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Funded Projects Query Form
45 matches

Program: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections*
Date range: 2016-2018
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PF-260729-18

Western Kentucky University Research Foundation (Bowling Green, KY 42101-1016)
Sandra L. Staebell (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

WKU Kentucky Museum/Library Special Collections Sustainable Environment Planning Project

A planning project to develop a Preservation Environment Improvement plan for the university’s museum and library special collections, which include 30,000 artifacts, 75,000 books and periodicals, photographs, and audiovisual materials documenting the history and culture of Kentucky and the surrounding region.  The collections’ strengths include historic quilts, folk and decorative arts, toys, political memorabilia, as well as materials chronicling Kentucky Shakers, the Civil War, and World War II.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 11/30/2020


PF-260730-18

State Historical Society of Iowa (Des Moines, IA 50319-1006)
Andrew Harrington (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

State Historical Museum of Iowa Exhibit Gallery Lighting Project

A planning project to develop design and construction documents for a new lighting system to facilitate the preservation of objects pertaining to Iowa history and culture on display in the museum’s main exhibition gallery.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 3/31/2019


PF-260753-18

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Alexis Peregoy (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Planning for the Sustainable Preservation of At-Risk Film in the Center for Creative Photography Archives

A planning grant to explore and identify sustainable cold storage solutions for the at-risk film-based materials at the Center for Creative Photography (CCP). The collection includes more than 6 million photographs and related materials.  Items to be housed in the planned cold storage vault include cellulose nitrate and cellulose acetate negatives, transparencies, slides, and reel-to-reel film dating to the late 19th century.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2020


PF-260713-18

Brick Store Museum, Inc. (Kennebunk, ME 04043-0177)
Cynthia Walker (Project Director: November 2017 to present)

Planning the Improvement of Environmental Conditions for the Brick Store Museum Collection

The development of a plan to improve environmental conditions in the Brick Store Museum’s Kimball House, which houses a significant collection of textiles and historic objects related to the history of shipbuilding and tourism in Maine.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Cultural History; History, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$29,240 (approved)
$29,240 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 8/30/2019


PF-260728-18

Grand Rapids Public Museum (Grand Rapids, MI 49504-5371)
Tim Priest (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Grand Rapids Public Museum Improved Museum Archival Preservation and Access Planning Grant

A planning project to improve preservation conditions for the Grand Rapids Public Museum’s Community Archives and Research Center, a storage facility for its holdings of 250,000 artifacts and other sources on the history and culture of western Michigan, and to facilitate their increased use for research and teaching.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


PF-260745-18

Winterthur Museum (Winterthur, DE 19735-1819)
Joelle Wickens (Project Director: December 2017 to July 2019)
Joy Gardiner (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Beth J. Parker Miller (Co Project Director: July 2019 to present)

Sustainable Plan for Accessible Storage: Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library

A grant to establish a long-term storage plan to increase accessibility and improve preventive care of the museum’s collection of over 90,000 American decorative and fine arts objects displayed in 175 room settings.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2020


PF-260761-18

Proprietors Portsmouth Athenaeum (Portsmouth, NH 03801-4011)
Thomas Hardiman (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Planning Sustainable Environmental Improvements for Collections at the Portsmouth Athenaeum

A planning project to conduct comprehensive space reorganization and create a collections storage plan, as well as identify options for upgrading HVAC and fire safety systems.  The Portsmouth Athenaeum, located in three adjacent 1805 historic buildings, possesses an extensive collection documenting the history of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and the Piscataqua River region. It includes 35,000 rare and historic books, 2,490 archive and manuscript collections, 22,000 historic photographs, and 570 artworks and artifacts related to maritime and regional history.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$49,875 (approved)
$49,875 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 10/31/2019


PF-260771-18

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Teresa Kathleen Moreno (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Creating a Sustainable Environment for the Preservation of ASM’s Anthropological Photographs

An implementation project to create a secure and controlled, multi-climate suite for the Arizona State Museum’s anthropological photographic collection, which contains over 525,000 prints, negatives, and transparencies providing visual documentation of the rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and technologies of the indigenous peoples of the American Southwest.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2023


PF-260786-18

Middle Tennessee State University (Murfreesboro, TN 37132-0001)
Gregory N. Reish (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Improving Storage, Access, and Sustainability of American Vernacular Music Collections

A storage, shelving, and lighting renovation project for an archival collection documenting American vernacular music.

