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Funded Projects Query Form
24 matches

Grant programs:Media Projects Development*
Date range: 2019-2022
Sort order: Award year, descending

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TD-285377-22

International Documentary Association (Los Angeles, CA 90010-2207)
Ben Loeterman (Project Director: August 2021 to present)
Bombshell

Development of a documentary film chronicling the search for truth amidst the propaganda about the use of atomic weapons in World War II.

This is a development grant request for Bombshell, an intended 90-minute feature documentary, will trace how the US government constructed an appealing narrative for American consumption, how one reporter’s non-fiction masterpiece blew apart that narrative, causing national soul searching, and how Washington then enlisted Hollywood to re-assert its official line and instill it into the national conscience. Above all, Bombshell is about the power of narrative, perception, public opinion, and what we convince ourselves regardless of the truth.

Project fields:
Journalism; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


TD-285378-22

Fort Ross Conservancy (Jenner, CA 95450-9742)
Sarah Sweedler (Project Director: August 2021 to present)
Coming Round: The Kashia-Pomo Struggle for Homeland

Development of a documentary film on the history of a Native American tribe’s displacement and eventual return to their ancestral homeland.

Coming Round: The Kashia-Pomo Struggle for Homeland (Coming Round) is the story of a Native California tribe’s remarkably successful effort to recover sacred land and their quest for reunification with descendants of family members brought to Russia at the end of that country’s brief colonial venture on the California coast.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$74,261 (approved)
$74,261 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 12/31/2022


TD-285397-22

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Yuriko Gamo Romer (Project Director: August 2021 to present)
Diamond Diplomacy

Planning for an hour-long documentary on U.S.-Japanese relations through the prism of baseball.

Diamond Diplomacy is an hour-long documentary film for broadcast, about U.S. Japan relations through a shared love of baseball. Two ex-ballplayers, one American & one Japanese will tell their own baseball stories, while key points during a 150-year history (starting in 1872) will be highlighted.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Film History and Criticism; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 2/28/2023


TD-285457-22

MPT Foundation, Inc. (Owings Mills, MD 21117-1499)
Martin D. Huberman (Project Director: August 2021 to present)
Here, The People Rule

Development of a two-hour film exploring the history of presidential transitions.

It is the morning of January 20, 2009, just hours before the historic inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th President of the United States. At the White House, the Situation Room buzzes with activity. U.S. intelligence agencies are convinced that Somali terrorists have snuck into the country from Canada — and will explode bombs on the National Mall during the Inauguration. Unseen by the American public, Hillary Clinton, Condoleezza Rice and the highest levels of the Bush and Obama administrations are working together to ensure that the plot is not successful — and that the presidency will survive if it is. Here, The People Rule, a two-hour film for PBS, will unfold around a number of broad themes, each involving several transitions. We will hear interesting and enlightening stories of notable transitions in history.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 5/31/2023


TD-285502-22

Futuro Media Group (New York, NY 10027-4843)
Charlotte Mangin (Project Director: August 2021 to present)
To Have And To HOLD: A History of Marriage

Development of a documentary series on the history of marriage in the United States.

A new series of 5 hour-long documentaries in development for PBS that will tell the story of marriage in the United States, and how changes in this foundational institution have impacted everyone and everything, in particular the role of women. A HISTORY OF MARRIAGE will be presented in linear chronology, focusing on the macro shifts that have occurred in the definition and structure of marriage from pre-colonial times to the present — including major legal, legislative and policy shifts, as well as public opinion cataclysms and changes in social currents, collective thinking and behavior. In addition, we will present biographical profiles of the changemakers and innovators that have influenced different perspectives and possibilities within the religious, cultural, social and economic dynamics of marriage.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Social Sciences, General; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 12/31/2022


TD-277935-21

Catticus Corporation (Berkeley, CA 94710-2597)
Jason Cohn (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
TEZUKA: God of Manga

Development of an eighty-two-minute documentary on the artist and writer Osamu Tezuka (1928–89), a key figure in the development and popularization of Japanese comics and animation.

