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82 matches

Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections*
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Historic New England (Boston, MA 02114-2702)
Julie Solz (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50378-14
Historic New England Haverhill Center Environment and Storage Project

Improved storage of Historic New England's decorative art and household furnishing collections through the creation of a room-within-a-room storage pod in the museum's centralized collections and conservation center. Some 22,000 artifacts that document everyday life in New England would be rehoused in a mobile high density storage system within the pod, which will be designed to efficiently maintain environmental conditions for the collections.

Historic New England's Haverhill Environment and Storage Project will upgrade environmental controls in its collections and conservation center located in Haverhill, Massachusetts. The building's environment threatens the well-being of the collections due to wide temperature fluctuations, low wintertime humidity, and mold growth due to water infiltration through leaky windows. This project will mitigate environmental threats to the collection by not only rehousing priority objects in an interior microclimate storage solution but also secure the building envelope against further water leakage and conditions that will compromise the objects stored here.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2014 – 12/31/2016

Yellowstone Art Museum (Billings, MT 59101)
Robyn Peterson (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50416-14
[View white paper]
Illuminating Art: LED Relamping Project

An implementation project to install energy-efficient LED lighting and occupancy sensors in the Yellowstone Art Museum's exhibition galleries, where collections of American art are displayed. The museum's holdings focus on modern and contemporary art from Montana and the northern Rocky Mountain and northern Plains regions.

A preventive conservation project, Illumination: LED Relamping Project aims to improve the preservation environment and increase operational sustainability. The project will 1) replace 90-watt and 50-watt tungsten halogens with maximum 21-watt non-UV/IR-emitting LED lamps in the main museum building, 2) replace obsolete track heads in two small galleries, and 3) install occupancy sensors in the one gallery lacking them. The project will bring the Yellowstone Art Museum's lighting system in all art exhibition and storage areas up to 21st-century standards. Expected outcomes are 1) reducing heat generated by conventional systems and 2) joining green building choices already made by the YAM that are improving its preservation environment and its financial and environmental sustainability profile. By saving energy and costs, the project reinforces the YAM's commitment to its collections, cultural preservation, environmental policy, and quest for cost-effective operations.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism, Arts, General, Arts, Other
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $34,979 (approved); $34,979 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/2014 – 4/30/2015

Gibbes Art Gallery (Charleston, SC 29401)
Zinnia Willits (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50421-14
Framing the Future: Collections, Care, and Storage Renovation at the Gibbes Museum of Art

An implementation project to improve storage conditions for the Gibbes Museum's collections, which focus on art of the American south. Storage furniture would be installed in a new collections suite that is being created as part of a major renovation and expansion of the museum.

The Gibbes Museum of Art requests a Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Implementation Grant of $250,000 to relocate the fine art collection and purchase and install custom-designed, space and energy efficient storage equipment, return the collection and reinstall the collection in the new storage and study center, as part of a major building renovation entitled Framing the Future: A Campaign for Excellence at the Gibbes Museum of Art. The Gibbes is dedicated to generating scholarship, exhibitions and programs that promote a broad understanding of this region and its role in American and world history, and contemplate its future. The renovation and storage/study suite will go far to help make this knowledge accessible to diverse audiences, and add richness to the visitor experience.

Project fields: Arts, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $250,000 (approved); $250,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 6/30/2016

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Teresa Moreno (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50424-14
Planning a Sustainable Preservation Environment for Arizona State Museum's Anthropological Photographs

Planning and environmental assessment to create efficient, sustainable plans to repurpose space at the Arizona State Museum (ASM) at the University of Arizona into a consolidated storage space for the museum's collection of photographs documenting the history of Native Americans in the region. The project would identify appropriate and sustainable environmental parameters for the preservation of these photographs in the extreme desert climate of the American Southwest.

The Arizona State Museum proposes to conduct planning and assessment for the renovation and environmental improvement of three rooms where photographic collections are currently held. The proposal is to convert the three rooms (formerly offices) into one large climate controlled photographic archive suite with compact mobile shelving to maximize collections storage space. The creation of a climate controlled suite for long-term storage and curation requires reevaluation of the current environment and existing mechanical systems, and determination of appropriate and sustainable environmental parameters for the preservation of photographs in the desert climate. This study will also include a structural and electrical evaluation, preparation of architectural diagrams, development of physical design criteria, NHPA Section 106 Review, and implementation cost estimates. Completion of concept and schematic designs will enable further fundraising for implementation of renovations.

Project fields: Anthropology, Archaeology, Native American Studies
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $48,962 (approved); $48,962 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 9/30/2016

Franklin Institute Science Museum (Philadelphia, PA 19103)
Karen Elinich (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50428-14
Planning for a Curatorial Center at The Franklin Institute

A planning project for a new curatorial center that will house collections of material culture and archives related to the history of science, technology, photography, design and the arts. The Franklin Institute seeks to combine nine separate collections storage areas scattered around the museum and two rented storage facilities into approximately one offsite and two onsite spaces. The Franklin Institute would review and update its design plan based on the most current research in preventive conservation, with a focus on passive measures.

The Franklin Institute is a hands-on science and technology center that in 2013 served over 1.4 million people of all ages in Philadelphia and beyond. The Institute's holdings include records of its early activities as one of the nation's leading mechanics institutes, the Benjamin Franklin and Wright brothers collections, and collections of visual and material culture. These document the rise of technology and science in the US and how they shape and are shaped by broader culture. After many years of making do with repurposed spaces, the Institute's collections facilities must be improved to permit proper preservation and broader use of this valuable resource. This project will assemble an interdisciplinary planning team of outside experts and Institute staff to produce a curatorial center design that integrates sustainable preservation strategies, improves conditions for and access to the collections, and supports their increased use in the Institute's educational programs.

Project fields: History of Science, U.S. History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $17,968 (approved); $17,968 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015

University of Colorado Museum (Boulder, CO 80309-0001)
Christina Cain (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50431-14
Sustainable Microenvironment for Collections Storage

Planning for the creation of storage microclimates to improve the preservation of Navajo textiles and Native American pottery held in the anthropology collections of the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History.

This grant to the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History would provide funding to bring together a team of experts in preservation, sustainability, engineering, pest management, and environmental control to develop plans for creating a microenvironment for the storage of sensitive museum collections. The plan will include designs for a heating, ventilation and air conditioning system and building envelope improvements for two spaces within the museum structure. These rooms will be used to house the museum's pottery and textile collections, which are at risk in their current state and are the top priority for an improved preservation environment.

Project fields: Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology, Cultural History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2014 – 9/30/2016

Sealaska Heritage Foundation (Juneau, AK 99801-1245)
Charles Smythe (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50432-14
Preserving Cultural Collections through Sustainable Practices

Improved storage and preservation through the installation of compact shelving and the construction of object storage mounts and boxes for collections of Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian items held by the Sealaska Heritage Institute.

The Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) is dedicated to preserving and making a diverse collection of significant humanities holdings available for present and future generations. Prior to a facility relocation, this project will first purchase and install preservation-quality compact shelving structures that will be integrated with systems to manage relative humidity, temperature, light, and pollutants in its collection storage space. Then SHI will oversee the construction of preservation quality object storage mounts and boxing that protect objects during a facility relocation and in the long term, amid the objective of carrying out the project through sustainable and environmentally responsive best practices.

Project fields: Arts, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $182,654 (approved); $182,654 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015

New Hampshire Historical Society (Concord, NH 03301-6316)
William Dunlap (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50434-14
Improving Environmental Conditions to Preserve New Hampshire Collections

Improvements to the headquarters of the New Hampshire Historical Society to protect a significant collection documenting New Hampshire history from damaging environmental conditions, while reducing heat loss and energy consumption. Upgrades would include insulating the roof and skylights, protecting the collections from ultraviolet light, and replacing heating and mechanical systems.

The New Hampshire Historical Society proposes a rehabilitation of its National Registered-listed headquarters in Concord, the state capital. The Society's headquarters houses the single most comprehensive collection of the materials of New Hampshire history. Guided by the Secretary of the Interior's standards for Rehabilitation, the project will protect these nationally significant holdings against damaging internal environmental conditions and hazards; reduce heat loss, energy consumption, and the Society's carbon "footprint;" and protect the architectural character of the 1911 building. To accomplish these goals, the project will address current heat loss and gain through the building's roof and skylights, eliminate damaging ultraviolet radiation from natural light, and replace century-old heating and mechanical systems in order to safeguard collections, conserve energy, and maintain levels of temperature and relative humidity appropriate to an archive and museum.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $350,000 (approved); $350,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 9/30/2016

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Julie Arnott (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50437-14
University of Notre Dame, Rare Books and Special Collections, Sustainable Preservation Environment Project

A planning grant to address significant environmental factors--in particular, an aging HVAC system--that pose a threat to the applicant's Rare Books and Special Collections, which contain 175,000 volumes of printed books and periodicals dating from the 15th century to the present with topical strengths in Catholic Church history and theology, Irish Studies, Latin American Studies, Italian literature, and sports history.

The University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries requests $50,000 to develop a plan to address significant environmental factors posing a threat to the long-term preservation of its Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC). The Collections are housed in a dedicated underground vault area. The HVAC system that serves RBSC is original to the fifty-year old building and is not purpose-designed to serve the space: the zoning does not appropriately isolate work and collection storage. The heating, ventilating and cooling (HVAC) infrastructure is unable to meet the preservation needs of the collections and struggles to maintain even the broadest range of tolerances with respect to temperature and relative humidity (RH). The collaborative project team includes eight Notre Dame staff from the Libraries, Facilities, Utilities and the Office of Sustainability. This team will work closely with two environmental specialists from the Image Permanence Institute.

Project fields: Italian Literature, Medieval History, U.S. History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 6/30/2016

Carnegie Institute (Pittsburgh, PA 15213)
Sandra Olsen (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - 05/28/2014); Gretchen Anderson (Project Director, 05/29/2014 - present)
PF-50445-14
Carnegie Museum of Natural History Sustainable Anthropology Collection Storage Improvement

The improvement of storage environments for over 2 million ethnographic and archaeological objects produced by native peoples of the Americas, as well as similar materials from other parts of the world. The project would support the consolidation of storage spaces and the installation of compact shelving at the museum, based on environmental and facilities data collected during a year-long planning effort that identified ways to reduce energy consumption and improve collections storage.

The Carnegie Museum of Natural History's (CMNH) Anthropology Section possesses one of the world's outstanding collections. Ranking fifth in the nation, its holdings include 100,000 ethnological and historical objects, as well as 1.5 million archaeological artifacts, representing most of the continents. To ensure the future of these valuable holdings, the CMNH Section of Anthropology is undertaking an ambitious program to improve conditions in the off-site facility housing its collections. The main goals of this implementation grant proposal are sustainability, improvements to collection storage and climate control, and reorganization of areas by function. Once completed, the CMNH Section of Anthropology's collection conditions will be vastly improved and the collections will be much more accessible.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $341,848 (approved); $341,848 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2015 – 12/31/2017

Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff, AZ 86011-0001)
Jonathan Pringle (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50447-14
Exploring Sustainable Practices for Cold Storage for At-Risk Collections

A planning project to develop recommendations for a dedicated cold storage environment for the university's visual resource collections (photographs, negatives, motion pictures, and magnetic media) documenting the history and culture of the Colorado Plateau region.

