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Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants*
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Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85287-0001)
John Howard (Project Director, 03/27/2009 - 10/22/2009); Keith Kintigh (Project Director, 10/23/2009 - present)
PX-50022-09
TAG: Transatlantic Archaeology Gateway

To support: The development of tools for trans-Atlantic cross-searching and semantic interoperability between the two major archives of born-digital archaeological data in the United States and United Kingdom.

The TAG project aims to develop an infrastructure to support, bring together and enhance digital content funded in the USA and England/Wales. It will build initially on existing web services registries maintained by the ADS for the historic environment sector in Europe and extends these for North American usage. A web services application will then be developed to create a standards-compliant cross-search facility for metadata records held by ADS (for the UK) and tDAR (for the USA) covering the archaeology of England and the United States. In a second stage a richer and deeper web services cross-search facility will be developed for faunal remains databases in England and the USA, providing an architecture to enable deep data mining as well as a valuable research tool for archaeologists in the UK and USA. Having been established in two national digital archive services the long-term sustainability and promotion of the service is also secured for future development and enhancement.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $134,879 (approved); $134,879 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 7/31/2011

American Museum of Natural History (New York, NY 10024-5193)
David Kohn (Project Director, 03/27/2009 - present)
PX-50026-09
[View white paper]
Digitizing Darwin's Library

To support: The digital reconstruction of Charles Darwin's working library as it stood at the end of his life, to include the presentation of the complex array of annotations throughout his working texts.

This project which aims to reconstruct, digitally, Charles Darwin's working library as it stood at the end of his life's journey, will open up and make accessible to students of the humanities and the sciences whole new dimensions of Darwin's thinking. Over 700 of Darwin's most heavily annotated books are held at Cambridge University Library. The abundant hand-written notes on these books were painstakingly transcribed in the late 1980s. Now, thanks to high-resolution digital imagery, and an international partnership of Cambridge, the Natural History Museum in London, the Biodiversity Heritage Library-a consortium of natural history libraries, and the Darwin Digital Library of Evolution-an online scholarly edition of Darwin's manuscripts based at the American Museum of Natural History, Darwin's transcribed marginalia will be digitally married with scanned books from his own library and with scanned surrogate volumes of the exact editions Darwin owned from the partnership's libraries.

Project fields: History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $119,999 (approved); $119,999 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2009 – 1/31/2011

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510)
Ann Okerson (Project Director, 03/27/2009 - present)
PX-50046-09
A Virtual Manuscript Reading Room

To support: A pilot project to create an archive of and gateway to important manuscripts, related manuscript catalogs, and historical dictionaries in Arabic and Persian (19,800 pages) held separately in the collections at Yale University and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).

Yale and SOAS propose to build a virtual manuscript reading room that will 1) create an integrated set of full-text digital resources supporting manuscript research from manuscript catalogs and dictionaries by converting materials in Arabic, Persian, and Western scripts (Latin, German, Spanish, and French) and depositing these into searchable repositories; 2) augment existing digital collections of Arabic and Persian manuscripts by digitizing selected historical manuscripts, which highlight the contribution made to world knowledge by Middle Eastern philosophers, physicians, and scientists; and 3) develop an infrastructure, scalable for other collections rich in manuscripts and reference materials, to integrate manuscripts with related reference resources by building tools to analyze digitized materials and construct internal cross-references for connecting the materials in the archive. Cross-collection searching will enable patrons to explore the united collections simultaneously.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $103,168 (approved); $103,168 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2009 – 2/28/2011

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Roger Bagnall (Project Director, 11/30/2007 - present)
PX-50003-08
Concordia

The Centre for Computing in the Humanities at King's College, London joins the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University in responding to the NEH/JISC call for innovative digitization projects. Concordia is a creative and time-critical transatlantic collaboration that advances digitization priorities along two complementary axes: dissemination of key epigraphical, papyrological, and geographic resources for Greek and Roman culture in North Africa, and piloting of reusable, standard techniques for cyberinfrastructure. This demonstration project unites an array of separately produced and hosted primary source collections with a unique geographic dataset to provide search and analysis presently available only in a few special-purpose, closed systems. The content of three existing, respected collections (including 50,000 papyrological and 3,000 epigraphic texts) are brought together with open-source software and newly digitized content (an additional 950 epigraphic texts plus complete topographic and toponymic records for over 3,000 historical geographic features) to create an unparalleled research resource for Greek and Roman Libya and Egypt. Concordia uses basic Web architecture and standard formats (XHTML, EpiDoc/TEI XML, and Atom+GeoRSS). The project would catalyze the rapid establishment of a simple, Web-based research infrastructure which takes us beyond discrete Web pages and bland hyperlinks to actionable electronic citation and cross-project discovery without continued waiting for mature international repository networks or the putative 'semantic Web'. The results of this project would be freely accessible on the Web.

Project fields: Ancient History
Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $129,828 (approved); $129,828 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2008 – 3/31/2010

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Richard Kuhta (Project Director, 11/30/2007 - 01/25/2009); Stephen Enniss (Project Director, 01/26/2009 - present)
PX-50010-08
Shakespeare Quartos Archive

To support: The creation of a digital archive of pre-1641 quarto editions of Shakespeare's plays with a prototype for an interactive interface, toolset, and enhanced functionality.

The University of Oxford and the Folger Shakespeare Library propose a transatlantic digital collaboration to create the Shakespeare Quartos Archive. The one-year project will reunite all seventy-five pre-1641 quarto editions of Shakespeare's plays into a single online collection with contributions from the world's leading repositories in the United Kingdom and United States. The initiative includes development of a user interface and sophisticated digital toolset with research and teaching functions. The prototype for full functionality will embrace all thirty-two pre-1641 copies of "Hamlet" held by the participating libraries and result in a technologically advanced interface facilitating close examination and comparison of these internationally significant treasures. The Shakespeare Quartos Archive will be freely available to scholars, teachers, students, and actors across the globe.

