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Funded Projects Query Form
19 matches

Program: Media Projects Development*
Date range: 2015-2018
Sort order: Award year, descending

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TD-261053-18

International Documentary Association (Los Angeles, CA 90010-2207)
Ben Loeterman (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Winchelldom: The World of Walter Winchell

Development of a one-hour documentary and companion website about newspaper columnist and radio commentator Walter Winchell (1897–1972).

Project fields:
Cultural History; Journalism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$74,995 (approved)
$74,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


TD-253976-17

Women Make Movies, Inc. (New York, NY 10001-5059)
Grace Raso (Project Director: August 2016 to present)

Diego & Frida in Detroit

To support Diego & Frida in Detroit, a feature documentary exploring the life and art of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo during their time in 1930s Detroit, and the indelible impression they left on the cultural identity and political history of the city and its people. In Rivera’s Detroit Industry murals, he depicted Detroit’s working class, and its many races and ethnicities, on the rarefied walls of the city’s art museum—legitimizing their long-ignored cultural and historical contributions and defining Detroit’s cultural identity. Frida Kahlo faced some of her most challenging life events while living in Detroit, but through this adversity created some of her most critically acclaimed works of art and established a personal style that would define her work until the end life—changing the face of modern art along with it. Together, they brought the people of Detroit into a meaningful relationship with an art that was “theirs,” a legacy that has lasts to the present day.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural History; Labor History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$65,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


TD-256070-17

International Documentary Association (Los Angeles, CA 90010-2207)
Trisha Ziff (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Oaxacalifornia: The Return

The development of a script for a 90-minute documentary film that would explore the lives of a family of Mexican immigrants living in Fresno, California.

In 1994 we completed Oaxacalifornia, supported by the California Council of Humanities and IMCINE-Mexico; a documentary about the Mejia family from the Mixteca, Oaxaca, who came undocumented to the U.S. looking for work. We met them after they became citizens visiting the Mixteca with their children for the summer. Our original film explored their worlds; sense of identity, culture, language and their hopes for the future. Oaxacalifornia: The Return; meets the Mejia's 23 years later; drawing on material from the original film, we look at the changes. Today all three children are married, there are seven grandchildren, none of whom have visited Mexico, nor speak Spanish. They live in Fresno, with the exception of the youngest daughter Adriana who left home, completed a university degree and married a U.S. marine. The grandchildren are second generation, Mexican-American but describe themselves as American.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Latin American Studies

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$48,153 (approved)
$48,153 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 4/30/2018


TD-256096-17

Filmmakers Collaborative, Inc. (Melrose, MA 02176-3933)
Kathryn P. Dietz (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Cartooning America: The Fleischer Brothers Story

Development of a script for a feature-length documentary on the Fleischer brothers, a family of artists and producers who transformed the aesthetics and business of animation.

Cartooning America: The Fleischer Brothers Story is a feature documentary about a remarkable family of artists and inventors who revolutionized animation and brought us some of the most beloved cartoon characters of all time. Their cartoons were funny, sometimes surreal, and pure joy, with characters like Betty Boop, Popeye, and Superman who have become household names. But the Fleischers themselves are less known, and our documentary will change this, introducing a wide national audience to Max, Dave, Lou, Charlie, and Joe Fleischer, who created Fleischer Studios and a roster of characters who reflected the rough and tumble sensibilities of their own Jewish immigrant neighborhood in Brooklyn, NY. Their films were urban, modern, chaotic, and rude, and they painted a picture of what it meant to be American at the beginning of the 20th century.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 4/30/2018


TD-256254-17

Women Make Movies, Inc. (New York, NY 10001-5059)
Stephanie Black (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Jamaica Kincaid Documentary

Development of an 86-minute documentary film on the life and accomplishments of Jamaica Kincaid, an Antiguan-born novelist and poet.

