment with a programming language for describing how to draw string instrument outlines: violins, violas, and especially violoncellos. Based on the historical reconstruction in Francois Denis's definitive monograph, Traite de Lutherie, using straightedge and compass constructions, the software can enhance insights into techniques of eighteenth-century design, provide an archival format for describing the properties of string instrument outlines, and the instructions for generating highly accurate digital drawings for use in construction. Further, it can provide the foundation for a kind of computational art history, where the language and associated software serve as a descriptive tool for analyzing the evolution of instrument designs over time. This work will be integrated with ongoing, active experience constructing violoncellos, connecting the historical and conceptual with the practical.

Project fields: Architecture, Arts, Other
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Matthew Gold (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51895-14
The Social Paper: DH Start up Level 1

To support: Development of a free, open-source online writing tool that would allow scholars, students, and teachers to share and receive feedback on works-in-progress from colleagues and broader audiences. The tool would be incorporated into the Commons-In-A-Box software platform, and would allow users to keep an online portfolio of their work.

Peer review among graduate students is stuck in the pre-digital age. This project will pilot a new approach to graduate student writing that maximizes the strengths of both social networks and online writing environments with the intended goal of using interactive technology to re-imagine the contours of graduate education. The proposed Social Paper (SP) tool will be a free, open-source, ready-to-use networked writing environment that allows scholars to disseminate and receive feedback on works-in-progress among colleagues and the public. This online platform will enliven graduate work by using robust feedback mechanisms to generate networked discussion around student writing. In addition, the platform will allow students to keep a working portfolio of all writing and an accessible, dynamic archive of feedback from both peers and professors. The startup phase will culminate with a prototype which will be tested across a number of academic communities.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $29,965 (approved); $29,965 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 12/31/2015

University of Nebraska, Board of Regents (Lincoln, NE 68588-0430)
Leen-Kiat Soh (Co Project Director, 09/17/2003 - present); Elizabeth Lorang (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51897-14
Image Analysis for Archival Discovery (Aida)

To support: The development of a prototype tool that would allow scholars and students to apply image processing and machine learning techniques to identify specific visual elements within digitized collections. The project would start with an attempt to identify poetry found in the Chronicling America collection of historic newspapers.

Images created in the digitization of primary materials contain a wealth of machine-processable information for data mining and large-scale analysis, and this information should be leveraged both to connect researchers with the resources they need and to augment interpretation of human culture, as a complement to and extension of text-based approaches. The proposed project, "Image Analysis for Archival Discovery" (Aida), applies image processing and machine learning techniques from computer science to digitized materials to facilitate and promote archival discovery. Beginning with the automatic detection of poetic content in historic newspapers, this project will develop image processing as a methodology for humanities research and analysis. In doing so, it will advance work on two fronts: 1) it will contribute to the reevaluation of newspaper verse in American literary history; 2) it will assess the application of image analysis as a method for discovery in archival collections.

Project fields: American Literature
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 11/30/2015

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218)
Kim Gallon (Co Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present); Franklin Knight (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - 07/22/2014); Hollis Robbins (Project Director, 07/23/2014 - present)
HD-51904-14
The Black Press Research Collective Newspaper Project: Visualizing the History of the Black Press in the United States

To support: A two-day workshop to discuss the development of mapping and geocoding tools & data visualization authoring programs to assist scholars working with the Black Press.

In a little over a decade, historical and contemporary black newspapers have been digitized at a rapid rate. Yet a critical body of scholarship of these newspapers' impact continues to lag behind the technological developments, which have made these newspapers available to scholars and students. This dearth, in part, results from insufficient digital tools, which might assist researchers in understanding the geographic scope and social magnitude of the Black Press. The Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University and the Black Press Research Collective (BPRC) propose to develop a two-day workshop to discuss the development of mapping and geocoding tools and data visualization authoring programs to assist scholars in producing traditional and digital humanities scholarship on the Black Press. The workshop will bring together key Black Press scholars, librarians, archivists and data visualization experts to develop plans to create data visualizations from select data on the Black Press. The workshop will result in a white paper on the state of scholarship on the Black Press and proposals to develop a set of visualizations of its history.

Project fields: African American History, African American Studies, Journalism
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $29,117 (approved); $29,117 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 5/31/2015

University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA 95211-0110)
Caroline Schroeder (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51907-14
Coptic SCRIPTORIUM: A Corpus, Tools, and Methods for Corpus Linguistics and Computational Historical Research in Ancient Egyp

To support: The development of a user interface and language analysis tools to facilitate interdisciplinary, collaborative research and annotation of digitized Coptic texts.

Coptic, having evolved from the language of the hieroglyphs of the pharaonic era, represents the last phase of the Egyptian language and is pivotal for a wide range of disciplines, such as linguistics, biblical studies, the history of Christianity, Egyptology, and ancient history. Coptic SCRIPTORIUM provides the first open-source technologies for computational and digital research across the disciplines as applied to Egyptian texts. The project is developing a digitized corpus of Coptic texts available in multiple formats and visualizations (including TEI XML), tools to analyze and process the language (e.g., the first Coptic part-of-speech tagger), a database with search and visualization capabilities, and a collaborative platform for scholars to contribute texts and annotations and to conduct research. The technologies and corpus will function as a collaborative environment for digital research by any scholars working in Coptic.

Project fields: Ancient Languages, Classics, History of Religion
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 9/30/2015

Cleveland State University (Cleveland, OH 44115)
Meshack Owino (Co Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present); J. Mark Souther (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51912-14
Curating Kisumu: Adapting Mobile Humanities Interpretation in East Africa

To support: A collaborative venture between Cleveland State University's Center for Public History + Digital Humanities and Maseno University in Kenya to explore how to use the Curatescape mobile framework, which allows for mobile interpretation of historical and cultural sites, in Kenya.

The Center for Public History + Digital Humanities (CPHDH) at Cleveland State University and Maseno University in Kenya seek NEH Level II Start-Up funding for Curating Kisumu to extend best practices for mobile interpretation to the developing world. CPHDH will explore how to use the Curatescape mobile interpretive framework to facilitate interchange between the humanities and pressing needs in East Africa. Faculty and students on both sides of the Atlantic will conduct collaborative research. Our team will also explore how to modify Curatescape to enable bilingual user inputs on the administrative backend and to allow the richest possible experience for users who use still-prevalent feature phones. Our team will develop an educational exchange to create content; develop, implement, and test an app that we adapt thoughtfully to local needs and technical constraints; and collaboratively identify a set of recommendations for overcoming barriers to mobile curation in Africa.

Project fields: African History, Public History
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,494 (approved); $59,494 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2014 – 12/31/2015

Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Ann Armstrong (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51918-14
Orientation for the Mississippi Freedom Project: An Interactive Quest for Social Justice

To support: Development of a prototype for a location-based game centered on historical events surrounding orientation sessions at Western College for Women in preparation for the Mississippi Summer Project, in which students trained for civil rights activism in Mississippi in June 1964. The grant would fund a prototype of the first level, which provides historical content and context, drawing in a number of humanities consultants and offering an initial evaluation period.