This project will help plan for specialized storage for the fragile visual materials. These include photographs, negatives, moving images, and magnetic media that form a significant part of the rare and original archival collections housed in the Special Collections and Archives unit of the library. Funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections grant opportunity will bring in a team of specialized experts who will work collaboratively to plan for a storage environment that will significantly deter the degradation of these irreplaceable items.

Project fields: History, General, Native American Studies, Social Sciences, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,971 (approved); $39,971 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 9/30/2016

Museum of History and Industry (Seattle, WA 98109-4330)
Betsy Bruemmer (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50449-14
Analysis of Mechanical Systems and Building Envelope of the MOHAI Resource Center

The analysis of collection storage spaces and environmental conditions at Seattle's Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI), which houses diverse collections of archival and audiovisual materials and artifacts that treat the history of Seattle and the surrounding region. To improve care for these collections, the applicant would gather information about the museum's storage spaces and assemble an expert team to suggest sustainable improvements for storage and accessibility of the collections. A white paper would foster greater understanding of the preservation challenges facing cultural heritage institutions in the Pacific Northwest.

After moving into a renovated former granite warehouse, MOHAI is struggling to achieve a sustainable and appropriate preservation environment for its artifact and library collections. With NEH support, we wish to work with the Image Permanence Institute (IPI) of Rochester, NY to develop a better understanding of our mechanical systems and the effects of the building envelope on this system in a Pacific Northwest marine environment. We would also like to utilize IPI's expertise in materials science and deterioration to review the temperature and relative humidity specifications for our collections. Consultations with experts in building construction, mechanical engineering and HVAC systems have resulted in a variety of theories about this problem, from ground moisture seeping up though the concrete floors, to infiltration of outside air into the building, to inadequate mechanical equipment. A variety of solutions have been proposed, the source of the problem, however, remains a mystery.

Project fields: Cultural History, U.S. History, Urban History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 11/30/2016

Blount County Government (Maryville, TN 37803-7979)
Jackie Glenn (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50461-14
Blount County Archival Preservation Grant

The installation of new climate control and lighting in a renovated facility designed to preserve archival records, dating from the late 1700s to the present, pertaining to the history and culture of eastern Tennessee.

An implementation project for the reallocation of space to reduce energy consumption, improve and stabilize environmental conditions of the historical and cultural records collection of Blount County Records Management and Archives (hereafter referred to as the Archives.) Blount County's documents are currently stored in two locations which are not conducive to records storage. The Archives is requesting funding to help relocate the records by renovating a new (seventy-five hundred square feet) location at the Blount County Operation Center that will house all records collection in one place. Our stategy is to extend Blount County's Bee-Green program by installing an energy efficient HVAC system and make needed renovations in the Archive's location at the Operations Center. The advisory team has used environmetal monitoring data, space usage, and an area within the building's envelope to create a plan for a climate management system that will be energy efficient.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $119,100 (approved); $119,100 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2014 – 12/31/2015

Center for Research Libraries (Chicago, IL 60637-2804)
Don Dyer (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - 07/21/2014); Patrick Lummen (Project Director, 07/21/2014 - present)
PF-50472-14
Implementation Grant Project

Improvements to the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system at the Center for Research Libraries, which holds over five million items including rare and unique volumes and primary source materials dating from the 17th through the 20th centuries.

A Preservation and Access: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections implementation grant application to fund a capital improvement project to upgrade the heat and air conditioning system software and replace the two networks of sensors and controllers that automate the system that provides a preservation storage environment for the Center's 93,750 square feet of collection storage space.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $159,720 (approved); $159,720 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 9/30/2015

Shelburne Museum (Shelburne, VT 05482)
Richard Kerschner (Project Director, 12/27/2013 - present)
PF-50479-14
Protecting Shelburne Museum's Decoy Collection: Climate, fire, security, and lighting upgrades for Dorset House

An implementation project to preserve the Shelburne Museum's wildfowl decoy collection, which numbers nearly 1,400 objects and spans more than 150 years of decoy making primarily in New England, Long Island, the New Jersey coast, the Chesapeake, North Carolina's Outer Banks, and the Gulf states. To protect the collections, the museum would improve environmental conditions, security, and fire protection in the 1832 Dorset House, where the decoy collection and related art and artifacts are exhibited and stored.

Support is requested to stabilize and protect the Shelburne Museum Decoy Collection which is considered the finest and most comprehensive collection of decoys in the world. This two-year project is designed to control harmful temperature and humidity fluctuations, mitigate the risk of fire, reduce light exposure, improve security conditions, and improve exhibition and "open storage" conditions to allow better physical and intellectual access for the collection which is housed and exhibited in the historic and elegant Dorset House, built in 1832, that is located on the Museum's grounds. Shelburne Museum will employ a successful holistic approach of performing environmental, security, and fire system upgrades, while simultaneously conducting curatorial research and reinterpretation, exhibit upgrades, object conservation, and planning for programming to increase visitors' accessibility to the collections and their intellectual context.

[Media coverage]
Project fields: Arts, General, Cultural History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $350,000 (approved); $350,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2014 – 9/30/2016

Minnesota Historical Society (St. Paul, MN 55102-1903)
Shengyin Xu (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50350-13
[View white paper]
Interdisciplinary Planning for Energy-Efficient Cold Storage

An interdisciplinary study of energy-efficient cold storage options for film, magnetic media, and microfilm collections related to the history of Minnesota.

The Minnesota Historical Society requests $40,000 to conduct an interdisciplinary study of energy-efficient cold storage options for select collections in the Society???s headquarters building, the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul, MN. The levels currently recommended by the International Standards Organization (ISO) for film materials???photographs and slides, film, microfilm, video and audiotape ??? range from 36??F to 70??F and 20-50% relative humidity. Presently, the History Center maintains levels at 62??F and 36% relative humidity, which while standard for general collections, are not ideal for all film media. Using a single protocol for all collections also produces excessive energy loads. The planning grant would be used to thoroughly investigate the feasibility of and plan for a cold-storage area envisioned as a separate vault within the larger storage area, both to attain optimum environmental conditions for audio-visual collections and to reduce energy consumption.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $39,619 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

Abbe Museum (Bar Harbor, ME 04609)
Julia Clark (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50351-13
Implementing Sustainability Strategies for the Abbe Museum’s Collections Environment

The implementation of environmental improvements, consisting of upgrades to the climate control and lighting systems, for a museum that collects, preserves, and exhibits ethnographic and historic material relating to the four tribes of central Maine, collectively known as the Wabanaki. The collections, dating from 12,000 years ago to the present, include archaeological materials from sites around the state, works of contemporary Native American artists, and the library and archival collection of the museum's founder, Dr. Robert Abbe.

The Abbe Museum requests a one-year, $305,200 grant award in support of its Implementing Sustainability Strategies for the Abbe Museum’s Collections Environment project. The goal of the project is to implement three recommendations presented in the NEH-funded Environmental Improvements Report submitted by Watson & Henry Associates and Tuckerbrook Conservation in January 2012. Specifically, a grant award would fund replacement/improvement of the Abbe Museum’s exhibit lighting system, dehumidification system, and chiller in order to meet environmental preservation targets as well as implement economically and environmentally sustainable approaches to the building environment.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $220,000 (approved); $220,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2015

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61801-3644)
Jennifer Teper (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50357-13
Providing Sustainable Climate Control for the Archives Research Center at the University of Illinois

An implementation project to install new climate control and fire suppression systems for the university's Archives Research Center, which holds a diverse collection of primary source materials for the study of American music, academic student life, the history of commercial advertising, and numerous other subjects.

The University of Illinois Library and Archives seeks a Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections implementation grant to replace the existing climate control system for Archives Research Center (ARC), which will improve system operation, effectiveness, and energy efficiency as well as provide a preservationally sound storage environment for valuable archival holdings, which range from paper documents to historic instruments. Installation of a fire suppression system will also be included in the project. This implementation grant is a critical step towards furthering both the Library's commitment to sustainability as well as the preservation of one of the most valuable and unique collections held by the University of Illinois Libraries, which is currently stored in a less-than-ideal environment with no available fire suppression.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2016

Worcester Art Museum (Worcester, MA 01609-3196)
Rita Albertson (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50362-13
Collections Sustainable Storage Initiative

Planning for sustainable storage solutions and upgrading of climate control systems to improve preservation of and access to an encyclopedic collection of 35,000 works of art that span the world's cultures, with highlights in ancient art of the Mediterranean and the Americas, American and European painting, Asian art, decorative arts, and works on paper.

The Worcester Art Museum is seeking a Planning Grant to develop its Collections Sustainable Storage Initiative (CSSI), an updated comprehensive Report and Master Plan of its collections storage spaces, environmental control and safety systems. A multi-disciplinary team is assembled to perform this work including consulting architects and engineers. As part of this effort the Museum will also implement the environmental data logging and analysis recommended by team consultant Image Permanence Institute (IPI). The planning goal is to develop ecologically sound, efficient, and sustainable guidelines supporting the Museum's collections storage spaces, storage furniture systems, environmental monitoring and control systems, as well as safety and protection systems. The CSSI Report will then form the basis for rethinking the existing connections between storage and permanent collections, and guide the way to more efficient and sustainable collections preservation.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2015

Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Worcester, MA 01609-2280)
Kathleen Markees (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50364-13
[View white paper]
Creating a Sustainable Environment to Preserve Access to Humanities, Innovation, and STEM Education Collections at WPI

A partial renovation of the Special Collections wing of the George C. Gordon Library at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, which holds a diverse collection of business records, personal papers, and rare books relating to the history of industry and technical education in the United States. The proposed activities will improve environmental conditions by isolating air handling from the main library building's system, enhancing extant fire protection systems, and installing a new environmental control (HVAC) system for the special collections.

Worcester Polytechnic Institute's George C. Gordon Library seeks an implementation grant to fund the partial renovation of the existing Special Collections Wing to provide adequate environmental conditions and fire protection for the storage and preservation of archival and special collections materials.

[Media coverage]
Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
Lucinda Barnes (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50365-13
Providing a Cold Storage Unit for Preserving the Pacific Film Archive

An implementation project for the purchase and construction of a cold storage unit housing selected portions of the Pacific Film Archive, a collection of over 16,000 films focusing primarily on the cinematic history of the Pacific Rim.

