NEH banner

Funded Projects Query Form
15 matches

Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program*
Sort order: Award year, descending

Save this query
Create a new query
Export results to Excel

Columbia University (New York, NY 10027)
Sheldon Pollock
HG-50041-13
SARIT: Enriching Digital Texts Collections in Indology

Search and Retrieval of Indic Texts (SARIT, a Sanskrit word for "river") proposes to create a corpus of Sanskrit texts focused on three areas: Buddhist philosophy, Vedic hermeneutics, and literary theory. TEI-conformant digital editions amounting to more than 10,000 printed pages will be integrated with two existing reference resource databases from the two partner organizations: Epistemology and Argumentation in South Asia and Tibet (EAST, University of Heidelberg) and Sanskrit Knowledge Systems on the Eve of Colonialism (SKSEC, Columbia University). The University of Heidelberg is requesting 142,000€ from DFG.

This project will produce a structured corpus of Sanskrit texts, called SARIT, which will serve as a much-needed model both for the implementation of international encoding and markup standards, and for the application of such corpora in current Indological research. We will digitize more than 10,000 pages of Sanskrit texts in three related systems of knowledge. We will develop a user interface that stands up to the intricacies of these texts, including their many internal and external references, and to the demands of researchers, including intelligent searching and collaborative annotation. We will also link this corpus to two bio-bibliographical databases, EAST (Epistemology and Argumentation in South Asia and Tibet) and SKSEC (Sanskrit Knowledge Systems on the Eve of Colonialism). SARIT's extensible architecture and the dissemination of its standards, which represent the field's best practices, will enable its integration with the larger community of Indological research.

Project fields: Asian Studies
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $175,000
Grant period: 5/1/2013 – 4/30/2016

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Willemina Z. Wendrich
HG-50046-13
Ancient Egyptian Architecture Online - Illustrated Standardized Terminology (AEGARON-IST)

The development of a controlled vocabulary for ancient Egyptian architecture to be supported by geo-referenced, annotated illustrations of architectural details, which will be delivered through the Ancient Egyptian Architecture Online (AEGARON) digital library. The German Archaeological Institute is requesting 71.474€ from DFG.

Terminology to describe historic architecture has an effect on our perception and understanding of the ancient built environment. Classical architectural terms have been used inconsistently to describe ancient Egyptian buildings, resulting in a fuzzy terminology and an abundance of misunderstandings. Saddled with an "inappropriate" terminology, Egyptology needs to standardize the terms and qualify them through descriptions and illustrations. This is best done by thinking through the construction and function of architectural elements in the built space, their regional and temporal differences, and their importance in the development of ancient Egyptian architecture as a whole. Aegaron will provide a well thought out controlled vocabulary represented by georeferenced, annotated drawings and photographs of architectural details. The project will run from June 1, 2013 to May 31, 2015.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $157,170
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 5/31/2015

University of Nebraska, Board of Regents (Lincoln, NE 68588-0430)
Brett Barney
HG-50047-13
Diachronic Markup and Presentation Practices for Text Editions in Digital Research Environments

Using three case studies -- the Walt Whitman Archive; an edition of James Joyce's Ulysses; and an edition of J.W. Goethe's Faust -- the proposed project will experiment with methods of advanced TEI markup, create methods for detailed scholarly queries currently unavailable, and develop user interfaces to best display the variants exposed through diachronic markup. The German partner, the University of Frankfurt, is requesting 139,634€ from DFG.

The project is situated in the Digital Humanities area of literary criticism and textual scholarship, in particular the analysis of literary works in diachronic depth, that is: under perspectives of the genesis of their texts. Here, only the digital medium allows substantial future research and education in literary studies. In this context, the project addresses three major desiderata: 1. testing, improving, and making usable diachronic markup, that is the digital representation of document sources (based on TEI), 2. tools to operate on this data under the light of research requirements, and 3. means to publish and visualize the results of these operations. The project promises to develop and publish such tools and to provide best practices for a wide range of use cases. It does so by bringing together three leading projects in digital literary studies, covering different eras of German, US, and British literature: J.W. Goethe, Walt Whitman, and James Joyce.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $165,005
Grant period: 1/1/2014 – 12/31/2015

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Roger Bagnall
HG-50050-13
Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri

This collaboration between the University of Heidelberg and New York University would create a Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri (DCLP), building an infrastructure that initially focuses on Greek and Latin texts but that can accommodate other ancient literatures as well. The University of Heidelberg is requesting 123,880€ from DFG.