Freedom Summer brought together a diverse group to advocate for citizen rights. The two orientation weeks represented a microcosm of the civil rights movement. During that period, disparate groups met in Oxford, Ohio. While there, they shared stories, leveraged networks, and enacted change. Because of this experience, this project will prototype a location-based game that interprets the Mississippi Summer Project on the site of the 1964 orientation at Western College for Women. Using Augmented Reality Interactive Storytelling (ARIS), the game will inspire interest in these events and facilitate skill building for citizen engagement. Furthermore, this project draws from the prototype process to conceive a web-based platform for nonlocal audiences. An interdisciplinary team of game designers, public historians, historic participants, educators, and museum professionals will consider how the tools of place-based learning and distance learning animate civil rights movement themes.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,994 (approved); $59,994 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)
Michael Carrasco (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51921-14
The Mesoamerican Corpus of Formative Period Art and Writing

To support: The development of a prototype database and complementary tools to facilitate analysis of Mesoamerican iconography and art objects from the Formative period, 1500-400 BCE.

This project explores the origins and development of the first writing in the New World by constructing a comprehensive database of Formative period, 1500-400 BCE, iconography and a suite of database-driven digital tools. In collaboration with two of the largest repositories of Formative period Mesoamerican art in Mexico, the project integrates the work of archaeologists, art historians, and scientific computing specialists to plan and begin the production of a database, digital assets, and visual search software that permit the visualization of spatial, chronological, and contextual relationships among iconographic and archaeological datasets. These resources will eventually support mobile and web based applications that allow for the search, comparison, and analysis of a corpus of material currently only partially documented. The start-up phase will generate a functional prototype database, project website, wireframe user interfaces, and a report summarizing project development.

Project fields: Archaeology, Art History and Criticism
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,993 (approved); $59,993 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 9/30/2015

Arkansas State University, Main Campus (State University, AR 72467)
Angel Nieves (Co Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present); Alyson Gill (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51944-14
Dangerous Embodiments: Theories, Methods, and Best Practices for Historical Character Modeling in Humanities 3D Environments

To support: The development and testing of a comprehensive typology for avatar (graphical representations of a user or the user's character) creation in historical simulations in digital heritage environments.

This proposal calls for the development of a comprehensive typology for avatar creation, and deployment of representative avatars in two Unity environments chosen because of their difficult heritage. We will then study responses to different representative avatars within these environments using tools drawn from experimental philosophy, culminating in a Dangerous Embodiments symposium and resulting publication.

Project fields: Cultural History, Ethnic Studies, History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,510 (approved); $59,510 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 11/30/2015

Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum (Chicago, IL 60605-2403)
Jodi Lacy (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51957-14
Digital Historic Skies

To support: Preliminary planning and development of a web-based project to crowdsource information about historical astronomical maps, as well as a mobile application that would offer both humanistic and scientific interpretation of these materials.

The Adler Planetarium’s Digital Historic Skies will create an interactive mobile application that teaches the general public about art, history, and science in cultures throughout the world through the use of historic celestial maps and the current night sky. The application will incorporate citizen science data, a smartphone’s GPS, historic celestial cartography from different cultures, and current astronomical data. When users look at any region of the sky, they will easily access engaging and relevant historic, cultural, and contemporary astronomical information. The project has three major goals: 1) to develop an alpha prototype citizen science project to catalog celestial objects in Adler’s historic maps; 2) to develop a proof-of-concept prototype mobile phone application that teaches about cultures through historic celestial cartography; and 3) to draft implementation plans.

Project fields: Arts, Other, History of Science, Interdisciplinary Studies, Other
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $30,000 (approved); $30,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 10/31/2015

Cultural Heritage Imaging (San Francisco, CA 94102-5867)
Mark Mudge (Project Director, 09/17/2013 - present)
HD-51978-14
Data Sustainability and Advanced Metadata Management for Scientific Imaging in the Humanities

To support: The completion of two case studies examining documentation of computational photography methods applied to humanities collections, as well as dissemination of best practices and enhancement of relevant software tools.

This project will provide enhanced data sustainability, along with metadata and knowledge management, for computational photography (CP) software tools. CP technologies are based on the algorithmic extraction of information from multiple photographs, a process that generates new information not found in any of the original photos. The project will be based on not yet deployed prior work, providing metadata harvesting and knowledge management tools for Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) and Algorithmic Rendering (AR), which are undergoing rapid adoption by humanities practitioners. The project will evaluate and update these tools, exploring practical methods of organizing this data for archival ingest and reuse on site at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and the Institute of Classical Archaeology at the University of Texas at Austin. The project will study extending the management tools to other CP technologies, such as Structure from Motion photogrammetry and multispectral imaging.

Project fields: Archaeology, Arts, Other, Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218)
Ichiro Fujinaga (Co Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present); Susan Weiss (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51636-13
Digital Prosopography for Renaissance Musicians: Discovery of Social and Professional Networks

To support: The continued development of a prosopographical database tracing the social and professional networks of Renaissance musicians, using automated methods to identify individuals and biographical information within relevant sources and to establish relationships between them.

As part of Web 2.0 (Semantic Web), there is a new technology called FOAF (Friend of a Friend), describing relationships between people. We will investigate the applicability of FOAF for describing relationships between musicians of the past, thereby establishing a new biographical tool. Musicians have complex relationships,particularly those between teachers and students and those within ensembles of various sizes. Visual artists may have similar teacher-student relationships, but typically do not create their work together. Dancers may perform together, but they are usually taught in groups. Similarly, athletes may compete in groups, but they do not usually perform in public with their coaches. For this project we will focus specifically on relationships among Renaissance musicians and how to extract the biographical and relational data automatically from existing documents using natural language processing technology, creating a model applicable to other time periods and disciplines.

Project fields: Music History and Criticism
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $54,466 (approved); $54,466 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 10/31/2015

Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
Nancy Wicker (Co Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present); Lilla Kopar (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51640-13
[View white paper]
Project Andvari: A Digital Portal to the Visual World of Early Medieval Northern Europe

To support: A two-day workshop bringing together an international group of humanities scholars, cultural heritage professionals, and technical experts to begin planning for an online resource that would facilitate access to digital collections of the art and artifacts of the early medieval period in northern Europe, drawn from a range of dispersed institutional holdings.

Project Andvari is designed to provide integrated access to dispersed collections of northern European art and artifacts of the early medieval period (4th-12th centuries). Our goal is to create a digital portal offering aggregated search options and enhanced metadata. Funding is requested to convene an international workshop for humanities scholars, museum professionals, and technology experts to refine the conceptual design of the proposed research tool and identify its technological requirements in preparation for a pilot project. Ultimately, Project Andvari will facilitate interdisciplinary research in art, archaeology, history, and literary and religious studies of the northern periphery of medieval Europe. It will allow users to study visual culture across media and beyond traditional geographical and disciplinary boundaries. Its innovative application of search methods will promote analyses of relationships of artifacts and cultures, and help us discover the hitherto unnoticed.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $27,921 (approved); $27,921 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2013 – 12/31/2014

Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405)
Brian Graney (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51642-13
[View white paper]
Representing Early Black Film Artifacts as Material Evidence in Digital Contexts

To support: A scholarly workshop and follow-up activities that will bring together film studies scholars, moving image archivists, and library professionals to consider how digitization of early motion picture film might be improved to better capture the physical attributes of the film print. The workshop would focus on early twentieth-century films made for African-American audiences.