The Pacific Film Archive (PFA) requests a grant in the amount of $350,000 to purchase and install a walk-in cold storage vault at its collection storage facility. The vault will house unique and vulnerable motion picture negatives and earliest generation printing elements—our most important holdings and those in the greatest danger of deterioration. Moving these carefully chosen selections from the PFA collection into a cold storage room constitutes a significant, urgent improvement that adheres to the best practices in the field and will ensure future, public access to this important heritage.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2016

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (Philadelphia, PA 19103-3721)
Harry Philbrick (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50371-13
[View white paper]
Collections and Archives Storage Improvements Planning Project

A planning grant to assess the environmental conditions for a collection of 12,000 works of American art spanning more than 250 years.

In preparation for a planned major renovation of its 1876 Furness-Hewitt Historic Landmark Building, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) requests a $40,000 SCHC planning grant for a Collections and Archives Storage Improvements Planning Project to conduct a study of environmental conditions and potential for improvements through passive design in its current collections storage space and in two spaces identified for possible storage expansion or relocation. The grant will support study of conditions and the work of an interdisciplinary team of consultants, led by Michael C. Henry, PE, AIA (Watson & Henry Associates Preservation Architects & Engineers), who will build on internal expertise to guide PAFA through this process. The consultants will prepare a Collections Storage and Archives Improvements Plan final report describing the suitability, sustainability, and potential for improvements in the current and prospective storage areas identified by PAFA.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

George Eastman House (Rochester, NY 14607-2219)
Ralph Wiegandt (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50373-13
Comprehensive Environmental Assessment

A comprehensive environmental assessment of the George Eastman House, which contains materials related to the history and technology of still and moving images. The museum would develop a plan to improve care of its collections in environmentally and economically sustainable ways. The applicant requests an additional $10,000 to implement recommendations made by the project team.

George Eastman House requests a $40,000 planning grant to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of its building complex, to support a total project budget of $97,869. The planning grant will provide the staff, administration, and governing body with a core document to guide the Museum in implementing sustainable preservation environments for its collections. The Museum also requests $10,000 in supplemental funding to enact a pilot implementation project, crafted with the consulting team, to address a need identified during the site-visit.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/2013 – 3/31/2015

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (San Francisco, CA 94102-4522)
Jill Sterrett (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50381-13
Furnishing Sustainable Photography Storage

The purchase of storage furniture for the museum's 16,000-item photography collection, which spans the history of the medium from 1839 to the present day. The majority of the collections, which include representations of European and American modernism, surrealism, the avant-garde, Western landscape, and Japanese photography, would be housed in a vault adjacent to a new photography study center. This center would be established in a new building designed to achieve LEED Gold certification. A cold storage vault would also be created to protect a growing collection of color photography.

SFMOMA requests a $350,000 NEH SCHC implementation grant to enhance the preservation and use of its distinguished photography collection, numbering 16,000 objects. The proposed project includes purchase and installation of storage furniture for two new vaults, the Cold Storage Vault and the Study Center Storage Vault, which will house the entire photography collection within the museum’s building and allow for collection growth from 2012-2027. These storage systems and vaults are integral to a larger museum building expansion project that complies with the City of San Francisco Green Building Ordinance, among the nation’s most rigorous codes for reduction of waste in the built environment. Successful completion of the project addresses key priorities in SFMOMA’s 2012-2018 strategic plan: advancing sustainable preservation practices for the photography collection, and increasing access to and fostering use of the photography collection by the public and scholars.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2015

Detroit Institute of Arts (Detroit, MI 48202)
Barbara Heller (Co Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present); Terry Birkett (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50390-13
Detroit Institute of Arts Storage Upgrade and Rehousing Proposal

Renovation of four art storage rooms at the Detroit Institute of Arts, to house works of Asian, Native American, Pre-Columbian, and Oceanic art, and American, Canadian, African American, and modern and contemporary furniture.

The Detroit Institute of Arts requests NEH support to renovate four art storage rooms at the museum. The renovated rooms will house works from the DIA's outstanding collections of Asian art, Native American, Pre-Columbian, and Oceanic art, and American, Canadian, African-American, and modern and contemporary furniture. These works are presently stored in twenty-nine separate storage rooms throughout the museum. The project involves implementing environmental improvements and lighting upgrades, and installing necessary storage equipment, including powder-coated cabinets, racking and platforms with inert decking, and wall screens. Works of art will be moved into their assigned renovated, acclimatized and newly-designed storage rooms, unpacked, reorganized and properly rehoused to ensure their long term conservation and preservation. This will facilitate display, loans, scholarly study and research, and make the collections more accessible to the public.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2017

Dance Theatre of Harlem, Inc. (New York, NY 10031-1896)
Judy Tyrus (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50394-13
Dance Theatre of Harlem Planning Grant for DTH Archival Preservation Plan

The commissioning and delivery of a comprehensive preservation plan that will assess and identify cost-effective, energy-efficient solutions for the optimal preservation environment and conditions for on-site archival materials in the Everett Center for the Performing Arts, which holds the Dance Theatre of Harlem's collections on the history of modern dance in the United States. An additional $9,000 will support upgrades to the current Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system and to the lighting.

Dance Theatre of Harlem (DTH) requests a $40,000 planning grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections program to engage a team of professional consultants to develop a Preservation Plan for the DTH Archives. We are also requesting an additional $9,000 to begin implementing a few catalytic recommendations from the preservation plan. The preservation consultant, architect and engineer will work with DTH and Dance Heritage Coalition (DHC) staff to develop a comprehensive Preservation Plan that would properly assess the physical structure of the places where archival materials are kept, examine existing environmental conditions, and develop sustainable preservation solutions for the archive collection as well as provide recommendations for expanding access to the collection.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $49,000 (approved); $49,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 7/31/2015

Rochester Museum and Science Center (Rochester, NY 14607-2101)
Kathryn Murano (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50396-13
Developing Intentional Collections Storage

A planning grant to develop sustainable and efficient storage in a basement storage area for a portion of the museum's 1.2 million objects documenting Western New York's historical, natural, cultural, and technological heritage.

The Rochester Museum & Science Center (RMSC), located in Rochester, New York, is requesting $50,000 for a one-year period to develop a plan to better preserve the community's at-risk humanities collections through sustainable initiatives. The need for a storage area that provides safe, secure and appropriate environments for the museum's collections is the RMSC's most urgent preservation challenge. A Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections grant will allow us to work with expert consultants to create a plan that will transform the museum's basement collections storage and management spaces into a sustainable, space- and energy-efficient collections storage facility where the most environmentally sensitive humanities collections from problematic off-site storage areas can be relocated.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

Pepperdine University (Malibu, CA 90263-0002)
Mark Roosa (Project Director, 12/06/2012 - present)
PF-50401-13
[View white paper]
Pepperdine University Libraries Sustainable Preservation Environment Project

Planning for temperature and humidity control, lighting and energy usage, and sustainable architectural design for the holdings at Pepperdine University Libraries Special Collections, including materials on the history of American religion, the history of the university, and the history of southern California.

The Pepperdine University Libraries requests a planning grant of $32,735 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to fund an investigation into innovative and sustainable methods of preserving our humanities holdings in Payson Library???s Special Collections. Funding for this proposal would support the hiring of nationally recognized consultants to advise on three specific aspects of rare material preservation and display, including: 1) Temperature and humidity; 2) Lighting and energy usage; and 3) Sustainable architectural design. The goal of the project is to develop an integrated sustainability plan achieved through an interdisciplinary team-based planning process that can serve as a model for other libraries. Support from the Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections program will help us explore best practices for advanced sustainable energy use.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $32,735 (approved); $32,735 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/2013 – 10/31/2014

Historic Charleston Foundation (Charleston, SC 29402-1120)
Brandy Culp (Project Director, 12/13/2012 - present)
PF-50409-13
Climate Assessment for the Aiken-Rhett House Museum Collection

A yearlong planning project to provide for a sustainable means of managing the interior environment of the Aiken-Rhett House Museum for the long-term preservation of the collections and the historic interior finishes. The Aiken-Rhett House, c. 1820, managed by the Historic Charleston Foundation (HCF), is a rare example of a nearly intact, 19th-century urban townhouse complex, containing original objects and finishes in the main house and dependency buildings. The proposed study would use targeted monitoring techniques to measure temperature, relative humidity, dew point temperature, and air speed throughout the house. The resulting information would provide key insights into the deterioration of the architectural fabric of the house and the exhibited collections. The planning team would provide recommendations for more effective light control (guidelines for operating window shades, windows, and doors), natural ventilation, and minimal heating, as well as improvements to existing pest control protocols and periodic dehumidification.

Historic Charleston Foundation (HCF) is seeking a Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collection Planning Grant in the amount of $40,000 to develop a comprehensive plan for providing a sustainable means of managing the interior environment of the Aiken-Rhett House Museum for the longevity of the collections and the historic interior finishes. This project will enable HCF to better understand and eventually mitigate the direct effects of climate on the condition of the collection and historic finishes at the Aiken-Rhett House Museum. It is necessary to further study current conditions and strategically plan sustainable, low-impact methods of intervention in order to better manage the interior environment and preserve the collection.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/2013 – 11/30/2015

Monhegan Historical and Cultural Museum Association (Monhegan, ME 04852)
Jennifer Pye (Project Director, 12/13/2012 - present)
PF-50410-13
[View white paper]
Planning for a Sustainable Preservation Environment

Planning for improved environmental conditions to protect a collection of art, photography, and material culture that chronicles the history of Monhegan Island, Maine, ranging from early Native American fishing sites to an art colony that has flourished from the mid-1800s to the present. The planning team would investigate non-mechanical options for reducing humidity and improving conditions in the historic Lighthouse Keeper's House and the Gallery, the museum's seasonal display facilities, and optimize the existing climate control systems in the off-season storage vaults to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption.

The Monhegan Museum's Planning for a Sustainable Preservation Environment project will assemble a group of skilled professionals to work collaboratively to develop a plan that addresses several serious environmental issues that pose a threat to the long-term care and conservation of the Museum's varied and significant collection of artwork, documents, photographs, and artifacts chronicling the unique history and culture of Monhegan Island, Maine. This team's focus will be on two distinct areas of remediation, the first being the investigation and small scale implementation of effective non-mechanical climate-control options for the Museum's seasonal display facilities, and the second being the pursuit of optimizing the existing climate-control systems in the Museum's off-season storage vaults with an eye towards increased energy-efficiency, and ultimately, reduced energy consumption.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $25,500 (approved); $25,500 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2013 – 2/28/2015

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)
Eunice Haugen (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50252-12
[View white paper]
Space Planning: The Final Frontier

A planning grant to develop options for an efficient environmental system to preserve 12,950 historic textiles and pieces of apparel from around the world housed in the university's museum of design.