This project proposes to create a database of texts and cataloging data for the ancient papyrus manuscripts of Greek and Latin literature and texts of a quasi-literary nature. It will use and modify existing technology developed for documentary texts on papyrus. The first phase will carry out the needed technical work and use a series of existing bodies of data to stress-test the technology. The system will be capable in later phases of incorporating texts in other ancient languages that were written on papyrus. In this way, a crucial body of evidence for the early history of ancient literature as well as for ancient reading habits and education will be made much more widely available and be readily searchable in the original languages and in translation, opening its use up to a wider group of researchers and students.

Project fields: Classics
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $190,000
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 8/31/2016

Center for Jewish History (New York, NY 10011-6301)
Laura Leone
HG-50027-11
Wissenschaft des Judentums: An International Digital Collection

The digitization of approximately 1,000 volumes to add to the Wissenschaft des Judentums library, which was dispersed and partially destroyed during World War II.

The purpose of this project is to create a complete digital collection of the historic resources of the Wissenschaft des Judentums by enriching the unique Wissenschaft collection of the Frankfurt University Library with digital facsimiles of missing titles housed at the Center, and augmenting the Center’s growing digital collections. The Frankfurt University Library estimates that it is missing about 25% of the 11,000 titles that once constituted its world renowned collection of Wissenschaft des Judentums. The Center has identified approximately 1,000 (40%) of these missing books within the holdings of its partner organizations.

Project fields: Jewish Studies
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $103,657
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 8/31/2014

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6243)
Steve John Tinney
HG-50029-11
Bilinguals in Late Mesopotamian Scholarship

The development of a catalog and textual editions for a corpus of cuneiform texts from the first millennium BCE.

The project aims to significantly enrich the resources for the study of the political and religious practice and the intellectual history of ancient Mesopotamia in the first millennium BCE. We will focus on the corpus of cuneiform tablets inscribed with bilingual myths, incantations and liturgies written in the two main languages of the civilization: Sumerian and Akkadian. These texts constitute a crucial part of the learning common to the scribal elite of the time and provide important comparisons and contrasts to intellectual and religious innovations occurring elsewhere across contemporary Eurasia, such as Greek philosophy, Biblical prophecy, Buddhism and Confucianism. We will enhance access to this primary documentation by creating an online core corpus of these texts together with an introductory portal, search aids and translations which will open the material up to both specialists and non-specialists.

Project fields: Ancient Literature
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $181,751
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 8/31/2014

Indiana University, Bloomington (Bloomington, IN 47405)
Colin Allen
HG-50032-11
Linking and Populating the Digital Humanities

The development of tools that would allow scholars to link data between digital humanities collections, using the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy as a test case. .

The goals of the proposed LinkedHumanities project are to create and maintain data integration tools tailored to digital humanities collections in order to build a machine-readable "web of facts" about philosophy. The tools will interconnect structured digital representations of the humanities and leverage the created links to enrich the respective data repositories. Application testbeds include the Indiana Philosophy Ontology (InPhO) project and the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP). The specific outcomes of this proposal will be (a) the implementation of a linking service between the InPhO ontology and other knowledge repositories such as DBPedia and Freebase; and (b) the population of the InPhO ontology by leveraging the previously created links to other data repositories. Most importantly, however, the data integration tools will be designed to also serve the needs of other digital humanities projects.