The study of "race movies," the early motion pictures produced for black audiences in the first decades of the 20th century, presents an ideal humanities context for framing important questions bearing on the digital representation of film artifacts as material evidence: How must we reevaluate and amend current best practices for digitization of motion picture film which by design omit or obscure physical attributes of the original artifact?; And how might this representation of film as a material object offer a conceptual bridge for integrating audiovisual media within a wider network of related visual and textual documentation? The Black Film Center/Archive (BFC/A) at Indiana University proposes in this Level I Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant to explore these questions by convening an interdisciplinary group of scholars, moving image archivists, and technology specialists in digital humanities for a two-day conference and workshop to be held in November 2013.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $26,400 (approved); $26,400 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2014

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2446)
Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51668-13
A Digital Studio for the Optical and Chemical Analysis Of Manuscripts and Printed Books

To support: The analysis of a 15th-century printed book and development of an online educational resource to further researchers’ understanding of how a range of imaging technologies offer new knowledge about the production and reception of books and manuscripts.

We propose the creation of a digital studio for the optical and chemical analysis of manuscripts and printed books. In this Level II start-up project, we will capture images of a 1472 guide for priests written in Latin by a Florentine archbishop and printed in Strasbourg using moveable type. We will image selected pages from this book at specific frequencies in the ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectrum. We will also conduct spot-level densitometry and Raman spectroscopy on elements in this book. The resulting data from these images will then allow us to create a digital studio that will include interactive tutorials and demonstrations explaining the principles of optical and chemical analysis to students, scholars, and life-long learners in the humanities. This digital studio will also allow users to browse and compare the images and spectroscopic data to form their own understanding of the book’s production process and reception history.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,896 (approved); $59,896 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 1/31/2015

Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Michele Weigle (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51670-13
[View white paper]
Archive What I See Now

To support: The development of an open-source tool that would allow web browsers to digitally archive a web page or series of pages as they appear at a particular point in time, using as case studies web resources that address humanities themes such as religious history and political dialog.

The web has become a repository for much of our social culture. Thus, humanities scholars have recognized the need for archiving web objects to support their research. We propose to build an open-source tool to support this personal-scale web archiving. We will build a Firefox add-on to create an archive of a web page or web site from the perspective of the browser. This means that web pages requiring authentication, pages on social media sites, and pages displayed after some user interaction can all be archived in the standard Web ARChive (WARC) format. This tool will provide easy access to web archiving and give users the ability to "archive what I see now." The tool will also allow users to upload generated WARC files to a specified server for later access. With this tool, collaborating scholars could upload their WARCs to a common server to create special-purpose collections of various topics. These collections could then be accessed by standard web archive tools.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $57,892 (approved); $57,892 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 12/31/2014

Lane Community College (Eugene, OR 97405-0640)
Anne McGrail (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51671-13
[View white paper]
Bringing digital humanities to the community college and vice versa

To support: To conduct a survey of community college faculty and administrations and host a series of workshops at the Community College Humanities Association annual meeting to consider how community colleges can better participate in and contribute to the multiple ongoing conversations about digital humanities teaching and research.

Lane Community College proposes a Level I Start Up grant. The project will initiate a much needed nationwide dialogue regarding the lack of community college participation in, and contribution to digital humanities. The project's short-term outcome is the engagement of national thinkers, experts and community college stakeholders in a national conversation that will begin the longer discussion of how to improve community college engagement with digital humanities (a conversation that has been sorely lacking). This conversation will include blogs, e-surveys, a wiki and website and culminate in a day-long pre-conference session at the Fall 2013 Community College Humanities Association conference and a white paper synthesizing the project's discoveries and work. Long-term goals are to improve community college participation in Digital Humanities and hence support 2-year college humanities students in their education and careers.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $29,271 (approved); $29,270 (awarded)
Grant period: 3/1/2013 – 12/31/2013

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
Bethany Nowviskie (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51674-13
[View white paper]
"Are We Speaking in Code?" (Voicing the Craft & Tacit Understandings of Digital Humanities Software Development)

To support: A two-day workshop that will bring together digital humanities scholars and software developers for critical discussion and hands-on activities to further articulate and theorize the intellectual work behind the technical development of digital projects.

The Scholars’ Lab at UVa Library proposes a summit and planning meeting for 20 intermediate-to-experienced digital humanities software developers. Its first aim is to document what has been too quietly internalized and tacitly embodied in DH platforms and tools: developers’ expert knowledge about the intellectual work of code-craft and their unspoken understandings about the relation of code and praxis to ethics, scholarly method, and humanities theory. Its second aim is to formulate pragmatic responses and spark initiatives to bridge the communications gap between scholars and developers—bringing technical conversations that may seem too informal, inaccessible, or telegraphic into open, inclusive humanities discourse. This meeting will foreground theoretical and intellectual dimensions of DH craftsmanship—in software developers’ own terms—and foster needed discussions of the functional significance of source code in venues legible to and frequented by scholars and developers alike.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $29,902 (approved); $29,902 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2014

Georgia Tech Research Corporation (Atlanta, GA 30332)
Jacob Eisenstein (Co Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present); Lauren Klein (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51705-13
TOME: Interactive TOpic Model and MEtadata Visualization

To support: The development of a web-based tool for the visual exploration of the themes that recur across an archive, based on the text-analysis technique of topic modeling combined with the archive's related metadata. A digitized archive of 19th-century abolitionist newspapers would serve as the initial test case.

As archives are being digitized at an increasing rate, scholars will require new tools to make sense of this expanding amount of material. We propose to build TOME, a tool to support the interactive exploration and visualization of text-based archives. Drawing upon the technique of topic modeling--a computational method for identifying themes that recur across a collection--TOME will visualize the topics that characterize each archive, as well as the relationships between specific topics and related metadata, such as publication date. An archive of 19th-century antislavery newspapers, characterized by diverse authors and shifting political alliances, will serve as our initial dataset; it promises to motivate new methods for visualizing topic models and extending their impact. In turn, by applying our new methods to these texts, we will illuminate how issues of gender and racial identity affect the development of political ideology in the nineteenth century, and into the present day.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,999 (approved); $59,999 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 5/31/2015

Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274-4182)
Michael Phelps (Co Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present); Todd Hanneken (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51709-13
[View white paper]
Integrating Spectral and Reflectance Transformation Imaging for the Digitization of Manuscripts & Other Cultural Artifacts

To support: The establishment of best practices for the application of spectral imaging and Reflectance Transformation Imaging technologies to reveal new information about objects of study in the humanities. Activities would include the imaging of three test objects and follow-up quality evaluation undertaken by humanities scholars.

This project will bring together the nation’s leading experts to integrate two proven technologies for imaging cultural artifacts. The first technology is spectral imaging, which excels at collecting detailed color information in order to recover information which is indistinguishable to the naked eye, such as unreadable text on a manuscript or stages of revision in a painting. The second technology is Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), which captures the detailed surface texture of artifacts. RTI images can be viewed interactively and enhanced, allowing scholars and conservators to reconstruct the methods by which an artifact was produced and to analyze its current physical condition. The team will test two experimental integration procedures on three representative test objects. Humanities scholars will be responsible for evaluating the benefits. The work scripts and benefit analysis will be published for use in imaging major artifact collections around the world.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $58,338 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2014

Loyola University, Chicago (Chicago, IL 60611-2147)
Pamela Caughie (Co Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present); David Chinitz (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51718-13
[View white paper]
Metadata Schema for Modernist Networks

To support: A one-day workshop to engage humanities scholars and technical experts in the development of a standardized metadata schema and vocabulary that describes and enables discovery of digital projects in modernist studies.