We are requesting a $75,000 development grant in support of an 86-minute documentary film on the life & work of Caribbean writer Jamaica Kincaid. The documentary will trace her life from her childhood in colonial Antigua,to working as an au pair in Scarsdale, N.Y. as a teenager, to becoming the first black female staff writer for The New Yorker at age 26. Kincaid’s extraordinary path, her unique literary & frequently controversial voice will be brought to life through evocative documentary images set to narrated audio excerpts from her novels, rare archival material, interviews with scholars, and cinema verite footage reflecting daily life of the now 67-year-old writer. If awarded, the grant will support development of the film's content with literary, historical, and social science scholars; pre-interviews & archival research; a sample reel; & the writing of a comprehensive script outline.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Literature, Other; Public History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 4/30/2019


TD-256288-17

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Sara Bolder (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Crip Camp: A Documentary

Scripting of a 90-minute documentary that chronicles the 1960s and early 1970s summer camp experience of teens with disabilities and follows the lives of several campers, some of whom became lifelong civil rights advocates for people with disabilities.

Just down the road from Woodstock, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, a parallel revolution blossomed in a ramshackle summer camp for disabled teenagers. Steeped in humor and the music of the era, Crip Camp explores the universal experience of summer camp awakenings that would transform lives and shape the future of the disability rights movement. Told from the point of view of former camper Jim LeBrecht, the film traces the journeys of campers—both successful and tragic—up to the present day, in this compelling and untold story of a powerful journey towards inclusion.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 3/31/2018


TD-256275-17

Inside Out Media (Oakland, CA 94610-1839)
Marc Shaffer (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Splitting the Second: The Brilliant, Eccentric Life of Eadweard Muybridge

Scripting of a 90-minute documentary exploring the life and legacy of 19th-century photographer Eadweard Muybridge.

Splitting the Second: The Brilliant, Eccentric Life of Eadweard Muybridge is a 90-minute documentary and educational project exploring the life, work and legacy of the 19th-century photographer. During Muybridge’s lifetime, America and Europe underwent an unprecedented period of change, driven by an explosion of new technologies, the emergence of science, and the rise of industrial capitalism. Muybridge was an important contributor to this accelerating and shrinking world and has left a legacy of tens of thousands of photographs and a profound influence over our modern visual storytelling culture. His work raises questions that continue to resonate deeply today.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; Film History and Criticism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


TD-230733-16

International Documentary Association (Los Angeles, CA 90010-2207)
Joseph Angier (Project Director: January 2015 to present)

Lives in Vengeance: The True Story of the Searchers

Development of a 90-minute documentary about the making of the classic 1956 film, The Searchers, and the historical events that inspired it.

Lives in Vengeance is an epic American tale that spans two centuries and brings together two of America's most exciting historical eras: the golden age of Hollywood movie-making and the pioneer days of the western frontier that inspired so much of Hollywood's output. It's a documentary that will tell two interconnected stories that span 100 years of Western history. We start in 1950s Hollywood and chronicle the making of the movie classic The Searchers. The production of that film will be the lens to take us back to 19th-century Texas and the true-life stories that inspired it: the brutal kidnapping of Cynthia Ann Parker and the bloody Texas-Comanche wars that changed everything that came after. Our documentary will weave both stories together: the endless struggle to find the kidnapped Cynthia Ann Parker and the making of this iconic film.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


TD-250122-16

Minnesota Public Radio (St. Paul, MN 55101-2217)
Stephen Smith (Project Director: January 2016 to present)

Soldiers for Peace

Development of a one-hour radio documentary, a website, and public programs exploring the antiwar movement among Vietnam War soldiers and veterans during the late 1960s and early 1970s.

American Public Media’s documentary unit, American RadioWorks (ARW), requests a development grant of $75,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to develop Soldiers for Peace (working title), a one-hour, national public radio documentary, companion website and limited series of public events with a total project budget of $118,580. This groundbreaking project will explore the antiwar movement among Vietnam War soldiers and veterans in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Soldiers for Peace is in keeping with the Endowment's Standing Together initiative. This project will make extensive use of humanities themes and scholarship to help contemporary audiences, both civilian and military, better understand the experience of war and the return home. This is a timely topic, as in coming years the nation will mark the 50th anniversaries of events in Vietnam.

Project fields:
Journalism; Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$32,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 12/31/2019


TD-247967-16

International Documentary Association (Los Angeles, CA 90010-2207)
David Zeiger (Project Director: August 2015 to present)

Rebels, Wackos, and Bums...The Student Revolt of the Nineteen Sixties

Development of a feature-length documentary about the student movement of the 1960s.