The producers seek development funding for a feature length (82 minute) documentary exploring the extraordinary life and career of Osamu Tezuka (1928-1989), known in Japan as “The God of Manga.” One of the world’s most prolific and influential storytellers, his work is universally credited with elevating Japanese comics and animation to the heights of global popular culture, including in the U.S.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; East Asian Literature; East Asian Studies

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 9/30/2022


TD-277936-21

Documentary Educational Resources (Watertown, MA 02472-2554)
Kenny Kilfara (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Canada Lee, Native Son

Development of a feature length documentary examining the life of influential actor, athlete, musician, and civil rights activist Canada Lee (1907–52).

Canada Lee, Native Son tells the inspiring story of one of the 20th century’s greatest yet forgotten heroes. Canada was a pioneering African American athlete, musician, actor, producer and activist who poured his talent into fighting for racial and economic equality. His uncompromising stance prompted the U.S. Government to label him a Communist, destroying his reputation and career. Broken-hearted and impoverished, Lee died at the age of 45 from kidney disease.

Project fields:
African American History; Political History; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 12/31/2022


TD-277945-21

New York Foundation for the Arts (Brooklyn, NY 11201-8301)
Adam Kahan (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Sun Ra from Saturn

Development of a sixty-minute documentary film examining the life and work of jazz musician and forerunner of Afrofuturism Sun Ra (1914–93).

A documentary film about the influential pianist and bandleader Sun Ra (né Herman Poole Blount, 1914-1993). The sophistication and range of Ra’s music, his charismatic personality, his intellectual explorations and writings, and his continuing impact on jazz and related genres, make Ra a germinal figure of the 20th century.

Project fields:
African American History; Film History and Criticism; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$74,970 (approved)
$74,970 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 11/30/2021


TD-280386-21

City Lore: NY Center for Urban Folk Culture (New York, NY 10003-9345)
Joseph Dorman (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
The Colfax Massacre

Development of a feature-length film about a Reconstruction-era conflict between southern whites and African Americans and its legal and social legacy.

This project explores the history of the 1873 Colfax Massacre, the subsequent Supreme Court case U.S. vs. Cruikshank and their effect on the political rights of the South’s black population and the ultimate fate of Reconstruction.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; American Government

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,319 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 12/31/2022


TD-280470-21

Catticus Corporation (Berkeley, CA 94710-2597)
Jillian Schultz (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
You Should Never Blink

Development of a feature-length film exploring the artistic life, teachings, and legacy of Sister Corita Kent (1918–86).

YOU SHOULD NEVER BLINK presents the rebellious life of nun, artist, and educator, Corita Kent, also known as Sister Corita (1918-1986). From a working poor family, Corita harnessed her creativity and faith to build a life as an artist. By the 1960s she was a cultural icon, gracing the cover of Newsweek and pioneering a socially-engaged art practice. But her contribution is too often overlooked, and she is at risk of being forgotten. Combining archival footage, interviews, and animated sequences that will bring newly digitized photographs by Corita to life, this documentary reinserts the joyful art and activism of Corita into the narrative. She still has so much to teach us.

Project fields:
American Studies; Art History and Criticism; Arts, General

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 7/31/2022


TD-280519-21

Film Independent, Inc. (Los Angeles, CA 90036-5679)
Colin Rosemont (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Nihunavea: My Heart, My Center

Development of a ninety-minute documentary film on the Tejon Tribe of California’s struggle to reclaim sovereignty and revitalize their native language.

Nihunavea is a feature-length documentary film (co-directed by Sandra Hernandez and Colin Rosemont) bearing witness to the complex struggles of reclaiming Native California Indian cultural heritage, spirituality, and Tribal Sovereignty. Set shortly after the Tejon Indian Tribe’s decades-long struggle for sovereignty through Federal Reaffirmation, Sandra Hernandez—an enrolled member and elected official of the Tejon Indian Tribe—forges a path through government agencies, museum institutions, & academia as she works to revitalize the Kitanemuk language, repatriate artifacts, and strengthen the foundational core of her Native identity: family & community. This is a story of reasserting tribal sovereignty and reclaiming cultural heritage in the face of a historical legacy of dispossession.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2022


TD-277901-21

Filmmakers Collaborative, Inc. (Melrose, MA 02176-3933)
Kathryn P. Dietz (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Kaboom! How Comics Changed America

Development of three, sixty-minute films exploring the history of comics in American culture.