Loyola University Chicago will host a workshop for 16 participants in digital modernist projects in the U.S., Canada, and abroad which will result in the launching of ModNets as the most recent "node" in the Advanced Research Consortium (ARC). ModNets, a federation of digital projects in the field of modernist studies, faces unique challenges as it joins the ARC organization: we will address issues specific to the field of modernist studies, particularly the metadata needs for new media, such as film and phonography. The purpose of this workshop, which will include project directors, ModNets and ARC leaders, and metadata analysts, is to review ARC's RDF (metadata) vocabulary in the light of modernist scholarship and enhance it to meet the particular needs of modernist artifacts. The outcome will be a list of proposed changes to the existing ARC vocabularies and a working set of RDF documents for two existing projects.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $27,671 (approved); $27,671 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 8/31/2014

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Noah Wardrip-Fruin (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51719-13
[View white paper]
A unified approach to preserving cultural software objects and their development histories

To support: A Level 1 pilot project focusing on the preservation of software relevant to humanities scholars.

Software is an increasingly important part of our culture, and the humanities has responded with approaches such as digital culture studies, game studies, and software studies. Simultaneously, we face a growing erosion of computational history as the cycle of technological advancement and obsolescence continues. This project will pilot a new approach to software preservation -- one that draws on the best practices so far identified by those seeking to preserve scientific research and its context (on one hand) and games and virtual worlds (on the other) while being consistently informed by our growing knowledge of the research questions most important to the digital humanities. A team of librarians, computer scientists, and humanists will pilot this methodology by archiving UCSC's groundbreaking social simulation game Prom Week -- making progress towards a more unified approach to preserving software objects and their development histories for future scholars, students, and the public.

Project fields: Media Studies
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $30,000 (approved); $30,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 3/1/2013 – 6/30/2014

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5000)
Ryan Cordell (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51728-13
Uncovering Reprinting Networks in Nineteenth-Century American Newspapers

To support: The development of models, using tools from computational linguistics, to help track the spread of prints and reprints of poetry and short stories throughout 19th-centry newspapers, using the sources found in the Chronicling America database of digitized newspapers.

Uncovering Reprinting Networks in Nineteenth-Century American Newspapers seeks to develop theoretical models that will help scholars better understand what qualities--both textual and thematic--helped particular news stories, short fiction, and poetry "go viral" in nineteenth-century newspapers and magazines. Prior to copyright legislation and enforcement, literary texts as well as other non-fiction prose texts circulated promiscuously among newspapers as editors freely reprinted materials borrowed from other venues. What texts were reprinted and why? How did ideas--literary, political, scientific, economic, religious--circulate in the public sphere and achieve critical force among audiences? By employing and developing computational linguistics tools to analyze the large textual databases of nineteenth-century newspapers newly available to scholars, this project will generate new knowledge of the nineteenth-century print public sphere.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,805 (approved); $59,805 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 12/31/2014

University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)
Conrad Rudolph (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51735-13
FACES: Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems, Phase II

To support: The refinement of additional techniques for using facial recognition software to help with the identification of human subjects in portraiture for art historical research.

Before the advent of photography, portraits were, almost by definition, depictions of people who were important in their own worlds. But, as a walk through almost any major museum will show, a large number of these unidentified portraits from before the nineteenth century--many of them great works of art--have lost the identities of their subjects through the fortunes of time. Traditionally, identification of many of these portraits has been limited to often quite variable personal opinion. FACES (Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems) proposes to establish the initial potential of face recognition technology to this highly subjective aspect of art history while at the same time retaining the human eye as the final arbiter.

Project fields: Arts, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 5/31/2015

University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003)
Eric Poehler (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51744-13
The Pompeii Bibliography and Mapping Resource Project

To support: Further development of a web-based prototype platform that would allow researchers to access both geospatial and bibliographic information relevant to Pompeii.

The Pompeii Bibliography and Mapping Resource (PBMR) is a web-based research tool composed of three parts: 1. a bibliographic database and full-text document repository, 2. a Geographical Information System (GIS) and 3. a user interface. The PBMR creates a unique and powerful environment for humanities research by bringing together the full array of disparate sources about Pompeii and making them instantly available to the public and academics alike. Additionally, the online GIS permits users to make custom maps in their browser or download the core files for more advanced analyses. Most importantly, the user interface fuses spatial and bibliographic search tools, allowing users to ask questions about both the thematic and spatial relationships of a particular subject. Finally, although focused on the novel means of delivering the scholarship of a particular archaeological site, the specific content of the project does not limit its implementation for other subjects in the humanities.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,993 (approved); $59,993 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 5/31/2015

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701)
Fred Limp (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51753-13
21st Century Data, 21st Century Publications: 3D Model Publication and building the Peer Reviewer Community

To support: The development of a publication framework and peer reviewer community for scholarly publication of the three-dimensional models and complex datasets produced by archaeological research.

The preservation and dissemination of 3D archaeological data, and the adaptation of peer review to accommodate publications based on complex digital data and models, are key emergent issues in 21st-century archaeology and related fields in the humanities. The core problems this project addresses are (a) developing a process for the peer reviewed publication of the kinds of digital 3d models and complex, interactive datasets projects like ours are now producing, and (b) building a community of peer reviewers with the necessary skills and background to properly evaluate these publications. This project will support the creation of a pilot publication, which will be the focus of efforts to define a publication medium which effectively communicates the narratives constructed with these complex data and models and will move towards defining the process, or framework, for larger scale publications, providing the training and knowledge transfer needed.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,719 (approved); $49,719 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2013 – 12/31/2015

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Douglas Oard (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51766-13
[View white paper]
Bridging communities of practice: Emerging technologies for content-centered linking

To support: Two workshops to further explore how automated computational methods may facilitate access to cultural heritage materials by establishing structured relationships or links between digitized and born-digital sources, including web and social media content.

The project fosters convergence between two communities by addressing complementary aspects of a shared opportunity. Digital humanists are at the forefront of developing ways to render cultural heritage metadata increasingly interoperable as linked open data in tandem with information professionals working in libraries, archives, and museums. Computer scientists are developing automated techniques for extracting linkable data from the content itself. Bringing these communities together offers transformational potential for the application of a critical infrastructure in humanities scholarship. Two workshops will be organized to seize this unique opportunity. The first will bring together humanities scholars and computer scientists to explore applications of new content linking technologies to dispersed and disparate material. In the second, a larger group of humanities scholars will identify specific content to which techniques described in the previous workshop will be applied.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $24,650 (approved); $24,650 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2014

Electronic Literature Organization (Cambridge, MA 02139-4307)
Stuart Moulthrop (Co Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present); Rudyne Grigar (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51768-13
Pathfinders: Documenting the Experience of Early Digital Literature

To support: The development of preservation strategies for born-digital literature, including capturing reading experiences of both the original authors as well as other readers, all to be incorporated in the Electronic Literature Directory.

The Pathfinders project records performances by authors and ordinary readers of key early works of electronic literature, and develops presentation strategies to make these recordings accessible and useful to scholars and teachers. In the process we 1) preserve vanishing cultural material; 2) develop new strategies for recording and disseminating that material; and 3) provide prototypes for similar work on other digital texts.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $52,003 (approved); $52,003 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 5/31/2015

Mangalam Research Center for Buddhist Languages (Berkeley, CA 94704-1418)
Luis Gomez (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51772-13
The Buddhist Translators Workbench (BTW), a project of Mangalam Research Center for Buddhist Languages

To support: The continued development of a prototype of the Buddhist Translators Workbench, a platform for scholars and translators of classical Buddhist texts, as well as the preparation of supplementary user tutorials.