A feature documentary telling the as yet untold and broadly misunderstood story of the nineteen sixties Student Movement—the largest, most diverse and dynamic social movement in U.S. history. To mold this chaotic time into a dynamic and informative film that takes the audience through the arc of the movement while capturing the mood and spirit of the time as it was felt by its participants, Rebels, Wackos and Bums will weave together two streams: significant events and deeply personal experiences. Relying on archival resources, the film will focus both on key moments (many of which have been forgotten or buried in history), and personal stories told in letters, diaries, personal photos, and even home movies.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 10/31/2016


TD-234884-16

New York Foundation for the Arts (Brooklyn, NY 11201-8301)
David Scott Pultz (Project Director: July 2015 to present)

The Bones Speak

Development of a 55-minute documentary about the role of New York City’s Spring Street Church in the abolitionist movement and about the lives of its congregants.

The Bones Speak is a 55-minute documentary about the archaeological discovery of early 19th-century burial vaults of a former New York City abolitionist and integrated church, and the human remains found there that have undergone DNA and isotope analysis by bioarcheologists.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 11/30/2016


TD-235038-16

Lawrence Arts Center (Lawrence, KS 66044-3042)
Randal Maurice Jelks (Project Director: August 2015 to present)

I, Too, Sing America: Langston Hughes Unfurled

Development of a two-part, 100-minute documentary about Langston Hughes’s life and art.

Langston Hughes (1902-1967) achieved renown for being the first African American to make a living solely from his writing. Consequently, Hughes’s aesthetic and personal reputations have undergone intensive scholarly scrutiny, resulting in a number of interpretations of his public and private selves—including a few that have been featured in documentary films. Many of these representations have fostered the mistaken impression that Hughes was primarily a Harlem Renaissance-era poet. The Dream Documentary Collective, formed to create a two-part documentary film about Hughes’s life and art, dispels this overly simplistic view of Hughes’s voluminous career. In collaboration with the Lawrence Arts Center, we propose to explore the multiple ways in which Hughes constructed his identity, participated in the international arts scene, and engaged the American Dream in a documentary film entitled, I, Too, Sing America: Langston Hughes Unfurled.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; American Literature

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


TD-235104-16

Southern Documentary Fund (Durham, NC 27702-3622)
Ashley Blair York (Project Director: August 2015 to present)

A History of Rural Appalachian Culture

Development of a feature-length documentary film focusing on media portrayals of American mountain and rural populations over the past one hundred years.

The Hollywood Hillbilly is a feature-length documentary intended for public television broadcast. The film examines representations of Appalachia in the media as constructed over the past century. The documentary uncovers the origins of the American “hillbilly” archetype, explores the impact of these representations in Appalachia and beyond, reveals how this shape-shifting icon reflects the evolution of America’s aspirational self-image over the decades, and asks critical questions about our role as journalists and storytellers in representing the communities we portray. Anchored in a historical framework, the project seeks to engage audiences through an exploration of humanities ideas, themes, and scholarship; raise a multitude of questions related to regional and rural identity and socio-economic class; and offer an urgent exploration of how we see and think about white poverty in rural America.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; History, General; Rural Studies

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 9/30/2016


TD-250107-16

Documentary Educational Resources (Watertown, MA 02472-2554)
Margo Guernsey (Project Director: January 2016 to present)

The Price of Survival: A Documentary Film About Pauli Murray

Development of a one-hour documentary film script on the life, work, and historical impact of civil rights activist Pauli Murray.