This project involves installation of custom-sized compact shelving and new lighting in the archival storage facility of the Center for Popular Music at Middle Tennessee State University, one of the nation’s premier collections of research materials documenting the full breadth of American vernacular music. The collections comprise manuscripts, sound recordings, video recordings, sheet music, songbooks and other rare books, instructional materials, photographs, performance documents, serials, and other items. Robust recent growth of the collections has created challenges to sustainability and institutional resilience that will be ameliorated by these capital improvements. With a total cost of $408,189, the project will allow rare materials to be sustainably stored, better organized, and effectively guarded against fire and other perils while improving accessibility for staff and, by extension, the Center’s thousands of annual patrons.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$205,000 (approved)
$205,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


PF-260790-18

Adirondack Historical Association (Blue Mountain Lake, NY 12812-0099)
Doreen Alessi-Holmes (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Enhanced Environmental Conditions for Humanities Exhibitions

Replacement of outdated environmental control systems in the Adirondack Historical Association’s 1969 “Life in the Adirondacks” building, whose exhibitions and collections explore early settlements; extractive industries such as logging and mining; the birth of tourism based on nature and recreation; early environmental conservation movements; and the Native American experience from pre-contact through the 21st century. The project would install energy-efficient equipment including air handlers, chillers, a new boiler, particulate filtration, and an emergency generator.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


PF-260791-18

St. Peter's Lutheran Church of Manhattan (New York, NY 10022-4613)
Jared Robert Stahler (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Nevelson Chapel Environmental Systems Replacement

Installation of a dedicated environmental control system and LED lighting in Louis Nevelson’s 28-seat Chapel of the Good Shepherd in Saint Peter’s Church in New York City.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Urban History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


PF-260799-18

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Jane H. Wald (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Evergreens Environmental Improvements

Improvements to The Evergreens, a historic house museum, including the replacement and expansion of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system, which would protect collections of art and historic objects that document the life and work of poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

The Emily Dickinson Museum (EDM) seeks funding for environmental improvements to The Evergreens, one of two Dickinson family homes housing the Museum’s internationally significant collections related to the renowned poet. Widely ranging temperature and relative humidity have placed collections at risk. The project goal is to make significant improvement to the collections environment while controlling future operating costs. An assessment of present building envelope conditions will lead to refined strategies for non-mechanical and mechanical systems improvements. Methods will include interior storm windows, air sealing, and additional insulation as appropriate and suitable to the building. Mechanical improvements will focus on replacing an aging residential heating and cooling system with a new HVAC system and extending ductwork to spaces that are not currently conditioned.

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2020


PF-260768-18

University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)
Donna E. McCrea (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Sustaining the University of Montana’s Archival Collections: A Planning Project

This planning proposal requests $20,671 to bring together an interdisciplinary team to review and evaluate current indoor climate conditions, heating and cooling equipment, and the building envelope of the University of Montana's Mansfield Library. The team will produce actionable recommendations for effective, sustainable and practical conservation measures to improve climate control and air filtration in storage areas holding the library’s archival and special collections materials.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$20,671 (approved)
$20,671 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 10/31/2019


PF-260810-18

Detroit Institute of Arts (Detroit, MI 48202-4008)
Barbara Heller (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Time-Based Media Climate-Controlled Storage Planning Grant

The DIA respectfully requests a $33,640 National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Planning Grant to conduct a feasibility assessment of two possible areas to create a climate-controlled Time-Based Media (TBM) storage room to store, preserve and protect the physical legacy collections such as artworks that include video, film, slide, audio, computer technologies in various electronic formats, and audio-visual collection from the museum’s Research Library and Archives Collection that have sound and video recordings in analog and digital formats. Through this planning grant, the museum will explore and recommend sustainable approaches for the long-term care of its TBM Collections through the allocation of specific climate controlled environments to store and house its key legacy TBM artworks and non-art/archival collections.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$33,640 (approved)
$33,640 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


PF-260946-18

American Institute of Physics (College Park, MD 20740-3841)
Melanie J. Mueller (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

AIP Niels Bohr Library & Archives–Preservation and Stewardship of the History of Physics

The renovation of underground storage space to provide improved preservation conditions and future growth space for the Niels Bohr Library and Archives, a repository of published and unpublished sources documenting the history of physics, astronomy, geophysics, and related physical sciences.

Project fields:
History of Science

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2021


PF-255660-17

Buffalo Bill Memorial Association (Cody, WY 82414-3428)
Philip Anthony (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Cody Firearms Museum: Sustainable Infrastructure Improvements

An implementation project to upgrade environmental controls and improve fire and security systems at the Buffalo Bill Memorial Association’s Cody Firearms Museum, which houses a collection of 7,000 firearms and more than 20,000 related objects chronicling the development of firearms from 1425 to the present.  The collection would be stored and then reinstalled after the museum undergoes a complete renovation.


The Buffalo Bill Center of the West will improve collections care and infrastructure in the 45,000 square-foot Cody Firearms Museum (CFM). The CFM holds more than 7,000 firearms, the most comprehensive collection of American firearms in the world and the only firearms museum that has earned American Alliance of Museums accreditation. Planning is underway for a complete reinstallation of the CFM, which will interpret the story of firearms as a continuous narrative about people, ingenuity, and artistry. While the reinstallation process is underway, and CFM objects have been moved to safe temporary storage, engineers will connect CFM galleries to the Central Plant at the Center of the West, eliminating outdated boilers and providing clean, efficient atomizer humidification in the CFM. The project will also eliminate deficiencies in the fire and security systems of the CFM.