The Buddhist Translators Workbench (BTW) offers an interactive digital environment for scholars and translators of classical Buddhist texts. Focused on lexicographic research, it gives ready access to the resources needed to research key terms in context and suggests new lines of inquiry. Scholars can record their findings for broad dissemination, and the ability to log user threads and dialogs will support collaboration and encourage user contributions. Extensive interactive annotations of key terms will preserve the work of earlier generations and create new possibilities for interdisciplinary work. By establishing a shared body of knowledge easily accessible across specialized disciplines, BTW will serve as a model for other scholars working in clearly delimited fields. Level I focused on planning, developing alpha-level prototypes for inputting data, and choosing sample terms and texts. Level II will initiate work on a proof-of-concept database to go online in May 2014.

Project fields: Asian Languages
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 1/31/2015

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85287-0001)
Erin Bell (Co Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present); Mark Tebeau (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51773-13
Mobile Museum Initiative

To support: Development of a prototype of Curatescape Museums, a platform for mobile interpretation of museum collections, as well as best practices for small to mid-sized museums interested in implementing mobile technologies.

The Center for Public History + Digital Humanities (CPHDH) and the Ohio Historical Society seek NEH Level II Start-Up support for the Mobile Museum Initiative (MMI) to extend our understanding of best interpretive and technological practices for mobile interpretation in museum settings. MMI innovates both in technology and interpretive humanities practice. On the interpretive side, the project proposes to challenge the conventional approach to app deployment in museum settings that is built around museum navigation and pays little attention to visitor usage patterns. We will be recommending an interpretive practice that emphasizes connectivity between objects around themes, ideas, and chronologies. In addition, we will emphasize the foregrounding of visitor studies as a significant part of the design and deployment of mobile applications. On the technology side, CPHDH will work to release a beta version Curatescape Museums an open-source (and, optionally, hosted) software application.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
Stephen Railton (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51774-13
[View white paper]
Digital Yoknapatawpha

To support: The development of an expanded prototype that allows for the mapping and study of William Faulker's fiction that took place in the imaginary county of Yoknapatawpha.

Digital Yoknapatawpha is a new means to interrogate the fiction that Faulkner wrote between 1926 and 1960 about his mythical county. The current prototype, built by PI Railton and a national team of Faulkner scholars in collaboration with the digital humanities technologists at UVA, models a way to enter every character, location and event in single texts into a robust database, and map that data into an atlas of interactive visual resources. Our proposal will extend this prototype to enable inter-textual study of all the Yoknapatawpha fiction. This enlargement will deploy the exceptional capacities of digital humanities to make the study of Faulkner’s engagement with a particular place and major issues in American history as dynamic as his repeated returns to it and them. The extended design will provide students with new means to appreciate Faulkner’s art, and scholars with transformative digital pathways to research all that his work can reveal about literature and culture.

Project fields: American Literature
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $59,084 (approved); $58,970 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2014

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Champaign, IL 61820-6903)
William Underwood (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51787-13
Understanding Genre in a Collection of a Million Volumes

To support: The continuing development of software that would allow users to classify digitized literary works by genre, including allowing for the changing definitions of genre over time.

Large digital collections offer new avenues of exploration for literary scholars. But their potential has not yet been fully realized, because we don’t have the metadata we would need to make literary arguments at scale. Subject classifications don’t reveal, for instance, whether a given volume is poetry, drama, fiction, or criticism. Working with a hand-classified collection of 4,275 English-language works, we have discovered new perspectives on the history of genre. But to flesh out those leads (and permit others to undertake similar projects) we need to move to a scale where manual classification would be impractical. We propose to develop software that can classify volumes by genre while allowing definitions of genre to change over time, and allowing works to belong to multiple genres. We will classify a million-volume collection (1800- 1949), make our data, metadata, and software freely available through HathiTrust Research Center, and publish substantive literary findings.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $57,163 (approved); $57,163 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 11/30/2015

Kitchen Sisters Productions (San Francisco, CA 94133-5107)
Nikki Silva (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51791-13
[View white paper]
Pop Up Archive: Standardized Preservation and Distribution of Culturally Significant Audio

To support: The development of open-source software tools and educational materials to facilitate the dissemination and long-term preservation of oral histories, radio broadcasts, and other audio content.

Pop Up Archive is a simple system to preserve audio content by making it searchable, reusable, and shareable in ways that are meaningful to scholars and producers. The Kitchen Sisters inspired and collaborated on the initial phase of the project, which entailed an academic survey of existing methods for storage of and access to audio content, as well as the alpha release of software plug-ins for Omeka. Phase two of the project, for which we are seeking a Level II Start-Up Grant, will finalize and test these plug-ins across public media organizations and oral history archives, create a centralized repository of audio records, and educate relevant communities through a shared web space. The system will be open source and will conform to national archival standards, without requiring technical expertise from participating organizations. For the first time, content can be indexed for safe and permanent preservation and made accessible to producers, scholars, students, and the public.

Project fields: Media Studies
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $60,000 (approved); $60,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2014

Independent Feature Project (New York, NY 10003-6811)
Woo Jung Cho (Co Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present); Roger Williams (Project Director, 10/01/2012 - present)
HD-51801-13
[View white paper]
Traveling While Black

To support: A two-day workshop led by Games for Change that will result in the development of a proof-of-concept prototype for a game based on The Negro Motorist Green Book, first published in 1936 with advice for African Americans traveling in the Jim Crow South.

The history of African American travel is one of the great untold American stories. We seek a Level I Start-Up Grant to support the collaboration between humanities scholars and interactive designers to develop a choice-driven, exploratory game that places players directly in the shoes of African American travelers of the past. Through the game mechanics, players will explore the nature of prejudice, how it manifests, and the discrimination African Americans had to endure during the pre-civil rights era. The game will engage students and allow them to make strategic decisions, developing problem solving and systems thinking skills. Players will gain a rich and complex understanding of this important period in our nation’s history that continues to have contemporary resonance. The learning experience within the game will be augmented by the other platforms--documentary film, web series and digital cultural mapping--that make up the Traveling While Black (TWB) transmedia project.

Project fields: African American Studies
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $30,000 (approved); $30,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 1/31/2014

National Hispanic Cultural Center (Albuquerque, NM 87102-4508)
Shelle Sanchez (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51506-12
[View white paper]
Digital Dialectic: Forging New Paths of Inquiry in the Humanities

To support: The development of software and related curricula to allow for the in-depth examination and analysis of visual humanities content within both immersive digital dome and web-based environments. The project will use as a model Mundos de Mestizaje, a contemporary fresco that highlights Hispanic history and cultural dialog.

Digital Dialectic empowers humanities education with technology that sparks deeper contextual understanding of cultural artifacts and illuminates the multicultural nature of the humanities. Frederico Vigil's fresco, Mundos de Mestizaje, allegorically depicts 3000 years of Hispanic history, focusing on cross-cultural exchange of ideas. NHCC and ARTS Lab will create an interactive software application allowing users to explore the fresco, and through educational information embedded in the imagery, discover the dynamic nature of the humanities and their connection to Hispanidad. The asset will deploy on 2 interactive platforms: a digital dome presentation and a web-based viewer. The immersive dome piece will allow widespread audiences to view the fresco at actual scale and dive into details with high-resolution magnification; it will be distributed nationally and internationally to museums with fulldome theaters. The web-based viewer will allow self-guided exploration of the fresco.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,472 (approved); $46,069 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2012 – 9/30/2013

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA 02139-4307)
Kurt Fendt (Co Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present); James Paradis (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51509-12
[View white paper]
Annotation Studio: multimedia text annotation for students

To support: The development of an open-source, web-based annotation tool to assist students in interpreting literary texts and other humanities sources.