We seek funding to plan a process of renovating and refurbishing the Goldstein Museum of Design's (GMD's) largest collection storage area, which houses textiles and non-label historic costume (apparel). The plan would be used to prepare to seek funding for implementation of the renovation and re-housing of objects stored in this storage space. We estimate this planning to take one year, beginning in the fall of 2012. As a part of this plan, the museum staff, environmental engineer, textile conservator and the UMN facilities manager would assess the museum's environmental systems, set points and policies that address the balance of environmental preservation (reducing one's carbon footprint) and create a sustainable climate in which the artifacts can be stored and preserved for generations to come. The 1,255 square feet collection storage area that will be the subject of our planning is home to 13,000 objects or approximately 45% of the collection.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $31,068 (approved); $31,068 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013

Juneau-Douglas City Museum (Juneau, AK 99801)
Jane Lindsey (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50253-12
[View white paper]
An Energy-Efficient Climate Control System for the Juneau-Douglas City Museum

An implementation project to purchase and install a heating, humidity, and ventilation system to improve the preservation environment for a collection of art, artifacts, and historic documents and photographs relating to the history of the city of Juneau.

The Juneau-Douglas City Museum requests $300,000 from the National Endowment of Humanities, Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections to install a heating, humidity, and ventilation upgrade that will correct and stabilize internal temperature deficits in our historic building that houses our collections. Housed in the first library built by public funds in Alaska in 1951 as a territory of the United States, the Juneau-Douglas City Museum resides in a building listed on the national register of historic places for the official 49-star flag raising ceremony when Alaska achieved statehood in 1959. Since initial construction in 1951, this facility has had no upgrades to its heating system, and has no integrated heating, ventilation and air cooling. The Juneau-Douglas City Museum is the only Museum in Alaska dedicated to the city of Juneau’s art and history collection

Project fields: History, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $275,000 (approved); $275,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Moravian Archives, Bethlehem (Bethlehem, PA 18018-2757)
Paul Peucker (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50255-12
[View white paper]
The Moravian Archives Storage Renovation Project

An implementation project involving the purchase of storage furniture, the replacement of lighting fixtures, and the rehousing of more than 100 art works and 450 ethnographic objects and textiles documenting the history of the Moravian Church in North America from the 18th century to the present.

The Moravian Archives in Bethlehem, Pa., (MAB), requests an implementation grant of $148,085 to renovate the storage space in the facility's larger vault in order to improve storage conditions of its multifaceted collections related to the Moravian Church in North America, detailing the history of this important transatlantic religious group from the 18th century to the present. Specific project renovations would include 1) the installation of compact, moveable shelving, 2) installation of a hanging storage system for framed materials, 3) re-housing of object collection into acid-free boxes, and 4) replacement of outdated fluorescent lighting with new energy-efficient lighting outfitted with UV filtering sleeves. These improvements would address many goals outlined in recent preservation assessments, and would ensure the preservation and continued access to MAB collections.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $148,085 (approved); $148,085 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/2012 – 6/30/2013

Northern Kentucky University W. Frank Steely Library (Highland Heights, KY 41076)
Lois Hamill (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50256-12
[View white paper]
W. Frank Steely Library Special Collections & Archives Sustainable Preservation Environment Planning Project

A planning project for a sustainable preservation environment for three special collections that focus on the history and culture of northern Kentucky and the university's archives.

The W. Frank Steely Library, Eva G. Farris Special Collections & Schlachter University Archives (SC&A), at Northern Kentucky University (NKU) requests $40,000 plus an additional $10,000 for recommended activities for a National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections planning grant. This would fund the next phase of a comprehensive plan to create and maintain a sustainable preservation environment for the long term protection of its collections. This planning grant project would result in the evaluation of the SC&A’s existing environmental climate and performance characteristics and operational practices related to the current HVAC system servicing the Archives. The results would drive a plan to develop a sustainable preservation environment with specific steps for improved operation, effectiveness and energy efficiency. The project would be a collaborative effort of Steely SC&A personnel, NKU’s Facilities Management division, and preservation research experts from the Image Permanence Institute.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Wilderstein Preservation (Rhinebeck, NY 12572)
Duane Watson (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50259-12
[View white paper]
Planning for a Sustainable Preservation Environment in the Wilderstein Mansion

A planning project to identify ways to create and maintain sustainable environmental conditions in Wilderstein, a historic house museum with collections of fine and decorative arts, manuscript materials, books, photographs, maps, deeds, sheet music, and architectural and landscape drawings that were acquired and preserved by four generations of the Suckley family who lived in the house from 1852 to 1991.

An interdisciplinary team led by Michael Henry, engineer and architect, Penelope Watson of Watson and Henry Associates, conservators Richard Kerschner of the Shelburne Museum and Alan Balicki of The New-York Historical Society, and staff from Wilderstein will analyze interior climate data recorded over a two-year period and will meet as a team to observe the building structure, systems and conditions in which collections are stored and exhibited. The team will investigate the environmental management features of the original architecture, especially those related to ventilation and control of solar gain. Two workshops which function as intensive working sessions will be scheduled: "Environmental Management Objectives" and "Environmental Management Strategies." The results of these workshops will form the basis for the final report and plan for the Wilderstein Mansion Sustainable Preservation Environment Plan.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2014

Carnegie Institute (Pittsburgh, PA 15213)
Sandra Olsen (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50260-12
[View white paper]
Anthropology Collection Storage Improvement and Sustainability Planning for the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

A planning project for improved storage and environmental controls in the museum's annex building, which houses a large anthropological and ethnological collection representing North, Central, and South American cultures, as well as those of Africa, Asia, and Oceania.

The Section of Anthropology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History possesses one of the world's outstanding collections. With more than 1.6 million archaeological and ethnological objects representing most of the continents, this collection deserves the best preventive conservation and storage possible. The Anthropology collections currently suffer from overcrowding and are intermingled with other areas and decentralized. The overcrowding puts existing collections at risk, makes it more cumbersome to use them, and limits acquisition of new objects. In order to implement more efficient space usage and improve collection care, it is imperative to begin planning improvements. CMNH Anthropology is already strongly committed to sustainable practices, but also understands that every organization and department can introduce additional improvements. This planning grant will enable investigation of methods to further increase sustainability at our facility.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,521 (approved); $39,521 (awarded)
Grant period: 12/1/2012 – 11/30/2013

Winterthur Museum (Winterthur, DE 19735)
Lois Price (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50265-12
Winterthur Sustainable Preservation Environment Project

An implementation project to improve the management of environmental conditions for the protection of the museum's collections, which include nearly 90,000 fine and decorative arts objects made or used in America between 1640 and 1860. A new climate control and integrated monitoring system would be installed in the museum, galleries, and research library, improving the collection environments in more energy-efficient ways.

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library is committed to lifelong learning in the humanities and to the sustainable preservation of the collections that support this mission. To this end, Winterthur requests a $350,000 NEH SCHC implementation grant as part of an $873,338 project to enhance the preservation of the collections and reduce collection-related energy costs. Installation of a new HVAC control system will effectively manage energy and the preservation environment in Winterthur’s three major collection buildings–the Museum, Galleries, and Research Building. These buildings house one of America’s outstanding collections of decorative arts and research material related to material culture as well as extensive programming, exhibitions, conservation and scientific research facilities, and two graduate programs critical to training cultural heritage professionals.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $350,000 (approved); $350,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 9/30/2015

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (Williamsburg, VA 23187)
Patricia Silence (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50269-12
[View white paper]
Evaluation of Mechanical and Control Systems Serving the Art Museums at Colonial Williamsburg

A planning project to evaluate climate control and lighting systems in the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum and the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, which house collections of fine and decorative art objects made or used in America or Great Britain between 1680 and 1830, and folk art holdings of paintings, sculpture, carvings, textiles, and pottery crafted by minimally trained and untrained American artists between the early 18th century and the present. The aim of the project is to identify the best methods to meet preservation goals, while doing so in energy-efficient and cost-effective ways.

This NEH planning grant would be used to evaluate mechanical and control systems serving the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum and the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, with the goals of a) developing a plan to replace and upgrade systems and thereby improve reliability, performance and efficiency, and b) creating and sustaining a safer environment for the Colonial Williamsburg collections. Targeted areas include evaluation of: 1) the condition and performance of mechanical equipment, especially the 1984 air handlers and heating plant; 2) the condition and performance of the chiller plant, including assessment of plate heat exchanger fouling of modular chillers used with open tower condensing loop; 3) optimum control strategies and BAS programming to maintain museum environmental conditions with minimal energy use; 4) existing BAS operations and maintenance support; 5) lighting upgrade options to reduce energy usage and light exposure to the collections.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $50,000 (approved); $50,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 2/28/2014

National Society of the Colonial Dames of America (Washington, DC 19140)
Karen Daly (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50272-12
[View white paper]
Interdisciplinary Assessment and Plan for an Energy Efficient HVAC System for Dumbarton House

Planning for sustainable environmental conditions to preserve humanities collections in Dumbarton House, a Federal period historic house museum with holdings of furniture, fine and decorative arts, household goods, clothing and textiles, as well as books, manuscripts, and maps that document the history of Georgetown and Washington, D.C., in the early 1800s.

Dumbarton House tells the story of life in the City of Washington during the formation of the early republic and a new national identity. This project will explore and recommend sustainable approaches to collections care and preventive conservation for the house and its collections. Recent failures in the 21-year-old patchwork HVAC system demonstrate that a planned upgrade, based on a thoughtful review, not a crisis-response, is a critical institutional responsibility. Our advisors have voiced concern over our ability to efficiently and effectively manage the current system. An interdisciplinary team of sustainability, collections and energy experts will review environmental conditions records, and all assessments, and then explore and recommend a holistic approach to measured, responsive, system and operational changes. We expect requests for energy audits and a geothermal assessment. The team will formally recommend next-steps to the board for implementation.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $37,965 (approved); $37,965 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013

Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia (Atlanta, GA 30334-9056)
Christine Wiseman (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - 01/27/2014); Christopher Davidson (Project Director, 01/28/2014 - present)
PF-50274-12
Sustaining Georgia's Historical Records

An implementation project to upgrade environmental control and lighting systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce costs, while improving preservation environments for government records and manuscripts documenting nearly three centuries of Georgia's history and culture.

The Georgia Archives seeks to expand upon energy saving measures initiated over the past two years by updating and further automating the heating ventilation air conditioning system (HVAC), updating lighting in the research library and original documents reading room, and recommissioning the HVAC system. The fundamental goals of the project are to increase energy saving efforts established by the Archives??? environmental management team, continue to maintain a preservation environment that provides for the best possible conditions for the permanent storage of nearly three centuries of historical records with the least possible consumption of energy, while gathering and disseminating data that will be of use to other cultural organizations who undertake similar projects.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $122,147 (approved); $122,147 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 9/30/2015

Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts (Minneapolis, MN 55404-3506)
Brian Kraft (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50290-12
[View white paper]
LED Lighting Project

An implementation project to upgrade the current lighting system by replacing halogen with LED bulbs in galleries that exhibit light-sensitive works, including prints and drawings, textiles, African, Asian, and Native American art.