Project fields:
History, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


PF-255571-17

University of Alaska, Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK 99775-7500)
Leslie McCartney (Project Director: November 2016 to present)

Developing a Master Audiovisual Storage Plan for Historical Materials at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

A planning project to develop practical solutions for the preservation of audiovisual holdings of the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections and Archives (APRCA). The collection includes 11,300 oral history recordings and 15,000 film and video items documenting the history of the state of Alaska and the circumpolar North.


The project is to develop a 20 year Master Audiovisual Storage Plan aimed at alleviating overcrowded storage conditions for historical film, videotape, audiotape, digital recorded media and photographic materials. Consultants will make recommendations for shelving styles and layouts that will increase current storage capacity, work with curators/archivists to predict future space needs, identify two or three viable locations in the library where new climate-controlled vaults for audiovisual materials could most effectively and efficiently be constructed, and provide cost estimates. The team will aim for pragmatic long-term solutions that balance costs and environmental impacts with the need to provide high quality collections care.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$49,474 (approved)
$49,474 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


PF-255801-17

Providence Athenaeum (Providence, RI 02903-2709)
Matthew Burriesci (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Providence Athenaeum: Sustaining Collections

An interdisciplinary planning project to develop recommendations for improving the environmental conditions and physical safety of the Athenaeum’s collections of books and pamphlets, to include a thermal environment study and building-wide electrical mapping.

The Providence Athenaeum seeks to fund Stage One of a multi-phase, comprehensive assessment of our historic building's envelope and systems, especially as they relate to the preservation and conservation of our historic collections. Stage One will employ conservation experts, engineers, and electricians in close consultation with our experienced conservator and team leaders. We will conduct a thermal assessment of the building to inform improvements in the building envelope to enhance collection environments, further develop sustainable preventive conservation and practical climate control strategies, and map our antiquated and patchwork electrical system, fire detection and suppression system, and security system, in order to better assess known (but as yet unidentified) risks to our collection, and to improve the resilience of both our institution and our extensive collections.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


PF-255804-17

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)
Kris Kiesling (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Sustaining Rare Maps and Books at the University of Minnesota

The purchase and installation of shelving, fire suppression, and security equipment to protect the James Ford Bell Library, along with the university’s rare book collection, as part of the relocation of these holdings to the university’s special collections facility.


The Libraries of the University of Minnesota Twin Cities requests an Implementation Grant of $350,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections program. The grant, combined with campus funding, a large private gift, and additional fundraising, will enable the U of M to complete the transfer of its most valuable humanities collections to a sustainable, climate-controlled environment adjacent to updated spaces for research services and instruction. The total project cost is estimated at $1.8 million. Pre-design and schematic design phases have been completed, and the project is scheduled for completion in Spring 2018. The requested grant will support the purchase and installation of customized shelving to store maps and rare books in the underground caverns of the Elmer L. Andersen Library, a component of a larger project.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PF-255805-17

Chicago Historical Society (Chicago, IL 60614-6038)
M. Alison Eisendrath (Project Director: December 2016 to October 2018)
Russell L. Lewis (Project Director: October 2018 to May 2019)
John Russick (Project Director: May 2019 to present)

Assessing the Preservation Quality of Collections Storage, Display, and Work Spaces at the Chicago History Museum

The analysis of collection spaces, mechanical controls and environmental conditions at Chicago Historical Society’s Clark Street facility, which houses diverse collections of artifacts, archival material, textiles, and decorative arts that reflect nearly 300 years of Chicago and Illinois history. To improve care for these collections, the applicant would gather information about the museum’s storage spaces and assemble an expert team to suggest sustainable improvements for mechanical and non-mechanical climate control systems. 

The Chicago Historical Society/Chicago History Museum (CHM) requests a $50,000 Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections planning grant to: 1) Assess the preservation quality of collections storage, display, and work spaces at the Museum’s Clark Street facility; 2) Analyze the Museum’s existing HVAC systems; 3) Identify and begin to implement achievable strategies for optimizing the performance of existing mechanical systems to advance the Museum’s preservation and sustainability goals; and 4) Identify longer-term strategic priorities for HVAC upgrades and/or replacement to improve system efficiency and effectiveness and create a sustainable preservation environment for the Museum’s collection holdings. $40,000 of the requested funding will be used to engage consultants from the Image Permanence Institute (IPI) to support planning activities; the remaining $10,000 will be used to implement recommendations coming out of the planning process.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


PF-255845-17

University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)
Kelly J. Dixon (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Sustainable Care for the University of Montana’s Anthropological Museum Collections

An implementation project to upgrade environmental controls and rehouse artifacts in the University of Montana’s Anthropological Curation Facility (UMACF), which holds an extensive collection of ethnographic materials on the American West. The project would be undertaken in partnership with tribal representatives, who would collaborate on community-based policies for preventive conservation, storage, and handling strategies.