Annotation Studio will be a web-based application that actively engages students in interpreting literary texts and other humanities documents. While strengthening students' new media literacies, this open source web application will develop traditional humanistic skills including close reading, textual analysis, persuasive writing, and critical thinking. Initial features will include: 1) easy-to-use annotation tools that facilitate linking and comparing primary texts with multi-media source, variation, and adaptation documents; 2) sharable collections of multimedia materials prepared by faculty and student users; 3) multiple filtering and display mechanisms for texts, written annotations, and multimedia annotations; 4) collaboration functionality; and 5) multimedia composition tools. Products of the start-up phase will include a working prototype, feedback from students and instructors, and a white paper summarizing lessons learned.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,979 (approved); $49,979 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 3/31/2013

New School (New York, NY 10011-8871)
Peter Asaro (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51513-12
[View white paper]
Digital Video Navigation and Archival Content Management Tools for Non-linear Oral History Narratives

To support: This project builds on advances in HTML 5 to allow non-linear, hypertextual connections within audio and video archives of humanities materials, with the Oral History of Robotics archive serving as a test case.

This project will enable public oral history archives of audio and video materials to present history in a way that makes it more accessible to public web users, students and educators, while allowing historians to present non-linear historical narratives. Through new open source video tools, it will support the intuitive navigation of large media archives. These tools will initially support a project on the oral history of robotics, which includes an existing archive of video interviews with pioneers in the field. Current on-line archives of materials are difficult to navigate and are forced into flat linear structures, while those with search capabilities rarely offer intuitive or accessible interfaces for non-specialists. The envisioned tools will exploit the latest capabilities of HTML5 to present materials (e.g., documents, maps, photos, and webpages and related archival videos) as a video is being viewed and navigate video in non-linear paths.

Project fields: History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,986 (approved); $49,986 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Long Island University (Brookville, NY 11548-1327)
Deborah Mutnick (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51531-12
[View white paper]
The Pathways to Freedom Digital Narrative Project

To support: The planning and alpha-level prototyping of a web and mobile-based resource that would facilitate public access to digital content on the African-American Civil Rights Movement created by collaborative, interdisciplinary teams of undergraduate students.

The digital content created by Pathways to Freedom students and faculty will feature a variety of media, artifacts, and documents with a primary focus on local civil rights oral histories mapped to archival documents and specific Brooklyn locations. It will be produced by undergraduate students and their professors in Pathways to Freedom as well as undergraduate and graduate Computer Science and/or Media Arts students, with the support of faculty and IT specialists, and will have enduring value to the academic and broader public, including middle and high school groups as well as other college students. Through an innovative use of existing digital tools and technologies, the prototype will combine oral history interviews with images of archival documents and interactive maps, enabling those artifacts to be seamlessly integrated on a variety of platforms including the Internet, a digital repository, and mobile devices.

Project fields: African American Studies
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $25,000 (approved); $24,713 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 9/30/2013

Wright State University Main Campus (Dayton, OH 45435-0001)
John Magill (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - 10/04/2012); Gwen Evans (Project Director, 10/05/2012 - present)
HD-51538-12
[View white paper]
The Scholar's Dashboard: Creating a multidisciplinary tool via design and build workshops (OhioLINK)

To support: A series of three two-day workshops that will bring together collaborative teams of scholars, librarians, and technologists to identify and design a range of potential tools and features to augment use of the digitized cultural heritage materials within the OhioLINK Digital Resource Commons.

The Scholar's Dashboard project is a series of three two-day design and build workshops, teaming humanities scholars, librarians, and technologists in innovative application development to optimize use of humanities collections from the OhioLINK Digital Resource Commons (DRC). The DRC is a 500,000 item open access collection from Ohio academic and cultural heritage organizations. Dashboard users will select and combine collections, add descriptions and metadata, and re-visualize and re-present information. DRC collections with relevant information (oral histories, narratives, records, documents, images, e.g.) will form the design base. Design and build workshops allow researchers and scholars to specify features needed to rapidly expand DRC functionality. This model will then be used as a magnet for further digital humanities collections, as scholars, librarians, and archivists contribute collections in order to benefit from the Scholar's Dashboard design and capabilities.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $41,587 (awarded)
Grant period: 3/1/2012 – 11/30/2013

North Georgia College and State University (Dahlonega, GA 30533)
Bonnie Robinson (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51539-12
[View white paper]
Encouraging digital scholarly publishing in the Humanities

To support: A workshop for directors of university presses and experts in publishing and peer review working toward developing a sustainable model to increase both institutional and technical support for publishing born-digital, book-length scholarly monographs in humanities topics, especially for small university presses.

With Level 1 funding, the University Press of North Georgia will explore the peer review process for publishing born-digital book length scholarly monographs in the humanities in order to encourage their support, acceptance, and use in academia. The expected result will be an increase in the creation and dissemination of scholarly research in the humanities, thus positively assisting scholars and university administrators involved in the tenure process, as well as editors, librarians, and graduate students. Our project will leverage the expertise available at small university presses and build their capacity to encourage more scholarly publishing in the humanities. We will utilize a current working group of university presses focused on electronic publishing, the Consortium of Open Access Textbooks, and partner specifically with the University Press of Florida, Wayne State University Press, and the University Press of Akron to complete this project.

[Grant products] [Media coverage]
Project fields: Communications
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $24,923 (approved); $24,923 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 7/31/2013

CUNY Research Foundation, College of Staten Island (Staten Island, NY 10314-6609)
Christina Tortora (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51543-12
A prototype of a syntactically annotated corpus of Appalachian English

To support: The continued development of a database of syntactically annotated Appalachian English that aligns speech files to text transcriptions.

This project aims to create an innovative database with a new approach to the analysis of dialect data, furthering research in linguistics and in other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. The ultimate product will be an on-line, freely accessible, ~1,000,000 word, "syntactically annotated" (or "parsed") corpus of Appalachian speech. A syntactically annotated corpus is a body of text which has been annotated with syntactic tags; such annotation assigns syntactic structure to the text, allowing the user to find and statistically study lexical and syntactic configurations of any type. This project would create the first such corpus of Appalachian speech, and will also be of use to educators interested in the vocabulary and grammar of Appalachian English, and to scholars investigating the sociology or social history of the Appalachian region. It will be made available to the public, and will be searchable with open-source, free, and fully accessible software.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $44,169 (approved); $44,169 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 5/31/2014

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51548-12
[View white paper]
Digital Humanities in the Classroom: Bridging the Gap between Teaching and Research

To support: The early-stage development of a collaborative transcription, translation, and editing platform for Latin and ancient Greek texts. With this project, undergraduate and graduate students would participate in the creation of digital editions for inclusion in the Perseus Digital Library.