A preventive conservation project, the LED lighting project will upgrade the Minneapolis Institute of Arts' current lighting system. Specifically, the project will replace fifty-watt Halogen lamps with twelve-watt non-UV/IR emitting LED lamps in first and second floor galleries, special exhibition galleries, and study rooms containing light sensitive works of art at-risk for irreversible damage. Both energy efficient and cost-effective, LED lamps will significantly enhance the MIAs ability to safeguard and sustainably preserve its world-renowned encyclopedic art collection for future generations. Furthermore, the optimal color rendering properties of the LED lamps will make it possible for the MIA to present art works under complimentary light conditions for the benefit of current visitors. The project will begin in October 2012, following multiple years of testing including a one-year testing phase of LED lighting in the museum's third floor galleries.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $60,415 (approved); $60,415 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 6/30/2013

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Stephen Enniss (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - 02/13/2014); Daniel De Simone (Project Director, 02/14/2014 - present)
PF-50296-12
Folger Sustainable Preservation Environment Project

An implementation project to improve environmental conditions in the library's storage facility and reading room containing 256,000 books; 75,000 rare manuscripts; 250,000 playbills; 50,000 prints, photographs and drawings; and audiovisual materials, all of which pertain to the literature, history, and art of Shakespeare and the Elizabethan period.

The Folger Shakespeare Library requests an implementation grant to fund Phase 2 of the Folger Sustainable Preservation Environment Project (FSPEP), capital improvements to three critical air handler units to help create a sustainable preservation environment for the long-term storage of the Folger’s unparalleled collection of Shakespeare and early modern European resources by 2017. These capital improvements (and the operational changes dependent on them) will ensure that lower summer dew points can be maintained in the Folger vaults and New Reading Room, and follow the recommended actions of Phase 1 of FSPEP, a one-year in-depth study of mechanical system optimization and environmental data in critical storage areas made possible by an NEH Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections planning grant.

Project fields: British Literature
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $350,000 (approved); $350,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2016

Stearns History Museum (St. Cloud, MN 56301)
Charlene Akers (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50297-12
[View white paper]
Environmental Systems for the Archives of the Stearns County Historical Society, Inc.

An implementation project to install a heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system for the museum's archival storage area, which contains 1,300 linear feet of documents and business records; over 500,000 photographic images; 1,800 taped oral histories; and 400 architectural blueprints documenting the history of the central Minnesota region.

The Stearns County Historical Society is requesting support for an HVAC system for its 1,300 sq. ft. archival storage area. The total cost for the project is $75,047. Of this amount, $33,503 is requested from NEH. The purchase and installation of the equipment will require three months and two months of evaluation. As a result of installing a designated HVAC system in the archival storage area, temperature and humidity levels will remain stable throughout the year: 68 degrees Fahrenheit, +/- 2 degrees F., and humidity levels will be 40%, +/-5% RH. The efficiency of the system will be 95%. This will result in $2,000 to $3,000 savings for the area. The savings will be applied to the conservation of the archival collection. The 8,000 plus Research Center patrons will have available to them environmentally stable documents, photographs, negatives, oral histories, diaries, and numerous family and business records which can be used to support sound humanities scholarship.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $33,503 (approved); $33,503 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/2013 – 6/30/2013

Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390)
Amy McColl (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50306-12
[View white paper]
Swarthmore College Special Collections Preservation Planning Project

A planning project to evaluate environmental conditions and climate control systems and to develop recommendations for sustainable preservation strategies for the college's special collections: the Friends Historical Library, the Peace Collection, and the McCabe Library Rare Book Room.

Swarthmore College requests an NEH planning grant of $32,000 to hire an outside consultant to assess the mechanical systems and recommend sustainable environmental practices for the long-term stewardship of its three most valuable, distinctive, and distinguished humanities collections: Friends Historical Library, the Peace Collection, and the McCabe Library Rare Book Room. The College will match the grant with an in-kind contribution in excess of $8,000. This grant would enable us to fully evaluate current environmental conditions by engaging an expert consultant with a proven track record in very similar projects, and gain recommendations on how we might best address the specific problems that are adversely affecting these unique and rare collections. The collections are used regularly by students and a wide variety of humanities scholars interested in Quakerism and the history of social reform movements in North America during the last two centuries.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $32,000 (approved); $32,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Albuquerque Museum Foundation (Albuquerque, NM 87194-7006)
Steven Pettit (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50315-12
[View white paper]
The Albuquerque Museum Storage and Environmental Consulting Project

A planning project for improved environmental conditions and storage for a diverse collection of 25,000 Native American, Spanish Colonial, and Anglo-American objects and documents relating to the history and art of the Rio Grande Valley and the Albuquerque area.

The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History is embarking on Phase II of its commitment to renovate the museum structure, update permanent history exhibits, and enlarge collections storage. The primary goal of the planning grant project would deal specifically with developing a comprehensive strategy that would allow the museum to best utilize the additional 9,500 sq. ft. of storage included in the upcoming building renovation; generate a prioritized collections content survey in a context of preventative conservation mandates related to specific collections types; acquire specialized storage equipment meeting professionally accepted standards in all storage areas; identify conservation treatment priorities; address and formalize off-site storage facility policies and procedures; and develop targeted funding resources that will allow the museum to continue collections-related upgrades into the foreseeable future.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $18,378 (approved); $18,378 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 6/30/2013

Baltimore Museum of Art (Baltimore, MD 21218-3827)
Alan Dirican (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - 10/29/2013); Daniel Bleemke (Project Director, 10/30/2013 - present)
PF-50319-12
[View white paper]
Building Automation System replacement

An implementation project to install a new building automation system that would enable more effective control and continuous monitoring of environmental conditions for the protection of the museum's collection of 90,000 works of art. The collection includes significant holdings of European and American works on paper, African art, Asian art, American fine and decorative arts, and European and American modern and contemporary works.

The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) requests $350,000 toward the $1.5 million cost of upgrading its outdated Building Automation System (BAS), which controls the temperature and humidity levels required to preserve the Museum's outstanding collection of 90,000 works of art. The new BAS will maximize the impact of a decade of improvements to mechanical, lighting, and electrical systems that have complemented an energy conservation program, ongoing improvements to the building envelope, and a proactive energy procurement program. The new BAS is the next step in the Museum's commitment to sustainability and efficiency in the stewardship of its collection. The replacement of the BAS is part of a $24.5 million capital program scheduled to conclude in 2014, the BMA's 100th Anniversary.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 9/30/2014

Denver Museum of Nature and Science (Denver, CO 80205)
Stephen Nash (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50321-12
Sustainably Rehousing the Denver Museum of Nature & Science American Ethnology Collection

The purchase of up to 135 custom-designed cabinets to house a portion of the 21,996 Native American cultural artifacts in the American Ethnology Collection, which would be relocated to a new state-of-the-art Rocky Mountain Science Collections Center in the fall of 2013.

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science seeks a $349,059 Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections implementation grant to purchase 135 cabinets in which to sustainably re-house the nationally significant American Ethnology Collection (AEC) in the Rocky Mountain Science Collections Center (RMSCC). Currently under construction and on target for LEED-Platinum certification, the RMSCC is scheduled for completion in fall 2013. Energy sources will include a ground source heat pump, solar-heated hot water, and a photovoltaic array. Systems will provide sustainable preservation. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system will buffer temperature and humidity fluctuations. Cabinets will be installed on mobile carriages to maximize efficiency. Energy efficient lights will be controlled by occupation sensors and timers. Concentric zones of increased security will protect the collection from theft. Cabinets will provide a final buffer against threats to the AEC.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2013 – 12/31/2017

Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site, Inc. (Philadelphia, PA 19130)
Sara Jane (Sally) Elk (Project Director, 12/05/2011 - present)
PF-50322-12
[View white paper]
Evaluation of Potential Collection Storage Areas at Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site.

A planning project to determine storage solutions for 2,600 artifacts and 1,300 publications, archival records, photographs, and oral history recordings of prison life dating from the late 18th to mid-20th centuries.

Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site, Inc.( ESPHS) seeks a $40,000 Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections grant to conduct a planning study to assess the potential of two historic structures for transformation into a facility for the “Abandoned Collection” of items left on the site during the penitentiary’s period of disuse from 1971-1994. ESPHS will also evaluate present storage of the donated "New Collection," housed in the staff offices. The organization will consider practical aspects such as visitor circulation, availability of electricity and mechanical systems, and overall environmental sustainability. During the grant period, the buildings will be evaluated, previous studies will be reviewed, nearly one year of environmental monitoring data will be analyzed, and staff, architects, and a conservator will consult to develop an Environmental Management Plan. The final plan will reflect cost-effective solutions for managing two collections on a large site with many needs.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2012 – 12/31/2014

Litchfield Historical Society (Litchfield, CT 06759)
Julie Leone (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - 09/06/2011); Jessica Jenkins (Project Director, 09/07/2011 - present)
PF-50139-11
[View white paper]
Improving Environmental Conditions to Preserve Collections

An implementation project to improve environmental conditions in the society's 1901 Noyes building, the primary exhibition space for fine and decorative arts, furniture, textiles, and other historical artifacts that document the history of Litchfield. The building envelope would be tightened to minimize air and water penetration; energy-efficient LED lighting, climate controls, and an energy management system would be installed, along with compact shelving for the storage of collections.

The Litchfield Historical Society seeks a Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Implementation Grant to execute specific recommendations made by an interdisciplinary team of experts consisting of an architect, engineer and museum conservator. The project is designed to create a preservation environment that provides the best possible conditions for the collection with the least possible consumption of energy. The grant will repair degraded brick and masonry and repair and/or replace ineffective gutters and leaders; update and repair the existing HVAC system; install an energy management system to integrate HVAC systems of all four museum buildings; purchase PEM2 dataloggers to more effectively monitor conditions in each building; update and replace heat intensive lighting; install space saver shelving to replace outdated and overcrowded stationary shelving in the Collections Storage room; and purchase supplies to rehouse specific collections.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $320,000 (approved); $320,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 9/30/2013

Rhode Island Historical Society (Providence, RI 02906-1012)
Bernard Fishman (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - 09/06/2011); Christiana Grefe (Project Director, 09/09/2011 - present)
PF-50152-11
Environmental and Security Upgrades to Preserve Library Collections

An implementation project to install a sustainable environmental control system and make building improvements and security upgrades to preserve collections documenting the history of Rhode Island from pre-European contact to the present.

The Rhode Island Historical Society (RIHS) seeks $400,000 to support a $1.3 million project to install an environmental and humidity control system to protect the most important collection of Rhode Island historical material. The upgrade uses geothermal and solar components to elevate efficiencies and enhance long-term sustainability. It will secure the building envelope from moisture penetration, improve its thermal qualities, and enhance safety and security systems. The RIHS has successfully completed similar systems and complex construction projects. Project designs have been approved by the state historic preservation organization. Fundraising is well advanced and an NEH award is expected to be the last element needed to complete the effort. Recently reaccredited by the American Association of Museums, the RIHS sustains high standards of collections care and management. Current RIHS strategic plans have identified the Library upgrade as its highest collections-related priority.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 6/30/2015

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art (Hartford, CT 06103-2911)
Linda Roth (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - present)
PF-50157-11
[View white paper]
Preserving American and European Furniture and Decorative Arts

Implementation of improved storage for the museum's American and European furniture, metalwork, ceramics, glass, and sculpture. These 12,600 objects would be rehoused in new storage furniture in the basement of the Morgan building, which would be reconfigured to provide a secure zone with improved climate control, security, fire protection, and lighting systems.