The University of Montana Anthropological Curation Facility (UMACF) is respectfully requesting a National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Implementation Grant to: 1) upgrade the environmental controls, conservation upgrades, and security in the UMACF’s repository in ways that reduce the UMACF’s reliance on mechanical systems while still maintaining ideal climate control and security for the collections; and 2) to support travel costs for collaborative ventures with Tribal Historic Preservation Offices (THPOs) and Tribal Culture Committees to rehouse approximately 675 cultural (i.e. ethnographic) objects representing Rocky Mountain Front and Great Plains heritage. These objects represent the region’s great accomplishments from the past.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$111,377 (approved)
$111,377 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


PF-255847-17

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Lea Stevens McChesney (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Developing a Comprehensive Collections Preservation Master Plan at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology

The development of a collections preservation master plan to re-organize and upgrade current conditions for collections stored across multiple environments, and that include archaeological, ethnographic, and osteological materials, as well as archives documenting cultures of the American Southwest.

With the development of a Comprehensive Collections Preservation Master Plan, the Maxwell Museum will identify long-term, sustainable preservation practices to reorganize and upgrade its 24 different collection spaces into micro-climates that will help control for the various material types present in the collections. In particular, team efforts will focus on developing sustainable means to address humidity fluctuations in storage areas through identifying next steps to be implemented.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$47,315 (approved)
$47,315 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PF-255848-17

Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Erik Charles Nordberg (Project Director: December 2016 to April 2019)
Mary Wallace (Project Director: April 2019 to present)

Mechanical System Analysis and Collection Needs Assessment

A planning project to assess environmental conditions and preservation needs for the Walter P. Reuther Library, Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, and to develop recommendations for sustainable improvements to environmental controls for the collections.


The Walter P. Reuther Library, Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, seeks an award of $50,000 in the “planning grant” category of the Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections program of the Division of Preservation and Access of the National Endowment of the Humanities (NEH). The award will match institutional funding to assess persistent environmental control and collections preservation problems in the Reuther Library’s original 1975 building and its 1991 addition. Current conditions present serious concerns for the long-term conservation of its significant and unique humanities collections.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


PF-255854-17

Everson Museum of Art of Syracuse and Onondaga County (Syracuse, NY 13202-3091)
D. J. Hellerman (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Environmental Management Improvements Plan for the Everson Museum of Art

A planning grant to assess and update the environmental monitoring program for collections of American art held in a historic I.M. Pei building (1968) and to develop an Environmental Management Improvements Plan for the preservation of the museum’s collections.

In conjunction with a planned exhibition and international symposium in 2018 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the iconic 1968 building that is the Everson Museum of Art, the Museum respectfully requests a $50,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support of a planning project to (i) update the Museum’s current environmental monitoring program, including monitoring of selected intra-wall conditions to determine if interior humidification in winter might be contributing to deterioration of the concrete exterior, and (ii) create a comprehensive long-term preservation strategy based on the collected data. The Environmental Management Improvements Plan (the Plan) will incorporate sustainable preventive conservation strategies for the preservation of the Museum’s collections, for reducing energy costs, and for avoiding damage to the unique and architecturally-significant concrete exterior walls of Pei’s landmark structure.

Project fields:
Architecture; Arts, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 11/30/2018


PF-255862-17

Colorado Museum of Natural History (Denver, CO 80205-5732)
Melissa Bechhoefer (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Sustainable Preservation of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science Archaeology Collection

 A project to rehouse an archaeology collection that focuses on North America. The 72,000 archaeological objects would be moved into the newly constructed LEED-certified Avenir Collections Center and placed on custom-created storage mounts and in new cabinetry.


The Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS) requests a Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections implementation grant for a three-year project to sustainably preserve its internationally significant Archaeology Collection into the Museum’s state-of-the-art Avenir Collections Center. Grant funds will support collections assistants who will move and rehouse this collection. Cost share will include DMNS-contributed time (from staff, interns, and volunteers), preservation supplies, and indirect, as well as museum storage equipment from a third party. The project will improve accessibility of the Archaeology Collection for scholars, source communities, students, and the general public, and will promote continued humanities research and cultural partnerships. Dissemination of project results and information about the design and construction of the Avenir Collections Center will provide an important resource to other humanities museums looking to sustainably preserve their collections.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


PF-255866-17

Philbrook Museum of Art, Inc. (Tulsa, OK 74114-4104)
Rachel Keith (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

To Plan the Renovation of the Philbrook Museum of Art HVAC System

A planning project to address significant environmental factors—in particular, an aging heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system—that pose a threat to the Philbrook Museum’s comprehensive fine art collection. The proposed project seeks to incorporate sustainable practices into future plans for environmental controls and to identify ways to balance the needs of the 1927 museum building with the preservation requirements of the 14,000 objects stored and exhibited in the historic structure.