A three-part series that looks at the history of comics in America, and how a lowbrow art form rose to the heights of legitimacy. The series explores how outsiders and outcasts have used the medium tell their versions of the American story. We present a broad and inclusive treatment of the many genres that have defined American comics, with a particular emphasis on the lesser-known underground and alternative traditions, and the current wave of creator-owned, creator-driven content.

Project fields:
American Studies; Arts, General; History, General

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2022


TD-277905-21

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Elizabeth J. Harrington (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Our Mr. Matsura

Development of a feature-length documentary on Sakae “Frank” Matsura (1873–1913), a Japanese photographer who came to live in the Pacific Northwest in the early twentieth century.

Our Mr. Matsura, a feature-length documentary, will tell the story of Japanese-born photographer Frank (Sakae) Matsura who came to live in the Pacific Northwest in the early years of the 20th century. Matsura created a body of work that transcended mere documentation of his adopted home. He depicted, with obvious warmth and connection, the varied peoples of northeastern Washington State, along with surprising self-portraiture some of which reads as photographic “performance.” In addition, he extended this performance photography into collaborative visual storytelling with members of the diverse population in Okanogan County, white settlers and native American people alike. It is a unique portfolio of imagery and has much to tell us about a transitional time in U.S. history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$74,791 (approved)
$74,791 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 4/30/2022


TD-271416-20

Stone Lantern Films, Inc. (Suffern, NY 10901-6826)
Sarah Mondale (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Tourist Nation: The History of American Tourism

Development of a four-part documentary series exploring the history and impact of American tourism.

We are requesting funds to develop a 4-part documentary series for public television about the history of American tourism. The series will tell the amazing story of how a nineteenth-century pastime for the wealthy grew into what is arguably today the world's largest industry, touching the lives of almost everyone for better or for worse. The series will showcase recent humanities scholarship while exploring a facet of our history that is largely unknown to the public: how and why tourism shaped our understanding of our nation and the modern world.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 5/31/2021


TD-271447-20

New York Foundation for the Arts (Brooklyn, NY 11201-8301)
Oren D. Rudavsky (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Luis Muñoz Marín: The Making of a Modern Puerto Rico

Development of a ninety-minute film on the life of Luis Muñoz Marin(1898–1980), the first democratically elected governor of Puerto Rico.

Luis Muñoz Marín: The Making of a Modern Puerto Rico will be a 90-minute documentary in English and Spanish about an era of radical transformation in Puerto Rico, led by the first elected Puerto Rican Governor Luis Muñoz Marín. The charismatic Muñoz Marín, dubbed “the father of modern Puerto Rico” embraced a plan of U.S. economic investment for the island. He set aside the roiling debates over political status that had paralyzed the island, in favor of an economic transformation tied to the U.S. He simultaneously embraced an ambitious project of cultural nationalism. As part of this effort, he formed an internationally award-winning film and education division, seeking “a new spiritual identity”, a way to create foundational myths for the Puerto Rican people. This development grant will enable us to travel again to Puerto Rico, to record interviews, to continue archival footage research and to write an NEH production proposal, including full scripting, and the editing of a trailer.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latino History; Political Science, General; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2022


TD-271452-20

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Marco Williams (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Eyes on the Prize Reclaimed

Development of a documentary film about the history and legacy of Eyes on the Prize, the landmark public television series about the civil rights movement.

Eyes on the Prize Reclaimed is the story of African American filmmaker Henry Hampton, the creation of the acclaimed television history of the civil rights movement and its legacy today. The 90-minute documentary will explore the ‘making-of’ Eyes on the Prize, interwoven with the filmmakers’ experiences as civil rights activists. It will explore the series’ significance in teaching generations of Americans about the civil rights movement, and it will measure its lasting impact in light of recent thinking about the movement, in scholarly work and in public sites of memory. The film will be directed by Marco Williams (Two Towns of Jasper) and written by Maia Harris (GI Jews), filmmakers whose previous documentaries have delved deeply into questions of race and civil rights.