The Wadsworth Atheneum respectfully requests $400,000 in outright grant funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities Grants for Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections program. Funds will be used to acquire custom-designed storage equipment for its furniture, metalwork, ceramics, glass, and sculpture collections as part of the renovations scheduled for Phase I of the Collection Storage Renovation Project. Phase I comprises the reconfiguration of the basement of the Museum's Morgan building to create and outfit storage rooms for its furniture, metalwork, ceramics, glass, and sculpture collections.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $325,000 (approved); $325,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 2/28/2014

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305)
Michael Keller (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - present)
PF-50169-11
[View white paper]
Planning: Upgrading Climate Control to Preserve Audiovisual Collections

A planning project to provide stable temperature and relative humidity to the storage areas of the Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound, which possesses over 350,000 music and spoken sound items with strengths in jazz, opera, symphonic chamber music, and oral histories.

The Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound proposes a project to plan for providing stable temperature and relative humidity in its collections storage areas and providing customized shelving to meet the storage needs of the archive's disc collection. The project will be an opportunity to re-imagine the space in terms of energy efficiency to find the best possible balance between stewardship of cultural heritage collections and stewardship of the environment. In the course of a year, the project team will evaluate factors contributing to the current collections environment, including the shelving, the storage area, the HVAC system, and the building envelope. Working in collaboration with library and campus staff, the consultants will provide specific recommendations for improvements. The resulting report will outline plans to optimize the storage space for preservation, systems performance, and space usage, and will lay the foundation for projects to implement these necessary changes.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,508 (approved); $39,508 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 11/30/2012

University of Texas, Arlington (Arlington, TX 76019-9800)
Ann Hodges (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - 07/24/2014); Brenda McClurkin (Project Director, 07/25/2014 - present)
PF-50176-11
Creating Cold Storage Vault to Preserve Archival Collections Related to Texas History

Construction of a cold storage vault for approximately 5 million photographic negatives held by the library's special collections department providing a visual record of the history and culture of Texas from the late 19th century to the present.

The University of Texas at Arlington Library requests $400,000 to support the construction of a cold storage vault to stabilize and preserve more than 5 million photographic negatives that are at severe risk of imminent loss to accelerating deterioration. The negatives constitute irreplaceable documentation of Texas culture and history and of the natural and built environments of the Dallas-Fort Worth area. They are heavily used for a variety of purposes, from scholarly publications to family research to renovation of historic buildings. Consultants have advised that cold storage is the most cost-effective means to preserve the negatives. It will dramatically retard their deterioration, allowing time for selective digitization to proceed in a carefully planned fashion. The funding would build upon a solid foundation created by years of staff work, recent advice received from expert consultants, and the identification of an extremely suitable location for the vault.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $300,000 (approved); $300,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 8/31/2015

Museum of Northern Arizona (Flagstaff, AZ 86001)
Elaine Hughes (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - present)
PF-50204-11
[View white paper]
Purchase Compactor Shelving and Acid-Free Supplies for Preserving Archival Collections

An implementation project involving the purchase of storage furniture and supplies to consolidate and rehouse 3,566 linear feet of anthropological archives currently held in several locations on the museum's campus.

The Museum of Northern Arizona (MNA) requests a total of $164,858 from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a three year project to address the preventative preservation needs of archives at MNA. The goal of this project is to improve archive storage conditions while also upgrading intellectual control and increasing ease of access to these important records. Most of MNA's archival records are in dispersed storage locations and are poorly housed in acidic or unstable containers. To achieve the project goal MNA's objectives are to relocate 3566 linear feet of archives from dispersed buildings for assessment, rehousing and consolidation in the Easton Collection Center (ECC) which is LEEDs certified at the Platinum level. With NEH support MNA will purchase rehousing supplies and compactor shelving for installation on rails already in place in the ECC.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $139,858 (approved); $139,858 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 8/31/2014

Springfield Library and Museums Association (Springfield, MA 01103-1733)
Wendy Stayman (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - 11/13/2012)
PF-50208-11
[View white paper]
Improving Climate Control to Preserve Collections of the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum

The purchase and installation of climate modification equipment in a 19th-century historic building that houses unique art of the collector George Walter Vincent Smith, including Japanese armor, Tiffany glass, Chinese cloisonné, Middle Eastern textiles and carpets, and 19th-century American paintings.

The Springfield Museums request funding for the installation of sustainable climate modification in the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum in Springfield, MA. The 1896 American Renaissance building houses a cross-cultural humanities collection of 6,000 objects that include Asian Decorative arts, Japanese Arms & Armor, American paintings and a plaster cast gallery. The goal of the proposed system is to add air-conditioning and ventilation to the Museum to create a stable environment for exhibition displays and the large collections storage area as well as a temperature appropriate to human comfort without compromising the structural and historical integrity of the building. Implementation of this project will enable the introduction of cooling and superior air filtration to the gallery areas - stabilizing the temperature, modifying relative humidity fluctuations, and improving the air quality. This will have a profound positive impact on the preservation of the Museum’s collections

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $320,000 (approved); $320,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 8/31/2012

Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (Hartford, CT 06105)
Katherine Kane (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - present)
PF-50212-11
Preserving Collections in the 1871 Harriet Beecher Stowe House

An implementation project to improve conditions in the 1871 Harriet Beecher Stowe House where household furnishings, paintings, drawings, and decorative art items created or acquired by Stowe are exhibited and stored. A water mist fire suppression system would be installed, the thermal performance of the building envelope would be improved, climate control would be upgraded and extended throughout the house, and light control strategies would be implemented.

The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (HBSC) seeks implementation funding in the amount of $400,000 for Phase II of a multiyear project to protect the Stowe Center’s nationally significant collections. This request is for environmental and climate control improvements and fire suppression in the 1871 Harriet Beecher Stowe House, replacing outdated and minimally functional equipment, conditioning spaces that have never been conditioned and adding fire suppression. HBSC successfully completed Phase I, the Library/Archives Storage Vault, and that experienced team of staff and consultants will conduct Phase II. Improving environmental conditions in the Stowe House is the highest institutional preservation and strategic priority.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $335,000 (approved); $235,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 12/31/2016

Museum of New Mexico Foundation (Santa Fe, NM 87504)
Mark MacKenzie (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - present)
PF-50215-11
Planning: Environmental and Lighting Systems, Museum of International Folk Art and the New Mexico Museum of Art

A planning project to explore energy-efficient strategies for the care of collections at the Museum of International Folk Art, which holds one of the largest collections of folk art in the world, and the New Mexico Museum of Art, with a collection of late 19th- and 20th-century art of the Southwest.

The Museum of International Folk Art (MOIFA) and the New Mexico Museum of Art (NMMoA) request a planning grant from the NEH Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections program to assess environmental needs and outline a plan for energy-efficient upgrades within collections areas. The proposed project involves convening an interdisciplinary team in order to determine new energy-efficient lighting strategies for MOIFA, as well as climate control systems improvements for NMMoA. The goal of this project for MOIFA will be a lighting assessment of all collections areas, with a focus on the outdated and harmful exhibit case lighting within the Girard collection exhibit. NMMoA's goal is to assess its lighting systems and to develop a plan to stabilize its environment while increasing the energy efficiency of its climate control systems. Severe relative humidity fluctuations within the original 1917 building adversely affect the building and the museum's collections.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2012 – 1/31/2016

Museo de Arte de Ponce (Ponce, PR )
Angel Santiago (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - present)
PF-50224-11
[View white paper]
Purchase Storage Furniture to Preserve Collections

The purchase and installation of high-density mobile storage equipment for the Museum's collection of 1,259 three-dimensional objects, which include 19th-century Western sculpture, pre-Columbian Caribbean cultural artifacts, and modern Puerto Rican folk art.

The proposed project addresses Museo de Arte de Ponce's need to strengthen and enhance the care of its 1,259 three-dimensional objects collection. The project goal is to achieve a significant improvement in the visible storage area through acquisition and installation of a high density, manual, mobile, storage system. After a two- year renovation and expansion project, Museo de Arte de Ponce reopened its facilities on November 14, 2010, with a new 38,000 sq ft Annex Building that includes a 4,090 sq ft visible artworks storage of which 717 sq ft are dedicated to guarantee proficient space for the storage of this collection. Acquisition of storage units will contribute significantly to the long-term conservation of the objects, to prolong their useful life and guarantee a lifelong access for future generations.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $149,800 (approved); $149,800 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 9/30/2012

National Czech and Slovak Museum and Library (Cedar Rapids, IA 52404)
Stefanie Kohn (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - present)
PF-50231-11
[View white paper]
Purchasing Storage Furniture to Rehouse and Make Collections Accessible

An implementation project to purchase storage furniture and environmental and light monitoring equipment to preserve library and artifact collections on the history and culture of Czech and Slovak immigrants and their descendants in the United States.

The National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library (NCSML) seeks NEH support in the preservation of its humanities collections following a natural disaster by purchasing and installing new storage furniture and environmental and light monitoring equipment, creation of an Integrated Pest Management System, moving the artifact and library collections to a new museum and library currently under construction, and restoring and updating documentation and cataloging of the artifact and library collections.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $175,000 (approved); $175,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2011 – 8/31/2013

Town of Winchester (Winchester, MA 01890-2706)
Mary Ellen Lannon (Project Director, 12/08/2010 - present)
PF-50233-11
[View white paper]
Planning: Archival Storage in the Historic Sanborn House

Planning for the renovation of an archives storage facility in the historic Sanborn House to better preserve the Town of Winchester's historical collections of maps, photographs, publications, artifacts, and legal and genealogical records.

The Town of Winchester requests $35,000 to plan a storage facility for its consolidated historical collections. Project funds would be used to engage a team of experts in the fields of conservation, architecture, archival practice, and engineering to work with the Town of Winchester's Head of Engineering, Town Clerk, Historical Commission, and the Executive Director of the Historical Society to develop plans and specifications for a storage facility on the ground floor of the Sanborn House, a National Register building currently being restored as a cultural and historical center with funding from the Massachusetts Historical Commission, foundations, and private donors. The planning process would focus on a review of collections and calculation of their storage needs, analysis of environmental data for the Sanborn House, review of the building envelope and its capacity for passive and active measures to provide a storage environment that is energy- and cost-efficient.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $35,000 (approved); $34,075 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2011 – 3/31/2013

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109)
Robert Behrens (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - 03/01/2011); Larry Hicks (Project Director, 03/01/2011 - present)
PF-50010-10
[View white paper]
Henry Ford Estate Powerhouse Heating System Replacement

An implementation project to install a new heating system and other improvements to help preserve the collections housed in the Power House facility at the Henry Ford Estate-Fair Lane, home of American industrialist Henry Ford and his family.