The Philbrook Museum of Art HVAC system is in great need of a total overhaul. Major concerns include: 1) The two boilers we have are over 25 years old, are inefficient, and have outlived their useful life. 2) The eight air handlers we have are also all over 25 years old and have likewise outlived their useful life. 3) The software related to our control panel is in need of upgrades. In visiting with Philbrook leadership in both the Curatorial and Facility Departments, they feel that this is the single largest barrier to Philbrook’s ability to ensure the long-term stability of the collection as an organization over the next 20 years. Furthermore, as environmental standards in the field have changed especially over the past ten years, reexamining the needs of the collection vis-à-vis sustainable approaches to preventative conservation is a top institutional priority.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Architecture; Arts, Other; Cultural History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


PF-255820-17

Amon Carter Museum of Western Art (Fort Worth, TX 76113-2365)
John B. Rohrbach (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Furnishing Sustainable Photography Storage

Improved storage for the Amon Carter Museum of American Art’s photography collection, to include the expansion by 50 percent of the existing photography vault; the upgrading of HVAC systems controlling the vault climates; and the reorganization of existing storage into a more efficient layout, supplemented by the purchase and installation of new storage furniture as needed to allow for projected collection growth. 

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art (ACMAA) is dedicated to collecting, preserving, and displaying the finest examples of American art, and to serving an educational role through exhibitions, publications, and programs devoted to the study of American art. Sustainable preservation of its collections is both a mission-critical activity and a priority of the institution’s strategic plan. With this project the museum intends to expand its existing photography storage vaults, replace and update the vaults’ mechanical components, and bring increased efficiency to the storage layout.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


PF-255826-17

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Whitney Baker (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Improving the Physical Environment in Spencer Research Library

A planning grant to study significant environmental factors—in particular, an outdated heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning system—that pose a threat to the applicant’s rare book, manuscript, and archival collections.

The University of Kansas Libraries requests funds to develop a plan to closely monitor Spencer Library's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system that poses a threat to long-term preservation of its rare book, manuscript, and archival collections, plus additional funds to implement findings resulting from the testing process. University of Kansas Libraries hopes to enlist the consulting services of Image Permanence Institute to develop a sustainability plan for optimizing the current air handling unit and heating-air conditioning system in Spencer Library. IPI consultants will make three site visits to set up, collect, and analyze data from Spencer's air handling unit and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The Institute will provide ongoing investigations of mechanical system settings and operations over 18 months, develop suggestions and priorities for optimizing the existing system and improving the preservation quality of Spencer Library's spaces.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


PF-255836-17

Historical Society of Seattle and King County (Seattle, WA 98109-4330)
Jason Young (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

A Sustainable Preservation Environment at the MOHAI Resource Center

A combination of passive and mechanical measures to improve the storage environment for artifacts and archival materials documenting the history and culture of Seattle from the early 1800s to the present day.

The Historical Society of Seattle & King County, also known as the Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI), requests $350,000 in support of the implementation of a sustainable preservation environment at the MOHAI Resource Center. Currently, fluctuating and sustained high and low relative humidity poses a long-term risk to the collection, and HVAC units are not properly functioning, resulting in unnecessary energy consumption. A successful planning phase supported by NEH identified the solution put forth in this application: constructing a wall to create two spaces within the library, allowing for more targeted conditions with less energy; replacing a malfunctioning HVAC unit with three, properly sized units; installing a Building Management System to allow better control of HVAC units; and installing fans within textile storage to combat stratification. When completed, consultants project MOHAI will maintain target preservation requirements while reducing electric consumption by more than 20% and will reduce natural gas consumption by 35%.

Project fields:
History, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


PF-255856-17

Mariners' Museum (Newport News, VA 23606-3759)
William N. Hoffman (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Preventative Conservation Initiative for the Long-Term Storage of Conserved Objects from the USS Monitor Collection

No project description available

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Arts, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$24,861 (approved)
$24,861 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2017 – 10/31/2018


PF-255840-17

Hampton University (Hampton, VA 23668-0001)
Valinda S. Carroll (Project Director: December 2016 to September 2017)
Tina Darlene Rollins (Project Director: September 2017 to present)

Wade in the Water: Preservation Environment Plan for the Peabody Collection at the Harvey Library at Hampton University

A planning project to assess storage facilities and develop a long-term plan to preserve the Peabody Collection of Harvey Library, one of the oldest aggregations in the U.S. of research materials supporting the study of African American history.

The William R. and Norma B. Harvey Library at Hampton University seeks support for “Wade in the Water: Preservation Environment Plan for the Peabody Collection at the Harvey Library at Hampton University.” The Library proposes a planning project to enhance the long-term preservation of its most valuable collection. A team of consultants will help the Hampton University team refine its strategy for taking corrective action. The PEP project will include site visits, meetings, and conference calls between the consultants and local stakeholders. The consultants will help the library to narrow down the strategic options and to select a realistic and achievable strategy and future improvements for preservation of the collection.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$39,955 (approved)
$39,955 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


PF-249698-17

Historical Society of Delaware (Wilmington, DE 19801-3091)
Michele Anstine (Project Director: December 2015 to June 2018)
David W. Young (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

George Read II House Museum, Environmental Conditions Improvements for Sustainable Collections Preservation

The installation of new energy-efficient HVAC, fire detection, and water drainage systems to help protect the collections of furniture, paintings, decorative items, and archaeological materials contained in the George Read II House, a historic landmark and museum.