Project fields: Philosophy, General
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $172,215
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 4/30/2014

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
Lucie W. Stylianopoulos
HG-50014-10
Digital Music Notation Data Model and Prototype Delivery System

An international collaboration between the University of Virginia and the University of Paderborn to develop the Music Encoding Initiative (MEI) demonstration project in order to establish an open source, non-proprietary academic encoding standard for music notation.

The UVa Library requests $161,175 in outright funds from NEH to collaborate with the University of Paderborn in Detmold, Germany, to produce a Music Encoding Initiative (MEI) demonstration project and to engage in dissemination efforts that will establish MEI as the predominant academic encoding standard for music notation. The demonstration project will include basic software for transforming material into MEI, a searchable archive of representative MEI-encoded data, and a prototype delivery system for items in the archive. This will allow the scholarly community to overcome the limitations of today's printed editions by extending the potential of digital editions, implementing new methodological techniques for music research, and facilitating collaboration between musicologists.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $161,175
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 1/31/2014

Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08544-2001)
David S. Magier
HG-50019-10
[View white paper]
The Yemen Manuscript Digitization Initiative

An international collaboration between Princeton University and the Freie University, Berlin to preserve three private libraries and create an online resource for their dissemination; the project team will digitize 236 Arabic manuscripts in the fields of Islamic theology and law.

The Yemen Manuscript Digitization Initiative (YMDI) is a collaborative project between Princeton University Library and the Freie Universität Berlin. YMDI's mission is the preservation and dissemination of the Arabic manuscripts in the private libraries of Yemen. Working closely with a Yemeni non-profit organization which has endeavored to save Yemeni manuscripts for the past decade, during the grant period, YMDI will digitally preserve three private libraries in the capital city of Sana'a, a total of 236 manuscripts. These digitized sources will then be virtually conjoined to twelve manuscripts in the rare book collections of the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin and the Princeton University Library, creating a freely accessible repository of Islamic manuscripts whose scope is unparalleled in the world. This infrastructure maintained at Princeton University Library will be the basis of additional rare manuscripts targeted for preservation by YMDI's advisory board in the coming years.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $153,595
Grant period: 6/1/2010 – 10/31/2013

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory R. Crane
HG-50020-10
The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus

An international collaboration between Tuft's University and the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) to join together the digital holdings of Tuft's Perseus Digital Library and the DAI's Arachne into the largest collection of Greco-Roman materials online.

The German Archaeological Institute (DAI) and Tufts University propose to combine and expand the collections of two of the oldest and most established digital projects in Classical Studies--Arachne and Perseus--and thus create a single comprehensive digital library about the ancient world. The resulting collection will contain CIDOC-CRM metadata for more than 250,000 archaeological sites and objects, MODS/FRBR bibliographic records for editions of every major Greek and Latin author whose work survives either in the manuscript tradition or in substantial fragments, and TEI P5 compliant XML transcriptions for 20 million words of Greek and Latin primary sources, as well as for more than 50 million words of archaeological documentation, major lexica, commentaries, and encyclopedias. The project bridges gaps between the material and the textual record and between scholarship in German and English, opening up this content not only to the two partner sites but third-party development.

Project fields: Classics
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $174,828
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 6/30/2014

Getty Research Institute (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688)
Thomas W. Gaehtgens
HG-50021-10
[View white paper]
German Sales 1930-1945: Art Works, Art Markets, and Cultural Policy

An international collaboration between The Getty Research Institute, the Heidelberg University Library and the Art Library, Berlin State Museums to create an open, searchable database of German art auction catalogs from 1930-1945.

The goal of the project "German Sales 1930-1945" is to bibliographically identify auction catalogs from Germany, Switzerland, and Austria from the period 1930 to 1945, to digitize them, convert them using OCR into searchable texts, and make them accessible as a research database on the Internet for scientific study. The project will provide indispensable sources for provenance research and for art and social science research concerning the German art market, and will make them freely accessible to the general public.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $174,120
Grant period: 1/1/2011 – 6/30/2013

Maharishi University of Management Research Institute (Fairfield, IA 52556-9073)
Peter M. Scharf
HG-50022-10
Sanskrit Lexical Sources: Digital Synthesis and Revision

An international partnership between the Sanskrit Library (Maharishi University of Management) and the Cologne Digital Sanskrit Lexicon (CDSL) project (Institute of Indology and Tamil Studies, Cologne University) to establish a digital Sanskrit lexical reference work.