Project fields:
African American History; Film History and Criticism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2022


TD-269722-20

Headfirst Arts & Media, Inc. (El Cerrito, CA 94530-2038)
Yoav Potash (Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Diary from the Ashes

Development of a ninety-minute documentary film on the diary of Rywka Lipszyc, which records her experience as a Jewish girl in the Lodz ghetto during the Third Reich.

“Diary from the Ashes” is a 90-minute television documentary that reveals the biography and writing of Rywka Lipszyc, an intensely imaginative and intelligent 14-year-old girl whose diary was found in the rubble of an Auschwitz crematorium in 1945. The diary remained unread—and her identity, story, and fate unknown—for the next seven decades. The film will contextualize Rywka’s story through a variety of humanities disciplines—history, literature and journalism, feminist theory, Jewish studies, theology, and philosophy—which correspond to different facets of her diary. Rywka Lipszyc (pronounced “Rivka Lipshitz”) recorded her innermost thoughts while the Third Reich directly oppressed her through forced labor, starvation, and the murder of her family. “Diary from the Ashes” will bring to life the talent and voice of this irrepressible young woman, who used her imagination to cope with the unimaginable.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
European History; Jewish Studies; Women's History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2020 – 8/31/2022


TD-269729-20

Filmmakers Collaborative, Inc. (Melrose, MA 02176-3933)
Jon Roger Dunham (Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Herculaneum: Reading the Invisible

Development of a documentary film chronicling the work of the Digital Restoration Initiative team at the University of Kentucky as they attempt to digitally preserve 2,000-year-old papyrus scrolls.

A feature-length documentary film following computer scientist Dr. Brent Seales and his Digital Restoration Initiative team of the University of Kentucky as they image the more than 2,000 year old papyrus scrolls found at the ancient city of Herculaneum, destroyed along with Pompei by Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Ancient Literature; History of Philosophy

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


TD-266328-19

New York Foundation for the Arts (Brooklyn, NY 11201-8301)
Robert S. Levi (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Hazel Scott: Café Society

Development of a documentary film about the African American musician and broadcast pioneer Hazel Scott (1920–81).

This is a request for a $75,000 media development grant for Hazel Scott: Café Society, a sixty-minute broadcast documentary film. The program focuses on the life and work of the African-American singer, classical and jazz pianist, stage and film actress, political activist, and broadcast pioneer, Hazel Scott (1920-1981). In a career that spanned four decades, Hazel Scott was an innovative performer whose influence impacted five seminal movements in American culture—classical music, cabaret and musical theater, jazz piano, broadcast television, and Hollywood films. Even now, almost seventy years after her groundbreaking debut as the first African-American to host a network television show, Hazel Scott’s legacy as a broadcast pioneer remains unrivaled but under-celebrated.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


TD-266339-19

Media Process Educational Films (Chicago, IL 60607-1901)
Starr Sutherland (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
City Lights

Development of a one-hour documentary on San Francisco’s City Lights Bookstore and the poet and publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti (born 1919).

This is a request for $75,000 to research and script a one-hour documentary on City Lights Bookstore and Book Publishing. The iconic bookstore in San Francisco is best known as home of The Beats, but its enduring legacy has been a 65-year commitment to publishing and promoting progressive ideas that foster a more humane culture.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Journalism

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


TD-266403-19

University Corporation at Monterey Bay (Seaside, CA 93955-8001)
Meghan O'Hara (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Tektite Revisited: NASA's Forgotten Underwater Mission

Development of an eighty-minute documentary on the Tektite Program, an experimental underwater research station operated by NASA in the U.S. Virgin Islands between 1969 and 1970.