This project addresses the implementation of environmental improvements for the Delaware Historical Society’s collections of the nationally significant George Read II House Museum, situated in the Old New Castle (DE) National Historic Landmark District. The on-site Read House collections provide opportunities for wide-ranging humanities-based research and scholarship, interpretive programs for all ages, and undergraduate and graduate training. The application requests support for carefully planned improvements at the George Read II House Museum to improve preventive conservation measures, to improve the environmental conditions for collections, and to improve safety and security of collections with both non-mechanical measures and energy-efficient mechanical systems upgrades. Preventive measures that anticipate changing climate and storm intensities will reduce the threat of future episodic moisture intrusion.

Project fields:
American Studies; Architecture; Cultural History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 4/30/2020


PF-249710-16

Pepperdine University (Malibu, CA 90263-0002)
Mark S. Roosa (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Pepperdine University Libraries: Developing a Sustainable Preservation Environment for Humanities Collections

Upgrading climate and security systems, including HVAC, lighting, fire suppression, shelving, and building envelope improvements in Pepperdine’s Special Collections and University Archives, which house rare books and manuscripts informing history, literature, religion, and other humanities topics.

The previous receipt of NEH funds for a Planning grant resulted in consultant recommendations for improving quality and sustainability standards for Pepperdine University Libraries' Humanities Collection. The University is requesting funds for an Implementation grant to support the renovation of a dedicated preservation environment for Pepperdine's history rich Special Collections and University Archives. This preservation environment will include sustainable preservation systems (mechanical, lighting, fire suppression, shelving and structure) that will extend the usable life of our rare and valuable materials while also serving as a demonstration space for feasible, affordable preventative preservation at other medium-sized institutions.

Project fields:
History, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Literature, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


PF-249653-16

Computer History Museum (Mountain View, CA 94043-1311)
Nina Fairles (Project Director: November 2015 to August 2016)
Adriane Tafoya (Project Director: August 2016 to May 2017)
Karen J. Kroslowitz (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Improvement Plan for the Long-Term Preservation of Computer History Museum Collections

A planning project to hire an objects conservator and an engineering consulting firm to evaluate optimal environmental parameters in two buildings housing the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world, encompassing computer hardware, software, documentation, ephemera, photographs, oral histories, and moving images.

The Computer History Museum (CHM) is home to the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world, encompassing computer hardware, software, documentation, ephemera, photographs, oral histories, and moving images. Its mission is to preserve and present for posterity the artifacts and stories of the Information Age. CHM reaches an international audience of academic and humanities researchers, educators and students; industry innovators and filmmakers as well as other museums, archives and libraries. Through a National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Planning Grant the Computer History Museum will create a plan aimed at long-term sustainability of the artifact collection by identifying energy-efficient environmental improvement options for CHM facilities. The plan will be used to set work and budget priorities as well as solicit funding for actual improvements.

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$34,992 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


PF-249703-16

Indianapolis Museum of Art (Indianapolis, IN 46208-4182)
Kathryn Haigh (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Creating a Suitable and Energy-Efficient Lighting Environment for the Preventive Conservation of the Permanent Collection

Conversion to energy-efficient LED lamps in all gallery and storage areas of the Indianapolis Museum of Art, which holds significant collections of African, American, Asian, European, and contemporary art.

The Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) seeks to enhance the preservation of the collection and reduce collection-related energy use and costs by converting to LED lamps for lighting the permanent collection in the galleries and in collection storage. Conversion to LED lamps is timely and addresses key components of the IMA's 10-year Strategic Plan, as well as the Long-Range Conservation Plan. The Museum-wide conversion of all existing incandescent and fluorescent lamps to LED lamps will safeguard the collection, eliminating UV emissions from lamps and improving color perception and clarity to potentially allow for lower light levels in the galleries. It will also realize a return on investment reflected in reduced electricity utilities costs, a reduced number of lamps purchased per year, and reduced labor costs due to less frequent replacement of lamps. This reduction in operating costs further enhances sustainability by making funds available to collections-based research and programs.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$190,000 (approved)
$190,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 1/31/2018


PF-249706-16

Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19103-6510)
Judith M. Guston (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Analysis of Environmental Challenges at the Rosenbach

A planning project to assess environmental challenges, including the HVAC system, pest infestation, water infiltration, and light, affecting the Rosenbach’s 19th-century townhouse and to recommend sustainable solutions to protect its holdings of 30,000 rare books, and 300,000 manuscripts and its extensive decorative and fine arts collection of over 20,000 objects.

The Rosenbach's collections and historic house represent the core of its mission and the basis for its exhibitions and programs. Therefore, the long-term environmental and financial sustainability of the collections and building is paramount to the Rosenbach's continued success. The purpose of this project is to conduct a thorough analysis of the Rosenbach's environmental challenges--HVAC system, pest infestation, water infiltration, and light. These issues are familiar to many historic house museums and institutions with valuable collections acutely sensitive to environmental fluctuations. Rosenbach staff will work with three contractors and two consultants to analyze current conditions, identify proposed solutions ready for implementation, and achieve savings in energy, cost, and time with the ultimate goal of protecting the institution's collections. The project team anticipates that the results of this planning grant will be applicable to many other historic houses and museums.