The Department of Classics at Tufts University seeks level II funding to design and test an integrated platform on which students will collaboratively transcribe, edit, and translate Latin and Greek texts, creating vetted open source digital editions. This project, while giving students the opportunity to work with original untranslated documents, also contributes to the efforts of the scholarly community worldwide to meet the challenge of publishing large numbers of primary source documents online while preserving high editorial standards. The students' work will be vetted by experts, encoded in XML TEI following best practices in the Digital Humanities, and published online in the Tufts Digital Library and the Perseus Digital Library, which receives more than 700,000 visits a month. The integrated platform will be made available as open-source software and can be used as a model for editing and translating any source documents in any language and any Humanities field.

Project fields: Classics
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 8/31/2014

Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation (Springfield, IL 62701-1004)
Patrick Juola (Co Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present); Daniel Stowell (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51556-12
[View white paper]
Is That You, Mr. Lincoln?: Applying Authorship Attribution to the Early Political Writings of Abraham Lincoln

To support: The application of several automated authorship attribution tests to determine if Abraham Lincoln may have written anonymous or pseudonymous newspaper articles early in his political career.

The words of the Gettysburg Address and Second Inaugural steadied a nation consumed by civil war and have since encouraged countless millions around the globe in their struggles for democracy and equality; however, Abraham Lincoln did not always write to inspire. Both his contemporaries and subsequent historians have suggested that as a young Illinois legislator, Lincoln frequently wrote vicious, and oftentimes libelous, newspaper articles and published them anonymously or with a pseudonym. Thus far, however, no historian has conducted a systematic search of relevant newspapers or developed a way to identify which articles Lincoln authored. This project proposes a solution. By merging two areas of the humanities, history and linguistics, this project will apply a series of innovative authorship attribution tests to the question of which anonymous and pseudonymous newspaper articles Lincoln wrote early in his career.

Participating institutions
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation (Springfield, IL) - Applicant/Grantee
Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA) - Participating institution
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $57,000 (approved); $57,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 6/30/2013

Funding details
Original grant (2012) $50,000
Supplement (2012) $7,000

University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
George Williams (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51559-12
[View white paper]
Making the Digital Humanities More Open

To support: The development of a tool to make digital texts in the humanities accessible to visually impaired readers by converting text into braille.

BrailleSC will undertake its second stage of development by designing and deploying a WordPress-based accessibility tool that will create braille content for endusers who are blind or low vision. Specifically, we plan to extend the use of Anthologize--a free and open source plug-in for WordPress that currently translates any RSS text into PDF, ePub, HTML, or TEI--to include the conversion of text to braille. As a result, we will not only make it easy for content creators to convert a text into braille, thereby extending humanities content to hundreds of thousands of visually disabled readers, but we will also experiment with making braille available visually through the WordPress interface. In partnership with the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland, College Park, we will continue to model the ways in which digital humanities projects should be designed and implemented with the needs of disabled users in mind.

Project fields: Communications
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,339 (approved); $49,339 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 8/31/2013

University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Natalie Houston (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51560-12
[View white paper]
The Visual Page

To support: A book history project that seeks to identify and analyze visual features of books such as margins, spacing, and typeface, using as a test case approximately 60,000 page images from 300 books of Victorian poetry printed between 1860 and 1880.

All printed texts convey meaning through both linguistic and graphic signs, but existing tools for computational text analysis focus only on the linguistic content. The Visual Page will develop a prototype application to identify and analyze visual features in digitized Victorian books of poetry, such as margin space, line indentation, and typeface attributes. This will enable scholars to compare documents, identify distinctive or typical books, and track historical changes and influence over very large sets of digitized texts. Current research into such questions is limited by our human capacity to view and compare only a fairly small number of texts at one time. Thus our understanding of their historical significance is based on limited information. Computer analysis can point to significant patterns and trends over a much larger set of texts, which will ultimately transform our understanding of Victorian print culture and the humanities at large.

Project fields: British Literature
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,955 (approved); $43,870 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-1168)
Katherine Gossett (Co Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present); Liza Potts (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51561-12
[View white paper]
Building an Open-Source Archive for Born-Digital Dissertations

To support: A three-day workshop to explore relevant issues and identify requirements for the development of an archive for the preservation of dissertations that incorporate interactive or dynamic digital media.

This proposal for a Level I Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant would support an interdisciplinary workshop aimed at identifying the issues, opportunities and requirements for developing an open-source system into which born-digital dissertations (e.g., interactive webtexts, software, games, etc.) can be deposited and maintained, and through which they can be accessed and cross-referenced. The workshop will build upon the framework set up by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLDT) and the United States Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Association (USETDA), which support the creation and dissemination of digital dissertations, but, despite best efforts, do not currently offer a comprehensive, central repository or index of born-digital dissertations such as exists for print (e.g., Proquest). One of the primary goals for this workshop will be to develop a plan for the development of such a tool as well as the identification of a project advisory board.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $25,000 (approved); $24,570 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 3/31/2013

Bard Graduate Center (New York, NY 10024-3602)
Aaron Glass (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51565-12
[View white paper]
The Distributed Text: An Annotated Digital Edition of Franz Boas’ Pioneering Ethnography

To support: Early-stage development of a digital edition of Franz Boas' The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians, which will be annotated extensively by joining distributed collections from archival and museum collections.

Under the rubric of a new Franz Boas Critical Edition book series, we propose to reprint and annotate Boas's important 1897 monograph The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians in both print and as a multimedia website. Framed with scholarly essays and contemporary Kwakwaka'wakw perspectives, the new editions will re-unite the original text with widely distributed archival and museum collections that shed new light on the book. This project will reveal the nature of co-authorship in Boas's work, use multimedia to return sensory richness to his ethnography, and make this historic research more relevant to contemporary scholars and indigenous communities. The Digital Humanities Start Up Grant (level II) will be used to fund a workshop to plan the digital edition; for design of a wiki for collaborative research; for travel to determine the full range of materials to be digitized; for production of sample webpages to test interfaces and functionality; for salary toward project administration and digital technology assistance; and for development of innovative software to reproduce and render searchable the large amounts of Kwakw'ala-language materials.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2012 – 8/31/2013

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Travis Brown (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51568-12
[View white paper]
Active OCR: Tightening the Loop in Human Computing for OCR Correction

To support: The development of a proof-of-concept correction tool to improve optical character recognition in humanities text collections.

We propose a proof-of-concept application that will experiment with the use of active learning and other iterative techniques for the correction of eighteenth-century texts provided by the HathiTrust Digital Library and the 2,231 ECCO text transcriptions released into the public domain by Gale and distributed by the Text Creation Partnership (TCP) and 18thConnect. In an application based on active learning or a similar approach, the user could identify dozens or hundreds of difficult characters that appear in the articles from that same time period, and the system would use this new knowledge to improve optical character recognition (OCR) across the entire corpus. A portion of our efforts will focus on the need to incentivize engagement in tasks of this type, whether they are traditionally crowdsourced or through a more active, iterative process like the one we propose. We intend to examine how explorations of a users' preferences can improve their engagement with corpora of materials.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $41,906 (approved); $41,906 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2012 – 5/31/2014

SUNY Research Foundation, University at Buffalo (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)
Neil Coffee (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51570-12
[View white paper]
Tesserae: A Search Engine for Allusion

To support: The early stage development of a computational tool to detect and analyze literary allusions, with an initial focus on Latin and ancient Greek.