The activities of this project are part of a long-term effort to provide suitable collection environments at The Henry Ford Estate-Fair Lane, a National Historic Landmark. The Power House was, to Ford, the center and heart of the Estate. Uniquely, it housed a a water-powered electrical plant, sophisticated mechanical systems for the entire Estate, a working garage, and a private research lab (now used as Archives). This project will focus on reducing adverse winter conditions in the Power House collection environment by replacing the outdated, deteriorated, and dangerous steam-heating system, and equipping the many large windows with UV filters. This work will preserve and sustain the Power House collections by 1) eliminating detrimental temperature and humidity spikes caused by the current system's frequent malfunctions, 2) remove the annual risk of direct water damage from steam leaks, and 3) substantially reduce potential harm from UV light.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $350,000 (approved); $350,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 6/30/2011

Columbia University (New York, NY 10027)
Janet Gertz (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50011-10
[View white paper]
Sustaining the Rare and Special Collections of Burke Theological Library

A planning project to analyze and recommend improvements to environmental conditions in the rare book and special collections area of the Union Theological Seminary's Burke Library, a repository documenting the history of Christianity and Western religions from the medieval era to the present.

The Columbia University Libraries seeks a one-year planning and evaluation grant to diagnose the causes of damaging temperature and humidity fluctuations in the rare book and special collections stacks of Burke Theological Library and propose realistic, achievable, customized solutions to bring conditions more closely in line with preservation recommendations for prolonging the useful life of unique and valuable books and manuscripts. This project focuses on Burke Library's Brown Tower, which houses the rare and special collections. Burke Library is the largest theological library in the western hemisphere and is an invaluable resource for scholars in many humanities fields beyond theology and religious studies, including anthropology, education, history, languages, music, philosophy, social sciences, and visual arts.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $35,900 (approved); $35,900 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 6/30/2011

Frick Collection (New York, NY 10021)
Joseph Godla (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50013-10
[View white paper]
Creating a Preservation Environment for Renaissance Limoges Enamels

The creation of a preservation environment for a collection of Renaissance Limoges painted enamels that are exhibited in two historic display cases built by architect John Russell Pope.

The Frick Collection seeks support for the renovation of two of its historic display cases in order to create a suitable environment for the collection of forty-six Renaissance Limoges enamels that are normally housed in them. The enamels collection is considered one of the most important such collections in the world. Recent studies of the conditions within the cases, however, revealed that the enamels were exposed to high fluctuations in temperature and humidity. Because the cases are considered a significant part of the museum's historic interior, the Frick proposes modifying the cases such that the enamels can be safely kept there, but without significantly altering the cases' original design. Specifically, the plan will create a sealed and buffered space within the original cases to protect the enamels from exterior environmental fluctuations, while at the same time preserving the cases' historic facades.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $99,000 (approved); $99,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 8/31/2011

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-0001)
Richard Szary (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50017-10
Fire Protection for Special Collections at the University of North Carolina

An implementation project to install a fire suppression system in the University's Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, a repository concentrating especially on Southern history and culture.

The collections in the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library are among the most significant research resources at the University of North Carolina and serve a wide range of educational and research purposes for humanities scholars in Chapel Hill and beyond. Developed over more than a century and a half, the special collections in Wilson Library reflect a tremendous investment of thought, dedication, and resources in building one of the nation's preeminent research collections. The Library has a long-standing commitment to the preservation of its special collections and has provided many of the resources needed to fulfill this goal. One of the most critical unmet needs, however, is the installation of a building-wide sprinkler system. In the current challenging economic climate, funds for capital expenditures are very limited. Funding from the NEH to install sprinklers for the special collections stack areas will be a major first step towards meeting this critical need.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $400,000 (approved); $400,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 4/30/2013

City of Ontario (Ontario, CA 91764-4196)
Theresa Hanley (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50021-10
[View white paper]
Developing a Master Preservation Plan for Collections at the Museum of History and Art

A planning project leading to sustainable strategies for preserving a collection housed in a historic building, consisting of artifacts on the material and social history of Southern California.

The museum's staff requests a planning grant to engage representative city officials and a team of three consultants--a conservator, environmental management specialist, and historic preservation architect--to develop a Master Preservation Plan for Collections. The museum's collections are currently housed in a designated historic building constructed in 1937 by the Works Progress Administration. The preservation plan would focus on collaboratively developed strategies to balance collections needs and vulnerabilities with the performance capacity of the historic building envelope. Project staff would employ appropriate passive and active measures to mitigate risks to stored collections by determining reasonably achievable targets for collections environments. The plan would also propose solutions that would be energy and cost efficient; respect the historic fabric of the museum and a possible second 1950s-era building designated for future museum use; and make efficient use of available storage spaces.

Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 10/1/2010 – 9/30/2013

University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
Janis Tomlinson (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50028-10
[View white paper]
University of Delaware Museums: Planning for Consolidated and Sustainable Collections

Planning for reallocation of space to improve energy consumption and environmental conditions for the care, storage, and preservation of a diverse collection of over 12,000 paintings, photographs, and art objects.

A Conservation Assessment Program (CAP) report in 2009 recommended that the space usage in two University Museums' buildings (Old College and the adjacent Mechanical Hall) be reviewed and reformulated. Funding is sought to bring the authors of the report back to the university to undertake this essential next step. Far more than a consultancy, this project will enable two internationally recognized experts on environmental management and collections conservation--Michael C. Henry and Wendy Claire Jessup--to work with an interdisciplinary team of museum staff, students, and faculty. Together, they will analyze the environmental systems, building envelopes, and collections storage needs in order to create a comprehensive space allocation plan to optimize usage and environment in existing museum spaces. The university will support this project by waiving indirect costs, providing support for Mr. Henry to teach a course in Art Conservation, and cover costs for Museums and Facilities staff.

[Grant products]
Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,970 (approved); $39,970 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2010 – 7/31/2011

Abbe Museum (Bar Harbor, ME 04609)
Julia Clark (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50034-10
[View white paper]
Planning for a Sustainable Preservation Environment for Collections

Planning for sustainable environmental conditions to protect the museum's ethnographic and archaeological collections, which focus on the history of Native Americans in Maine.

As a collecting institution, the Abbe Museum focuses on Maine's four Native American tribes: the Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Micmac, and Maliseet, collectively known as the Wabanaki. Operating from two public facilities, the Abbe Museum's mission is to inspire new learning about the Wabanaki Nations with every visit. The Museum's collections, exhibitions, and programs focus on Native American traditions in Maine and explore the broader Native American experience, past and present. The Abbe Museum requests a one-year grant award in support of its "Planning for the Sustainability of the Abbe Museum's Collections Environment" project. The goals of the project are to review the current climate control systems, review and re-identify appropriate standards for exhibition and storage environments, and determine if the system can be re-engineered or altered to meet the new environmental preservation standards, as well as implement "green" approaches to the building environment.

Project fields: Anthropology
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 12/31/2012

Historic New England (Boston, MA 02114-2702)
John Childs (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50035-10
[View white paper]
Developing a Master Plan for Environmental Improvements and Energy Conservation

Planning for sustainable environmental conditions in a centralized collection storage facility that houses nearly half of Historic New England's 110,000-item collection of decorative arts and household furnishings.

Historic New England (HNE) requests funding for a master plan to evaluate energy conservation options and control system upgrades at its collections storage facility in Haverhill, MA. HNE maintains the most comprehensive and best-documented collection of New England decorative arts and household artifacts in the country, a rich resource for scholars and exhibitions. Despite efforts since 1989, environmental controls at the facility have remained problematic. With the purchase of the building in 2006, HNE is now in a position to develop a comprehensive approach using all available techniques. HNE has assembled a multidisciplinary project team who can study the interactions of the building envelope and mechanical systems for the entire facility. Expected outcomes include cost-effective solutions that can be shared with other museums, as well as an improved storage facility that is financially and environmentally sustainable and can house expanded public programming.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 10/31/2010

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61801-3644)
Jennifer Teper (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50036-10
[View white paper]
Developing an Energy Efficient and Sustainable HVAC System at the Archives Research Center

A planning project for improved climate control and the installation of a fire suppression system for the Archives Research Center vault, which houses extensive collections on American musical culture, national cultural and educational organizations, and the history and administration of the University of Illinois.

The University of Illinois seeks a Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections planning grant to analyze the existing climate control system for the Archives Research Center (ARC), as well as evaluate the performance characteristics of the storage vault area to develop a plan for improved operation, effectiveness and energy efficiency. Planning for the installation of a fire suppression system would also be included. This planning grant is a critical step towards improving the preservation of one of the most valuable and unique collections held by the University of Illinois Libraries, which is currently stored in a less-than-ideal environment with no available fire suppression.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $13,720 (approved); $11,867 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2010 – 3/31/2012

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Stephen Enniss (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50048-10
[View white paper]
Folger Sustainable Preservation Environment Project

A planning project to develop sustainable environmental controls for one of the world's leading repositories of materials on Shakespeare and early modern European history and culture.

The Folger Shakespeare Library requests a planning grant to fund Phase 1 of the Folger Sustainable Preservation Environment Project (FSPEP), the development of an overall plan for creating and maintaining a sustainable preservation environment for the Folger's unparalleled collection of Shakespeare and early modern European resources. Preserving the collection is a critical priority of the Folger. Data collected to-date supports the conclusion that current environmental conditions at the Folger are not optimal for long-term collection preservation, with nearly all building areas showing the collections are at risk of natural aging, metal corrosion, mechanical damage, and/or mold growth. This project will be a collaborative effort of Folger facilities staff, curators, and conservators, guided by the expertise of preservation technology and energy consultants with the Image Permanence Institute (IPI) and Herzog/Wheeler & Associates.

Project fields: British Literature
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 8/31/2011

Litchfield Historical Society (Litchfield, CT 06759)
Catherine Fields (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50068-10
[View white paper]
Developing an Environmental Management Strategy for Collections

A planning project to develop strategies for managing environmental conditions for collections related to Connecticut and American history and culture that are housed in four historic buildings.

The Litchfield Historical Society (LHS) is seeking a Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections planning grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to create a long range Environmental Management and Facilities Care Plan for the Society's four buildings and the collections housed in them: the Noyes Memorial Building, the Tapping Reeve House, the Litchfield Law School, and the Pamela Cunningham Copeland Curatorial Center. The grant will allow LHS to assemble an interdisciplinary team of experts consisting of an architect, engineer, conservator, and HVAC contractor to comprehensively review each building's interior, exterior, HVAC systems, and current collections environment and provide a written report with recommendations addressing immediate issues and long term projects. The Facilities and Environmental Management Committee will then use these reports to create a long range Environmental Management and Facilities Care Plan for the society.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $39,500 (approved); $39,500 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 1/31/2012

Friends of the Middle Border, Inc. (Mitchell, SD 57301-7901)
Lori Holmberg (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50074-10
[View white paper]
Improved Environmental Controls for the Dakota Discovery Museum

An implementation project to modify environmental conditions in a museum housing a collection of art and artifacts that document the history of North and South Dakota and the region.