This is a request for $75,000 for the development of a script for The Price of Survival, a one-hour documentary film appropriate for public television about Pauli Murray, a leading twentieth century intellectual. Murray advocated the only way to root out inequality was to address race and gender discrimination simultaneously. As a civil rights leader, she is credited with helping to develop direct non-violent action in the 1930s as a strategy for civil rights that would pave the way for the movement of the 50s and 60s. As a lawyer she is the architect of modern feminist legal theory. As a writer and theologian, she has left us with groundbreaking material on American democracy and identity. Privately, Murray feared that her homosexual identity could ruin her career or worse. The film weaves Murray’s diaries, private notes, poetry, and autobiography into a narrative that takes viewers on a journey through the shifting social boundaries and cultural landscape of twentieth-century America

Project fields:
African American History; American Studies; Women's History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


TD-250108-16

Women in Film & Video, Inc. (Washington, DC 20016-1851)
Leola Calzolai-Stewart (Project Director: January 2016 to present)

Black Diplomacy

Development of a one-hour documentary about the contributions of African American diplomats during the Cold War.

Requesting development grant for Black Diplomacy, a one-hour documentary, to examine the contributions of African American diplomats during the Cold War period, a time when the issues of race, democracy, and diplomacy converged and the US was faced with the challenge of reconciling its democratic ideals with its social reality. Our three main protagonists: Ambassador Edward R. Dudley, Ambassador Terence Todman, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and Director of the United States Information Agency, Carl T. Rowan, will reveal the successes and failures of black envoys who served in one of the least integrated federal agencies, the Department of State. Their experiences will be viewed through the lens of W.E.B. Du Bois' concept of double consciousness. The film also examines the impact of race on foreign policy, the need for diverse representation of our country overseas, and the trailblazing careers of the diplomats who helped pave the way towards substantive change.

Project fields:
African American History; Diplomatic History; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 8/1/2017


TD-250065-16

Catticus Corporation (Berkeley, CA 94710-2597)
Jason Cohn (Project Director: January 2016 to present)

Modernism Inc.

Development of a one-hour documentary film that examines the life and work of architect and industrial designer Eliot Noyes.

Modernism, Inc., explores the rise and fall of American Modernism through the lens of one of its most influential practitioners, Eliot Noyes, who built the design programs for the likes of IBM, Westinghouse, and Mobil Oil. The film weaves Noyes’ fascinating personal story with the broader context of corporate America’s fulsome embrace of modernism during the period of postwar economic expansion and culminates in the under-documented backlash against Noyes and his generation of modernists during the counter-cultural upheaval of the Vietnam era.

Project fields:
Architecture; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 7/31/2018


TD-233990-15

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4629)
Robert C. Vaughan (Project Director: May 2015 to present)

Gone to Vietnam: Personal Chronicles of Veterans

Fifty years after the first U. S. ground troops landed in Vietnam, the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (VFH) is giving Americans a new way to view that war without the filters of politics or the national news media. With Good Reason (WGR), produced by VFH, is recording oral histories with scores of Vietnam veterans from all branches of the military, along with their families and Vietnamese allies. The resultwill be sound rich radio documentaries to share with a national radio audience, braodcast, webcast, and podcast.

Project fields:

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


TD-228339-15

New York Foundation for the Arts (Brooklyn, NY 11201-8301)
Oren D. Rudavsky (Project Director: August 2014 to present)

Joseph Pulitzer: A Voice of the People

The development of a 90-minute television documentary that examines the career of publisher Joseph Pulitzer and the emergence of modern mass media in late 19th- and early 20th-century America.

"Joseph Pulitzer: A Voice of the People" is a 90-minute documentary film that will explore the life and work of the pioneering publisher and the rise of the modern mass newspaper.

Project fields:
Journalism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2015 – 10/31/2015


TD-228514-15

Interfaze Educational Productions, Inc. (Berkeley, CA 94710-3104)
Rick Tejada-Flores (Project Director: August 2014 to present)

Unspeakable: The Life of Junius Wilson

Development of a 60-minute documentary on Junius Wilson (1908-2001), a deaf African American man from North Carolina who was convicted of attempted rape and spent most of his life institutionalized.

Junius Wilson, a deaf African man, was ruled insane and sent to a segregated mental institution where he would be castrated and remain for 67 years. He was unable to communicate because he spoke a form of sign language only taught to black people. Wilson's powerful story offers a lens to explore what happens when racial discrimination, marginalization of people with disabilities and the primitive conditions of mental health treatment in the early 20th century interact and reinforce each other. A holistic understanding of the forces that shaped Junius Wilson's life offers a model to understand the issues that our society faces today.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 3/31/2017