Tektite Revisited: NASA’s Forgotten Underwater Missions (working title) is an eighty-minute feature-length documentary that tells the story of the Tektite Program, an experimental underwater research station operated by NASA in the U.S. Virgin Islands between 1969-1970. A sensuous visual depiction of NASA’s manned spaceflight research in the Caribbean as an international “Space Race” came to a close, the film employs a vast collection of rarely-seen and newly-restored archival materials (16mm film, audio recordings, photographs, extensive government records), and revisits a series of unlikely missions led by America’s “aquanauts,” who lived underwater for weeks on end. Tektite Revisited uses the forgotten program as a case study for examining a Cold War-era cultural preoccupation with survival in extreme environments, and ultimately suggests the program’s role in a set of larger, global questions regarding humanity’s relationship to its home planet.

Project fields:
American Studies; Art History and Criticism; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$74,989 (approved)
$74,989 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2019 – 10/31/2022


TD-266430-19

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Tracie Holder (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
The People's Will

Development of a sixty-minute documentary using the 1849 Astor Place Riot as a vehicle to explore the history of theater and Shakespeare in nineteenth-century America. 

In 1849, American militia and police opened fire on a crowd of 15,000 rioters in the heart of New York City. Twenty-three people died and scores more were wounded. Improbable though it sounds, the riot was sparked by two rival productions of Macbeth and marked the first time American troops would fire on American citizens. The People's Will, a 60-minute documentary, will tell the dramatic story of the Astor Place Riot, an event all but lost to history. Based on wide-ranging scholarship, the film will explore the seething debates of the antebellum period over competing definitions of democracy, economy, and culture that would ultimately define the young republic. We are seeking a total of $74,992 to consult with our panel of scholars, write a script, and produce a sample reel for the film. Beyond the film, we have established partnerships with The Public Theater and the Folger Shakespeare Library with whom we will develop public programs and a companion traveling museum exhibition.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$74,992 (approved)
$74,992 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2019 – 7/31/2020


TD-266435-19

Anchorage Museum Association (Anchorage, AK 99501-3544)
Julie Michelle Decker (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Alaska Documentary with Ric Burns

Development of a three-part documentary film on the history of Alaska produced through a partnership between the Anchorage Museum and Steeplechase Films.

The Anchorage Museum, in partnership with Steeplechase Films, will develop a three-part documentary series titled Alaska, produced for national broadcast. To date, no comprehensive documentary has been completed on the history and identity of Alaska. While Alaska continues to hold a strong focus for reality television and wildlife documentaries, a cohesive film based on scholarship, history and strong humanities content has not been accomplished. The film series will present the attraction that Alaska continues to hold in the American imagination, while also exploring the authentic history and experience of life in Alaska—how Alaska has emerged as a place of strong adaptation and resilience, of individualism mixed with community, innovation and diversity. The film series will explore the patterns, themes and stories of Alaska's peoples who have thrived with the land for generations--and those who are profoundly affected by either their visit or their life of calling Alaska home.

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2019 – 11/30/2021


TD-264650-19

Katahdin Productions (Los Angeles, CA 90036-3251)
Laura Bialis (Project Director: August 2018 to present)
All This Life: The Many Worlds of Roman Vishniac

Development of a film script exploring the life and work of American photographer Roman Vishniac (1897–1990) in Eastern European Jewish communities.

From the cosmopolitan streets of prewar Berlin to the shtetls in Poland to the Princeton offices of Albert Einstein, All This Life takes viewers on a journey, through the lens of one of the foremost photographers of the 20th century. Roman Vishniac is best known for having traversed Eastern Europe from 1935-38, on assignment to photograph Jewish life. A few years later these communities would be destroyed, and Vishniac’s work would provide the last visual records of an entire world, becoming iconic images in Jewish collective memory. Vishniac owes his fame to this specific collection, but his prolific – and mostly unpublished – body of work depicts an entire era of Jewish history in Europe and the US. No less important than his work as an artist, Vishniac was an avid scientist, and made major contributions in the field of microscopic photography. All This Life will illuminate Vishniac’s career and stunning photographs, and detail his dramatic life story and flamboyant personality.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; European History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2019 – 8/31/2019