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 3/31/2019


PF-249688-16

Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
Sarah Keen (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Colgate University Special Collections and University Archives Preventive Conservation Planning Project

A planning grant for improvements to the Special Collections and University Archives in Colgate’s Case Library and Geyer Center for Information Technology, which holds a collection of rare books and 2,265 cubic feet of archival records pertaining to the history of the university and the surrounding region. The project would result in specific steps to identify sustainable, preventive conservation measures related to climate control, storage systems, lighting, and security in the library. An additional $10,000 is requested to remediate leaks in exterior walls of the archive.

This planning project will outline steps to ensure sustainable, preventive conservation of Colgate University's Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA). University Archives is the repository for university records and also includes records of the Baptist Education Society of the State of New York 1819-1915 and Colgate Family papers. Highlights of Rare Books and Manuscripts include collections of Joseph Conrad and George Bernard Shaw. The project will comprise planning for renovation of Archives storage (3,570 s.f.) including environmental control and storage systems; expanded vault storage (to 2,130 s.f.) with appropriate climate control, shelving, and security; and processing areas. The project team comprises representatives from SCUA, the library, the facilities department, sustainability office, and three faculty users of the collections. Consultants include the specialist who consulted on our 2013 NEH Preservation Assistance grant and Image Permanence Institute.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


PF-249717-16

Bernice P. Bishop Museum (Honolulu, HI 96817)
Charmaine Wong (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Developing a Master Preservation Plan for the the World's Largest Hawaiian and Pacific Archaeology Collections

A planning project to improve storage and environmental conditions for a collection of more than one million archaeological artifacts from throughout the Pacific.

The Anthropology Department at the Bishop Museum will develop a Master Preservation Plan for the Archaeology Collections, which comprise an estimated 1.2 million artifacts and samples. This project will assemble a team of qualified professionals consisting of a conservator, a historic preservation specialist, a mechanical engineer, and collections and facility staff members.  The Master Preservation Plan builds on previous museum-wide conservation surveys and will focus on assessing the preservation needs and issues of the collections, environmental conditions, and collections spaces, and make recommendations to mitigate risks that are sustainable and specific to the varied collections, the museum, and Hawaii.  The plan will produce thoughtful and informed recommendations, implementation plans, and next steps guide both the short- and long-term stewardship and preservation of the collections, including plans for the consolidation of collections and HVAC ductwork.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Cultural History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$49,581 (approved)
$49,581 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


PF-249689-16

Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (Richmond, VA 23220-2657)
William M. Kelso (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Improving Conditions for the Jamestown Rediscovery Collection

Improvement of environmental conditions through replacement of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and controls in storage and display areas, and conversion to LED lighting in the museum.  The two million artifacts in the archaeological collection document one of the earliest colonial settlements in the New World and would be rehoused and reorganized as part of the project.

The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation (Preservation Virginia), which is responsible for daily operations at Historic Jamestowne, will undertake a two-year project to improve the storage environment of its unparalleled archaeological collection. To this end, outdated and inefficient Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) equipment and controls in three artifact storage and display areas will be replaced with greener systems. The lighting in the archaeological museum will be converted to LED lamps. The collection will be rehoused and reorganized to accommodate a continually expanding assemblage of artifacts from archaeological excavations and reduce the time needed to access materials. The project will allow JRF to save energy and money whilst ensuring sustainable protection of this unique and irreplaceable cultural heritage collection.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$235,000 (approved)
$235,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


PF-249721-16

George Eastman Museum (Rochester, NY 14607-2219)
Taina Meller (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Environmental Improvements Implementation Project

The installation of temperature and humidity control equipment in storage spaces containing the museum's photography and moving-image technology collections. Better environmental controls would improve the care of these materials, which support the study of the history of photography and motion pictures.

George Eastman House is the world’s leading international institution for the collection, study, and preservation of photography, moving images, and related technology with associated collections that are among the strongest in the world. The Museum seeks a grant of $350,000 to improve the environmental conditions that exist in two primary collection areas: the Photography Vault and the Technology Vault (photographic and cinematic equipment).The total project cost is $836,546. A professional engineering firm will design, install and test a new efficient and flexible system. Significant improvements will be realized in long-term preservation of the museum’s photography and technology collections; staff, researchers, and scholars will benefit from increased access to collections resulting from a balanced and stable environment; and replacement of an inefficient HVAC system with one that meets industry standards will result in decreased maintenance costs and climate monitoring efforts.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


PF-249722-16

Huguenot Historical Society, New Paltz, N.Y. (New Paltz, NY 12561-1415)
Josephine Bloodgood (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Sustainable Preservation of Collections and Architectural Assets at Historic Huguenot Street

A one-year planning project to assess the environmental conditions in 12 historic structures containing over 14,000 artifacts and archival materials providing a history of everyday life in the New Paltz region from pre- and early colonial periods through the first half of the 20th century and to recommend strategies for passive and sustainable measures for maintaining collections environments, while preserving the character of these historically and culturally important buildings.

Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) seeks an NEH Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Planning Grant to fund a team of experts in collections preservation and environmental management to comprehensively review twelve historic structures containing collections and recommend sustainable strategies for maintaining environmental conditions. The over-arching aim of this project is to explore ways to improve the quality of the environment for the historic buildings and the collections within through passive and other sustainable means that will also reduce the institution's reliance on fossil fuels and cut associated costs. To accomplish this,the consulting team will monitor the exteriors, interior conditions, and mechanical systems and meet with staff to discuss strategies to manage humidity and temperature in the houses. The resulting Environmental Improvement Report will serve as an important guide for Historic Huguenot Street's long-term collections management and preservation policies.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Architecture; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$49,170 (approved)
$49,170 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


PF-249730-16

Makah Cultural and Research Center (Neah Bay, WA 98357-0160)
Janine Ledford (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Makah Museum Lighting Retrofit to Improve Exhibit Environment Project

Conversion to LED lighting in a tribal cultural center that houses a library/archives and object collection documenting the history of the Northwestern Coast Makah people.  The proposed project requires moving the Ozette archaeological collection from the current gallery to nearby temporary storage, installation of LED lighting, and reinstallation of the exhibit, as well as staff training in environmental monitoring protocols.

The Makah Cultural and Research Center proposes to replace an antiquated lighting system to protect artifacts on display and conserve energy resources. The current heating system produces excessive heat and will be replaced with an energy efficient LED system with controls and occupancy sensors.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$232,000 (approved)
$232,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


PF-249652-16

Montana Historical Society (Helena, MT 59601-4514)
Molly Kruckenberg (Project Director: November 2015 to present)

Analysis and Optimization of the Mechanical Systems for Sustainable Preservation of Collections

Planning for sustainable preservation of art, artifacts, archival materials, photographs, and publications at the Montana Historical Society Museum and Research Center (MHS).  These collections document Montana history and culture since 1865, and include 50,000 museum artifacts, 35,000 linear feet of archival materials, 60,000 books and government documents, 500,000 historic photographs, 12,000 maps, 10,000 reels of newspaper microfilm, and 2,500 oral histories.  The applicant would convene an interdisciplinary Environmental Management Team to identify energy-efficient methods for improving environmental conditions in the collections storage areas.

Environmental data gathered over the past several years has shown significant relative humidity and dew point fluctuations in collections storage areas at the Montana Historical Society. Based upon this data, recommendations from a 2014 Conservation Assessment, and a 2014 facilities inventory, the MHS has determined that an in-depth review and analysis of the current mechanical system in our main facility is necessary to plan for and ensure the long-term, sustainable preservation of our collections. MHS has assembled an interdisciplinary team of curators, archivists, librarians, administrators, mechanical systems engineers, and conservators to review and analyze the current operation of the mechanical systems at the MHS. This team will identify both non-mechanical or passive and mechanical methods for improving environmental conditions in collections storage areas while being energy efficient.

[White paper]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$49,263 (approved)
$49,263 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


PF-249657-16

Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (Boston, MA 02114-2702)
Benjamin K. Haavik (Project Director: November 2015 to present)

Developing a Comprehensive and Sustainable Strategy for Protecting Historic New England’s Collections

A planning project to develop a comprehensive and sustainable strategy for protecting collections related to the cultural heritage of New England, which amount to 110,000 artifacts and 1.2 million archival materials, held in one storage facility and in 37 historic properties across six New England states.

A planning project to develop a comprehensive strategy for sustainably protecting the 110,000 artifacts and 1.2 million archival materials at Historic New England's 37 historic house museums and collections storage facility. A museum security consulting firm will be hired to work with an interdisciplinary team composed of senior Historic New England staff on a security audit that will include: an assessment of existing systems and protocols for theft prevention and fire protection; cost-effective recommendations for managing security operations; and short- and long-term recommendations for improving the existing systems and protocols to better protect the nation's largest and most wide-ranging collection of New England cultural heritage. The project will serve as a model for stewards of other house museums who wish to protect their collections in a sustainable manner while maintaining high standards for visitor access, authenticity, and preservation of historic fabric.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PF-249697-16

Bryn Mawr College (Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899)
Marianne Weldon (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Preservation Study for Special Collections at Bryn Mawr College

A planning project to assess the storage environment for the college library’s special collections, containing art and artifacts, rare books, manuscripts, and archives dating from the 15th century to the present, and to develop plans for improved climate control and security.

Bryn Mawr College requests a $40,000 planning grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections program to develop a plan for creating a cost-effective, energy-efficient storage area for the College's Special Collections, one of the largest and richest collections of art, cultural artifacts, rare books and manuscripts to be found among liberal arts colleges in the country. We will use NEH funding to hire an outside consulting firm to evaluate the current storage facilities in Canaday Library and Thomas Hall to determine which practical and environmentally sustainable options are available. The project committee overseeing this project will use the information collected in the study to develop a strategic plan for prioritizing and implementing recommended measures, and will begin immediate implementation of transitional steps to create improved storage areas for the most vulnerable collections until the larger-scale renovations can take place.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017