Project fields: British Literature
Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $119,598 (approved); $119,598 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2008 – 9/30/2009

Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc. (Charlottesville, VA 22902-0316)
Jillian Galle (Project Director, 11/30/2007 - present)
PX-50011-08
The St. Kitts-Nevis Digital Archaeology Initiative

To support: The development of an integrated digital archive of diverse archaeological and historical data related to the experiences of African slaves who labored on 17th-, 18th- and 19th-century sugar plantations in the Caribbean.

The St. Kitts-Nevis Digital Archaeology Initiative is an innovative collaborative project designed to further scholarship on slavery. An international team of scholars from the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery at the Thomas Jefferson Foundation in Charlottesville, Virginia, the University of Southampton's Nevis Heritage Project, and the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool will digitize and deliver on the Web information from two eighteenth-century plantations and their slave villages, one located on Nevis and the other on St. Kitts. The result will be a first-of-its-kind digital collection of fully searchable archaeological and historical data from multiple slave village sites in the Caribbean. The teams will create a robust digital archive of archaeological and historical data through use of rigorous and well-defined cataloging standards and metadata, insuring interoperability and analytical comparability. DAACS archaeological analysts will catalog all of the archaeological materials to DAACS standards. Ceramicists from the University of Southampton and University of Tennessee will analyze and digitize all slave-made coarse earthenware ceramics. All recovered faunal remains will be digitized at Colonial Williamsburg's Zooarchaeological Laboratory. The rich documentary record of these plantations will be digitized in archives in the United Kingdom and on Nevis and St. Kitts. Both archaeological and documentary data will be freely accessible through two Web-based portals: the research-oriented DAACS Web site and the publicly-oriented International Slavery Museum Web site.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $132,832 (approved); $132,832 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2008 – 3/31/2009

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory Crane (Project Director, 11/30/2007 - present)
PX-50013-08
PhiloGrid: Creating a Virtual Research Environment for Classics

To support: Creation of a digital collection of fragmentary writings of Greek historians and development of a virtual research environment for Greco-Roman antiquity using grid technologies that would be broadly applicable to other humanities disciplines.

[A grid is a computing architecture that coordinates large numbers of computers and data to act as a single large computer. It enables individuals or institutions grouped as virtual organizations to dynamically share computational resources.] Philogrid, a collaboration of the Perseus Digital Library (DL) at Tufts University in the United States and the Internet Centre at Imperial College London in the United Kingdom, proposes to create an expandable, grid-enabled, Web service-driven virtual research environment for Greco-Roman antiquity based initially upon open source texts and services from the Perseus DL. First, we will add to the Perseus DL the writings of Greek historians that exist only in fragmentary form. This task goes beyond simple data entry: we will create the first major digital collection of fragmentary authors designed from the start to interact with multiple source editions. Second, we will create a repository of philological data about the Greco-Roman world seeded with twenty years' worth of Perseus materials. The objects that we create will not only include books but every labeled object within each logical document. Third, we will convert the workflow that has evolved over the past ten years to process textual materials in Perseus into a grid-enabled workflow based on Web services that can be applied to and customized for many collections. Although this project will concentrate on the classics collections in the Perseus DL, the new workflows will also process non-classical Perseus content, and will thus from the start demonstrate their generality. The development process will follow a strategy already successfully employed in e-Science projects at the Imperial College Internet Centre. It will consist of conversion of the Perseus workflow and tools into a Web service environment, in which the Perseus workflow is analyzed into steps, each of which is published as a Web service with a configurable API. A workflow mirroring the Perseus workflow will then be composed and fine-tuned using model data from Perseus and sample data from the digitization within the current scope of this project. The results of this project would be freely accessible on the Web.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Classical Literature
Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $119,992 (approved); $119,992 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2008 – 8/31/2010

Internet Archive (San Francisco, CA 94129-1711)
Kristin Negulescu (Project Director, 11/30/2007 - present)
PX-50016-08
The World Wide Web of Humanities

To support: Development of tools and methodologies for indexing and analyzing the textual parts of larger digital collections, more focused browsing ("crawling") of the Web, and unified access to data resources.

The Internet Archive (IA) houses one of the largest publicly accessible collections of digital artifacts in the world, with more than 110 billion Web captures that include content from more than 65 million Web sites in over 40 languages. In addition, IA maintains a collection of more than one million public domain texts, thousands of still and moving images, and numerous multimedia software titles. IA plays an active role in the development of digital archiving standards and open-source tools and participates in the Open Content Alliance and the International Internet Preservation Consortium. The English partners in the project are the Oxford Internet Institute, which specializes in researching the effects of the Web and technology on scholarship and teaching, and Hanzo, a company focused on advanced Web archiving technologies. The proposed project would use advanced hyperlink analysis and data mining to study how research in the digital humanities has been framed, funded, and implemented internationally over time. The resulting data would be archived in a specialized collection of several million Uniform Resource Identifiers that would be made available for future research and analysis. The collection would include a range of content such as digital humanities project Web sites and tools, portals, datasets, and research reports. In addition to the data archive outlining the development and current state of the humanities on the Web, the applicant would index the collection for full-text search, encode the indexed data, and make available an interface and tools for future research. All these resources would be freely available on the Web.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grants
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $106,395 (approved); $106,395 (awarded)
Grant period: 4/1/2008 – 3/31/2009

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