The Tesserae Project is an interdisciplinary research effort employing computational methods to detect and analyze literary allusion (a form of text reuse) currently focusing on Latin and ancient Greek. The Project seeks funding to create a fully-functional, publicly available tool to detect similar phrases in two texts at rates that approach those of literary commentators. To this end, funding will support adding sensitivity to word meaning, phrase context, and sound similarity. Detection rate improvements will be measured against a set of 3000 parallel phrases previously graded for literary significance. A revised website will inform researchers of research results and new functions of the tool. The project team will give presentations and produce publications explaining the function, results, and theoretical consequences of the fully operational tool. This work is preliminary to an out-year Implementation Phase that will see the addition of English, French, Italian, and Spanish.

Project fields: Classical Literature
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,835 (approved); $49,835 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 2/28/2014

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Jon Miller (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51571-12
[View white paper]
Essays in Visual History: Making Use of the International Mission Photography Archive

To support: A workshop in the summer of 2012 that would design the template and protocols guiding the creation of visual essays that would draw from the extensive collections of the International Mission Photography Archive.

An extraordinary resource for comparative research in the humanities can be found in the historical images that comprise the International Mission Photography Archive (IMPA). The 62,000 photographs presently in the database represent cultures across Africa, India, China, Korea, Japan, Oceania, the Caribbean, and Papua New Guinea. The requested NEH Level 1 start-up grant will support a workshop devoted to the design of a series of visual essays authored by accomplished scholars who will use images from IMPA to explore topics in their areas of expertise. Called Essays in Visual History, the series will be hosted by the USC Digital Library and featured on the website of the Center for Religion and Civic Culture (CRCC). The workshop will explore relationships with other publication initiatives at USC, specifically those under development by the Center for Transformative Scholarship and The Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, which offer opportunities to maximize the visibility of the of the proposed series.

Project fields: History of Religion
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $25,000 (approved); $22,450 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 9/30/2013

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
James Dickie (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - 07/09/2012); Trevor Munoz (Project Director, 07/10/2012 - present)
HD-51573-12
[View white paper]
ANGLES: A web-based XML Editor

To support: The further development of a web-based editing tool for scholarly editors and students to use to prepare humanities texts with markup based on the Text Encoding Initiative.

ANGLES: A web-based XML Editor proposes a bridge between humanities centers who have greater resources to program scholarly software and the scholars who form the core user community for such software through their teaching and research. We propose a solution to the adoption gap that has developed between scholars with digital materials and technical developers designing the applications scholars are using in their research. By combining the model of intensive code development (a.k.a. the "code sprint") with testing and feedback by domain experts gathered at nationally recognized disciplinary conferences, we will develop a web-based editor for working with XML markup through engagement with the large and active community of scholars, teachers and developers who work with the TEI.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,929 (approved); $31,507 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013

University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Patricia Fumerton (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present); Carl Stahmer (Co Project Director, 12/18/2013 - present)
HD-51581-12
[View white paper]
English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA): "Ballad Illustration Archive"

To support: The adaptation of image-oriented computer vision software in order to facilitate more effective cataloging and discovery of similar but distinct illustrations found within the English Broadside Ballad Archive.

Focusing on the expansive English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu, containing over 2,000 distinct 17th-century woodcut illustrations, our proposed Ballad Illustration Archive (BIA) will allow unprecedented access to these hard-to-access images that are important cultural and artistic productions. Our project will make significant technological inroads through innovative integration of computer vision software and human cataloguing, delivering to the end-user a product which is technically cutting-edge and marked by careful scholarship. It will thus enable enhanced research in multiple humanities disciplines and also make these compelling images available to the interested non-specialist public. Ultimately, we see this project expanding to include a wider variety of early modern illustrations; we also expect it to expand the possibilities for future digital scholarship.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2012 – 3/31/2014

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701)
Jesse Casana (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51590-12
[View white paper]
Mapping archaeological landscapes through aerial thermographic imaging

To support: Research into the best techniques for using aerial thermographic imaging to support archeological research, with tests to be run at sites in Cyprus, Dubai, and South Dakota.

This project aims to develop techniques for efficient, high-resolution aerial thermal infrared imaging of archaeological sites and surrounding landscapes. Archaeologists have been aware since the 1970s that images which record thermal wavelengths of light can reveal surface and buried archaeological features that are otherwise invisible, but the costs and difficulty of the technology has made its application beyond the reach of most scholars. This project will develop methods for collecting high-resolution thermal infrared images using a specialized camera mounted on a remote-controlled unmanned aerial vehicle. Conducting surveys at archaeological sites in three environmentally and culturally distinct regions--Cyprus, Dubai and South Dakota--our results will demonstrate the potential and limitations of the technology in a variety of archaeological contexts, offer guidelines for executing surveys and processing results, and serve as a blueprint for other investigators in the future.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $49,999 (approved); $49,999 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2012 – 7/31/2014

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10018)
Matthew Knutzen (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51618-12
[View white paper]
NYC Chronology of Place, a Linked Open Data Gazetteer

To support: The development of a gazetteer for New York City -- a digital dictionary of place names which will allow scholars, students, teachers, and the public to find and connect historic information about the city from the NYPL collection.

The New York Public Library seeks to build NYC Chronology of Place, a Linked Open Data gazetteer, enabling researchers to connect historical geographic places to fixed locations, and use the results to enhance their work. Gazetteers are dictionaries of place names which, when digital, act as location databases; services like Google Maps rely on gazetteers to link named places to map coordinates, the referential web of geography. In this project, NYPL will make an important contribution to the field, building a gazetteer to create, verify, and connect data about New York City’s places through time, from the early Lenape names to the skyscraper now being built at One World Trade Center. This project will help resolve the problem that place names, boundaries, and even natural features change over time. This project will extend NYPL’s work converting historical maps into data via a historical gazetteer.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2012 – 7/31/2013

University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)
Conrad Rudolph (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51625-12
[View white paper]
FACES: Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems

To support: A Level 1 project that will test the use of facial recognition software in the context of art history, with a long-term goal of assisting in the identification of human subjects in portraiture.

In recent years, a great deal of attention has been paid in art history to the face both theoretically and historically, especially the portrait and above all the portrait bust. At the same time, an enormous amount of research has been conducted on face recognition technology (the use of computerized evaluation systems for the automatic identification of a human face from a digital image). But, to the best of our knowledge, no one has yet attempted to join these two developments in an interdisciplinary way, applying cutting-edge face recognition technology to works of art, specifically portraiture. Before the advent of photography, portraits were, almost by definition, depictions of people who were important in their own worlds. But as a walk through almost any major museum will show, a large number of these portraits from before the nineteenth century--many of them great works of art--have lost the identities of their subjects through the fortunes of time.

Project fields: Arts, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $25,000 (approved); $25,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2012 – 5/31/2014

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Jennifer Guiliano (Project Director, 10/03/2011 - present)
HD-51627-12
[View white paper]
Topic Modeling for Humanities Research

To support: A workshop and follow-up activities for 50 participants on the use of topic modeling with large-scale humanities datasets as a method of analysis for humanities scholarship.

Topic Modeling for Humanities Research, a one-day workshop, will facilitate a unique opportunity for cross-fertilization, information exchange, and collaboration between and among humanities scholars and researchers in natural language processing on the subject of topic modeling applications and methods. The workshop will be organized into three primary areas: 1) an overview of how topic modeling is currently being used in the humanities; 2) an inventory of extensions of the LDA model that have particular relevance for humanities research questions; and 3) a discussion of software implementations, toolkits, and interfaces.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amounts: $24,808 (approved); $24,802 (awarded)
Grant period: 5/1/2012 – 4/30/2013

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