The Improved Humanities Collections Environment Control Project will improve the current environmental conditions at the Dakota Discovery Museum for humanities collections objects in storage and exhibit areas. The project will include the upgrade of the existing heating, ventilation and air conditioning system control software, the installation of steam humidification for the lower level storage area, modifications to the boiler intake and exhaust pipes to prevent boiler failures, the relocation of a thermostat/humidistat from a non-collection area to an exhibit area and activation of roof top unit economizers to improve air quality. These improvements and modifications will provide for better and more reliable control of the museum environment, allowing the thousands of collections items to be utilized for exhibit and research purposes for the public.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $11,054 (approved); $11,054 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 5/31/2012

Newark Museum (Newark, NJ 07102-3109)
Richard Stomber (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - 12/17/2013); David May (Project Director, 12/18/2013 - present)
PF-50077-10
Installing a Fire Alarm System to Protect the Museum's Art Collections

Installation of a fire alarm system in the museum's North Wing, which contains permanent galleries for American and Asian art, as well as storage for metals, jewelry, works of art on paper, furniture, and textiles.

The Newark Museum seeks a $175,000 grant to underwrite the purchase and installation of a new Fire Alarm system for the Museum's North Wing, which showcases for the public the majority of the Museum's permanent art galleries including the American Art collection on the 1st and 2nd floors, the Asian Art collection on the 3rd floor, and the storage of collection materials such as metals, jewelry, paper, furniture and textiles from the American, Asian, African and Decorative Arts collections. The Museum currently leases a 1987 ADT Unimode Fire Alarm System that has become obsolete As the collections are the foundation for all humanities activities in service to constituencies in New Jersey and beyond, the protection of these materials is of paramount importance for ensuring that they remain accessible to public audiences.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $175,000 (approved); $175,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2011 – 6/30/2014

Public Museum of West Michigan (Grand Rapids, MI 49504-5371)
Marilyn Merdzinski (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50078-10
Improving Climate Control in the Museum's Main Exhibition Building

An implementation project to install new automated control equipment for the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system in a museum focusing on the history and culture of Grand Rapids and its surrounding region.

Energy costs at the Grand Rapids Public Museum consume more than $1 million annually. The Museum, cognizant of its global responsibility to be "green," is currently taking measures toward LEED-EB certification. However, the most pressing need--and one critical to preserving its significant humanities collection--is to address the failing environmental controls of the HVAC system at its 15 year old main facility, the Van Andel Museum Center. An interdisciplinary team of experts concluded that replacement of the direct digital control system is a critical preventative conservation measure and immediate need. With assistance of this grant, the Museum will be able to purchase an open protocol DDC which was bid out two years ago and brought to schematic design at that time. The Museum was unable to implement the plan earlier due to funding shortages experienced during Michigan's severe economic downturn. This grant reduces the Museum's expense by 50% making implementation feasible.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $222,390 (approved); $222,390 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Preservation Society of Newport County (Newport, RI 02840)
Charles Moore (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50079-10
[View white paper]
Feasibility Study for the Use of Geothermal Climate Modification at The Breakers

A planning project to explore the use of geothermal energy to improve interior environmental conditions for a collection of Gilded Age art and furnishings located in The Breakers.

The Preservation Society of Newport County requests NEH funding in the amount of $27,848 to assist with a planning study for a potential geothermal application of climate modification at The Breakers, the Society's signature property. Collections endure poor climate conditions, especially during the summer when humidity is very high and outside temperatures soar. Dehumidification and air circulation or cooling are required for the collections. Painted and gilded surfaces and fragile textiles are especially susceptible. The project will be based on an earlier study which determined that a bedrock aquifer is on The Breakers site. To determine if this is a viable source of water for a geothermal climate application, a geologist and engineer will work with the society's team and a drilling company to drill a test well, line it with steel casing, and allow a 72-hour flow to determine the water quality and flow rate. This is a "green project," which will use an untapped source for climate modification.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $27,848 (approved); $27,848 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2010 – 4/30/2011

Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum (Chicago, IL 60605-2403)
Devon Pyle-Vowles (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - 07/26/2011); Jennifer Brand (Project Director, 07/27/2011 - present)
PF-50084-10
[View white paper]
Planning Storage Improvements for the Historical Collections

A planning project leading to recommendations for improving the storage of a collection of artifacts related to the history of astronomy, maritime history, and related fields.

The Adler Planetarium seeks funding to develop a Collections Storage Improvement Implementation Plan. The Adler is the only independent planetarium in the world to steward significant museum collections. These collections, spanning the 12th to the 21st century, comprise historic scientific instruments, rare books, works on paper, archival collections, photographs, paintings, and spacecraft models and support exhibitions, planetarium shows, and educational programs that merge current science with the humanities. The proposed new Plan would build upon findings from a 2008 Collections Storage Improvement Study, which identified several risks to the Adler collections, including water leakage, fire and smoke, and unstable media. The Adler would retain the same teams from 2008, Wendy Jessup and Associates, Inc., and Watson & Henry Associates, to provide specific guidance in the form of layouts and budget estimates in order to improve collections storage and reduce energy costs. After the grant period, the Implementation Plan will guide the Adler to create a consolidated collections management and curatorial workspace.

Project fields: Museum Studies or Historical Preservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $40,000 (approved); $40,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

American Precision Museum, Inc. (Windsor, VT 05089-1312)
Ann Lawless (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50087-10
[View white paper]
Improving Environmental Conditions for Historical Collections

A planning project to explore passive and mechanized methods for managing humidity levels in a National Landmark museum building that houses a collection of historic machine tools, documenting the history of precision manufacturing in the United States.

The American Precision Museum in Windsor, Vermont seeks to develop plans to improve environmental conditions that are adversely affecting collections in the Robbins & Lawrence Armory building, a National Historic Landmark. The building houses the museum and its unparalleled collection of industrial machinery along with other artifacts, archival, and library materials. This planning project would bring together a team of staff and four consultants: a conservator and a preservation architect working with a civil and a mechanical engineer. The team would study existing information about the building and collections, then explore on-site, draft architectural and engineering strategies, and convene again to review these ideas for consistency and compatibility. The plans would be finalized in November 2011 to a level sufficient to seek implementation funding. The consultants would also assist in developing proposals for implementation.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $25,348 (approved); $25,348 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/2010 – 11/30/2011

Samish Indian Nation (Anacortes, WA 98221-0217)
Jason Ticknor (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50088-10
[View white paper]
Planning for the Future: Professional Evaluation of the Samish Indian Nation's Archival Storage Facility

A planning project to improve environmental conditions at the Samish Archives and Cultural Resource Department, which holds the historical and legal records of the tribe.

The Samish Indian Nation's Archives and Cultural Resource Department is seeking grant support to improve its archival storage facility. We would like to hire a consultant to evaluate the department's current facilities and procedures. The consultant will assess the facility, evaluate the current conditions of the building and the archival collections which it houses, and then prepare a report with recommendations for facility and procedural improvements. An enhanced facility will allow the department to care for the collections more efficiently, and to preserve collections for the benefit of the tribe and community.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $5,957 (approved); $5,957 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 6/30/2011

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Geoff Emberling (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - 12/20/2010); Laura D'Alessandro (Project Director, 12/21/2010 - present)
PF-50089-10
Rehousing Metal Artifacts of the Oriental Institute

The purchase of storage cabinetry and supplies to house a collection of 10,433 metal objects from the Near East dating from the early Bronze Age through the Islamic period.

This two-year project seeks to rehouse the Oriental Institute Museum's collection of ancient metal artifacts in modern, museum-quality cabinets. A contract conservator will be hired for the duration of the project to carry out the project activities. Old, acidic packing materials will be replaced with new, acid-free substitutes. The artifacts will be photographed for entry into the Museum's database. The contract conservator will carry out a condition survey of the artifacts before they are rehoused.

Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $306,507 (approved); $306,507 (awarded)
Grant period: 11/1/2010 – 9/30/2013

Frelinghuysen Morris Foundation (Lenox, MA 01240-5256)
Kinney Frelinghuysen (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50094-10
[View white paper]
Planning for Sustainable Environmental Conditions to Preserve Collections

Planning for sustainable environmental conditions to preserve the Frelinghuysen Morris House and Studio and its collection of modernist art, sculpture, film and photographs, furniture, letters, and other materials from the estate of artists George L. K. Morris and Suzy Frelinghuysen.

The Frelinghuysen Morris House & Studio (aka Frelinghuysen Morris Foundation) is requesting a $36,265 grant for the long term monitoring of its historic collection of art objects, furniture and structures. This grant will fund the development of recommendations for improving interior environmental management for sustainable preventive conservation of the collections and the historic house. A team consisting of a collections conservator and historic buildings engineer will compile and analyze data in order to make recommendations for improving the interior environment for the collections and the building fabric.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $36,265 (approved); $36,265 (awarded)
Grant period: 3/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Massachusetts Historical Society (Boston, MA 02215-3631)
Peter Drummey (Project Director, 12/10/2009 - present)
PF-50097-10
Improving Security for American History Collections

An implementation project to install an updated security system in a research library holding extensive collections of American history materials.

Having successfully completed critical systems and fire suppression upgrades, the Massachusetts Historical Society is positioned to effectively address the physical security of its flagship building and unparalleled collections. The MHS Security Infrastructure Project is the culmination of a multi-year effort to analyze risks to the collections and identify appropriate preventive preservation actions. Key elements of the project include a new digital security network infrastructure, an upgrade from passive analog surveillance to dynamic analytic driven digital surveillance, improved perimeter surveillance and lighting, expansion of the access control system, a new intrusion alarm system and devices, and upgrades to life safety and fire detection. The proposed MHS Security Infrastructure Project assures that the Society's National Historic Landmark building and unique collections will be protected with a security architecture befitting their importance to American history.

Project fields: Library Science
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $351,784 (approved); $351,784 (awarded)
Grant period: 8/1/2010 – 7/31/2013

Genesee Country Village and Museum (Mumford, NY 14511)
Patricia Tice (Project Director, 12/16/2009 - present)
PF-50124-10
[View white paper]
Creating a Sustainable and Energy Efficient Storage Space for Art and Artifacts of Western New York

An implementation project to create an energy-efficient storage facility for the history and art collections of the Genesee Country Village and Museum Art Gallery.

Genesee Country Village & Museum (GCV&M) seeks support to create a safe, secure, sustainable, and energy-efficient storage facility per the recommendations of the 2006 NEH-funded We the People assessment grant by conservator Barbara Moore. This request is part of a larger initiative to completely renovate the Art Gallery, create new collections storage area equipped with museum quality storage furniture to house our most fragile and significant collections within a sustainable, archivally acceptable environment.

Project fields: Art History and Criticism
Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Division: Preservation and Access
Total amounts: $400,000 (approved); $400,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 7/1/2010 – 6/30/2013

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