The proposed project aims to synthesize, extend, revise, and improve the principal lexical reference works of Sanskrit, one of the world's richest culture-bearing languages, and to provide wide public access to them in the digital Sanskrit library.

Project fields: Asian Languages
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $177,872
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 6/30/2014

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Champaign, IL 61820-6903)
Mara R. Wade
HG-50004-09
[View white paper]
Emblematica Online: Emblem Digitization, The German Emblem Database, and The OpenEmblem Portal

The digitization of emblem book collections at University of Illinois (UI) and the Herzog August Bibliothek (HAB); the development of a central OpenEmblem Portal; and the creation of an extensive database of interoperable metadata.

This proposal requests funding to present emblem books in a digital environment and to develop a portal for a key genre of Renaissance texts and images. Emblematica Online will fulfill its goals through its three constituent activities: 1) Emblem Digitization: the complete digitization of two premiere emblem collections of world-wide prominence; 2) The German Emblem Databases: the creation of extensive metadata with broad functionality for the German emblems of both institutions in mirror websites; and 3) The OpenEmblem Portal: the development of the portal as an open access research site incorporating book-level metadata from emblem digitization projects worldwide and emblem-level metadata from Illinois and the Herzog August Bibliothek (HAB). The OpenEmblem Portal hosted at Illinois will have a mirror portal at the HAB.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $175,032
Grant period: 10/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Eastern Michigan University (Ypsilanti, MI 48197-2214)
Helen Aristar-Dry
HG-50010-09
[View white paper]
RELISH: RENDERING ENDANGERED LANGUAGES LEXICONS INTEROPERABLE THROUGH STANDARDS HARMONIZATION

An effort to unify two digital collections of endangered languages with special attention given to harmonizing the European and American standards for language documentation and lexicon building.

When a lexicon constitutes the only record of a dying or already extinct language, it can contribute unique linguistic and cultural information to our store of scientific knowledge. And making it interoperable with other lexical data becomes a critical research priority. However, there still exist major barriers to lexicon interoperability. The most significant barrier is that standards-setting bodies have arrived at different standards for format and markup on the two sides of the Atlantic. The RELISH project will create an interoperable virtual archive by addressing a two-pronged problem: (1) the lack of harmonization between digital standards for lexical information in Europe and America, and (2) the lack of interoperability among existing lexicons of endangered languages, in particular those created with the Shoebox lexicon-building software.

Project fields: Linguistics
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $160,793
Grant period: 7/1/2009 – 6/30/2012

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Willemina Z. Wendrich
HG-50012-09
[View white paper]
AEGARON-Ancient EGyptian ARchitecture ONline: A Repository for Standardized Architectural Information & Drawings

The development, in collaboration with the German Archaeological Institute Cairo (DAIK), of a digital library of three-dimensional renderings of ancient Egyptian structures based on a variety of existing sources using CAD technology, rendered as image files, and contextualized by metadata.

Comparison of the ancient built environment is often difficult due to different standards used in publications. Correctness, drawing style, as well as the indication of materials, damage, or conjecture differ widely. Other problems are that architectural drawings are presented out of their original natural or urban context, they are sometimes only available in obscure & difficult to find publications, or not published at all. In order to enable cross-disciplinary work, and make the drawings broadly accessible, the central purpose of the project is two-fold: A) provide one visual language by using the same clearly outlined conventions in all drawings; B) provide annotations in the form of extensive metadata, which give factual information and a 'critical apparatus' for visual representations, outlining sources, producers, methods and purposes of the drawings.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $174,296
Grant period: 6/1/2009 – 5/31/2013

Create a new query